The Northern Light August 2021

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AUGUST 2021 VOL. 52 | NO. 3

Excellence! A M A G A Z I N E O F 3 2 ˚ S C O T T I S H R I T E F R E E M A S O N R Y TM


COMING AUGUST 2021

29 DEGREES + 6 CORE VALUES = 1 EXTRAORDINARY LIFE

THE JOURNEY CONTINUES... 00

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THE NORTHERN LIGHT

August 2021

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Inside this issue…

4 Leadership Report

Charge to the Virtual 32nd Degree Class of 2021

7 Cleveland Center Opens with

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony 8 In Memoriam 8 Robert V. Monacelli Receives Tompkins Award 10 Celebrating Success

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CULTURE 12 250 Years of Double-Headed Eagles:

1768-2018

6 From the Editor’s Desk

The Pursuit of Excellence

11 Southern Jurisdiction Scottish Rite Journal

NEWS

FEATURES

24 Valley of Excellence 27 The Valley of The Firelands

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EDUCATION

Building Character Master of Achievement

18 25th Degree

22 4th Degree

We Are All Builders

28 The Valley of Northern

New Jersey Gets Creative to Achieve VOE Status

31 The Valley of

Rockville Centre

C CHARITIES 21 NJ Pioneers Dinner Provides

Opportunity to Thank CDC Contributors

34 Leon M. Abbott Scholarship Profile:

Rachel Glover 35 Builders Council Tie Gets a New Look

On the cover Excellence is not a destination; it is a journey. The Valley of The Firelands scored a perfect 100 in the Valley of Excellence program. That level of achievement takes vision, teamwork, and a whole lot of dedication by both the officers and members. This issue of The Northern Light celebrates all our Valleys who have taken steps toward excellence. Whether it is excellence in operations, leadership, service, philanthropy, or membership, one thing is clear: those who have begun the journey are already seeing the fruits of their labors. Congratulations to all who pursue excellence! Cover Photo: Matt Harmon/ Little Red Hen Photography

August 2021

M MEMBERSHIP 36 Twelve Tips to Win at Recruitment 38 Reflecting the Light of The Rite 39 Onboarding Your New Members 40 Around the Jurisdiction 44 32˚ Celebration M MASONRY 45 Shriners International Awareness Day 46 Sovereign Grand Commander

David A. Glattly Inducted into the DeMolay International Alumni Hall of Fame

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CHARGE TO THE

Virtual 32nd Degree Class of 2021 More than 1,000 members waited longer than a year to receive the esteemed 32nd degree. As a gesture of gratitude for their patience during these extraordinary times, the Supreme Council offered these members the chance to become Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret through a Virtual 32nd degree celebration. This first-class cinematic experience united Brothers across the jurisdiction and featured a historic ceremonial dubbing from all 15 states. Here is Commander Glattly’s charge to the class.

Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret: welcome! Welcome to achieving the 32nd degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the United States of America.

You, and the more than 1,000 Brothers joining with you today, are part of history. This is the very first virtual 32nd degree presented by our Supreme Council in our 208-year history! Congratulations!

I’m sure you were impressed by the degree that you have just witnessed, with the Core Values and lessons within. Constans, our hero, faced several challenges with tempters offering him much to entice him to leave his sworn vigil. Would you have been swayed with the pleasant offer of a fine party with women? How about the opportunity of great wealth? Or to be given life eternal on Earth? Constans kept his vigil until finally swayed to help defend the people of his city being attacked. Constans paid the ultimate price for his loyal service. “Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” Spes mea in Deo est—My hope is in God. May your hope and trust be in God. Our Scottish Rite has an important acronym: ICE, which stands for Inspiration, Convenience, and Enjoyment. We strive that every event we plan should be inspirational, convenient, and enjoyable for our members—thus, our Thursday Night at the Rite, our Virtual Reunions, and many other events including this very day’s virtual 32nd degree. I joined the Valley of Northern New Jersey over 30 years ago, and I am proud to be a Scottish Rite Mason. You have joined a great organization that should also make you proud. I am proud of our vision statement: “We will strive to be a fraternity that fulfills our Masonic obligation to care for our members.”

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WELCOME

by David A. Glattly, 33˚, Sovereign Grand Commander

I am proud of our Grand Almoner’s Fund—taking care of our Brothers in trouble and with the swiftness in which we respond. I am proud of our White Flower Society—caring for our Masonic widows and keeping them within our Fraternity’s family. I am proud of our Abbott Scholarship program—giving assistance to the youth of our Scottish Rite families for their education.

partnered with the Southern Jurisdiction Scottish Rite and Shriners International, allowing men from throughout North America to find a way to join Freemasonry. I am extremely proud of the Core Values of our Scottish Rite woven within our degrees: Reverence for God, Devotion to Country, Service to Humanity, Integrity, Justice, and Tolerance.

I trust that you are as proud as I am. How can you not be? If you are as proud, help me spread the word of Scottish Rite to all Brother Master Masons. Let all know of the good work of our Scottish Rite! Thank you. Spes mea in Deo est. Fraternally,

“Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” I am proud of our Children’s Dyslexia Centers throughout our jurisdiction— helping to remediate children with reading challenges. I am proud of our Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library—that is charged with keeping both Masonic and American history and culture alive. I am particularly proud of our new Masonic Hall of Fame coming this year which will be a destination for all Masons. I am proud of our “Not just a man. A Mason.” campaign in our Path Forward program to help all Grand Lodges market Freemasonry. I am proud of our new “BeAFreemason.org” web site,

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FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

The Pursuit of Excellence

T H E

N O RT HERN LI G H T A magazine of 32˚ Scottish Rite Freemasonry

August 2021 | Vol. 52 | No. 3

by PJ Roup, 33˚, Editor, Active for Pennsylvania

SOVEREIGN GRAND COMMANDER David A. Glattly, 33° EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Michael C. Russell, 32°

been reimagined to fit into today’s world. While they are admittedly not the way we have always done them, the result is clear: they work. And they work well. As Brother Henry Ford said, “If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.” Thanks to things like Virtual Reunions, Rite on the Road, and innumerable out-of-the-box ideas that Supreme Council and our Valleys have tried, the Scottish Rite, NMJ has not gotten what we have always got, but rather we have been able to succeed in spite of all that has happened in the world around us.

issue of The Northern Light is dedicated to excellence—not just Valleys of Excellence, though we do feature a few of them here, but the general pursuit of that elusive and seemingly unattainable goal.

This issue is filled with stories of the pursuit of excellence. The Valley of Northern New Jersey developed a unique recruitment program to help them grow while the rest of the world was contracting (see Twelve Tips to Win at Recruitment, page 36). In Onboarding Your New Members (page 39), Bob Siebold, 32°, MSA, Commander in Chief of the Valley of The Hudson, details some of their Valley’s best practices for getting new members involved. Finally, beginning on page 24, you can read about just a few of the Valleys who have found ways to achieve the title, Valley of Excellence.

As we slowly emerge from our collective pandemic-induced standstill, we have the chance to look back over the past year and assess the way we have approached the business of Scottish Rite Masonry. What we have seen is that there are ways to do the usual business of the Valleys in unusual ways. Brotherhood drop-ins, caring for our widows, recruiting and involving our new members—all of these things have

I hope that this issue of The Northern Light inspires you to work within your Valleys to help them achieve greater things than any of us could have imagined just over a year ago. It’s all about the pursuit of excellence. Each step forward, no matter how small, is a positive for your Valley. As Brother Vince Lombardi said, “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence.”

“Excellence is to do a common thing in an uncommon way.” —Brother Booker T. Washington

This

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EXECUTIVE EDITOR Linda Patch EDITOR PJ Roup, 33° CREATIVE DIRECTOR Rodney E. Boyce, 33° CONTENT MANAGER Joann Williams-Hoxha DIRECTOR OF DESIGN Matt Blaisdell, 32° COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE Thomas R. Labagh, 33°, Chairman Richard V. Travis, 33° Donald R. Heldman, 33° Donald G. Duquette, 33° PJ Roup, 33° J. Brian McNaughton, 33° Linda Patch SUPREME COUNCIL, 33° Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. THE NORTHERN LIGHT (ISSN 1088-4416) is published quarterly in February, May, August, and November by the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A., as the official publication. Printed in U.S.A. Periodicals postage paid at Boston, MA, and at additional mailing offices.   POSTMASTER Send address changes to The Northern Light PO Box 519, Lexington, MA 02420-0519 MAILING ADDRESS PO Box 519, Lexington, MA 02420-0519 EDITORIAL OFFICE 33 Marrett Road (Route 2A), Lexington, MA 02421 phone: 781-862-4410 email: editor@srnmj.org WEBSITE: www.ScottishRiteNMJ.org @scottishritenmj @TNLMagazine Copyright ©2021 by Trustees of the Supreme Council of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A.


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NEWS

Cleveland Center Opens with Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

by Jocelyn Wallace, Grant Writer and Scottish Rite Charities Coordinator

The Children’s Dyslexia Center of Cleveland celebrated its 20th anniversary with the Valley of Cleveland this past April with a public ribbon cutting ceremony that marked its recent move to Rocky River, Ohio. Those in attendance included members of the Board of Governors, Center staff, and Sovereign Grand Commander David A. Glattly who assisted with the honors. The weather was beautiful for early spring, with attendees gathering outside the Center to watch as Board Members stood side-by-side to present the commemorative purple ribbon. On a count of three, Commander Glattly and Board Chairwoman Bonnie Youngblood made the official cuts as the crowd cheered. Afterward, as a way to honor their long-term commitment to the center, the Board of Governors

surprised John and Bonnie Youngblood by naming the welcome center after them. Following a celebratory toast of sparkling grape juice and closing remarks by the Commander, attendees travelled to Berea Masonic Center for a recognition ceremony held in honor of 12 new members of the Builders Council. Membership in the Builders Council requires a

commitment of $10,000 to the board restricted fund of any Children’s Dyslexia Center throughout the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. Each attending member was presented with a coveted green tie— a symbol of their ongoing pledge to support the Cleveland Center and the children it serves. At a separate event, Franck T. Kakou, 32°, was presented with a specially commissioned, first-of-its-kind pink tie. (See “Builders Council Tie Gets a New Look,” page 35 to find out how this special tie came to be.) Part of the Children’s Dyslexia Center's great re-awakening, the Cleveland Center will continue to serve students in-person at a limited capacity until September when it hopes to fully reopen to its students and tutor trainees. In the meantime, staff and board members are very excited about the potential of the new space and what the support of the Builders Council means for its students.

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In Memoriam

Ill. A. Norman Johnson, 33°

1945 – 2021

Ill. A. Norman Johnson, 33°, Active Emeritus Member for this Supreme Council for the state of Connecticut, laid down his working tools on Monday, April 5, 2021.

Ill. Charles C. Wicks, 33°, an Active Member for this Supreme Council for the state of Indiana, laid down his working tools on May 16, 2021.

Awarded the Supreme Council Medal of Honor in 1997 for his distinguished service to Freemasonry. Also presented the “Sword of Merit” by the Grand Encampment Knights Templar Eye Foundation in 2017.

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Ill. Charles C. Wicks, 33°

1926 – 2021

Raised a Master Mason in Wyllys-St. John’s Lodge No. 99, at West Hartford, Connecticut on March 8, 1948, where he served as Worshipful Master in 1958 and Trustee for more than 10 years. Received the degrees of the Scottish Rite in Connecticut Consistory in the Valley of Norwich on May 7, 1949. Coroneted a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33° Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on September 30, 1970. He was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council on September 26, 1979 and served as Deputy for the state of Connecticut from 1981-1994. He continued as an Active Member until September 26, 2000 at which time he became an Emeritus member of the Supreme Council.

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Robert V. Monac Receives Tompk

Raised a Master Mason in Goshen Lodge No. 12 at Goshen, Indiana, where he served as Worshipful Master in 1980 and Trustee from 1981-83. Received the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of South Bend on April 23, 1977, where he served as Commander in Chief from 1992-94. Coroneted a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33° Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on October 3, 1995. He was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council in Philadelphia in August 2010 and was set to become an Emeritus member in August of 2021.

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cottish Rite, NMJ congratulates Brother Robert V. Monacelli, 33°, MSA, who received the Daniel D. Tompkins Medal for his outstanding and exemplary service to the Masonic fraternity at large. The Tompkins Award is conferred by the Scottish Rite to honor distinguished contributions not often witnessed by the general membership. The Daniel Tompkins Medal is named for Daniel D. Tompkins, first Sovereign Grand Commander of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. Brother Tompkins also served the nation as vice president under President James Monroe. On May 8, the New Jersey Statewide Reunion in Bordentown honored MW Grand Master Robert V. Monacelli, 33°

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NEWS

celli kins Award

Staff Updates We are pleased to welcome two new staff members to the Supreme Council team: Kris Cywinski and David Abbott. Both are based at our headquarters in Lexington, Massachusetts and started this spring.

in a special ceremony. In attendance was Sovereign Grand Commander David A. Glattly, who presented the award to Brother Monacelli. Brother Monacelli is a member of Azure Masada Lodge No. 22 and belongs to the Valley of Northern New Jersey. “Brother Bob was my Deputy’s Representative to the Valley of Northern New Jersey for my nine years as Deputy for New Jersey. He has devoted 43 years of service to the Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction and counting,” said Commander Glattly. “From his leadership impact to volunteer work, his contributions to our great Fraternity are vast and far-reaching.”

August 2021

Kris Cywinski

David Abbott

Kris Cywinski is the new Executive Secretary to Sovereign Grand Commander David A. Glattly, 33°. She just relocated to Massachusetts, coming to us from the Valley of Springfield, Illinois, where she served as Administrative Assistant for the last five years. In 1979, Kris began working in the legal field in downtown Chicago as a legal secretary and continued for more than 20 years while raising her three children. Kris has many hobbies, but one of her favorites is checking out auctions.

David Abbott, 32°, serves as an accountant at Supreme Council, reporting to Matthew Gerrish, 32°, Director of Finance. David is a Senior DeMolay and previously worked for the Valley of Boston where he is a member. He also worked as an Accounts Payable Specialist for Carbonite and an Administrative Assistant for the East Bridgewater Police Department. David graduated from Bridgewater State University with a bachelor’s degree in history and mathematics as well as a graduate degree in accounting.

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NEWS

Celebrating Success

by Michael C. Russell, 32,̊ Executive Director

From our earliest years of tee ball to sitting on the couch watching the Big Game on a beautiful Sunday afternoon in February, every season has its cinematic culmination. The pièce de résistance for Scottish Rite in the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction is June 16 of each year. This is the official end and beginning of a new Valley year.

In 2020-2021, the unthinkable happened. Freemasonry and the world were shut down in nearly every town and every city in our jurisdiction. Who knew we would be sitting here on June 16 celebrating some great successes—successes not seen in many years! Some may see this as “just another day.” I want you to see June 16 as a time of reflection, of enthusiasm, of excitement for where you have been and a target for where you want to be. Take time to CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS! Send a letter to your members about how excited you are for their membership. Think on and enjoy the little things— things like burnt coffee, stale donuts, and that feeling of a sore hand after a good Masonic handshake.

1 2 0 2 N O I S S E S O L I A H A N NC UL E V E L A N D , O

Once you have taken the time you need to celebrate your Valley accomplishments, then and only then should you start working toward that feeling of success once again. AUGUST

21 28-31, 20

Rock Fo r th oWs eE aIbNoVu tI TtoE Y O U !

& as we Ro ck io th is ye ar Se ss ion . ev ela nd , Oh 21 An nu al 20 Jo in us in Cl r ou h y th ro ug Rit e ou r wa 33 °, go to u’r e a 32 ° or Wh eth er yo rn mo re sio n to lea es l-S ua . nn NM J.o rg /A w to re gis ter ion an d ho Sc ot tis hR ite ss Se ’s ar ye ab ou t th is

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The upcoming Supreme Council Session in Cleveland is a great time to praise and raise up those who won big. And celebrate we shall! Know that your Supreme Council is proud of your work. We will all soon be back–sleeves rolled up, ready and willing to win in 2022!

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Chips from the Quarry: A Mason and Mathematician

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Brent Morris, Ph.D., wrote his doctoral dissertation on the mathematics of card shuffling, based on a card trick he learned in high school. He is founder of the Scottish Rite Research Society, the only American Past Master of Quator Coronati Lodge, and Managing Editor of the Scottish Rite Journal. Illustrated by Br. Ted Bastien, 32°

Happy Retirement, Brother S. Brent Morris!

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everal articles paid tribute in the May/June 2021 issue of the Scottish Rite Journal to retiring Managing Editor S. Brent Morris, 33º, GC. In addition to the Chips from the Quarry feature honoring Masons who have been mathematicians, Dr. Morris provided his own light-hearted recollections of his career at the Scottish Rite Journal in “Confessions of an Accidental Editor.” “If anyone had suggested I would have a career as a writer or editor,” Br. Brent wrote, “I would have laughed at them. My passion was in mathematics. One of the reasons I majored in math was that I didn’t like to write. I was a math geek before it was cool, but look at me now!” Our “accidental editor” became the Journal’s Book Reviews Editor, Managing Editor, and, for a while, Editor of both Heredom and The Plumbline, publications of the Scottish Rite Research Society. The issue featured two comic illustrations (presented on this page) of Br. Brent by Br. Ted Bastien, 32º, who retired as well in spring 2021 and whom we will also miss deeply. “The Most Interesting Man in Masonry” by Br. Maynard Edwards, 32º, KCCH, offered additional reminiscences of Dr. Morris. Br. Maynard discussed Brent’s distinguished career as a cryptologist for the U.S. National Security Agency, his Masonic scholarship and authorship of many books, and his avocation as an amateur magician. Br. Brent even once had a brief stint as Gino the Genie, a traveling Magical Genie Mascot for a small fast-food chain! The May/June issue also introduced the new Managing Editor for the Scottish Rite Journal, Dr. Mark Dreisonstok, 32º, KCCH. An interesting anecdote connects the two editors: twenty-seven years prior to meeting in person, Ill. Br. Morris and Br. Mark actually “met” within the pages of the Journal. An October 1992 issue shows an author’s photo of Br. Mark directly facing Br. Brent’s picture as Book Reviews Editor on the adjoining page! Comments Dr. Morris: “We like the irony, synergy, and coincidence that here one Managing Editor is facing the other—29 years before the transition!” We at the Scottish Rite Journal view this “premonitory page placement” as fortuitous for the magazine’s future.

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250 Years of Double-Headed Eagles: 1768-2018 by Jeffrey Croteau, Director of the Van-Gorden Williams Library and Archives and Hilary Anderson Stelling , Director of Collections and Exhibitions, Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library

The double-headed eagle is perhaps the Scottish Rite’s most recognizable symbol. Yet to many, both within the fraternity and without, it is a strange bird indeed. Here, we take a look at how the representation of this bicephalous avian has changed over time.

C By the early 1860s, the eagle was sometimes depicted on documents with its feet close together and its wings outstretched in a relatively stiff manner.

One of the earliest depictions of a double-headed eagle appears on a patent issued by Henry Andrew Francken to Samuel Stringer in 1768, essentially investing him with the powers of a Deputy Inspector General in the Rite of Perfection.

C B Detail of Original Minutes and Letters of Constitution of Supreme Council, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, 1813-1814. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2014/015/001.

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A Detail of Patent Issued to Samuel Stringer, 1768. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, A2015/142.

A The Stringer double-headed eagle is, like many of the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century depictions, relatively skinny and almost dragonlike. This version features many of the elements that characterize doubleheaded eagles in the next quarter millennium: the wings are spread, the talons grasp a sword, and a single crown floats just above the two heads. The first seal of the NMJ’s Supreme Council, from 1813, features a relatively unadorned-looking doubleheaded eagle that appears to be sitting atop a sword rather than grasping it.

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The image, unsurprisingly, appears to be based on that used by the Southern Jurisdiction’s Supreme Council which was founded in 1801. By the 1840s, the NMJ was using a simple two-headed black eagle grasping a sword as part of its seal.

Detail of Supreme Council Decree and Order Regarding Its Authority, 1848. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, Gift of the Supreme Council of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite, A2019/178/0273.

D The sword, and in the case of the 33rd degree, the crown, were often part of the depiction. In many cases, the

D Detail of Circular Warning Against the Hays (Cerneau) Supreme Council in New York City, 1862. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, Gift of the Supreme Council of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite, A2002/108/1.

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double-headed eagle during this period appears with a banner draped over the sword and containing the mottos of either the 32nd degree (Spes mea in Deo est) or that of the 33rd degree (Deus Meumque Jus). E

In the 1860s, a three-dimensional double-headed eagle with a crown served as a jewel for the 33rd degree. James Freeland (1827-1902), a clothier and Scottish Rite member from Massachusetts, wore a handsome jewel with a double-headed eagle made of silver, gold, and red velvet. E

In 1884, the Supreme Council’s Committee on Rituals and Ritualistic Matters produced a report on eagles within the Scottish Rite. The report appears to have been issued in response to the following preamble and resolution which was also published in the 1884 Supreme Council Proceedings: “Whereas, There is a variety in form of "Double Headed Eagles" in use as emblems of this Supreme Council; therefore Resolved, That the proper form of a Double Headed Eagle as an emblem

of this Supreme Council be referred to the Standing Committee on Rituals and Ritualistic matter for designation.” In other words, the Supreme Council thought it was time to define how its double-headed eagle should look. The report looks back first to the Grand Constitutions of 1786 which includes a description of the seal of the Supreme Council stating that the bird should be portrayed as “a large black Eagle, with two heads, the beak of gold, the wings displayed…” Apron Owned by James H. Freeland, ca. 1861. Gift of James H. Freeland. Photograph by David Bohl.

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Jewel Owned by James H. Freeland, ca. 1863. Gift of James H. Freeland. Photograph by David Bohl.

F An unadorned black eagle with outstretched wings formed part of the imagery of Freeland’s painted 32nd degree apron.

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C DOUBLE-HEADED EAGLES continued

The 1884 report clearly lays out how the double-headed eagle should appear starting first with the 32nd degree version: “The double headed eagle of Kadosh, that is, of the 30th, 31st, and 32d [sic] degrees, is a white and black Eagle. The head, neck, legs and tips of the wings of white feathers, while the body and wings are black. In brief, the bird should be in its natural colors, its wings extended yet drooping. The black symbolizing decay and the white sublimation, or the approaching gradual change to the incorruptible, the becoming pure, holy, Kadosh, immortal. In the claws is a naked sword; one talon of the right claw clinching the hilt of the steel blade in serpentine shape, the left claw grasping the blade. The white ribboned motto pendent from the hilt to the point of the sword contains the words ‘Spes Mea in Deo Est’ in black.”

motto pendent from the hilt of the sword to the point contains the words: ‘Deus Meumque Jus.’” The report was officially adopted the following year. By 1900, the Supreme Council’s 33rd degree double-headed eagle had essentially transformed into a double-headed bald eagle combining the Scottish Rite’s symbol with a recognizably American one. G This patriotic double-headed eagle was used for many years on 33rd degree Scottish Rite certificates in the NMJ—an image underscored by two American flags shown draped on either side. In 1916, Scottish Rite member Edwin D. Washburne, who worked in the jewelry business, collaborated with

Sovereign Grand Commander Barton Smith to create a multi-piece set of ritual objects wrought in silver. Several of the objects in this set were decorated with a cast double-headed eagle set in a border of laurel leaves. H The silver set was commissioned and designed to help mark the 50th anniversary of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction’s Union of 1867. Harry Augustin Thompson, who received the 33rd degree in New York in 1923, wore a jewel that incorporated a large silver eagle with a jeweled purple crown topped with a delta. I The Valley of Lowell, Massachusetts, presented this jewel to Thompson, G Detail of Honorary 33° Member Certificate Issued by the Supreme Council for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction to David A. Sawdey, 1900. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, A1988/028.

Following this description, the report lays out the prescribed appearance of the double-headed eagle used for the 33rd degree: “[T]he emblematic Eagle of an Inspector-General is similar to that of Kadosh; except the gold takes the place of the white, and the Ducal Coronet [i.e., crown] surmounts the heads of the Eagle, and that again supporting a small Delta of gold, the base downward containing the initial letter Jod. The fillet of the crown of an Honorary 33d [sic] is crimson, while that of an Active is purple. The crimson or purple ribboned

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H Detail, Tray, 1916. Roger Wallace and Sons, Wallingford, Connecticut. Gift of the Supreme Council, 33, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U. S. A.

I Jewel Owned by Harry Augustin Thompson, ca. 1923. Gift of Union Lodge #31, A.F. &. A. M., Union, Maine.

who was the treasurer of the Moxie Company founded by his father. Compared to the smooth-feathered eagle on James Freeland’s jewel, the eagle on Thompson’s jewel looks more substantial and has more detailed feathers in keeping with the eagles that appeared on Scottish Rite certificates in the twentieth century. J Detail of 32° member certificate issued by the Supreme Council for the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction to August Silz, 1900. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, Gift of Terry Golson, A1999/044/001.

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The double-headed eagle’s depiction on NMJ certificates throughout the twentieth century is remarkably consistent. J In 1900, the doubleheaded eagle on 32nd degree certificates featured an eagle with two black-feathered heads. K By 1911, the double-headed eagle on 32nd degree certificates had two whitefeathered heads. While the appearance was not so obviously the double-headed bald eagle featured on 33rd degree

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DOUBLE-HEADED EAGLES continued

certificates, the look was more aligned with that bird than with previous depictions. This version of 32nd degree double-headed eagle was in use all through the twentieth century and into the twenty-first including on certificates issued in 2000. In 2018, the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction introduced a newly designed double-headed eagle. L It was rightly described as having “a crisp, clean and modern look.” The current double-headed eagle is instantly recognizable as being in line with the appearance of previous versions of the symbol; however, this contemporary look still carries the traditions of the past 250 years with it.

L Double-headed Eagle, updated in 2018.

K Detail of 32° certificate issued by the Valley of Hartford to John A. Waterhouse, 2000. Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, Gift of the Estate of John A. Waterhouse, A2011/037/071.

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BECOME A MEMBER OF THE SCOTTISH RITE MASONIC MUSEUM & LIBRARY

In 1975, the Scottish Rite Masons of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction founded the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library in Lexington, Massachusetts, and continue to support it today. Since its beginnings, the Museum has worked to inspire generations through its collections, exhibitions, online resources, and publications that tell the story of our nation and celebrate the rich history of Freemasonry and fraternalism. Sign up as a member today and you will help us continue our proud tradition of telling uniquely American stories. Your membership contribution goes directly towards the Museum’s annual operating expenses. Your tax-deductible contribution allows us to offer free admission to all visitors. You can learn more about membership in the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library—and join as a member—at the museum’s website: srmml.org/about/membership/. Thank you for your support!

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? Did You Know? The Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library offers membership levels from $40 to $500. Among the benefits at the $100 Contributor level is reciprocal membership— including free or reduced admission—at over 1,000 museums in North America for two members of the same household.


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Building Character 2 5 T H

D E G R E E

MASTER OF ACHIEVEMENT

Benjamin Franklin

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The Northern Light


E D U C AT I O N

by Jason David MacKeen, 32° Valley of Southeastern Massachusetts Hauts Grades Academy

The drama of the 25th degree, Master of Achievement, is unique in its

presentation as an embedded narrative outlining the achievements of Brother Benjamin Franklin. I have never seen this degree performed in a Valley but was drawn to write about it in order to get a fuller understanding of its allegory and lessons. The Core Values of this degree are Devotion to Country and Service to Humanity. I cannot think of a better avatar for these values than Benjamin Franklin, and the drama of the 25th degree acts as an engaging introduction to his lesser-known exploits. The unique format of this degree excels in communicating its values. Rather than a degree that dryly lists off a series of achievements with a solemn admonition to act in a like fashion, Master of Achievement presents the lessons in a “modern” format, emulating This Is Your Life and injecting a certain amount of humor into the drama. There are two major moral lessons present within the 25th degree. The first is presented between the skits as a young Brother full of confusion and despondency reaches out to Brother Franklin for advice and guidance. Franklin advises the young Mason on his own system of growing virtue. The thirteen virtues of temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, justice, moderation, cleanliness, tranquility, chastity, and humility are concentrated on one at a time for the period of a month. The goal of this practice is that the laser-like focus on one virtue will allow for more

August 2021

progress in that area—despite Brother Franklin’s admission that some virtues, particularly humility, may not be as easy to work on. While Franklin’s virtue calendar has gained more popularity recently, it is likely that this degree is the first introduction to the concept for many Brethren. This introduction alone gives the degree a certain moral advantage. While the nature of the program focuses on many virtues taken as a whole, it speaks to Franklin’s continued service to humanity. Through personal experimentation and time testing, Brother Franklin lays out a clear path available for use by both Masons and the profane. The second lesson in morality speaks to devotion to country and the moral implications of that devotion. The first skit outlines the events surrounding the establishment of a defensive militia in Philadelphia. While the focus of the

skit is on Franklin, the more interesting moral struggle is that of the Quaker majority. The two Quakers that reach out to Brother Franklin the evening before the militia vote express the trial that nine members of the Assembly face: whether to be true to exact tenets of their faith or to do everything in their power to protect their families and neighbors. The issue is resolved through a conveniently-timed prayer meeting. Man is often torn between two equally compelling and moral choices, and as we see during the events of the skit, the benefit of prayer will often lead him to the answer he knew all along. We find the philosophical lesson of this degree in the second skit. The constitutional delegates presented during the skit mirror their historical counterparts. We learn that they have become caught up in personal grievances and pet projects—unable

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E

E D U C AT I O N

BUILDING CHARACTER continued to see the forest through the trees. It is only through the sage philosophy of Brother Franklin that the document is saved. He warns the other delegates about sacrificing the good for the great. He, like all of the delegates, takes issue with certain portions of the Constitution but is wise enough to recognize that he is not infallible. By becoming hyper-focused on their own visions for the nation, the delegates are allowing a more robust nation founded

Through it we see the real-world fruits of an actual Brother’s quest to exemplify those values over his long and distinguished life.

positions, to leading the Craft as a Grand Master, Brother Franklin never shied away from a new experience and the accompanying opportunity for self-improvement. All Brethren should learn from this example and lead their lives not only as workers in the quarries but as students in the classroom. The long list of achievements heard during the drama by the Master and the crowded dais of functionaries present the important life lesson of considering one’s legacy. Despite Franklin’s self-professed issues with humility, it is unlikely that even he would have envisioned a life of such achievement. The average Brother on the street will most likely not invent the next Franklin stove, but he should be ever mindful of his impact on the future. What that Brother may see as a

simple act of charity or kindness may very well cause a series of ripples that improve his lodge, community, or family for generations to come. This degree expertly presents the Scottish Rite values of Devotion to Country and Service to Humanity.

The life lessons of this degree are of great use both in and out of lodge. Through it we see the real-world fruits of an actual Brother’s quest to exemplify those values over his long and distinguished life. For this reason alone, I believe the degree should be required viewing for every new Scottish Rite Mason with the hope that it can transfer some of Brother Franklin’s spark to the new initiates.

by the experiences and knowledge of many to rot on the vine. This is often the case with all of mankind. We wrap ourselves in fantasies about the perfect home, the perfect self, the perfect lover. Our sights are set solely on that perfect goal. As a result, we allow small achievements and great opportunity to slip away. No Mason should ever be content that his work on the Temple is completed, but it is equal folly to never step back and observe the progress that has been made. The life lessons of this degree are of great use both in and out of lodge. It stresses the importance of being a life learner, and that we should always be mindful of the impact we will have on future generations. The framing drama of the degree makes it clear that Franklin never stopped learning and never stopped working on his rough ashlar. From constant moral self-improvement, to ambassadorial

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The Northern Light


C

NJ Pioneers Dinner Provides Opportunity to Thank CDC Contributors

CHARITIES

by Darien Koons, 32˚, Manager of Donor Relations

Generosity

to our Children’s Dyslexia Centers comes in many forms. Some individuals are able to give generously of their time by volunteering any hours they can to help their center succeed. Others contribute their talents by sharing a skill or gift that is unique to them with the goal of helping children learn or growing the center’s impact. Lastly, we have those that contribute their treasure by donating money to help meet the financial needs of the program. While we often think of supporting our Scottish Rite Children’s Dyslexia Centers as just a financial commitment, those who donate their time and talents serve equally important roles.

On May 7th of this year, the Children’s Dyslexia Centers of New Jersey honored those who contributed of their time, their talents, and their treasure at its annual Pioneers Dinner. This dinner is named in honor of the five men who served as pioneers for the Children’s Dyslexia Centers in New Jersey and are largely responsible for its existence. It is because of these five men and the dedicated volunteers and donors who have followed in their footsteps that our New Jersey Centers enjoy the success that they do today.

TRAVIS SIMPKINS

At this year’s dinner—the first since 2019 due to the Coronavirus pandemic —more than 50 of the New Jersey Children’s Dyslexia Centers greatest supporters gathered for a night of fellowship, fun, and celebration as they looked back on the struggles and triumphs of the last year. At the event, Supreme Council Director of Charities Walter F. Wheeler, 33°; Executive Director Michael C. Russell, 32°; and Sovereign Grand Commander David A. Glattly, 33°, each spoke to the group to thank them for their incredible support and encourage them to continue their life-changing efforts.

Pioneers Club members (l to r): Verdon R. Skipper, 33˚; Kenneth L. Larsen, 33˚; Malcolm Wernik, 33˚; Donald D. “Pete” Miller, 33˚; and Thurman C. Pace Jr., 33˚.

August 2021

A highlight of the evening was Ill. Brother Gerald Sharpe, 33°, telling his own story about growing up with dyslexia—making evident the challenges that this group of dedicated supporters works hard every day to eliminate for the students under their care. Brother Sharpe went on to talk about the impact that dyslexia intervention had on his life and how it influenced him to go into education himself. While many of the attendees came to the event armed with donations in hand, the sole purpose of the event was clear —to give a hearty and well-deserved “thank you” to all for their involvement in our life-changing work.

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We Are All Builders 4 T H

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D E G R E E

The Northern Light


E D U C AT I O N

by PJ Roup, 33˚ Active for Pennsylvania Member, Committee on Ritualistic Matters

“Across the world, Master Masons are raised every day, and every day we are called to live by the principles of our Order: Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth. We live these in our daily lives whether among strangers, friends, or family because we recognize their value in meeting everyday challenges.” So begins the newest Scottish Rite, NMJ degree, Builder. Members who are familiar with the typical format of formal prologue, allegory, and curtain should immediately notice that this is not your ordinary degree. Here, our prologist is dressed casually in a crisp, white shirt and khakis. He speaks to the audience as a contemporary. He shares the same struggles that you and I do. He feels the same stresses. But then he focuses our attention on the dimly lit scene behind him: men working on the Temple of Solomon. He asks us to think about just how monumental a task had been placed before our three Grand Masters—that of building a home for God on Earth. As our prologist speaks, he dons an apron, picks up his tools, and enters the scene as a workman (as all of us are) on the Temple. Written and approved in 2019, Builder replaced the previous fourth degree, Master Traveler. This new degree was conceived as a way to both bridge the gap between the Blue Lodge degrees and introduce candidates to the Scottish Rite style of degree communication. The degree was also written with the intention of being portable. We wanted Valleys to be able to take it out to the lodges. There are minimal props, relatively few characters, and no special effects August 2021

or complicated lighting requirements. The degree is perfect for the Rite on the Road program. Hiram Abiff, the central character of Builder, is well known to all Master Masons. The story takes place in the hours leading up to that fateful event with which all Master Masons are familiar.

As Freemasons, we are all builders— builders of ourselves, builders of each other, and builders of a more perfect world. We meet Hiram early on as he patiently answers the naïve but innocent question of an eager Entered Apprentice, Joabert. His thoughtful response immediately reveals his humility. What Samuel, the overseer, thought of as an impertinent question becomes the focus of Hiram as he offers his devotion in the dimly lit Holy of Holies: How does just one man build the Temple of God? As he communes with the Great Architect of the Universe, he arrives at an answer—one that had been there all the time, but just out of reach.

Images from the Supreme Council’s 4th degree video, Builder.

Our Grand Master is pleased with the revelations of his devotion. The bell tolls to call the Brethren back to labor, and he heads toward the south gate to check the progress of the work. Builder is an uncomplicated, thoughtful degree designed to make each of us feel a part of both the Blue Lodge and the Scottish Rite. It is both familiar and unsettlingly new, and it conveys an important message: As Freemasons, we are all builders— builders of ourselves, builders of each other, and builders of a more perfect world. That is the beautiful message of this degree. ScottishRiteNMJ.org

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Valley of New Haven, CT Total Beginning Membership

The Valley of Excellence award recognizes Valleys in the Scottish Rite, NMJ that go above and beyond in their endeavors. With focuses on areas of membership, service/philanthropy, leadership development, and operations, this program encourages Valleys to deliver a premier Scottish Rite experience.

46.00 398

New 4˚ Members

9

Restorations

5

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,000.00

Blue Envelope

$6,854.00

Valley of Norwich, CT Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

38.01 338

New 4˚ Members

3

In the following pages are the overall scores as well as a few key statistics for each Valley that achieved a total of at least 25 percent.

Restorations

1

Service Events

1

Valley Charitable Contributions

$2,000.00

In this and coming issues, we will spotlight those Valleys that have achieved the rank of Valley of Excellence. In this issue, we feature our cover story on the Valley of The Firelands (who scored a perfect 100) as well as the Valleys of Rockville Centre and Northern New Jersey.

Blue Envelope

$7,028.00

Valley of Waterbury, CT Total Beginning Membership

Congratulations to all of our Valleys who have upped their game to make the Scottish Rite experience the best it can be!

New 4˚ Members

Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

91.13 502 34

Valley of Hartford, CT Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

78.08 711 12

40.00 242 15 1

Service Events

0

Blue Envelope

Valley of Bridgeport, CT

TOTAL VOE SCORE

Restorations

Valley Charitable Contributions

Valley of Lower Delaware, DE Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

$0.00 $4,221.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

56.73 111 15

Restorations

1

Restorations

1

Restorations

2

Service Events

7

Service Events

7

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

24

TOTAL VOE SCORE

ScottishRiteNMJ.org

$76,847.00 $3,857.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

$5,733.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$5,811.00

Blue Envelope

$250.00 $6,167.00

The Northern Light


VALLEY OF EXCELLENCE

Valley of Bloomington, IL Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

43.00 800

Valley of Moline, IL Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

42.38 567

Valley of Springfield, IL

TOTAL VOE SCORE

90.83 1137

Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

7

New 4˚ Members

4

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

3

Restorations

4

Restorations

3

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

6

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,600.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$5,599.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of Chicago, IL Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

90.48 2992

Valley of Peoria, IL Total Beginning Membership

$0.00 $1,689.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

63.50 997

Valley Charitable Contributions

$14,233.00

Blue Envelope

$10,890.00

Valley of Evansville, IN

TOTAL VOE SCORE

77.43 931

Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

62

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

19

Restorations

1

Restorations

3

Service Events

14

Service Events

1

Service Events

4

Valley Charitable Contributions

$12,000.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$18,714.07

Blue Envelope

Valley of Danville, IL Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

69.23 1927 18

Valley of Quincy, IL Total Beginning Membership

13

14

$0.00 $5,578.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

35.52 705

20

New 4˚ Members

Valley Charitable Contributions

$7,100.00

Blue Envelope

$2,819.00

Valley of Fort Wayne, IN

TOTAL VOE SCORE

68.78 2104

Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

5

New 4˚ Members

17

Restorations

4

Restorations

1

Restorations

5

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

1

Valley Charitable Contributions

$5,000.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$9,438.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of Freeport, IL Total Beginning Membership

$0.00 $2,401.00

32.55

Valley of Southern Illinois, IL

62.15

751

Total Beginning Membership

2044

TOTAL VOE SCORE

TOTAL VOE SCORE

$14,095.00

Blue Envelope

$10,560.00

Valley of George Rogers Clark, IN

TOTAL VOE SCORE

100.0

Total Beginning Membership

89

New 4˚ Members

30

New 4˚ Members

6

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

5

Restorations

7

Restorations

1

Service Events

0

Service Events

2

Service Events

8

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,528.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$4,197.00

Blue Envelope

August 2021

15

Valley Charitable Contributions

$885.00 $7,951.00

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

$950.00 $2,487.00

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Valley of Indianapolis, IN Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

58.07 6163

Valley of Boston, MA Total Beginning Membership

38.33

2960

Total Beginning Membership

423

TOTAL VOE SCORE

New 4˚ Members

54

New 4˚ Members

94

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

61

Restorations

11

Restorations

1

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$29,070.68

Valley Charitable Contributions

$22,000.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$20,814.50

Blue Envelope

$21,095.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of South Bend, IN Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

90.29 1911 43

Valley of Greenfield, MA Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

62.52 106

Valley of Springfield, MA Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

7

New 4˚ Members

20

$0.00 $3,095.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

70.00 492 16

Restorations

5

Restorations

0

Restorations

2

Service Events

1

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Terre Haute, IN Total Beginning Membership

$17,542.00 $8,996.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

25.29 1244

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Lowell, MA Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

6

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

4

Restorations

Service Events

0

Service Events

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,000.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$3,892.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of Salem, MA Total Beginning Membership

$790.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

69.67 258 8 42 1 $0.00 $9,136.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

41.18 379

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,500.00

Blue Envelope

$2,915.00

Valley of The Merrimack, MA Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

79.67 189 10

Restorations

6

Service Events

2

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Worcester, MA Total Beginning Membership

$756.00 $4,208.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

91.00 430

10

New 4˚ Members

18

Restorations

12

Restorations

17

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

ScottishRiteNMJ.org

$2,000.00

New 4˚ Members

Service Events

26

38.53

Valley of Southeastern MA, MA

TOTAL VOE SCORE

0 $0.00 $8,237.00

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,720.00

Blue Envelope

$7,274.00

The Northern Light


VALLEY OF EXCELLENCE

Valley of Aroostook, ME Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

31.67 63

New 4˚ Members

5

Restorations

0

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Augusta, ME Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

$0.00 $727.00

360 10

Service Events

0

Valley of Bangor, ME Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

$0.00 $4,765.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

39.67 902 11

Restorations

1

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Portland, ME Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

$0.00 $5,027.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

61.37 748 25

Restorations

5

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$2,000.00

Blue Envelope

$5,701.00

August 2021

leveraged the help of a Brother who is a respiratory therapist and carefully drafted protocols to ensure the safety of their members. These included sanitizing areas and equipment before and after events, checking temperatures, and filling out health screen forms.

38.33 1

Blue Envelope

Just call The Firelands the little Valley that could. In addition to being one of the smallest Valleys in Ohio, they are also one of the newest Valleys within the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, comprised of approximately 150 Brothers.

by Joann Williams-Hoxha, Content Manager

TOTAL VOE SCORE

Restorations

Valley Charitable Contributions

The Valley of The Firelands

The Valley of The Firelands was the first to achieve a perfect score within all categories for the Valley of Excellence. Pictured here are the 14th degree team and five new members that were recruited in the spring.

Valley Secretary Dwight Damschroder, 32°, said his Valley does not have a brick-andmortar building of their own, but they effectively use all the Masonic temples within their region to cater to members. They run approximately two events each month typically in different parts of their Valley to be sure each member can attend an event that is close to home.

Jaxin and Maddie Mohr enjoy their ice cream cones at the Valley of The Firelands’ ice cream cruise-in at Lisa’s Ice Cream in Willard, Ohio.

“We’re getting plural members in our Valley, because they see all that we’re doing,” Brother Dwight said. “It’s been really wonderful helping other lodges and our Valley to grow.”

“We’re not tied to any building; we’re tied to the people,” Brother Dwight said. That mentality is likely the secret to their success; they not only met, but exceeded, many of their goals within all categories for the Valley of Excellence. Their Brother-to-Brother calling goal was 31. They knocked it out of the park with 150. How about providing educational programming to a minimum of eight Brothers amid a pandemic? No problem— they went ahead and quadrupled that goal!

Deb Kemerley enjoys an ice cream during the family life cruise-in event, the 12th family life event of the year for The Firelands, giving them a perfect score of 100 for The Valley of Excellence. “No Valley in NMJ can beat us; only tie us,” touted Valley Secretary Dwight Damschroder, 32°.

With COVID restrictions, Brother Dwight said they were forced to cease gatherings for a bit, but they have not missed any of their degree work since then. They

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The Valley of Northern New Jersey Gets Creative to Achieve VOE Status

by Joann Williams-Hoxha, Content Manager

Where most of us saw a restrictive pandemic in 2020, the Valley of Northern New Jersey saw an opportunity. With a little ingenuity and the Valley of Excellence scorecard as their framework, they continued to connect with Brethren in their Valley, provide help to their fellow man, and even recruit new members. “We had come to a consensus that, regardless of the lockdown requirements, the Valley was going to fight, but in a different way. From there, we began a steady march with the purpose of giving our members the best possible experience,” Valley Secretary Paul M. Ferreira, 33°, MSA, said. Regular meetings continued twice a month for the Valley with their newest tool: Zoom. Scheduled presenters provided the education and fellowship that members craved during a time of isolation, and Brother Paul said his Valley began to see increased attendance from members who had not participated in quite some time.

They also established a food bank, partnering with a local charity that offered meals to seniors and those in need. With an initial goal of 300 pounds of food by the holiday season, they far surpassed expectations. The Valley received $4,800 in donations in addition to more than 1,500 pounds of food!

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Total Beginning Membership

“We can say with certainty the [Valley of Excellence] program helped us to become the creative mindset we were but with new and exciting twists on how to address traditional areas of weakness. It acted in many ways like a SWOT [Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats] analysis which basically defines strengths and weaknesses of an organization,” Brother Paul explained.

3

Service Events

0

Valley of The Androscoggin, ME Total Beginning Membership

$0.00 $3,317.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

59.26 513

New 4˚ Members

4

Restorations

3

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$2,550.00

Blue Envelope

$6,681.00

Valley of Bay City, MI New 4˚ Members

“Our tips on attaining the Valley of Excellence award would simply be to allow your Valley leaders to think outside of the box and find new ways to apply the many categories of opportunity that exist,” Brother Ferreira said. “Become the creative animal that our goals and purposes drive us toward.”

295

Restorations

Total Beginning Membership

Brothers from the Valley of Northern New Jersey enjoyed a luau as one of their family life events.

45.00 2

Blue Envelope

Valley Secretary Paul Ferreira, 33°, shows off the first 300 pounds of food the Valley of Northern New Jersey donated to a local food pantry.

TOTAL VOE SCORE

New 4˚ Members

Valley Charitable Contributions

Their online efforts worked exceedingly well. Their Valley of Excellence goal for recruiting new initiates was 38. Their actual results were 129 new initiates as of press time. For Brothers over the age of 75, the Valley developed a door knocker program, providing in-person visits to see how they were doing. For those who didn’t answer, Valley Brothers left behind a door tag with contact information for the Valley office explaining the reason for the visit. If they needed anything, whether it be a grocery run or a phone call to ease the isolation, they were encouraged to reach out.

Valley of Rockland, ME

TOTAL VOE SCORE

91.00 837 10

Restorations

6

Service Events

6

Valley Charitable Contributions

$9,674.00

Blue Envelope

$5,996.00

Valley of Detroit, MI Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

73.38 1877 35

Restorations

7

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$8,754.00

Blue Envelope

$7,704.00

The Northern Light


VALLEY OF EXCELLENCE

Valley of Grand Rapids, MI Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

62.14 567 17

Valley of Nashua, NH Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

Restorations

3

Restorations

Service Events

0

Service Events

TOTAL VOE SCORE

87.17 299 8 16 5

Valley of Southern New Jersey, NJ

TOTAL VOE SCORE

78.74 1471

Total Beginning Membership

19

New 4˚ Members Restorations

3

Service Events

6

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,134.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

$2,800.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$6,154.66

Blue Envelope

$8,812.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of Marquette, MI Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

60.00 298

Valley of PortsmouthDover, NH Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

45.00 385

$14,163.00

Valley of Albany, NY

TOTAL VOE SCORE

40.00 331

Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

6

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

0

Restorations

1

Restorations

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Traverse City, MI Total Beginning Membership

$596.00 $2,012.13

TOTAL VOE SCORE

38.00 133

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Central Jersey, NJ Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

8

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

0

Restorations

Service Events

0

Service Events

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Concord, NH Total Beginning Membership

$266.00 $1,803.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

63.67 263

$0.00 $4,265.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

90.83 1241 21 7 10

13

New 4˚ Members

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,250.00

Blue Envelope

$2,204.00

Valley of Binghamton, NY

TOTAL VOE SCORE

70.70 206

Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

8

Restorations

0

Service Events

4

Valley Charitable Contributions

$5,000.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,250.00

Blue Envelope

$9,187.00

Blue Envelope

$2,396.00

Valley of Northern New Jersey, NJ

TOTAL VOE SCORE

91.00

Valley of Buffalo, NY

Total Beginning Membership

992

Total Beginning Membership

129

New 4˚ Members

New 4˚ Members

9

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

7

Restorations

Service Events

0

Service Events

Valley Charitable Contributions

$5,040.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$9,856.47

Blue Envelope

August 2021

11

$9,500.00

14 2 $6,600.00 $30,883.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

56.67 352 21

Restorations

1

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$2,250.00

Blue Envelope

$3,596.00

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Valley of Jamestown, NY Total Beginning Membership

91.29

206

Total Beginning Membership

630

New 4˚ Members

2

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

0

Restorations

Service Events

2

Service Events

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of New York City, NY Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

$140.00 $1,667.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

38.33 735 55

TOTAL VOE SCORE

57

Valley of Utica, NY Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

28.00 322

New 4˚ Members

4

6

Restorations

0

4

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$2,142.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

$3,770.00

Blue Envelope

$5,006.00

Blue Envelope

$2,303.00

Valley of Schenectady, NY Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

92.67 313 12

Valley of Akron, OH Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

60.84 760 10

Restorations

4

Restorations

2

Restorations

5

Service Events

0

Service Events

6

Service Events

1

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Norwood, NY Total Beginning Membership

$0.00 $7,461.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

33.00 117

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,252.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,235.00

Blue Envelope

$3,620.40

Blue Envelope

$4,384.00

Valley of Syracuse, NY Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

73.21 379

Valley of Cambridge, OH Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

48.41 1612

New 4˚ Members

1

New 4˚ Members

8

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

0

Restorations

2

Restorations

8

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Rochester, NY Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

30

42.53

Valley of Rockville Centre, NY

TOTAL VOE SCORE

$500.00 $3,721.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

91.67 490 16

Valley Charitable Contributions

$9,000.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$3,747.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of The Hudson, NY Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

94.83 313 46

Valley of Canton, OH Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

61

$12,022.00 $6,361.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

62.45 1478 24

Restorations

1

Restorations

5

Restorations

2

Service Events

4

Service Events

6

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$6,000.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,576.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

$5,827.00

Blue Envelope

$8,956.00

Blue Envelope

$4,641.00

Blue Envelope

$7,705.00

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The Northern Light


VALLEY OF EXCELLENCE

Valley of Cincinnati, OH Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members Restorations Service Events

TOTAL VOE SCORE

74.39 4162 159

2 $20,000.00

Blue Envelope

$16,446.70

Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

38.23 1830

New 4˚ Members

23

Restorations

15

Service Events Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Columbus, OH Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

0 $0.00 $9,351.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

90.55 4429 106

Restorations

9

Service Events

6

Valley Charitable Contributions

$14,350.00

Blue Envelope

$30,347.00

Valley of Dayton, OH Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

98.73 3820

New 4˚ Members

73

Restorations

25

Service Events

6

Valley Charitable Contributions

$17,800.00

Blue Envelope

$24,103.00

August 2021

by Joann Williams-Hoxha, Content Manager

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Valley Charitable Contributions

Valley of Cleveland, OH

The Valley of Rockville Centre

Officers of the Valley of Rockville Centre welcome some of their new 32° Masons.

What is the secret to the Valley of Rockville Centre’s success for achieving Valley of Excellence status? Brother Mark Berkson, 32°, Valley of Rockville Centre Secretary, says it takes a group of dedicated Brothers who all bring something unique to the table. “It all started with an executive board meeting to discuss the Valley of Excellence,” Bro. Berkson said. Various Brothers then handled different categories under the Valley of Excellence umbrella. Brother Jim Calkins, 32°, the Valley’s MVP for Brother-to-Brother calls, is now working with Brother Mark on revamping their Ambassador Program. Brother Michael LaRocco, 32°, MSA, is known as the Valley’s “Ritual Director” and serves as the point person for all the degrees the Degree Team does. And of course, there’s Brother Mark himself, who is the main contact for every candidate who walks through the door. He has a humble demeanor and is not one for bragging; but his Valley scorecard shows their recruitment goal for new initiates was 42, and they exceeded it, with 57 new initiates as of press time! Brother Mark credits a team of Recruitment Ambassadors who helped to earn that win. In addition, they refined the program and expanded the number of ambassadors for both recruitment and restoration. Perhaps the most difficult category in which to meet their Valley of Excellence goal was family/life events.

“Fortunately, we were able to have our blood drives,” Brother Mark said. “We are hopeful that fewer restrictions (due to COVID) next year will help us meet our goal.”

Dist. John Hansen, 32°, MSA participates in a Valley of Rockville Centre blood drive.

And it is not just Brothers who are helping with the Valley’s success. Judy Smith, widow of Brother Linton Smith Jr., 33°, MSA, volunteered to help coordinate programs and events for Valley widows. Judy said, “Just tell me what you need help with, and I’ll do it.” Brother Mark summed up the secret to his Valley’s success very succinctly: having a group of enthusiastic members who enjoy working as a team to make the Valley of Rockville Centre a Valley of Excellence. A big congratulations to the Valley of Rockville Centre on a job well done!

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Valley of Steubenville, OH Total Beginning Membership

36.59 836

Valley of Allentown, PA Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

9

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

5

Restorations

Service Events

0

Service Events

Valley Charitable Contributions

$1,200.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$4,010.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of The Firelands, OH Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

100.0 154 28

Valley of Altoona, PA Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

64.99 2674 32

Valley of Erie, PA

7

Restorations

3

0

Service Events

6

$3,894.50 $21,691.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

31.89 1200 12

Valley Charitable Contributions

$3,000.00

Blue Envelope

$2,944.00

Valley of Harrisburg, PA

45

6

Service Events

0

Service Events

$3,809.00

Blue Envelope

Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

92.83 1532

Valley of Bloomsburg, PA Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

36

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

10

Restorations Service Events

Service Events Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Youngstown, OH Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

1 $8,064.00 $12,343.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

41.59 784 24

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Coudersport, PA Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

$3,266.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

32.39 1155 17

4350 70

Service Events

Blue Envelope

91.98

New 4˚ Members Restorations

$0.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

Total Beginning Membership

9

Valley Charitable Contributions

654 1

Restorations

$2,680.00

62.17

New 4˚ Members

2

Valley Charitable Contributions

TOTAL VOE SCORE

Total Beginning Membership

Restorations

Valley of Toledo, OH

8

Valley Charitable Contributions

$10,115.00

Blue Envelope

$26,556.00

Valley of Lancaster, PA Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

72.27 1219

New 4˚ Members

6

3

Restorations

9

0

Service Events

7

$0.00 $3,643.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

35.01 1918 13

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of New Castle, PA Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

$6,000.00 $17,656.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

59.67 2154 10

Restorations

7

Restorations

5

Restorations

4

Service Events

0

Service Events

4

Service Events

5

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

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TOTAL VOE SCORE

ScottishRiteNMJ.org

$500.00 $6,114.00

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

$0.00 $5,673.71

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

$26,689.00 $9,311.00

The Northern Light


VALLEY OF EXCELLENCE

Valley of Philadelphia, PA Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

76.55 1124

Valley of Uniontown, PA Total Beginning Membership

TOTAL VOE SCORE

50.58 748

Valley of Eau Claire, WI

TOTAL VOE SCORE

48.21 620

Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

51

New 4˚ Members

12

New 4˚ Members

6

Restorations

14

Restorations

15

Restorations

1

Service Events

0

Service Events Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Pittsburgh, PA Total Beginning Membership

3 $19,250.00 $8,604.92

TOTAL VOE SCORE

74.60 3817

Service Events Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

Valley of Williamsport, PA Total Beginning Membership

0 $0.00 $4,949.00

TOTAL VOE SCORE

43.39 1211

Valley Charitable Contributions

$2,381.00

Blue Envelope

$5,954.00

Valley of Green Bay, WI

TOTAL VOE SCORE

40.00 271

Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

48

New 4˚ Members

9

New 4˚ Members

8

Restorations

10

Restorations

1

Restorations

1

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

3

Valley Charitable Contributions

$65,811.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$14,654.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of Reading, PA Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

TOTAL VOE SCORE

51.83 2028 14

Valley of Providence, RI Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

$205.00 $6,778.50

TOTAL VOE SCORE

64.17 738 27

Valley Charitable Contributions

$0.00 $1,685.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of Madison, WI

TOTAL VOE SCORE

50.76 546

Total Beginning Membership New 4˚ Members

6

Restorations

8

Restorations

1

Restorations

2

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Valley Charitable Contributions

$10,000.00

Valley Charitable Contributions

Blue Envelope

$17,524.01

Blue Envelope

Valley of Scranton, PA Total Beginning Membership

$11,476.00 $5,927.00

46.32

Valley of Central Vermont, VT

35.00

636

Total Beginning Membership

148

TOTAL VOE SCORE

TOTAL VOE SCORE

Valley Charitable Contributions

$587.00 $3,706.00

Blue Envelope

Valley of Milwaukee, WI

TOTAL VOE SCORE

90.50 581

Total Beginning Membership

New 4˚ Members

8

New 4˚ Members

8

New 4˚ Members

Restorations

3

Restorations

0

Restorations

5

Service Events

0

Service Events

0

Service Events

1

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

August 2021

$250.00 $3,249.00

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

$0.00 $4,614.00

10

Valley Charitable Contributions Blue Envelope

$27,250.00 $8,378.00

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C

Leon M. Abbott Scholarship Profile: Rachel Glover

by Jocelyn Wallace, Grant Writer and Scottish Rite Charities Coordinator

Giving Back: Children’s Dyslexia Graduate Raises $2 for Nashua, NH Cen

Leon M. Abbott Scholarship recipient Rachel Glover has been a part of the Masonic family almost her entire life. After her father joined the Fraternity when she was eight, she grew up at the lodge and with local appendant bodies. This, in turn, inspired her to join Job’s Daughters, where she has served as a member and volunteer for the past 12 years. Having grown up hearing about the Abbott Scholarship and the stories of those for whom it has made higher education possible, Rachel knew exactly where to apply when it finally came time to consider college. Enrolled at Indiana Wesleyan University, Rachel is currently studying biology, education, and honors humanities with the dream of becoming a high school science teacher. Her education will allow her to combine her two greatest passions: mentoring young adults and the field of science. Rachel asserts that she would not be the same person she is today if not for the Abbott Scholarship and the Scottish Rite Masons behind it. She said, “The Masons in general and the bodies surrounding it have really made

me the person that I am. They have given me confidence, my leadership skills, and I think that is what this program really embodies—helping people reach their fullest potential and further their education. Without this program, I would not be in the place I am personally or financially.” For those growing up in the Fraternity and interested in all that it has to offer, Rachel had the following advice: “Pour into it as much as you can, because you will get out what you put into it. You can grow as much as you are willing to dedicate and will learn so much about yourself, so much about other people, and about how the world works by being involved in the Masons.” To help support the work of the Leon M. Abbott Scholarship Program, please visit: DonateRite.org

L

ast fall, high school sophomore Sam Caliri was assigned a service project at school that involved giving back to the community. While brainstorming ideas, his mind went to the Children’s Dyslexia Center he had attended a few years ago.

“I realized how much they helped me growing up and how much going to the Center impacted my life in a positive way, and I wanted to do something for them,” he said. Sam and his mother Cindy reached out to the Center he had attended in Nashua, New Hampshire, to see how they could help. They learned that the program needed individualized materials so they could continue providing services for students during the pandemic. When Sam heard this, he made it his mission to raise as much money as he could. He wrote a letter sharing how the Dyslexia Center had helped him and began reaching out to local businesses for support. “One in five people suffer from dyslexia. I am Sam Caliri, and I am one of the one in five,” his letter began. With COVID closures hampering some

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The Northern Light


CHARITIES

a Center 2,000 nter

by Bridget Steele, Manager of Research and Grants

Builders Council Tie Gets a New Look

by Darien Koons, 32˚ Manager of Donor Relations

The Scottish Rite Valley of Cleveland and its members are avid supporters of their local Children’s Dyslexia Center. This has never been more apparent than this spring when Illustrious Brother Gregory Kita, 33°, who serves on the board of the Cleveland Center, recruited 12 Brothers from the area to become the newest members of the Children’s Dyslexia Centers’ Builders Council—a recognition society for those that commit to donating $10,000 over the course of 10 years.

of his efforts, he and his family turned to social media to share his letter. The response was overwhelming. “People in the community were probably our biggest supporters—people who knew Sam and knew about his reading difficulties,” his mother said. Sam’s work raised $2,000 for the Nashua Center. When he paid a visit to the Center to present staff with the funds he had raised, Center Director Aileen Cormier said she was incredibly impressed. “Not only did he raise money for our Center and for a very worthy cause, but he went a step further to help increase awareness about a disability that I think so many people misunderstand,” she noted. Sam said his life has changed a great deal since going to the Center. Besides being more confident in his reading, he received all A’s this past semester and is even taking honors classes. When it came time to present his project at school, Sam said his teacher was blown away by his work. “He thought I did one of the most impactful sophomore projects he’s seen,” Sam beamed.

August 2021

However, when Brother Franck Kakou, 32°, Sovereign Prince for the Valley of Cleveland, was approached to join with his Brothers in making this commitment, he had a different plan. He informed Brother Kita that he would not be making a $10,000 pledge over 10 years. Rather, he wanted to make a greater impact by contributing an immediate gift of $20,000. In return, he asked only a small favor— that his Builders Council tie be made pink in honor of breast cancer awareness and as a way to display his affinity for both of these important causes. In honor of his generosity, Brother Kakou was presented with his oneof-a-kind pink Builders Council tie by Sovereign Grand Commander, David A. Glattly, while attending a special event at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland. Commander

Glattly later remarked, “Franck is an inspiration to all of us—not only because of his generous gift, but because of his big heart which he showed in his incredible support of the children of the Cleveland Dyslexia Center.” It is truly a fitting recognition for a dedicated Brother and supporter of the Cleveland Center.

Commander Glattly poses with Brother Franck Kakou, 32° who proudly wears his new pink tie.

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M

Twelve Tips to Win at Recruitment

by Michael Kinigstein, 33°, MSA Valley of Northern New Jersey

An essential component in any Valley’s growth plan is a defined pathway to membership growth and retention. Allow me to speak briefly about our Valley's defined path to success in terms of membership recruitment.

1

Backstory

36

The COVID-19 pandemic created a set of new challenges that many of us had no idea how to initially address. In New Jersey, it was impossible to meet in large groups indoors. This created many months of empty meeting nights and cancelled events. One of my goals as Commander in Chief was to develop creative ideas on how we could stem the tide of emptiness and simultaneously spur our leadership in a direction of growth.

Our Valley Secretary came up with the idea of, “Drive for 75,” a campaign centered around the theme of getting 75 new members. Our Executive Council agreed. Graphics and a member application were created around this theme with visuals of highway signs with a speed limit of 75 posted. Then, a member had the idea of incorporating a one-time petition fee of $75 with a defined expiration date to get the campaign kicked off. This idea spurred tremendous growth.

In consulting with our Executive Secretary, he indicated that our largest class was 75 new members in one reunion. Our Valley traditionally conducts two reunions per year. Therefore, attempting to match our largest class and thus exceed that number was a massive challenge, but we were ready to take on that challenge.

Unfortunately, the pandemic took center stage again as revised rules were posted putting a temporary end to any gatherings, large or small. We were back to the drawing board and produced an outdoor only, 100-person maximum Rite on the Road event for this new crop of anxious candidates.

ScottishRiteNMJ.org

Conduct a survey with your Secretary to discover the Valley’s years of highest growth. Analyze these numbers and create a plan centered around themes that may have taken place at those times.

7 If you have areas of your territory that contain bilingual communities, find ways to connect. Encourage members of your Valley who are fluent in that language or culture to discuss joining the Scottish Rite. Offer to conduct a Rite on the Road in their lodge or district.

2 Make recruitment a Valley-wide goal, and let it be known through all social media channels and newsletters.

8 Prepare a live degree as part of a Rite on the Road event to accompany the 4th degree video. New members joining will be impressed, and they will also see an opportunity to get involved!

Rite on the Road cast and candidates from an August 22, 2020 outdoor event which welcomed 48 new members to the Valley.

The Northern Light


MEMBERSHIP

3 Instruct lodge ambassadors to promote the event in lodge announcements.

9 Find ways to involve both your current members and your new members. Offer non-speaking parts in degrees or even support parts in events. Make the opportunities FUN!

4 Search your member archives for first- and second-line signers of established members, and highlight an opportunity for those signers to earn a membership attainment award or special cap that you create to recognize them. In our Valley, any member who either brings in five candidates in one class or cumulatively recruits 10 new members earns a blue cap from the Valley and is presented with it at a ceremony.

10 Create new member packets for distribution to new members. Ideas of what to include: Valley accessories (pins, ties, lanyards, shirts, etc.), Valley contact info, meeting times, and their Scottish Rite degree passport. You can also provide information on Valley history, opportunities for involvement, awards, committees, and charity projects.

5 Sponsor a free dinner for all members who bring in at least one new member. Again, reference those archived petitions for firstline signers.

11 Watch parties! Come one, come all! Bring a lodge Brother or just come on your own to help fill up or complete your degree passport! Conduct an in-house survey of the degrees needed most by the membership. Then, couple that with a “Nite at the Rite” themed event showing video degrees and possibly one live degree.

6 Seek support from lodges from within your service area to sponsor a Rite on the Road event. Have your Valley offer to pay for refreshments and other associated costs. This is a great opportunity to “go on the offense” with the Rite on the Road 4th Degree video kit!

12 Invite Hauts Grades students to discuss some of the core purposes and teachings of the Scottish Rite. Some Master Masons would be intrigued to know that the Scottish Rite can be the “University of Freemasonry.”

Advice on Recruitment Planning

In Conclusion

Pandemic or not, the suggestions I have provided here are proven to work! We have brought in over 100 new members for this census year with more waiting in the wings.

These are just some of the ideas we have implemented that have worked. Each Valley has a set of unique characteristics that can be applied. What are yours? What is your “why”? Make it unique. Express it...then go for it! Because in the end, we all benefit from an organization that is cutting edge and a team that’s “in it to win it.”

August 2021

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M

Reflecting the Light of The Rite

by Michael Moran, 32°, Ph.D., Valley of Harrisburg

Beginning in 2019, the Valley of Harrisburg developed and implemented a reflection discussion process following the conferral of one or more Scottish Rite, AASR, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction degrees. The impetus for the post-degree reflection discussions was the Hauts Grades Academy paper that I wrote entitled Core Values, Reflection and Scottish Rite Dramas. Our Active, Ill. Brother Tom Labagh, 33°, recruited reflection group members and scheduled initial meetings for me to explain the group’s activities. Initially, the team consisted of facilitators William Britton, 32°; Donald W. Cramer, 32°; Arthur Dinger, 33°; Charles Goetz, 32°; Mark Mattern, 32°; Rev. Matthew D. Randolph, 32°; and Richard L. Wenner, 32°. I served as the evaluator. I developed documents and resources to help group members understand the processes of reflection. Those processes focused on developing guiding questions for discussions following degrees. The documents included a list of Scottish Rite NMJ Core Values, a “primer” on developing guiding questions and facilitating discussion, a list of Bloom’s Taxonomy Action Verbs, and a tool for discussion analysis called the Fink Taxonomy of Significant Learning. Initially, one degree per in-person Reunion was Michael Moran, 32°

chosen for an added 20-to30-minute reflection period to determine if the members wanted to participate in these programs. The response was very positive. But holding a reflection after every degree would have significantly lengthened the Reunion schedule, so the intent was to continue with just one per Reunion. When the pandemic disrupted our plans, we determined that this would be a good program to follow each Thursday Night at the Rite presentation—beginning Charles Goetz, 32° and Mark Mattern, 32°

10 minutes after the closing video credits. Brother Labagh managed the scheduling and advertising of the postdegree reflection discussions with the assistance of the Valley Secretary, Ill. Brother John Cook, 33°. Attendance varied, with anywhere from 10-35 participants in a Zoom session, but the discussions were always meaningful and well-received. Prior to each post-degree reflection discussion, I worked with a designated facilitator to develop and refine a list of guiding Arthur Dinger, 33°

questions specific to a degree. That refinement emphasized the spectrum of thinking skills as described in the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy. Following an in-person or online degree, Brethren participated in a facilitator-led discussion emphasizing the relevant Core Values. The primary purpose was to give Brethren the opportunity to actively discuss the degree as well as provide stimuli for personal reflection on the degree lessons. Survey data was collected and we analyzed the discussion content and process using the Fink Taxonomy. The survey data was strongly positive, indicating that Brethren attending the inperson or online discussions felt they were valuable. They affirmed that the reflection sessions helped them better understand the degrees and apply information from the degrees to their life. Data from the Fink Taxonomy was also positive. Plans are to continue the reflection discussions when in-person or online degrees resume—hopefully, in the fall. The reflection discussions build on the thought that the Scottish Rite is the “University of Freemasonry.”

Live reflection on the 27th degree—Knight of Jerusalem—in the Valley of Harrisburg.

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The Northern Light


MEMBERSHIP

Onboarding Your New Members In business, we often say it costs more to lose a client than it does to gain one. The same can be said for any organization—its members are its most precious commodity. The care and feeding of members starts immediately after the individual joins the group. In the Scottish Rite, we need to be aware of this. In my local Valley, the Valley of The Hudson—located in New York, that process of shepherding our new members begins with a great onboarding program. When I became Commander in Chief, I made it a priority to structure a strong onboarding program. In 2020, the Valley ran this in a live format just before COVID and transitioned to a virtual

platform in 2021. We didn’t change the content; we just migrated to Zoom. To help you with this, I have made a punch list of things to think about along with topics

by Bob Siebold, 32°, MSA, Commander in Chief, Valley of The Hudson

to consider when putting an onboarding program together (see below). Now that you have the operational basics, let’s talk topics. We wanted our new members to walk away with a functional knowledge of how our Valley operated, AASR basics, and the value of being a member of the Rite. When doing this, the trick is to keep the segments crisp, clean, timely, and short (five minutes per speaker). After all, you are covering a lot of information in a relatively short period of time.

N E W M E M B E R E X PE R IE NCE Get everyone involved: officers, emerging Valley leaders, and your legacy members. Everyone can play a role and has something to offer.

been designed for them specifically. It adds a personal touch and will drive participation.

Invite your legacy members. While the event is primarily an “onboarding” event for new Assign a chairman for the project—I suggest Scottish Rite members, legacy Valley members one of your Lieutenants from the Consistory. can enjoy it as well. What we stressed to our Have them form a committee to assist in the legacy men was that their presence was desired endeavor. and needed as they could add a phenomenal dimension to the dialogue. It was also a great Pick a central location that is good for everyone. way to meet the new Brothers. Our Valley meets in four different places, so we used the lodge where the Consistory meets. Create a PowerPoint deck that shows each It was convenient and served our purposes speaker and their topic. Have a projector, perfectly. screen, speakers (if a video is being shown), PC, and a podium with a microphone. I suggest Wrap the event around a meal. In our live using a larger lodge room or dining hall to format, we ran a breakfast. That got everyone hold the event with the focal point being the to the lodge early for a hot meal and some presenters and projection screen. brotherhood. Everyone loves food and great conversation. In the Valley of The Hudson, we ran the event on a Saturday and designated the dress code Designate specific key leaders from your Valley, as business casual. Lose the hats, jewels, and COD, or other groups to act as guest presenters all the bling. Keep the atmosphere loose and that will deliver focused messages to the welcoming. audience. Print a set of PowerPoint slides for each Market the event strongly through social media, member including speakers’ notes and also email, and telephone calls. Make sure to tell supply pens. This will encourage questions your new members that this program has throughout and stimulate participation.

August 2021

TOPICS Functions of the Valley Secretary and Treasurer Valley Online Resources—Web Site, COD Website, NMJ Website Valley Degree Team— Live, Nite at the Rite, Scottish Rite Radio Honors, Awards, and Knights of the Double Eagle Valley Service— Knights of Saint Andrew Valley and AASR History—a look back to look forward Individual Body Presentations Overview of the NMJ and COD AASR Philanthropy

The topics above will give your program a comprehensive look at your Valley and demonstrate the robust programming the Scottish Rite offers. While you can approach this deliverable in a live or virtual offering, the content is what really makes the day a memorable first step in a lifelong journey for your new members. If you do this well, you will see increased participation and excitement—two important elements in the success of any Valley.

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M

Around the Jurisdiction Scottish Rite Masons from the Valley of Bridgeport teamed up with Pyramid Shriners and marched in a Memorial Day Parade held in Trumbull, Connecticut.

CT

Brothers Vinny Cerroni, 32°; Ian Berkowitz, 32°; and Fred Pizzuto, 32°, of the Valley of The Hudson attended a Joint Reunion of the Valleys of The Merrimack and Salem in Newburyport, MA on June 5, 2021 to complete their gold passports. They are pictured here with the cast of the 18th Degree, conferred by the Emmanuel Chapter of Rose Croix, Valley of Salem, MA.

NY

The Valley of Northern New Jersey Rose Croix prepares for the taping of their Paschal Lamb event which was simulcast to members and their families via Zoom.

NJ

Deputy Jeff Simonton, 33°, dubs and creates a 32˚ Mason in Bangor, Maine for the Virtual 32° Celebration.

ME

NJ Matthew Glattly, 32°, poses with his father, Sovereign Grand Commander, David A. Glattly, 33°, and Robert Monacelli, 33°, Grand Master of New Jersey, after receiving his 32nd degree at the New Jersey statewide reunion in May.

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DE MI The Valleys of Delaware held a luncheon for their 33rd degree candidates and invited guests. Pictured (l to r) are MW Jeffrey D. Haass Sr., 32°, Grand Master; Evan R. Moody, 32°; John Foreaker, 32°; Ill. Herb Atkinson, 33°, Deputy for Delaware; Fred Palmer, 32°; Travis Simpkins, 32°, Valley of Boston; Ill. William Shaw, 33°; RW Stephen Tucker, 32°; and James Brady 32°.

The Northern Light


MEMBERSHIP

New MSAs John Oleszkiewicz and Fred Yates are congratulated at Vermont Council of Deliberation. Pictured (l to r) are Barry Duquette, 32°, Deputy’s Representative; Ill. Don Duquette, 33°, Deputy for Vermont; John Oleszkiewicz, 32°, MSA; Fred Yates, 32°, MSA; Ill. William Basso II, 33°, Active for Vermont; and Ill. Graham Trudo, 33°, MSA, Chairman of the MSA Committee.

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The Easter Bunny was available for pictures at America St. John’s Lodge No. 8 during their Easter family pancake breakfast. Scottish Rite Masons from the Valley of Bridgeport were in attendance to help with the event.

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The Valley of Chicago was pleased to host their Annual Meetings of Van Rensselaer Lodge of Perfection, Chicago Council Princes of Jerusalem, Gourgas Chapter of Rose Croix, Oriental Consistory, and the Scottish Rite Cathedral Association of Chicago on May 20.

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Scottish Rite Masons from the Valley of Bridgeport helped Brothers from America St. John's Lodge No. 8 during their Easter family pancake breakfast, making balloon twisting crafts and preparing over 200 candy-filled Easter eggs for the children to find.

CT Valley of Michigan-Southwestern Region Reunion Honoree, Brother Jim White, 33° (center), poses with the cast of the 21st degree.

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IN At the Indiana COD in June, three Brothers received the Sovereign Grand Commander’s Medal for Distinguished Service, and six others received the Indiana COD Medal of Honor. Congrats to these worthy men. They are (l to r): William L. Doctor, 33°; Delmar J. Proctor, 33°; Carl L. Whitman, 33°; Paul W. Burns, 33°; Ronald L. Buskirk, 33°; Jerry O. Deeter, 33°; Steven J. Dooley, 33°; Noel L. Sell, 33°; and Rick A. Cory, 33°.

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Around the Jurisdiction Commander Glattly and Monica attend the grand opening of the new location of the Cleveland Children’s Dyslexia Center.

On Friday April 16, 2021, the Valley of Buffalo welcomed 32 new members, 18 of whom were able to receive the 32nd degree that day.

The Valley of Northern New Jersey held a pandemic-safe Thursday Night at the Rite watch party. Front row (l to r): John Nause, 32°; Wade Collins, 32°; Ruben Fleitas, 32°; Anthony Medved, 32°. Back row (l to r): Justin Marchese, 32°; Charles Booth, 32°; Jashawn Anderson, 32°; Avery Seawright, 32°; Isaiah Smith 32°. Not pictured: Tom Murphy, 32°, photographer.

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The “Spring Into Swing” event was a huge success for the Dyslexia Education Training Center of Toledo, OH. In addition to the funds raised by ticket sales and raffles, the Scottish Rite Valley of Toledo contributed a check for $5,000. Presenting the check are Trent T. Dominique, 33°, Deputy’s Representative for the Valley of Toledo; Jeremy Z. Sharninghouse, 33°, Executive Secretary, Valley of Toledo; and several 32° members who were present for the May 2 fundraiser.

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ME Brother Charles Briggs, 33°, of the Valley of Bangor (left) was pleased to receive the Sovereign Grand Commander’s Medal for Distinguished Service on June 4, presented by Deputy Jeffry Simonton, 33°.

WI Brother Eric Falkner, 32°, speaks at the District 12 banquet about the impact that the Valley of Milwaukee has had on his son through their sponsorship of the “Go Baby Go” program (see the May 2021 issue of The Northern Light, for more information).

At the Valley of Bangor’s Spring Reunion, Deputy Jeff Simonton, 33°; Active Alan Heath, 33°; Active A. James Ross, 33°; and Deputy’s Representative Randy Adams, 33°, MSA, presented longtime Valley Secretary Guy Chapman, 33°, with the Sovereign Grand Commander’s Medal for Distinguished Service. Guy has been very influential in growing the Bangor Dyslexia Center endowment, maintaining relations with Masonic and community organizations, and running the operations of Valley of Bangor.

OH Members of New Hampshire and their families held a cast party to celebrate the success of their 30th degree Thursday Night at the Rite performance.

NH The Valley of Michigan held a Rite on the Road event at Cadillac-Clam Lake Lodge No. 331 and welcomed eight new members to the Scottish Rite.

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The Valley of Michigan—Southeastern Region produced an Easter Eve virtual service for their members.

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The Northern Light


MEMBERSHIP

The Valley of Milwaukee gathers food and clothing donations for local charity groups. Pictured (l to r) are Amanda Carlson; Napoleon Janczak, 32°, TPM; Donald Carlson, 32°, CIC; and James Stoebe, 32°, MSA.

The Valley of Cincinnati welcomed 70 new members during their Spring Reunion.

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RI OH Congrats to Brothers from the Valley of Dayton who received their black Scottish Rite caps. To qualify for the black cap, they must see all 29 degrees and be the first-line signers on a petition. They are (l to r): Richard A. Heiby, 32°; Alan W. Risner, 32°; Jay R. Johnston, 32°; Charles R. Gamble, 32°; and Jordan Ashley, 32°.

Rhode Island held their Council of Deliberation in June. Pictured (l to r) are: ME Robert Fish, 32°, MSA, Grand High Priest, RAM; Ill. Dennis W. Pothier, 33°, Active for RI; MW Robert B. Ellston, 32°, Grand Master; Ill. David A. Glattly, 33°, SGC; Ill. John K. Takian, 33°, Emeritus for RI; Ill. Elmer H. Palmer, 33°, Emeritus for RI; Ill. Steven E. Smith, 33°, Deputy for RI; Ill. Robert F. Ogg, 33°, Active for RI; Dad Michael K. Lawson, 32°, DeMolay Executive Officer for RI; MP Robert Ray Maddix, 32°, Grand Master of the Grand Council for RI.

Tom Jeffers, 33°, CIC of the Valley of Coudersport presents an Abbott Scholarship check to Ryan Clouser, son of Brother Chad Clouser, 32°.

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On May 17, the Valley of Scranton staged the 25th degree, Master of Achievement, live. Brothers traveled from Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, Ohio, and Illinois to see this infrequently performed degree.

At the Valley of Boston’s Consistory banquet, Sovereign Grand Commander, Ill. David A. Glattly, 33°, presented outgoing Commander in Chief, Ill. Eugene A. “Cappy” Capobianco, 33°, with the Sovereign Grand Commander’s Medal for Distinguished Service. Cappy has been influential in initiating more than 700 new Scottish Rite members during his term. He also led the Valley’s efforts to distribute thousands of pieces of PPE to members and Masonic facilities during the pandemic.

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If you would like to have your Valley featured in Around the Jurisdiction, be sure to submit photographs and descriptions to

Communications@SRNMJ.org

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Tune in on May 22nd at 10 AM ET for this special premiere of the 32° or May 27th at 8 PM ET for an encore performance! Be one of the first to witness the 32° as never seen before, including a symbolic dubbing of our new Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret. Mark your calendarsand for this extraordinary The Supreme Council congratulates welcomes the virtual event.

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Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret who took part in the Virtual celebrations on May 22 and MayLearn 27! more & register at

Reunion.SRNMJ.org/32

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MASONRY

Shriners International Awareness Day On June 6, 1876, the Imperial Council, the original governing body of Shriners International, was founded. To commemorate this important milestone, Shriners International has declared June 6 Shriners International Awareness Day. Our Shriner Brothers from Supreme Council took part in Shriners International Awareness Day by donning their fezzes and having a little fun. Pictured left to

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right are: Matt Garrish, 32°; Darien Koons, 32°; Sovereign Grand Commander David A. Glattly, 33°; Richard Elliot, 33°; James Dill, Jr., 33°; Richard Travis, 33°; Kamel Oussayef,

33°, MSA; Kevin Hecht, 33°; Alan Heath, 33°; and Michael Russell, 32°.

courage and sacrifice of everyone who served on D-Day.

The leadership of Shriners International is mindful that June 6 is also D-Day, the day in 1944 when Allied forces landed on the beach in Normandy to begin the invasion of northern France. Shriners International and members of its fraternity, including those at Supreme Council, honor the

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MASONRY

Sovereign Grand Commander David A. Glattly Inducted into the DeMolay International Alumni Hall of Fame

Welcomed into the pantheon that includes John Wayne, Walt Disney, John Steinbeck, and President of the United States William J. Clinton is “the DeMolay boy from Clifton, New Jersey.” It is with great pride we announce that Sovereign Grand Commander David A. Glattly has been inducted into the DeMolay International Alumni Association Hall of Fame. The enshrinement was held at The DeMolay International Session in Dallas, Texas, on June 19, 2021, before a crowd of more than 450 guests with DeMolay International Grand Master Marc B. Bohn presiding over the ceremony. Said Commander Glattly

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as he reflected on the honor, “Truly, I consider myself ‘just a DeMolay boy from Clifton, New Jersey,’ and I often introduce myself that way. DeMolay set my path to character, helped me overcome uncertainties in myself as a young man, and allowed me to develop leadership skills I would not have gotten elsewhere. DeMolay taught me to look up and never give up.” Commander Glattly continued, “DeMolay laid the

standards and principles that allowed my young self to see what I thought was beyond reach was actually attainable if I worked hard and stayed true to my values. I thank God for directing me along this path as it made such a difference in my life.” DeMolay International maintains a DeMolay Alumni Hall of Fame in Kansas City where the Order was founded in 1919. It is designed to honor Senior DeMolays who have gone on to pursue careers of influence, attain positions of stature, or accomplish other lifetime achievements, and who credit their success in some manner to their experiences in DeMolay.

Some of the well-known figures in the Hall of Fame include actors Buddy Ebsen and Gary Collins, US House Speaker James C. Wright, Apollo 8 Commander Frank Borman, baseball greats Pete Rose and Harmon Killebrew, NFL quarterback Fran Tarkenton, broadcaster Walter “Red” Barber, and newscaster John Cameron Swayze. Also enshrined in the Hall of Fame with Commander Glattly was four-star General John T. “Jack” Chain, Jr., who served as commander in chief of the Strategic Air Command for the Reagan Administration.

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Honoring our Front Line Heroes First Responders Campaign

September 1 - December 1, 2021

This fall, the Scottish Rite, NMJ is honoring our first responders. Throughout time, these individuals have exemplified our Core Value of Service to Humanity. From the September 11 attacks to the COVID-19 global pandemic, our first responders have always been the front line heroes of our communities. Go to ScottishRiteNMJ.org/Heroes to see how your Valley can get involved and how you can order your very own commemorative Challenge Coin for the First Responders Campaign this fall!

ScottishRiteNMJ.org/Heroes