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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

FAIR PLAY

Volume  85,  Issue  VII

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Thursday,  October  31,  2013

‡'HSDUWPHQWVDQG3URJUDPVVKRZVXSSRUWIRU5HVROXWLRQIRU)DLU3D\$FW ‡3UHVLGHQW&KULVWLDQVD\VKHLVXQDEOHWRJLYH'LUHFW6DODU\,QFUHDVHV PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

SEE STORY ON PAGE 4

INSIDE THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE Â&#x2021;681<&RPPLWVWR/RFDO)RRG3JÂ&#x2021;³*RRG1HLJKERU,QLWLDWLYH´6HW3J Â&#x2021;0DLQ6WUHHWWR%HJLQ5HQRYDWLRQ3URFHVV3JÂ&#x2021;(PPHWW7LOO'RFXPHQWDU\6FUHHQHG3J


Cat  Tacopina EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Katherine  Speller   MANAGING  EDITOR

_________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

John  Tappen NEWS  EDITOR

Ben  Kindlon FEATURES  EDITOR

Suzy  Berkowitz

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF

Andrew  Lief

FEATURES          PG.  2B A&E                      PG.  9B

SPORTS  EDITOR

_________________

Dana  Schmerzler Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Madeline  Anthony Abbott  Brant Anthony  DeRosa   Roberto  LoBianco Jennifer  Newman COPY  EDITORS

Hannah  Nesich

ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITOR

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI 681<1HZ3DOW]2XUFLUFXODWLRQLVThe  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   Room  417.  Deadline  for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in   The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG E\WKHEXVLQHVVPDQDJHU&RPPXQLW\DQQRXQFHPHQWVDUHSXEOLVKHGJUDWXLWRXVO\EXWDUH subject  to  restriction  due  to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents   RIWKLVSDSHUFDQQRWEHUHSURGXFHGZLWKRXWWKHZULWWHQSHUPLVVLRQRIWKH(GLWRULQ&KLHI The  New  Paltz  OracleLVSXEOLVKHGZHHNO\WKURXJKRXWWKHIDOODQGVSULQJVHPHVWHUV RQ7KXUVGD\V,WLVDYDLODEOHLQDOOUHVLGHQFHKDOOVDQGDFDGHPLFEXLOGLQJVLQWKH1HZ3DOW] community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO7KH fax  line  is  845-­257-­3031.

Volume  85 Issue  VII

_________________

Nicole  Brinkley

NEWS

Maxwell  Reide

THE  GUNK  

WEB  CHIEF

MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

1B-­12B

THE  DEEP  END

Maya  Slouka

EDITORIAL  

Emily  Weiss

COLUMNS

BUSINESS  MANAGER

12B 9

$SULO&DVWLOOR.HOVH\'DPUDG1LFN)RGHUD5LFDUGR+HUQDQGH]6DOO\ 0RUDQ(LOHHQ/LHEOHU.D\FLD6DLOVPDQ6KHOE\6HLS.HOO\6HL] -DFN6RPPHU5\DQ:DO].ULVWHQ:DUÂżHOG

STAFF

Incident:  Alcohol/Drugs   Date:  10/12913 Location:  Parker  Quad M/S  arrested  for  possession  of  an  open  con-­ tainer. Incident:  None Date:  10/26/13 Location:  N/A No  criminal  incidents  for  this  date.  

11-­15

FOLLOW  THE  ORACLE

@NewPaltzOracle

Thursday,  Oct.  31 Showers High:  63  Low:  59

Friday,  Nov.  1

Showers  High:  51  Low:  32

Sunny High:  59  Low:  39

SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

Sunday,  Nov.  3

Partly  Cloudy High:  46  Low:  26 WANT  TO  WRITE  FOR  THE  ORACLE?

Contact  us  at   Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   for  more  information! The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Five-­Day  Forecast

Saturday,  Nov.  2

10

DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER

SPORTS  

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Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

3-­8

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VISIT â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE ORACLEâ&#x20AC;? ONLINE:

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SPORTS                  PG.  13

Monday,  

Partly  Cloudy High:  43    Low:  34


NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

   3

oracle.newpaltz.edu

SUNY  Students  Commit  to  Local  Food

SUNY  students  make  the  commitment  to  support  local  food  and  sustainable  practices.  

By  Katherine  Speller Managing  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUNY   New   Paltz   is   one   of   12   SUNY   campuses   taking  part  in  the  collective  purchase  of  1,000  gallons   of   locally   processed   tomato   sauce   from   farms   in  Ver-­ non  and  Kingston,  N.Y.,  as  part  of  SUNY  Chancellor   Nancy  Zimpher’s    SUNY  Commits  program  —  a  sys-­ tem-­wide  initiative  to  incorporate  more  locally  grown   food  products  on  SUNY  campuses.     The  purchase  is  part  of  the  launch  of  the  program,   which  looks  to  include  a  larger  expanse  of  New  York   foods  and  to  include  more  SUNY  campuses  in  future   growing  seasons.   SUNY  New  Paltz  President  Donald  Christian  said   the  program  —  as  part  of  Zimpher’s  “Power  of  SUNY”   strategic  plan  —  works  to  “take  what’s  happening  on   campuses   [and]   package   them   in   ways   that   show   a   broader  impact  across  the  entire  system,”  and  is  in  line   with   the   New   Paltz’   larger-­scale   food   service   aspira-­ tions. Christian  said  the  program,  works  to  “take  what’s   happening   on   campuses   [and]   package   them   in   ways   that  show  a  broader  impact  across  the  entire  system.”   “I  think  the  Chancellor  has  been  very  clearly  com-­ mitted  to  sustainability,  and  we  are  as  well,  as  well  as   doing  things  that  we  can  to  help  build  and  sustain  the  

PHOTOBY  JAYNA  COWAL

New  York  economy,”  Christian  said.   Christian  said  the  school  has  been  trying  to  estab-­ lish   connections   between   the   college’s   food   service   provider,   Sodexo,   CAS   and   regional   food   growers   to   seek  more  local  opportunities  in  the  future.  He  said  ad-­ ministration  has  connected  them  with  one  company  in   Orange   County   that   raises   salmon   in   an   “aquaculture   ÀRZWKURXJK V\VWHP´ WKDW XVHV WKH ZDVWH ZDWHU IURP the  salmon  to  grow  tomatoes  hydroponically.   “We’ve   connected   them   and   I   think   they’ve   had   some  early  explorations  but  I  don’t  know  if  there’s  any-­ thing  concrete  developing  there  yet,”  Christian  said. However,   Christian   said   one   challenge   for   future   local  food  expansion  depends  on  the  cost  students  are   willing  to  pay  for  their  food  as  demonstrated  by  a  re-­ cent  survey  by  Campus  Auxilary  Services  (CAS). “CAS  did  a  survey  recently  that  shows  far  greater   interest  among  students  in  having  locally  grown  foods   served  on  the  campus  compared  with  their  willingness   to  pay  for  locally  grown  foods,”  Christian  said.  “I  think   the  tipping  point  was  a  pretty  good  percentage  of  stu-­ dents   interested   in   paying   up   to   10   percent   more   for   food  if  they’re  getting  more  locally  grown  food,  but  the   idea  of  paying  30  percent  more  was  not  quite  as  posi-­ tively  received,  which  makes  sense.” Second-­year  sociology  major  Annie  Courtens  said  

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

students   pay   “a   reasonable   amount”   for   food   already   and   that   the   administration   should   look   for   every   op-­ portunity   to   provide   students   with   the   local,   organic   and  “good”  produce. Courtens   said   the   key   to   bringing   local   foods   to   campus  is  educating  students,  which  is  also  a  compo-­ nent  of  SUNY  Commits.   “The  conversation  has  to  be  a  student  movement,   students  to  students,”  Courtens  said.  “It’s  crucial.  It’s  a   necessity.” Christian  said  the  college  has  had  some  discussions   in  recent  years  to  build  faculty  interest  in  a  food  studies   focus,  a  “liberal  education  focus  dealing  with  history,   economy,  sociology,  biology.”   “We  have  a  bunch  of  courses  that  have  some  links   to  food  and  food  studies  and  nutrition,  but  they’ve  never   been  packaged  in  a  way  that  would  create  a  program,”   Christian  said.  “It’s  sure  something  the  administration   would  support  but  it  requires  faculty  initiative  to  try  to   move  that  along.” Courtens  said  she  believes  the  program  would  gar-­ ner  support  from  faculty  and  students  alike,  as  the  need   for  sustainable  food  is  universal.   “It’s  the  only  thing  that  connects  every  person  on   the  planet,”  Courtens  said.  “Food  is  what  unites  every-­ one   around   the   dinner   table.   Everyone   can   talk   about   food.  It’s  such  a  wide,  complex  issue.”


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

AMERICAN   INTELLIGENCE   AGENCIES The   United   Nations   said  Wednesday   it   has   received   assurances   from   the   U.S.   government   that   U.N.   communications   networks  â&#x20AC;&#x153;are  not  and  will  not  be  moni-­ toredâ&#x20AC;?   by   American   intelligence   agen-­ cies. ISRAEL   TO   BUILD   HOMES   IN   EAST   JERUSALEM   AND   WEST   BANK Israel  announced  plans  Wednesday  to  build   more   than   1,500   homes   in   Jewish   settle-­ ments  in  east  Jerusalem  and  the  West  Bank,   dealing   a   setback   to   newly   relaunched   peace  efforts  hours  after  it  had  freed  a  group   of  long-­serving  Palestinian  prisoners. U.S.  DRONE  STRIKES The   Pakistani   government   said   Wednesday   that   3   percent   of   2,227   people   killed   in   U.S.   drone   strikes   since   2008   were   civilians,   a   surpris-­ LQJO\ORZÂżJXUHWKDWVSDUNHGFULWLFLVP from   groups   that   have   investigated   death  tolls  from  the  attacks. AL-­QAIDA  ATTACKS The  wave  of  attacks  by  al-­Qaida-­led  Sunni   extremists  that  has  killed  thousands  of  Iraqis   this  year,  most  of  them  Shiites,  is  provoking   ominous  calls  from  Shiite  leaders  to  take  up   arms  in  self-­defense. ONE  TIME   RICHEST   MAN   FILED   FOR  BANKRUPTCY The   oil   company   of   Brazilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   one-­time   ULFKHVW PDQ ÂżOHG IRU EDQNUXSWF\ SUR-­ tection   Wednesday,   marking   a   hum-­ EOLQJEORZIRU(LNH%DWLVWDDĂ&#x20AC;DPER\-­ ant   former   champion   speedboat   racer   who  has  been  his  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  biggest  eco-­ nomic  cheerleader  in  recent  years. CONGOLESE  ARMY

The  Congolese  army  retook  one  of  the   last  remaining  strongholds  of  the  M23   UHEHOV :HGQHVGD\ ZLWK ¿JKWHUV UXQ-­ ning  for  the  hills  as  the  military  sought   to   extinguish   the   18-­month-­old   insur-­ UHFWLRQRI¿FLDOVVDLG Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Departments  Pass  Resolution  For  Fair  Pay  Act By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­In-­Chief  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Six  departments  and  programs  at  SUNY  New   Paltz   have   passed   a   Resolution   for   the   Fair   Pay   Act,  which  calls  on  administrators  to  help  improve   work  conditions  for  University  faculty  members.   The  elementary  education,  anthropology,  art   history,   library,   sociology   departments   and   the   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  Gender,  and  Sexuality  Studies  program   have  all  agreed  to  the  resolution,  which  was  drawn   up  by  university  faculty  members.  It  calls  for  sal-­ ary   increases   for   tenure-­track   faculty   members,   smaller  course-­loads  for  full-­time  lecturers  and  an   increase   in   the   minimum   pay   for   adjunct   profes-­ sors.   Art   History   Lecturer   Beth   Wilson   said   the   resolution   is   a   statement   from   the   faculty   which   demonstrates  that  regardless  of  position,  lecturers,   adjuncts  and  tenure-­track  professors  have  interest   and  stake  in  one  anotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  issues.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  what  the  administration  would  prefer   us  to  do  is  to  disconnect  these  issues,â&#x20AC;?  Wilson  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  the  compelling  thing  about  the  resolution   is   it   recognizes   the   connection   between   the   three   groups.â&#x20AC;? One  of  the  issues  brought  up  in  the  resolution   is   that   tenure-­track   professors   have   not   received   a   Direct   Salary   Increase   (DSI)   for   several   years,   including   the   time   when   United   University   Pro-­ fessors  (UUP)  and  New  York  State  were  negotiat-­ ing  a  new  contract,  between  2011  and  2013.  This   includes  professors  who  were  reviewed  and  were   TXDOLÂżHGWRUHFHLYHD'6,LQWKDWWLPH The  resolution  claims  that  the  campus  presi-­ dent,  in  neither  the  past  or  present  agreements  be-­ twen  UUP  and  the  state,  is  precluded  from  award-­

ing   salary   increases.   However,   SUNY   New   Paltz   President  Donald  Christian  said  he  is  unable  to  ac-­ complish  what  is  being  asked  of  him.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  provision  in  the  contract  that  lets  me   adjust  an  individual  salary  here  and  there  on  a  very   limited  basis,â&#x20AC;?  Christian  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  not  a  mecha-­ nism  for  whole  scale  faculty  increases  and  it  is  not   a  mechanism  that  gives  me  the  ability  to  give  major   salary  increases.â&#x20AC;? Christian   also   said   he   is   unable   to   give   into   the   demands   of   the   resolution   because   it   comes   from  the  campus  chapter  of  UUP,  as  opposed  to  the   statewide  union.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  very  clear  that  the  faculty  collective  bar-­ gaining  agreement  is  negotiated  between  the  gov-­ HUQRUÂśV RIÂżFH DQG VWDWHZLGH 883 DQG HPSOR\HUV are  not  given  the  right  to  negotiate  with  anybody   else,  including  groups  like  a  faculty  senate  and  it  is   explicitly  stated,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  faculty  come  to  me   with  a  resolution,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  nothing  I  can  do  about  it   because  it  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  come  from  statewide  UUP.â&#x20AC;? The  resolution  also  calls  for  an  increase  in  the   minimum  adjunct  pay,  which  is  $3,001  per  course   at  SUNY  New  Paltz.  According  to  Christian,  New   Paltz   has   the   highest   minimum   pay   for   adjuncts,   with   Stony   Brook   and   SUNY   Potsdam   having   nearly  similar  minimums  with  $3,000  per  course. But  Wilson  said  it  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  so  much  the  pay  as  it   is  that  in  some  cases,  adjuncts  are  doing  the  same   amount  of  work  as  some  tenure-­track  faculty  mem-­ bers  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;salariedâ&#x20AC;?  lecturers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  truly  looking  for  is  equal  pay  for   equal  work,â&#x20AC;?  Wilson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  are  adjuncts  who   teach  three  to  four  classes,  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  asked  to  put   in  the  same  amount  of  work  as  full-­time  professors   when  they  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  full  time.â&#x20AC;?

7KHÂżQDOLVVXHWKHUHVROXWLRQGLVFXVVHVLVWKH course  load  for  full-­time  lecturers  at  SUNY  New   Paltz.   The   resolution   states   that   New   Paltz   â&#x20AC;&#x153;is   unique   among   SUNY   comprehensive   colleges   in   having  an  academically  indefensable  course  load   RI ÂżYH FRXUVHV >@ SHU VHPHVWHU IRU LWV IXOOWLPH lecturers.â&#x20AC;? UUP   Chapter   President   Peter   Brown   said   the   amount   of   work   full-­time   lecturers   are   asked   WRIXOÂżOOOHDYHVWKHPÂłEXUQHGRXW´E\WKHWLPHWKH semester  is  over. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lecturers  are  asked  to  put  in  15  credit  hours   per  semester,  and  on  top  of  that  they  are  expected   to   do   outside   research,â&#x20AC;?   Brown   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   leaves   them  depleted  by  the  end  of  the  semester  and  this   ultimately  has  a  negative  effect  on  both  faculty  and   students.â&#x20AC;? The  resolution  asks  that  the  University  lower   the  course  load  to  four  courses  per  semester,  which   is  what  other  SUNY  schools  such  as  Cortland  of-­ fer.   President   Christian   said   in   his   October   re-­ port  to  faculty  members  that  while  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;nominalâ&#x20AC;?   course  load  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;equivalent  to  15  credits  per  semes-­ ter,â&#x20AC;?  most  lecturers  do  less  than  that. However,   that   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   stop   the   overall   cli-­ mate   and   morale   of   the   faculty   from   being   â&#x20AC;&#x153;ex-­ tremely  low,â&#x20AC;?  Brown  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   worked   here   for   a   long   time   and   this   is  the  lowest  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  ever  seen  morale,â&#x20AC;?  Brown  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  real  climate  of  fear  here  where  people   are  afraid  of  losing  their  jobs  or  being  passed  over   for  promotions  or  not  getting  a  line  in  their  bud-­ gets.  People  are  looking  elsewhere  for  jobs.  I  know   we  need  to  look  into  hiring  new  faculty,  but  we  also   need  to  focus  on  keeping  the  ones  we  have.â&#x20AC;?

Road  Expansion  Hopes  to  Generate  Commerce By  Katherine  Speller Managing  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.

Ground  will  be  broken  in  fall  of  2014  on  a   $2.4  million  construction  project  along  South  Putt   Corners  Road  to  Main  Street  that  could  ultimately   facilitate  business  expansion  in  the  area,  Deputy   Mayor  Rebecca  Rotzler  said.   Rotzler   said   the   project,   mainly   funded   through   New   York   State   Department   of   Trans-­ SRUWDWLRQÂśV 7UDIÂżF ,PSURYHPHQW 3URJUDP 7,3  with   about   $120,000   covered   by   Ulster   County,   includes   the   creation   of   six-­foot-­wide   shoulders   and  turning  lanes  on  Route  32  and  into  New  Paltz   High  School.   Rotzler  said  the  improvements  will  provide   opportunities  to  expand  the  areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  outdoor  recre-­ ational  facilities,  as  the  increase  in  shoulders  and   bike  lanes  improves  the  safety  of  the  area.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   project   has   been   under   discussion   for  

a  good  number  of  years  in  recognition  of  the  fact   that  having  our  high  school  accessible  by  a  long   road   without   shoulders   presents   a   great   danger   to  students  who  walk  or  bike  to  school,â&#x20AC;?  Rotzler   said.     In   addition   to   those   safety   factors,   Rotzler   said  the  project  will  improve  the  maneuvering  of   safety  vehicles  as  the  police  department  is  located   in  the  area.   Former   School   Board   President   Don   Kerr   is  the  leader  of  a  group  of  citizens  â&#x20AC;&#x153;from  diverse   backgroundsâ&#x20AC;?   looking   to   put   in   place   the   infra-­ structure  that  would  bring  business  expansion  to   the   area.   The   group   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   made   up   of   republican,   democrat,  green  and  independent  party  members    â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  hopes  the  growth  will  alleviate  the  pressure  on   New  Paltz  tax-­payers,  Kerr  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   republicans,   democrats,   greens   and   independents  come  together,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  rare,â&#x20AC;?  Kerr  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  just  want  to  make  damn  sure  the  task  comes  

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

to  fruition.â&#x20AC;? Kerr   said   the   ideal   businesses   would   be   â&#x20AC;&#x153;mid-­sizedâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;in   line   with   the   communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   standardsâ&#x20AC;?  and  that  the  larger  scale  corporations,   similar   to   Walmart,   would   not   make   it   past   the   planning  board.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   bigger   businesses   in   New   Paltz   and   never   will.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   mostly   small   mom-­ and-­pop  shops,â&#x20AC;?  Kerr  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  since  16  percent   of  people  are  paying  100  percent  of  the  taxes,  we   need  this  expansion  to  bring  in  the  tax  dollars.â&#x20AC;? Kerr  said  the  expansion  could  include  busi-­ nesses  like  a  drive-­in  movie  theater  or  a  perform-­ ing  arts  center  to  stimulate  the  commerce  in  the   area  and  bring  in  additional  tax  money.     Âł,WÂśVRQHSUDFWLFDOWKLQJZH>DVDFRPPXQLW\@ can   agree   on,â&#x20AC;?   Kerr   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   need   a   source   of   tax  revenue  to  ensure  I  can  live  in  my  house  and   my  neighbor  can  live  in  his  house  well  into  our   old  age.â&#x20AC;?


NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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Good  Neighbor  Addresses  Community  Safety

 5

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

TOBACCO   PURCHASING   AGE   FROM  18  TO  21 Smokers   younger   than   21   in   the   na-­ tion’s  biggest  city  will  soon  be  barred   from   buying   cigarettes   after   the   New   York   City   Council   voted   overwhelm-­ ing   Wednesday   to   raise   the   tobacco-­ purchasing  age  to  higher  than  all  but  a   few  other  places  in  the  United  States. MISTRESS  TESTIFIED Another  mistress  of  a  former  Utah  doc-­ WRUDFFXVHGRINLOOLQJKLVZLIHWHVWL¿HG Wednesday  that  he  had  once  described   how   he   could   induce   a   heart   attack   in   someone  that  would  appear  natural. BRACELET   CASE   COULD   BE   SETTLED  IN  SUPREME  COURT

The  Good  Neighbor  Initiative  promotes  a  partnership  between  the  college  and  community.

By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After   the   Oct.   5   sexual   assault   on   Plattekill  Avenue,  SUNY  New  Paltz,  the   University   Police   Department,   the   New   Paltz   Police   Department   and   both   the   Town  and  Village  of  New  Paltz  are  col-­ laborating   on   a   “Good   Neighbor   Initia-­ tive.” The   Good   Neighbor   Initiative   aims   to   address   the   issues   of     noise,   lighting   on   Plattekill  Avenue   and   other   residen-­ tial   streets   and   security.   It   promotes   an   ongoing  partnership  between  the  college   and  community,  a  press  release  from  the   school  said.   So  far,  both  UPD  and  the  New  Paltz   Police   have   increased   patrols   around   Plattekill   Avenue   during   the   evening   hours   in   order   to   increase   the   area’s   VDIHW\6LQFHWKHWLPHRIWKH¿UVWDVVDXOW nearly  a  month  ago,  there  have  been  no   reported  incidents  in  the  area.   At   a   “town   and   gown”   meeting   af-­ ter  the  Plattekill  assault,  community  and   University   leaders   addressed   the   issue   of     additional   lighting   on   Plattekill,   as   a   means   of   increasing   security   in   that   area.  At   a   recent   debate,   town   supervi-­ sor  candidate  Randall  Leverette  said  he   believes  both  the  university  and  the  local   community   could   share   the   cost   of   ad-­ ditional  lighting.   “I  would  like  [...]  to  cost-­share  some  

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

of   these   things,”   Leverette   said.   “The   students  here  are  a  responsibility  of  the   college   and   are   partly   residents   of   the   town,  so  I  think  these  are  things  we  can   share.” Town   Supervisor   Susan   Zimet   dis-­ greed,   however,   and   said   that   “govern-­ ments   have   to   take   responsibility   for   themselves.” “I   can’t   speak   for   the   lights   in   the   village,   but   the   lights   in   the   town   are   $22,000  a  year.  That  isn’t  a  lot  of  mon-­ ey,”   Zimet   said.   “The   reality   is,   there’s   a  part  of  the  road  that  is  Platekill,  that’s   in   the   village   and   that   is   the   village’s   responsibility.   It’s   their   obligation,   and   they   should   pay   for   it.   There’s   part   of   the  road  that  is  the  college’s,  and  another   part  that  is  the  village’s.” SUNY   New   Paltz   President   Don-­ ald  Christian  said  the  majority  of  lights   along  Plattekill  Avenue  are  on  the  cam-­ pus  side  of  the  street. “If  you  walk  along  Plattekill  at  night,   I  think  there  are  nine  or  10  lights  on  the   campus   side.  Almost   none   or   a   few   on   the   far   side,   the   village   side,”   Christian   said.   “That   prompted   some   conversa-­ tions   that   our   folks   have   been   involved   in  about  what  the  village  could  do  to  in-­ crease  lighting  on  that  side  of  Plattekill   Avenue   that   would   create   a   safer   envi-­ ronment,   not   just   for   SUNY   New   Paltz   students  but  for  parents  and  families  and   kids   living   here   in   the   community   as  

well.” The  initiative  also  brought  up  the  is-­ sue  of  noise  in  the  town  and  village  dur-­ ing  the  nighttime  hours.  The  New  Paltz   Village   Board   has   tried   in   the   past   to   pass   a   noise   ordinance   to   minimize   the   amount   of   noise   during   those   hours   in   the  past.  The  most  recent  attempt  to  pass   a  noise  ordinance  was  in  2011. &KULVWLDQ VDLG WKLV LV QRW WKH ¿UVW WLPH ORFDO RI¿FLDOV KDYH DVNHG WKH FRO-­ lege   to   look   at   the   issue   of   noise   con-­ trol   among   students   during   the   evening   hours.   He   said   this   has   been   a   concern   from  the  community  for  the  past  “seven   or  eight  years.” “There  was  some  sense  in  the  com-­ munity  that  the  college  should  be  doing   something   to   control   the   noise   by   stu-­ dents  coming  to  and  from  campus  after   the  bars  close  or  leaving  the  taverns  and   going  to  off-­campus  apartments,”  Chris-­ tian   said.   “But   the   village   couldn’t,   or   hadn’t,   approved   a   noise   ordinance   —   and  still  hasn’t.  So,  you  know,  we  were   sort   of   being   asked   to   do   something   there  that  the  village  wasn’t  even  willing   to  help,  or  hadn’t  been  able  to,  create  the   infrastructure  for  us  to  do  in  the  form  of   a  noise  ordinance.” As  of  right  now,  UPD,  the  town  and   village,  the  New  Paltz  Police  and  SUNY   New  Paltz  are  still  looking  at  options  to   include   enforcable   noise   control   issues   in  the  village  and  town.

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

The   court   battle   between   two   girls   and   their   Pennsylvania   school   over   “I   (heart)   Boobies!”   bracelets   could   be   settled   by   the   U.S.   Supreme   Court.   The  Easton  Area  School  District  board   voted   7-­1   Tuesday   night   to   appeal   a   federal  appeals  court’s  decision  that  re-­ jected  its  claim  the  bracelets  are  lewd   and  should  be  banned  from  school. SANDY  HOOK A  husband  and  a  mother  of  two  victims   of  the  Sandy  Hook  Elementary  School   massacre  told  a  Connecticut  task  force   Wednesday   they   don’t   want   the   911   tapes  released,  saying  no  one  needs  to   hear  the  sounds  from  that  day.   PUBLIC  LECTURES Brown  University  may  have  to  consider   changing  its  policies  on  public  lectures   after   New   York   City   Police   Commis-­ sioner  Ray  Kelly  was  shouted  down  by   community  members  and  students  as  he   tried  to  give  a  speech  about  his  depart-­ ment’s  stop-­and-­frisk  policy,  a  spokes-­ woman  for  the  Ivy  League  school  said   Wednesday. REPORTS  

OF   SEX   INCREASE

ASSAULT  

His  voice  thick  with  emotion,  Vice   President  Joe  Biden  on  Wednesday   again  toured  the  National  Domestic   Violence  Hotline  he  helped  create,   calling  victims  of  such  abuse  “prison-­ ers  in  plain  sight.” Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


6 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Candidates  Collide  At  Coykendall

There  will  be  three  gender-­neutral  suites  in  Bevier  Hall  next  semester.

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

By  Andrew  Lief   Sports  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   New   Paltz   Oracle   hosted   a   debate   between   Susan   Zimet   and   Randall   Leverette,   the   candidates   running  for  New  Paltz  town  supervisor.     The  debate,  held  on  Tuesday,  Oct.  29,  took  place   in  the  Coykendall  Science  Building  auditorium.  New   Paltz  residents,  as  well  as  SUNY  New  Paltz  students   ,attended  the  debate. Park  Point,  town  and  campus  police  cooperation,   lighting  on  Platekill  Avenue,  the  Good  Neighbor  Ini-­ tiative,   the   town   budget,   consolidation   and   fracking   were  all  discussed.     During   his   opening   remarks,   Leverette   said   he   would   like   to   improve   the   process   of   town   govern-­ ment  and  operate  with  more  transparency.  Zimet  said   that   she   will   use   her   power   in   government   for   the   “betterment  of  our  community.”     7KH ¿UVW LVVXH DGGUHVVHG ZDV 3DUN 3RLQW %RWK candidates  said  they  are  supportive  of  what’s  best  for   the  college,  but  feel  the  school  needs  to  pay  the  tax  so   the  burden  is  not  shifted  to  homeowners.    

In   regards   to   policing   the   Park   Point   area,   Lev-­ erette  and  Zimet  both  believed  that  responsibility  be-­ longs  to  university  police. On  the  issue  of  the  town’s  budget,  Leverette  said   ÀDZVVWHPIURPWKHFRPSWUROOHU¶VUHSRUWRIWKHEXG-­ get  allocations.     “The   town   needs   to   itemize   and   clarify   exactly   how  it  takes  in  and  spends  its  money,”  he  said. Zimet  argued  the  comptroller’s  report  was  based   on  the  previous  supervisor’s  budget  and  that  she  has   fought   to   get   the   town’s   budget   back   in   place.   She   also  said  she  would  rather  have  a  budget  that  decre-­ aed  taxes  by  4.4  percent  rather  than  Ulster  County’s   budget  that  increases  taxes  by  9  percent.     On  the  topic  of  Plattekill  lighting,  both  candidates   said   more   lights   should   be   present   on   Plattekill  Av-­ enue   to   make   the   town   safer   for   those   who   walk   in   that  area  at  night.     “One   attempted   rape   is   one   attempted   rape   too   many,”  Zimet  said.     With  the  Good  Neighbor  Initiative  —  a  joint  ac-­ tion  between  Police,  Town,  Village  and  University  of-­ ¿FLDOVZKLFKDLPVWRNHHSQRLVHFRQWURODQGSURPRWH

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

an    overal  safer  area  around  Plattekill  Avenue  —  Lev-­ erette  said  people  in  the  community  should  be  good   and    respect  neighbors.  Zimet  said  she’s  heard  the  de-­ crease  in  noise  from  students  has  been  “astoundingly   better”  this  year.     On  Town  and  Village  consolidation,  both  candi-­ dates  said  the  people  of  New  Paltz  will  have  to  make   a  decision  on  what  they  want  for  their  community.     Leverette   said   he   supports   the   ban   on   fracking,   but  he  believes  it  is  a  national  issue.  Zimet  said  dur-­ ing  her  tenure  as  town  supervisor,  fracking  has  been   banned  in  the  New  Paltz  and  she  is  working  to  have  it   banned  in  the  state  of  New  York.     In   her   closing   remarks,   Zimet   said   she   wants   to   make   New   Paltz   a   “bike   friendly”   place,   for   New   Paltz   to   have   its   own   water   system   and   for   taxes   to   be  lowered. “Keeping   the   taxes   down   has   always   been   my   main  focus  and  I’ve  delivered  every  year,”  Zimet  said. Leverette   said   his   focal   points   are   process   over   politics,   transparency   and   a   collaborative   govern-­ ment. The  election  will  take  place  on  Tuesday,  Nov.  5.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

   7

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School  Of  Education  Honors  Area  Teachers By  Jennifer  Newman Copy  Editor  |  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  SUNY  New  Paltz  School  of  Edu-­ cation   recognized   seven   teachers   around   the   area   for   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Award   for   Excellence  in  Teaching.   This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   recipients   are   Kimberly   Dunkin   of   Furnace   Woods   Elementary,   David   Brown   of   Horizons-­on-­the-­Hudson   Magnet   School,   Kim   Di   Curcio   of   Pine   Tree   Elementary   School,   Jaime   Ferrari   of   Furnace   Woods   Elementary   School,   Craig   Fryer   of   Millbrook   Middle   School   and   High   School,   Genevieve   Privitera   of   Pakanasink   Elementary   School   and   Robin   Scott  of  Berea  Elementary  School. Criteria  for  this  award  required  teach-­ HUV WR KDYH PDGH D VLJQLÂżFDQW LPSDFW RQ studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   lives,   on   their   learning   outcomes   and  growth  and  to  the  school  environment.   Teachers   who   receive   this   annual   award   are   recommended   by   area   school   administrators  and  selected  by  a  committee   of  education  faculty  and  professionals,  ac-­ cording  to  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  website.   The   Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Award   for   Excellence   in   Teaching   honors   excellence,   innovation,   service,   professionalism,   commitment   and   enthusiasm.   It   acknowledges   the   integral  

role   that   teachers   play   in   communities   where   they   foster   the   ideals   of   learning,   inquiry   and   the   primacy   of   education   as   a   foundation  for  intellectual,  social  and  eco-­ nomic   well-­being,   according   to   a   SUNY   New  Paltz  press  release. Scott,   a   teacher   at   Berea   Elementary   for   16   years,   questioned   the   award   when   VKH ÂżUVW KHDUG WKH QHZV WKDW VKH ZDV FKR-­ sen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To   be   very   honest   with   you,   when   I   received  a  letter  from  New  Paltz  stating  that   I   won   the   award,   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   what   the   award  was  or  what  it  was  for,â&#x20AC;?  Scott  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  almost  thought  it  was  a  joke.  I  looked  it   up  on  the  internet  and  to  my  surprise,  it  was   legitimate.â&#x20AC;? Scott  said  after  the  initial  discovery  of   the  award,  she  was  excited  that  it  was  initi-­ ated  by  her  administration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  you  think  about  how  busy  our   administrators   are,   there   is   hardly   time   to   write   glowing   letters,   never   mind   notice   the   extra   work   teachers   are   doing   to   help   children,â&#x20AC;?  Scott  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  truly  appreciate  the   kind  and  thoughtful  words  and  letters.  I  am   honored   to   be   in   a   category   with   such   ex-­ ceptional  educators.â&#x20AC;? Ferrari,  a  teacher  for  11  years,  also  felt   honored  to  have  been  given  the  award.  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  every  day  that  you  recieve  an   award  for  teaching,â&#x20AC;?  Ferrari  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being  a   recipient   of   this   award   means   a   lot.   It   re-­ minds   me   that   I   can   affect   change   and   be   DSRVLWLYHLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRQP\VWXGHQWVÂśOLYHV´ Ferrari   said   she   was   grateful   for   the   award   and   that   it   was   refreshing   to   know   that   her   efforts   did   not   go   unnoticed.   She   cited   the   other   teachers   she   works   with   as   her  support  system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   am   lucky   to   work   with   many   tal-­ ented   and   amazing   teachers,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   like  to  think  we  learn  from  each  other  as  we   support  each  other  and  try  to  do  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  best   for  our  students.  At  the  end  of  the  day,  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   what  truly  matters.â&#x20AC;? Privitera,  a  teacher  for  17  years,  is  cur-­ rently  in  her  seventh  year  of  teaching  sec-­ ond  grade,  and  said  she  was  just  as  honored   and   humbled   to   receive   the   award   as   any   teacher  would  be. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  are  so  many  wonderful  teachers   in  our  district,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each  one  is  dedi-­ cated,  inspiring  and  very  good  at  teaching.     We   all   have   our   own   unique   style   when   working  with  the  children  in  our  classes.  To   be  singled  out  is  [...]  quite  amazing.â&#x20AC;? Her   co-­worker,   music   teacher   Paula   Orcutt   recognizes   the   work   Privitera   puts   into  her  classroom.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gen  is  highly  respected  by  colleagues,   parents   and   students   and   it   is   a   privilege   to   teach   with   her,â&#x20AC;?   Orcutt   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   goes   above  and  beyond  what  is  expected  of  her   to   make   sure   she   reaches   every   child   and   LGHQWLÂżHVWKHLUOHDUQLQJVW\OHV&KLOGUHQDUH happy  in  her  classroom  and  know  that  Mrs.   Privitera   is   a   person   who   understands   and   cares  for  them.â&#x20AC;?   The   School   of   Education   at   SUNY   New   Paltz   honors   exceptional   teachers   throughout  the  Mid-­Hudson  Valley  as  part   of  its  objective  to  recognize  and  foster  ex-­ cellence,   not   only   among   its   own   alumni,   but  among  the  broader  community  of  teach-­ ers  in  the  Mid-­Hudson  Valley,  according  to   the  website. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  the  award  itself  is  a  great  way   WRUHFRJQL]HVRPHRIWKHWHUULÂżFHGXFDWRUV we  have  right  here  in  our  own  community,â&#x20AC;?   Privitera  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  so  wonderful  to  hear   the   accomplishments   of   each   of   the   other   recipients.â&#x20AC;?     Privitera   said   she   did   not   expect   an   award   for   her   work,   and   that   she   does   her   best,  not  for  herself,  but  for  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;little  guysâ&#x20AC;?   that  she  is  responsible  for  everyday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  truly  did  not  expect  an  award,  that  is   for  sureâ&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  do  what  I  do  because  I   absolutely  love  it.â&#x20AC;?

Senate  Discusses  Drug  Policy,  Black  Solidarity  And  Renovations By  Anthony  DeRosa Copy  Editor  |  N002385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   56th   student   senate   met   Wednesday,   Oct.  30  at  7:30  p.m.  in  Student  Union  (SU)  418.   Student  Association  (SA)  President  Man-­ uel  Tejada  opened  the  meeting  announcing  that   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Talk   About...â&#x20AC;?   Symposium   will   be   held  on  Nov.  16  in  the  SU  Building  Multipur-­ pose  Room.   Executive   Vice   President   of   SA   Zachary   Rousseas  said  that  he  had  previously  misinter-­ preted  SUNYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  non-­discrimination  policy  stat-­ ing   that   it   did   in   fact   protect   gender   identity,   however   not   all   SUNY   schools   adhere   to   the   policy.  Rousseas  said  that  the  efforts  made  by   the  senate  to  change  the  policy  when  they  pre-­ viously  believed  it  to  not  protect  gender  iden-­ tity  will  not  go  to  waste,  as  he  plans  to  rework   their  legislation  to  propose  mandatory  adoption   of  the  SUNY  non-­discrimination  policy  by  all   SUNY  schools  at  the  SUNY  Student  Assembly   on  Nov.  8.   Rousseas   also   said   that   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Know   Your   Rightsâ&#x20AC;?  event  will  take  place  on  Nov.  12  at  7  

p.m.  in  Lecture  Center  104.  The  event  will  be   attended  by  students  from  the  University  Police   Commission   as   well   as   special   guest   speaker   $QG\.RVVRYHURI.RVVRYHU/DZ2IÂżFHVZKR will  be  hosting  a  workshop  during  the  event.     Vice   President   of   Academic   Affairs   and   Governance   Jordan   Taylor   said   the   students   of  color  sit-­in  at  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  faculty   meeting  went  well,  with  students  voicing  their   concerns   to   faculty   over   racist   remarks   made   on   campus   and   professors   assigning   work   on   Black  Solidarity  Day  that,  according  to  Taylor,   is  not  allowed  because  it  is  on  the  campus  cal-­ endar.   The  SUNY  New  Paltz  website  states  that   any  student  who  informs  their  professor  about   their  participation  in  Black  Solidarity  Day  is  to   be  allowed  exceptions  from  school  work  to  be   made  up  at  a  later  date.  Black  Solidarity  Day  is   Monday,  Nov.  4.   Sojourner  Truth  Library  Dean  Mark  Colv-­ son   spoke   to   senate   about   the   library   renova-­ tion   and   the   substitute   space   provided   in   the   absence   of   the   libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   late   night   study   area.  

Colvson   said   that   the   College  Terrace   has   for   the  last  two  weeks  served  as  the  substitute  for   late   night   study   but   student   turnout   has   been   dismal.   Colvson   said   he   has   considered   closing   WKH VSDFH EXW VDLG LW ZLOO UHRSHQ IRU ÂżQDOÂśV week.  Colvson  said  he  was  open  to  suggestions   on   how   to   improve   the   late   night   study   situa-­ tion  and  asked  senate  to  discuss  the  issue.   Colvson  also  said  that  the  contract  bid  to   continue   the   libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   renovation   is   scheduled   to  go  out  early  this  winter  and  estimated  con-­ struction  to  start  again  in  spring  2014.       Senator   Kelly   Brennan   gave   a   presenta-­ tion   on   changing   the   campus   drug   policy   re-­ garding  marijuana.   %UHQQDQ LGHQWLÂżHG VRPH RI WKH SUREOHPV she  believed  the  current  policy  had,  including   the   collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   two-­strike   policy   for   marijuana   offenses   and   the   possession   of   .01   grams   of   PDULMXDQDEHLQJFODVVLÂżHGDVDQRIIHQVHZKHQ New  York  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  decriminalization  of  marijua-­ QDFODVVLÂżHVSRVVHVVLRQRIXQGHUJUDPVDVD ÂżQDEOHRIIHQVHRQO\%UHQQDQDOVRGUHZDWWHQ-­

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

tion  to  the  fact  that  the  vast  majority  of  arrests   and   police   reports   made   by   University   Police   Department   are   marijuana   related.   Brennan   listed  possible  suggestions  on  how  student  sen-­ ate  could  approach  changing  the  policy,  such  as   SA  President  Tejadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  campus  drug  survey,  cre-­ ating  a  petition  and  reaching  out  to  drug  policy   activists.   Senator   Paulina   Lustgarten   proposed   a   senate   sponsored   â&#x20AC;&#x153;green   ribbonâ&#x20AC;?   campaign   in   favor  of  better  drug  policy,  an  idea  countering   â&#x20AC;&#x153;red  ribbonâ&#x20AC;?  campaigns  that  promote  drug  ab-­ stinence.  SA  Vice  President  Rousseas  said  that   it  was  too  early  to  draft  legislation  for  this  kind   of  campaign  until  senateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drug  policy  survey   was   released.   Rousseas   said   that   the   surveyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   numbers   would   provide   for   stronger   legisla-­ tion  down  the  line.  SA  Advisor  Mike  Patterson   agreed,  and  said  that  supporting  this  campaign   before   the   senate   sponsored   drug   survey   was   complete   would   send   mixed   messages   to   stu-­ dents  and  administration.   The   senate   will   meet   next   Wednesday,   Nov.  7.


NEWS

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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Racial  Sign  Incident  Prompts  Education  Campaign By  Anthony  DeRosa Copy  Editor  |  N02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Black  Studies  professor  Karanja  Carroll  and  sociology   Professor  Alexandra   Cox   organized   a   public   screening   of   the  PBS  documentary,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Murder  of  Emmett  Tillâ&#x20AC;?  in  re-­ sponse  to  the  sign  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emmett  Till  deserved  to  dieâ&#x20AC;?  posted  in   Dubois  Hall  last  week.   The  documentary,  which  screened  on  Wednesday,  Oct.   30  in  Lecture  Center  100,  uncovers  the  life  of  Emmett  Till,   his  murder,  the  circumstances  surrounding  his  murder,  the   aftermath  of  his  death  and  its  effects.     $FFRUGLQJWR&DUUROOWKHLGHDWRVKRZWKHÂżOPVWHPPHG in  part  from  a  statement  SUNY  New  Paltz  President  Donald   Christian   made   in   his   email   to   the   campus   regarding   the   sign.   Christian  wrote  that  in  talking  with  students  about  the   incident,  many  did  not  know  who  Emmett  Till  was.   &DUUROOVDLGWKDWE\VKRZLQJWKHÂżOPDXGLHQFHVZRXOG hopefully  be  educated  as  to  who  Emmett  Till  was,  his  role   in  the  Civil  Rights  Movement  and  the  larger  Black  Freedom   Movement  as  well  as  why  the  posting  in  Dubois  is  of  sig-­ QLÂżFDQFHWRVWXGHQWV â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  that  a  lot  of  my  students  still  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  completely   get   why   this   matters   or   why   students   are   upset   about   the   VLJQ´&R[VDLGÂł>6FUHHQLQJWKLVÂżOP@ZLOOSXWLQWRFRQWH[W why  the  sign  felt  so  scary  for  a  lot  of  students.â&#x20AC;? Cox  said  the  most  poignant  reactions  to  the  sign  have   come  from  students  who  expressed  fear  and  anger  over  the   incident  only  to  receive  a  response  from  some  faculty  and  

administrators  that  the  incident  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;not  a  big  deal.â&#x20AC;?           â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  what  is  most  frustrating  to  me,  that   in  the  face  of  what  they  experience  as  outrage  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  get-­ ting   indifference,â&#x20AC;?   Cox   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   number   of   students   feel   like   there   has   been   a   sense   [from   administration   and   fac-­ XOW\@ WKDW WKH\ DUH UXIĂ&#x20AC;LQJ WRR PDQ\ IHDWKHUV E\ EULQJLQJ attention  to  the  issue,  that  raising  the  issue  only  causes  more   problems.â&#x20AC;?     Carroll   said   while   discussing   the   incident   in   class,   a   number   of   students   of   color   expressed   concern   over   their   safety   on   campus   given   the   racist   remarks   that   have   ap-­ peared  in  New  Paltz  in  the  past  few  years.           Âł7KLV KDSSHQHG LQ D GRUPLWRU\ >UHVLGHQFH KDOO@ ,WÂśV supposed  to  be  your  home  away  from  home  and  represent   some  level  of  security  and  comfort,â&#x20AC;?  Carroll  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yet  you   walk  out  of  your  suite  and  this  sign  is  what  you  see  across   the  hall?  There  is  clearly  an  issue  of  safety  that  has  come   upon  the  students.â&#x20AC;?   Cox  said  that  some  students  have  even  expressed  doubt   over  staying  in  New  Paltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  those  individuals  feel  like  they  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  be   part  of  this  community  anymore,  when  they  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  feel  safe   LQKDELWLQJWKRVHUROHV>DVFDPSXVOHDGHUV@WKHQ1HZ3DOW] isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  New  Paltz.  I  think  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  part  of  the  problem  when  not   proactively  addressing  this  issue.â&#x20AC;?   Carroll  said  that  student  organizations  should  lead  the   discussion   on   the   racial   signage   issue   because   it   effects   them   the   most,   but   said   that   Cox   and   himself   planned   to   organize  a  faculty  response  in  the  coming  weeks.    

REACH THE MASSES ALL AT ONCE AND ADVERTISE

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN Professors  spoke  before  the  screening  of  the  documentary  on  Emmett  Till.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully   within   the   next   week   or   two,   I   can   pull   some  faculty  together  and  we  can  start  having  some  discus-­ sions  about  how  to  have  these  things  not  happen  on  campus   and  infuse  this  particular  type  of  thinking  in  our  teaching,â&#x20AC;?   Carroll  said.    

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Documentarian Discusses Climate Change

JOSH FOX DELIBERATES ON HYDROFRACKING’S HARFMFUL EFFECTS Homes  lifted  off  their  foundations  as  the  remnants  of  hu-­ PDQOLYHVÀRDWHGWKURXJKWKHVWUHHWVDQGDSDUNLQJORW¿OOHG ZLWKSLOHVDQGSLOHVRIZKDWZDVRQFHDFRPPXQLW\²WKLVLV the  scene  “Gasland”  director  Josh  Fox  recalled  of  Hurricane   6DQG\¶VGHYDVWDWLQJGHVFHQWLQWR1HZ<RUN+DUERURQ2FW  )R[ DGGUHVVHG QHDUO\  SHRSOH LQ  WKH 681< 1HZ Paltz   Lecture   Center   (LC)   100   on   the   storm’s   one-­year   an-­ QLYHUVDU\7XHVGD\QLJKW7KHFURZGHGURRPLQFOXGHGMXVWDV PDQ\VWXGHQWVDVLWGLGUHVLGHQWVIURP1HZ3DOW]DQGWKHVXU-­ URXQGLQJDUHD ,Q6DQG\¶VZDNH*RY$QGUHZ&XRPRSRLQWHGWRFOLPDWH FKDQJHDVFRQWULEXWLQJWRWKHVXSHUVWRUP¶VLQWHQVLW\³%XW, WKLQNSDUWRIOHDUQLQJIURPWKLVLVWKHUHFRJQLWLRQWKDWFOLPDWH FKDQJHLVDUHDOLW\H[WUHPHZHDWKHULVDUHDOLW\LWLVDUHDOLW\ WKDWZHDUHYXOQHUDEOH´VDLG&XRPRMXVWGD\VDIWHUWKHVWRUP %XW IRU )R[ D EDQMRZLHOGLQJ GRFXPHQWDU\ ¿OPPDNHU IURPWKHXSSHU'HODZDUH5LYHUEDVLQLQ3HQQV\OYDQLD&XR-­ PR³EUHDNLQJWKHFOLPDWHVLOHQFH´LVQ¶WHQRXJK ³:HFDQ¶WWDONDERXWFOLPDWHFKDQJHDQGDOVRDOORZ>K\-­ GUDXOLFIUDFWXULQJ@WRJRRQ´VDLG)R[³7KDW¶VVKDPHIXOFRQ-­ WUDGLFWRU\VSHHFK´ 3ODFHFDUGVUHDGLQJ³7KDQN\RXIRUNHHSLQJ1HZ<RUN )UDFN )UHH´ OLQHG WKH ZDOOV RI WKH /HFWXUH &HQWHU URRP D FRPPRQPHVVDJHDWDQWLK\GURIUDFNLQJUDOOLHVDLPHGDW&XR-­ PRVHUYLQJDVDUHPLQGHURI1HZ<RUN¶V¿YH\HDUORQJPRUD-­ WRULXPRQWKHFRQWURYHUVLDOQDWXUDOJDVH[WUDFWLRQPHWKRG ³1DWXUDOJDVLVSUHVHQWHGDVWKHVROXWLRQ,W¶VSUHVHQWHG DVWKHPHWKDGRQHWUHDWPHQWIRURXUKHURLQOLNHDGGLFWLRQWR FRDODQGRLO±EXWLW¶VMXVWDQRWKHUGUXJ´6RFLRORJ\'HSDUW-­ PHQW&KDLU%ULDQ2EDFKVDLG³,WGRHVQRWKLQJWRFXUHXVRI RXUDGGLFWLRQ´ 2EDFKVDLGWKDWKDYLQJIDFWVRUVFLHQFHWKDWVKRZVK\-­ GURIUDFNLQJLVKDUPIXOWRWKHHQYLURQPHQWDQGKXPDQKHDOWK LVQ¶WHQRXJK ³%HKLQGWKRVHIDFWVZHQHHGPRELOL]HGFLWL]HQVDQGWKDW LVQ¶WHDV\WRDFKLHYH±WKDW¶VZKHUH-RVK)R[FRPHVLQ´ ,QDJDVFRPSDQ\EHJDQOHDVLQJODQGDURXQG)R[¶V KRPH WKH VLWH RI WKH 0DUFHOOXV 6KDOH ± WKH FRXQWU\¶V ODUJ-­ HVW XQGHUJURXQG GHSRVLW RI QDWXUDO JDV ,W  UXQV IURP :HVW 9LUJLQLDWKURXJK2KLRDQG3HQQV\OYDQLDWR1HZ<RUN7ZR \HDUVODWHUKHUHOHDVHG³*DVODQG´ )R[ KDV VSHQW PXFK RI WKH ODVW WKUHH \HDUV SURPRWLQJ KLV¿OPVDQGGRFXPHQWLQJWKHDQWLK\GURIUDFNLQJPRYHPHQW DFURVV WKH FRXQWU\ ,PDJHV LQ ³*DVODQG´ VXFK DV PHWKDQH WDLQWHGNLWFKHQIDXFHWVVSHZLQJÀDPLQJZDWHUDUHQRZXELT-­ XLWRXV,Q$SULOKHUHOHDVHG³*DVODQG,,´ 7KHUHZDVQRFRQVHQVXVRQK\GURIUDFNLQJDPRQJ1HZ <RUNHUVDVODWHDV$FFRUGLQJWRWKH6LHQD&ROOHJHVXU-­

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Thursday,  October  31,  2013

3+272%<'$1$6&+0(5=/(5

By  Roberto  LoBianco &RS\(GLWRU_rlobianco83@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

KDQGVORQJHQRXJKWRJHWWRWKH:KLWH+RXVH´5DSKDHOVRQ VDLG +RZHYHU)R[DVNHGWKHDXGLHQFHWRORRNEH\RQGLPSOH-­ PHQWLQJDEDQDQGWRZDUGVGHYHORSLQJFRPPXQLW\GULYHQVR-­ OXWLRQVWRWKHHQHUJ\FULVLV ³:HQHHGWRGHYHORSUHQHZDEOHHQHUJLHVLQDZD\WKDW¶V URRWHG LQ WKH VRPHWLPHV PHVV\ SURFHVV RI FLWL]HQ HQJDJH-­ PHQWDGHPRFUDWLFSURFHVV´)R[VDLG $FFRUGLQJWR)R[2FFXS\6DQG\DUHOLHIQHWZRUNPDGH XSRI2FFXS\:DOO6WUHHWSURWHVWHUVZKLFKZRUNHGZLWKORZ income   communities   affected   by   the   storm,   is   a   model   for   VXFKDSURFHVV 7KHJURXSHVWLPDWHVLWSURYLGHGPHDOVUHPHGL-­ ated   over   1000   homes   and   over   a   million   dollars’   worth   of   GRQDWHGVXSSOLHV7RGD\VRPHVXUYLYRUVDUHVWLOOZLWKRXW KRPHVDFFRUGLQJWRWKHDaily  News ,QWKHVSULQJ)R[VDLGKH¶OOEHWRXULQJDJDLQWKLVWLPH ZLWKRXWDQHZ¿OP7KHIRFXVWKHQZLOOEHKRVWLQJZRUNVKRSV WROLQNFRPPXQLWLHVZLWKUHVRXUFHVWREXLOGWKHLURZQUHQHZ-­ DEOHHQHUJ\LQIUDVWUXFWXUH ³,¶GOLNHWRFRPHEDFNDQGGRRQHKHUH´VDLG)R[ *Additional  reporting  by  Assistant  Copy  Editor  Hannah   Nesich


  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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3B

Turning The Page On New Paltz NOVELISTS SET NEW BOOKS IN THE VILLAGE By  Jahna  Romano Contributing  Writer  |  Romanoj3@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Three  Hudson  Valley-­based  authors  came  together   with  Nina  Shengold,  the  book  editor  for  Chronogram,   for  a  roundtable  discussion  about  the  settings  of  their   novels.   Jennifer  Castle,  author  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  Look  Different  in   Real   Life,â&#x20AC;?   Owen   King,   author   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Double   Featureâ&#x20AC;?   and   Greg   Olear,   author   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fathermucker,â&#x20AC;?   each   set   their  novels  in  New  Paltz,  either  stating  that  the  village   was  the  setting  directly  or  thinly  veiling  it  to  be  a  small   town  in  the  Hudson  Valley.   Shengold  got  the  idea  for  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;New  Pfalseâ&#x20AC;?  theme,   playing  with  the  idea  that  some  of  the  authors  referred   to  New  Paltz  under  different  names,  when  Unison  Arts   Center  asked  her  to  do  the  roundtable  discussion.   During   the   discussion,   the   three   authors   talked   about  what  it  was  like  to  use  New  Paltz  as  their  storiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   backdrop,  as  well  as  what  the  town  means  to  them  per-­ sonally.  .According  to  Shengold,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;it  was  a  lively,  fun   discussion.â&#x20AC;? The   three   authors   each   have   children   and   know   each  other  socially,  according  to  Olear.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  fun  to  hang  out  with  them  in  a  literary  con-­ text  rather  than  one  that  involves  elementary  school,â&#x20AC;?   he  said.   The   authors   each   took   their   own   direction   when   writing  about  the  village.  Olear  wrote  about  New  Paltz   directly,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;expansively  and  explicitly,  just  as  Joyce  does   with   Ulysses.â&#x20AC;?   In   his   novel   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fathermucker,â&#x20AC;?   he   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;readers  familiar  with  New  Paltz  will  readily  and  eas-­ ily  identify  the  places  the  protagonist  goes.â&#x20AC;?   In  contrast,  Castle  wrote  about  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mountain  Ridge,â&#x20AC;?   DÂżFWLRQDOWRZQEDVHGXSRQ1HZ3DOW]6KHQJROGVDLG allowing   her   â&#x20AC;&#x153;to   be   a   bit   looser   with   geography   and   distances.â&#x20AC;?   King   used   the   same   method   as   Castle,   writing   about   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hasbrouck,   New   York,â&#x20AC;?   in   his   novel,   which   DOVRDOORZHGIRUORRVHUGHÂżQLWLRQVRIVSDFHDQGQDPHV

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  BLOGSPOT.COM

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  JENNIFER  CASTLE

Despite  the  slight  changes,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  a  thin  veil  â&#x20AC;&#x153;any-­ one   who   knows   New   Paltz   will   easily   recognize   the   state   college,   Huguenot   graveyard   and   other   tell-­tale   signs,â&#x20AC;?  Shengold  said.   6KHQJROG VDLG VKH KRSHV WR UHDG PRUH ÂżFWLRQ VHW locally,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;set  on  the  banks  of  the  Wallkillâ&#x20AC;?  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;in  the   shadow  of  the  Gunks.â&#x20AC;?

 Castle  said  she  is  working  on  another  Young  Adult   (YA)  novel  set  in  the  Hudson  Valley.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   place   that   feeds   our   souls   as   writers   and   general  humans  and  where  we  want  our  kids  to  grow   up,â&#x20AC;?  Castle  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  all  [the  authors]  agreed  that  the   way  we  looked  at  our  lives  unfolding  here  played  a  big   part  in  how  our  recent  books  came  together.â&#x20AC;?

Want  To  Write  For  The  Oracle? Come  to  our  story  meetings  on  Sundays  in  SU  403  at  7  p.m. Thursday,  October  31,  2013


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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Helping Others To Help Themselves

CAMPUS CLUB CREATES FORUM FOR STUDENTS WITH EATING DISORDERS

Third-­year  media  and  production  founded  R10ts  Not  Diets,  a  group  dedicated  to  battling  eating  disorders.

By  Ben  Kindlon Features  Editor  |  N02182316@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

In  the  United  States,  only  one  out  of   every   10   people   suffering   from   eating   disorders   seeks   help.   The   other   90   per-­ cent  remain  untreated.   The   name   of   SUNY   New   Paltz’s   three-­week  old  club,  “R10ts  Not  Diets,”   is  derived  from  this  statistic  Club  Presi-­ dent,   third-­year   media   production   and   management  major,  Carissa  Cancel  said.   Cancel   said   she   started   her   blog   “R10ts   Not   Diets,”   to   raise   awareness   and   offer   support   to   people   suffering   from  eating  disorders.  She  said  her  blog   started  as  a  class  assignment  and  in  time   transformed  into  a  group  recognized  by   the   New   Paltz   Student’s   Clubs   and  As-­ sociations. “I  had  a  couple  of  requests  to  make   a   club   and   a   bunch   of   followers,”   Can-­ cel  said.  “I  decided  it  was  a  good  idea  to  

make  the  club.” 7KH FOXE KHOG LW ¿UVW PHHWLQJ RQ Oct.  24  in  SUB  407.  Although  the  club’s   Facebook  group  has  over  200  likes,  not   nearly  that  many  showed. 'HVSLWH D WXUQRXW RI RQO\ ¿YH VWX-­ dents,  Cancel  said  she  wants  to  encour-­ age  more  to  come  and  use  the  club  as  a   support  group.   Cancel   said   she   feels   that   people   may  be  embarrassed  to  come  out  to  the   meetings   because   of   how   others   will   view   them.   She   said   she   will   continue   to  encourage  people  not  to  feel  ashamed   and  instead  to  attend  meetings  and  open-­ ly  confront  their  issues. “I   want   people   to   feel   comfortable   coming   to   the   meetings,”   Cancel   said.   “These   meetings   should   be   seen   as   a   place   for   me   to   come   for   support   in   an   open  atmosphere.” Director  of  the  Psychological  Coun-­ seling   Center   Dr.   Gweneth   Lloyd   said  

eating   disorders   are   a   “very   prevalent   issue   in   college   age   students,”   but   also   said   that   the   onset   can   start   during   the   teen  years  or  even  younger.   She   said   that   eating   disorders   can   develop   from   various   issues,   includ-­ ing   negative   relationships   with   parents,   peers  and  partners.  The  media  is  another   main  source  contributing  to  the  onset  of   eating   disorders   among   young   adults,   Lloyd  said. “People   are   given   a   lot   of   mixed   messages   from   the   media,”   she   said,   “both  male  and  female.” According   to   the   National   Eating   Disorders  Association  (NEDA)  website,   over  20  million    woman  and  10  million   men   in   the   United   States   suffer   from   a   ³FOLQLFDOO\VLJQL¿FDQWHDWLQJGLVRUGHU´DW some  point  in  their  life.     Lloyd   said   that   people   suffering   from   an   eating   disorder   are   at   greater   risk  to  other  health  problems,  including  

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

PHOTO  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER

negative   impacts   on   the   cardiovascular,   respiratory,  oral  and  digestive  systems.       “The   malnourishment   creates   a   whole   range   of   other   medical   problems   for  them.  Eating  disorders  are  similar  to   a  drug  or  alcohol  addiction,”  said  Lloyd.   “It’s   very   emotionally,   psychologically   and  physically  painful.” While  Lloyd  said  that  she  is  in  sup-­ port  of  raising  awareness  and  combating   eating  disorders,  she  said  it  is  important   that  students  suffering  from  eating  disor-­ ders  should  not  use  “R10ts  Not  Diets”  as   an  alternative  to  seeking  additional  pro-­ fessional  help.   The  Psychological  Counseling  Cen-­ ter   is   located   in   the   Student   Health   and   Counseling   Center   on   the   SUNY   New   Paltz  campus.    Lloyd  said  she  wants  to  encourage   anyone   who   is   seeking   help   for   them   self  or  someone  they  know  to  contact  the   center.    Their  number  is  845-­257-­2920.


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Ready, JET, Go

JAPANESE TEACHING PROGRAM SENDS STUDENTS ABROAD By  Hannah  Nesich Assistant  Copy  Editor  |  N02183569@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu SUNY  New  Paltz  students  interested  in  teaching  or  Japa-­ nese  culture  have  an  opportunity  to  combine  both  passions  in  a   unique  program  that  was  recently  presented  to  the  campus  in  an   information  session. On  Tuesday,  Oct.  29,  SUNY  New  Paltz  students  gathered   in  SUB  409  to  learn  of  opportunities  to  teach  English  overseas   through  the  Japan  Exchange  and  Teaching  Program,  or  JET.   The   JET   program,   founded   in   1987,   is   a   government-­ sponsored  program  that  brings  more  than  4,000  native-­English   speakers  to  teach  in  Japanese  public  schools,  according  to  the   RIÂżFLDO ZHEVLWH 1HDUO\ KDOI RI WKH SDUWLFLSDQWV KDLOLQJ IURP more  than  40  countries,  are  from  the  United  States. Former   linguistics   professor   and   JET   participant   Nathen   Clerici   facilitated   the   information   session,   which   attracted   25   students  and  featured  Japanese  Consulate  Representative  Nor-­ iko  Furuhata  as  a  speaker.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Noriko  showed  a  few  short  videos  about  the  program,  in-­ cluding  a  few  examples  of  what  life  and  work  is  like  for  partici-­ pants,â&#x20AC;?  Clerici  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then  she  talked  about  some  of  the  details   of  application,  remuneration  and  the  support  system  in  the  pro-­ gram.â&#x20AC;?   The   eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   other   speaker   was   a   New   Paltz   alumni     and   a   participant   of   the   JET   program   from   2009   to   2013,   Serena   Winchell.  She  discussed  her  experiences,  showed  pictures  and   answered  questions.   The   session,   which   lasted   about   70   minutes,   wrapped   up   with  a  question-­and-­answer  portion  for  both  speakers,  accord-­ ing  to  Clerici.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  few  people  stayed  around  afterward  to  carry  on  the  con-­ versation,â&#x20AC;?   Clerici   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   attendees   responded   by   asking   many  questions.  They  are  in  various  stages  of  their  applications   and  had  different  concerns.  Some  are  not  graduating  this  year,   and  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  here  to  see  if  JET  is  something  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like  to  pursue   in  the  future.â&#x20AC;?   One  thing  students  learned  at  the  meeting  was  that  though   a   college   degree   is   required   to   apply   for   the   JET   program,   it   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  to  be  in  teaching  or  the  Japanese  language.   Lisa  Petro,  who  participated  in  the  JET  program  from  2009   to  2010,  entered  the  JET  program  with  an  undergraduate  degree   in   art   education,   which   she   said   helped   keep   her   grounded   in   her  work.

Clerici   was   an   international   language   major   and   Russian   minor  before  participating  in  JET. &OHULFLKDVĂ&#x20AC;H[HGERWKKLVWHDFKLQJDQGEXVLQHVVPXVFOHV After   teaching   English   through   the   JET   program   from   1999-­ 2001,  he  received  his  masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree  in  Japanese  literature  and   then   moved   back   to   Japan   to   work   in   purchasing   for   a   wood   company. Now  a  professor  of  linguistics,  Clerici  said  the  JET  experi-­ ence  was  a  direct  impact  on  his  career  path  and  the  reason  he   wanted   to   facilitate   an   information   session   for   interested   stu-­ dents. Âł>-(7@LVDJRRGFKDQFHWRUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWRQZKDW\RXÂśYHGRQHDQG where  you  want  to  go,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  can  appeal  to  people  with   various  aspirations,  like  if  you  want  to  teach,  or  if  you  want  to   go  to  graduate  school.â&#x20AC;? For   Petro,   the   attraction   was   simple.   Besides   a   personal   draw   to   Japanese   culture   and   a   classmateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   suggestion,   JETâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   reputation  stood  out  to  her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   are   many   programs   out   there   for   teaching   abroad,   but  JET  is  one  of  the  most  prestigious  and  widely  recognized,â&#x20AC;?   Petro  said.     With  prestige  comes  competition.  Petro  said  the  application   process  was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;intense.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   begin   in   October   with   the   application   and   an   essay.   <RXKDYHWRZDLWXQWLO)HEUXDU\WRHYHQÂżQGRXWLI\RXVFRUHGDQ LQWHUYLHZDQGWKHQIURPWKHUH\RXZDLWXQWLO$SULOWRÂżQGRXWLI you  are  selected,â&#x20AC;?  Petro  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  quite  exhilarating,  but  also,   really  taught  me  to  roll  with  life,  because  here  you  are  waiting   WRÂżQGRXWLI\RXUHQWLUHOLIHZLOOEHFKDQJLQJLQWKHQH[W\HDU Moving  abroad  alone  is  not  small  task.â&#x20AC;? Clerici  said  JET  candidates  can  improve  their  chances  by   teaching  English  on  a  volunteer  basis  and  taking  a  class  on  Japa-­ nese  culture  and  that  overall,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;if  you  have  a  good  personality,   you  have  a  good  shot.â&#x20AC;?   Petro   said   the   best   candidate   for   JET   is   someone   who   is   FRQÂżGHQWĂ&#x20AC;H[LEOHDQGUHVSRQVLEOH â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  you  have  an  appetite  for  learning,  are  open  minded,  and   willing  to  get  the  most  out  of  every  experience  that  comes  your   way,  then  you  are  a  great  candidate  for  JET,â&#x20AC;?  Petro  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teach-­ ing   experiences,   whether   you   are   seasoned   or   not,   will   come.   Resume  building  opportunities  will  be  there.  Chances  at  discov-­ ering  yourself  are  all  over.  It  is  in  the  adventure  that  JET  really   exists.â&#x20AC;?

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ESK D Y COP KOFF: COO

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boxed Delightsâ&#x20AC;? By  Maddie  Anthony   n02436976@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Each week, one of the members of our Copy Desk will share their culinary chops with you. Bon appetit! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  a  mistakeâ&#x20AC;Ś  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  acci-­ dentally  given  me  the  food  my  food  eats.â&#x20AC;?   If  you  know  what  this  quote  is  from  and   who  said  it  (clearly  Ron  Swanson)  then  you   watch  Parks  and  Recreation  and  you  are  per-­ fect.   If  this  is  also  how  you  feel  when  some-­ one   brings   you   a   salad   or   offers   you   a   rice   cake,  read  on. Each  week,  one  of  us  copy  editors  writes   about  one  of  our  favorite  meals  and  how  to   FUHDWHLW%HORZ\RXZLOOÂżQGRQHRIP\ID vorite  recipes:   1.   Waddle   over   to   Mobile,   or   Conve-­ nient,  or  Oscars  or  whatever  late  night  food   shack  is  closest  to  your  place  of  residence.   2.   Buy   a   box   of   something.   It   can   be   VWXIÂżQJ P\SHUVRQDOIDYRULWH 9HOYHHWDLQ stant  mashed  potatoes,  whatever  you  feel  at   the  moment.  It  just  has  to  be  a  box  and  it  has   to  be  delicious.   3.   Go   home.   Locate   the   stove   or   some-­ thing  like  it  that  will  heat  water. 4.  Follow  instructions  on  the  back  of  the   box  to  make  the  box  turn  into  food.   5.  Consume  said  food. The   most   important   thing   to   do   when   following   this   recipe   is   to   remember   that     â&#x20AC;&#x153;serving  sizesâ&#x20AC;?  are  arbitrary  markers  whose   only  purpose  is  to  make  you  feel  bad  about   yourself   when   you   realize   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   eaten   3.5   ÂłVHUYLQJV´RI9HOYHHWD  The  key  to  this  meal  is  to  not  let  yourself   get   caught   up   in   those   silly   details.  Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   had  a  hard  day.   Sit  back,  relax,  and  eat  the  whole  thing.


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Features

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

‘The Tempest’ With A Twist

THEATER DEPARTMENT SHINES A NEW LIGHT ON SHAKESPEARE By  Madeline  Anthony Copy  Editor  |  n02436976@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  JACK  WADE

The   SUNY   New   Paltz   Theater   Department   is   gearing  up  for  its  production  of  Shakespeare’s  classic   tale  “The  Tempest.”   “The   Tempest,”   a   classic   Shakespearian   roman-­ tic  comedy,  is  directed  by  Associate  Professor  Nancy   Saklad,   who   specializes   in   coaching   both   voice   and   acting.  Previously  she  has  directed  “Much  Ado  About   Nothing”  at  Boston’s  Public  Theatre,  “How  I  Learned   To   Drive”   at   Durham   Center   Stage   and   “Other   Peo-­ ple’s  Money”  at  Seacoast  Repertory  Theatre.   The   production’s   set   and   costume   inspirations   have  a  slight  steam-­punk  feel,  one  component  of  the   show  that  does  not  follow  traditional  tone.  Saklad  said   that   she   and   the   production’s   set   designer,  Associate   Chair  of  the  Theater  Department,  Ken  Goldstein,  col-­ laborated  on  the  look  of  the  set.   The  inspiration  for  a  two-­dimensional  image  of  a   ship  made  of  ice  came  from  Pinterest  and  the  set  was   remodeled   accordingly   after   a   ship   lodged   underwa-­ ter.   “One   of   the   biggest   differences   from   our   pro-­ duction  of  ‘The  Tempest’  and  others  is  all  the  gender   swapping   we   have   done,”   Brittany   Martel,   a   third-­ year  theater  performance  major,  said.   Martel,  who  will  be  playing  the  role  of  Ariel,    said   that  nearly  all  characters  in  “The  Tempest”  except  for   Miranda,  Prospero’s  daughter,  are  traditionally  male.   However,  in  the  upcoming  production,  Prospera,   Alonso,  Ariel  and  Trinculo  will  all  be  played  by  wom-­ en.   “With   swapping   four   characters’   gender,   the   re-­ lationship  dynamics  are  a  lot  different,”  Martel  said.   7KLVLVQRWWKH¿UVWWLPHWKHVHJHQGHUVZDSVKDYH been  made  for  a  production  of  “The  Tempest.”   Saklad   said   she   made   the   switch   primarily   be-­ cause   she   knew   she   wanted   Assistant   Professor   of   Theater  Connie  Rotunda  to  play  the  role  of  Prospera,   altered  from  the  traditionally  male  Prospero.   Saklad   said   she   was   pleased   with   how   the   deci-­ sion  has  affected  the  play  and  now  “can’t  see  a  man”   in  Prospera’s  shoes.     Rotunda   is   also   the   movement   director   for   the   production.  She  said  she  felt  that  having  a  woman  in-­ stead  of  a  man  as  the  lead,  altering  one  of  the  show’s  

central  relationships  from  father-­daughter  to  mother-­ daughter  creates  a  “different  atmosphere”  and  “brings   about  a  different  sense  of  emotion.”   Rotuna   also   said   she   thinks   casting   a   woman   in   the  lead  role  of  this  production  shows  “the  power  fe-­ males  can  have.” Prospera’s  character  is  a  former  dutchess  of  Milan   who  now  studies  magic  arts.   In  preparation  for  her  role,  Rotunda  said  she  start-­ ed  by  asking  herself    how  she  would  feel  if  she  were   actually  in  Prospera’s  shoes  and  realized  the  play  was   really  about  her  rediscovery.   “It’s   open   to   interpretation   because   it’s   a   fanta-­ sy,”  she  said.  “I  began  linking  the  text  to  my  sense  of   imagination.   What   would   it   be   like   to   be   banished?   What  would  it  be  like  as  a  woman  to  go  from  a  Victo-­ rian  society  to  a  place  where  there  is  no  culture?” Playing  a  lead  character  is  not  a  new  experience   for  Martel,  but  acting  as  a  spirit  is,  which  contributed   to  her  process  and  exploration  of  a  new  character. Martel  said  there  is  a  challenge  in  understanding   the  views  of  the  world  through  a  spirit’s  eye,  and  ad-­ mits  that  her  character  does  not  have  human  emotions.  She  said  her  character  work  has  included  an  ex-­ ploration  of  how  she  expresses  herself.   “I’ve  been  working  very  hard  on  the  language  and   making  sure  I  understand  it  all,”  Martel  said.  “If  I  as   the  actor  understand  all  of  it,  I  can  make  it  easier  for   the  audience  to  understand  as  well.” Although  she  has  a  strong  background  in  speech   training,   Saklad   said   the   unique   language   within   the   production  proved  to  be  a  challenge.   Because  the  actors  were  using  non-­contemporary   speak,   Saklad   said   it   was   necessary   for   the   cast   to   make  sure  their  speech  was  clear  enough  for  the  audi-­ ence  to  understand  them  easily.   Despite   the   challenges   of   the   production,   cast   members  are  excited  to  perform. “I  hope  that  the  student  body  will  take  interest  in   seeing   the   production,”   Martel   said.   “I   can’t   wait   to   hear  feedback  from  them.” Performances  will  run  in  McKenna  Theatre  from   Thursday  Nov.  14  to  Saturday,  Nov.  16  at  8  p.m.  and   Sunday,  Nov.  17  at  2  p.m.  and  another  series  of  perfor-­ mances  from  Thursday,  Nov.  21  to  Saturday,  Nov.  23   at  8  p.m.  and  Sunday,  Nov.  24  at  2  p.m.  

Katherine  Cryer-­Hassett  and  Connie  Rotunda  rehearse  a  scene.


  8B

Arts & Entertainment

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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

The Horror, The Horror

A SAMPLING OF SCREAMS AND SCARES FOR HALLOWS EVE By  Katherine  Speller Managing  Editor  |  katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Most   days   I   can   be   found   almost   exclusively   on   my  couch  with  whatever  furry  critter  is  in  the  vicinity   watching  a  bloodbath  on  my  TV  screen.  This  gets  pre-­ dictably  worse  as  we  get  closer  and  closer  to  Halloween   VHDVRQDQGWKHQXPEHURIKRUURUPRYLHWLWOHVRQ1HWĂ&#x20AC;L[ increases.     Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   compiled   a   few   of   my   favorites   for   this   time   of  the  year,  ranging  from  the  horrifying  to  the  hilarious   and  absurd.  If  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  horror-­junkie  like  me,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  sure   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   have   a   lovely   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   if   frightening   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   night.  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Birdsâ&#x20AC;?   Growing  up  (and  to  this  day)  I  had  a  massive  fear   of  birds.  Regardless  of  the  way  it  started,  I  remembered   friends,  teachers  and  classmates  always  telling  me  not   to  watch  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Birds,â&#x20AC;?  because  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  too  much  for  me.   (YHQWXDOO\  , GLG ÂżQDOO\ ZDWFK WKH WKLQJ Ă&#x20AC;LQFK ing  all  the  way  through  scenes  of  swooping  feathers,   crowing  and  eye  plucking.  But,  the  coolest  thing  about   WKLVPRYLHZDVÂżQGLQJWKHPHVVDJHEHQHDWKDERXWWKH relationships  between  women.   +HDY\KDQGHGDVLWLVWKHÂłELUGV´RIWKLVÂżOPDUH both   the   winged   monsters   and   the   ladies.   And,   ulti-­ mately,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   those   interactions   between   both   birds   that  proves  to  be  the  most  horrifying.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  Nightmare  On  Elm  Street  4:  The  Dream   Masterâ&#x20AC;? If   you   have   watched   any   of   the   )UHGG\ .UHXJHU ÂżOPV \RX KDYH WR have   a   sense   of   humor.   Fred-­ G\ÂśVDĂ&#x20AC;DPER\ ant,   charis-­ matic  villain  

who  became  such  a  commercial  entity  during  his  reign   RIWHUURUWKDWWKHODWHUÂżOPVLQWKHVHULHVZHUHFKHHVH fests.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dream   Masterâ&#x20AC;?   in   particular   has   this   loud,   col-­ orful   feel   that   is   somehow   more   outrageous   than   the   RWKHUÂżOPV And   if   you   can   stomach   painful   music   videos   paired   with   your   movies,   look   no   further   than   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are   You   Ready   For   Freddyâ&#x20AC;?   by   The   Fat   Boys   ft.   Robert   Englund  (the  actor  behind  Kreuger).   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alienâ&#x20AC;? ,FDQÂśWUHPHPEHUWKHÂżUVWWLPH,ZDWFKHG$OLHQLQ LWVHQWLUHW\RUWKHÂżUVWWLPH,ZDWFKHGLWZLWKRXWSHHN LQJEHWZHHQP\ÂżQJHUV 7KHÂżOPKDVWKLVFODXVWURSKRELFK\SHUYHQWLODWLRQ OLNHTXDOLW\WKDW,ÂżQGSHUIHFWLQDKRUURUÂżOP Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only   made   better   when   paired   with   a   protag-­ onist   that   inspires   empathy   on   such   a   visceral   level.   Without  a  doubt,  Sigourney  Weaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Ripley  will  al-­ ZD\VEHRQHRIP\IDYRULWHFKDUDFWHUVLQVFLHQFHÂżF tion/horror.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Exorcistâ&#x20AC;?   7KHÂżUVWWLPH,ZDWFKHGÂł7KH([RUFLVW´,ZDVDERXW ten  years  old.    Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  heard  stories  about  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  creepy  girl   who  pukes  on  a  priestâ&#x20AC;?  and  it  was  enough  to  peak   my  interest.   While   the   effects   are   now   considered   tame,   maybe   even   adorable,   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   something   mythic   DERXW WKH ZULWLQJ DQG VWRU\WHOOLQJ RI WKLV ÂżOP that  keeps  me  lost  in  the  magic  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  terror  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   it  inspires.   The   360   degree   head   spin   is   also   too   iconic   and  perfect  to  leave  off  this  list.   PHOTOS COURTESY OF BLOGSPOT.COM

SOME HONORABLE MENTIONS â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carrieâ&#x20AC;?  Directed  by  Brian  De  Palma â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Shiningâ&#x20AC;?   (1997  mini-­series)   Directed  By  Mick  Garris  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Theatre  Bizarreâ&#x20AC;?   Directed   By   Douglas   Buck,   Buddy  Giovinazzo,  David  Gregory,   Karim   Hussain,   Jeremy   Kasten,   Tom  Savini  and  Richard  Stanley

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Stendhal  Syndromeâ&#x20AC;?   Directed  By  Dario  Argento

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Miseryâ&#x20AC;?   Directed  By  Rob  Reiner

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creepshowâ&#x20AC;?  Directed  By  George  A.  Romero

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Insidiousâ&#x20AC;?   Directed  By  James  Wan

Thursday,  October  31,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

Breaking The Fourth Wall

24 HOUR THEATER PROVES ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ALL IN A DAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WORK By  Anthony  De  Rosa Copy  Editor  |  n02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

You  shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  doubt  what  a  group  of  talented  people  can   accomplish  in  24  hours.   Twenty-­four   Hour   Theater,   a   derivative   of   the   New   Paltz  Players,  an  organization  that  provides  a  forum  for  col-­ laborative  theater  projects  on  campus,  is  a  unique  theatrical   experience   where   artists   write,   cast,   design   and   rehearse   a   twenty   minute   show   in   the   span   of   24   hours.   The   show   is   then  performed  for  one  night  only  in  what  can  poetically  be   described  as  a  cosmic  explosion  of  creativity,  gone  as  quick-­ ly  as  it  arrived.   Held  in  Crispell  Hall  on  Saturday,  Oct.  26,  this  semes-­ terâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  performance,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sitcomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d,â&#x20AC;?  was  directed  by  second-­year   political   science   and   theater   double-­major   Brandon   Missig   and  stage  managed  by  third-­year  history  and  theater  double-­ major  Sara  Lyons.   The  production  featured  fourth-­year  English  and  theater   double-­major   Jade   Asta   Quinn,   second-­year   theater   major   Ryan   Christopher  Thomas,   third-­year   theater   major   Brielle   Cari,  third-­year  media  and  communications  major  Kevin  Fa-­ gan,  second-­year  theater  major  Spencer  Cohen,  and  second-­ year  theater  major  Kalia  Lay.   With  the  exception  of  Fagan  and  Lyons,  the  cast  and  di-­ rector  served  as  the  writers  of  the  show  as  well.   ,WEHJLQVDVDFOLFKpÂżOOHGÂľVVLWFRPSDURG\Âł3DOV´ Let  me  explain:  the  show  starts  as  a  show  inside  a  show,   with  one  being  a  sort  of  parody  of  other  shows. Confused  yet?  Well  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  (not)  sorry  to  say  that  things  are   going  to  get  a  whole  lot  more  metaphysical.   &RPSOHWHZLWKÂľVHUDDWWLUHÂąĂ&#x20AC;DQQHOMDFNHWVEDQG7 VKLUWV&RQYHUVHHWFÂąDVZHOODVWKHXVHRIDODXJKWUDFN scene  transfer  music  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baltoâ&#x20AC;?  references,  the  cast  does  an   excellent  job  of  convincing  the  audience  that  they  are  binge-­ watching  episode  after  episode  of  whatever  cookie-­cutter  sit-­ com  happens  to  be  on.   The   accuracy   with   which   the   cast   captured   the   feel   of   the   genre  in  their  writing   and  acting  leads  me   to  believe  that   they   indulged   in   some   of   the  previously  

PHQWLRQHGÂľVWKHPHGFOLFKHV 7KHÂżUVWÂżYHPLQXWHVKDVÂłWKHJDQJ´DV,OLNHWRUHIHUWR VLWFRPFKDUDFWHUJURXSVHQJDJLQJLQ\RXUW\SLFDOÂľVVLWX ational  comedy.     However,   after   a   box   containing   scripts   of   the   gangâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lives   (read   as   episode   scripts),   the   fourth   wall   shatters   and   the   show   becomes   self-­aware,   leading   to   the   emotional   breakdown  of  the  characters.   This  breakdown  causes  the  network  executive  (cleverly   placed   offstage   in   the   audience)   to   pause   the   show   and   in-­ form  the  viewers  that  it  has  been  canceled.   When  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;showâ&#x20AC;?  starts  again,  the  characters  experience   a   sinking   desperate   feeling   they   realize   to   be   their   cancel-­ lation.   The   characters   turn   on   one   another,   attacking   each   otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   archetypes   and   point   out   each   otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   one-­dimen-­ sionality.   Then,  in  a  brilliant  moment  of  cable  TV  reconciliation,   WKHFDVWSHUIRUPVDĂ&#x20AC;DVKEDFNPRQWDJHRIÂłHSLVRGHV´DVWKH\ FRPHWRJHWKHULQEHDXWLIXOVLWFRPÂżQDOHIDVKLRQ That  is,  until,  they  realize  their  writers  are  trying  to  wrap   up  the  show  and  in  an  act  of  rebellious  protest,  destroy  their   writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  scripts,  hoping  to  create  their  own  destiny.   This  leads  to  them  losing  the  ability  to  speak  from  a  lack   of  lines,  until  the  clicking  of  a  keyboard  writes  them  all  an   epilogue  where  they,  accepting  their  fate,  fade  to  cheesy  sit-­ com  guitar. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sitcomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d:  A   24   Hour  Theater   Productionâ&#x20AC;?   is   honestly   one   of   the   cleverest   and   creative   deconstructions   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   seen   in  a  long  while.  The  writing  is  superb,  and  all  the  jokes  are   on   point   for   anyone   who   has   watched   a   season   or   two   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seinfeld.â&#x20AC;?   The  show  also  manages  to  touch  on  a  bit  of  existential   UHDOLVPDQGWKHIHHOLQJRILQVLJQLÂżFDQFHWKDWFRPHVZLWKLW Âą VRPHWKLQJ , ZDVQÂśW H[SHFWLQJ WR IHHO JRLQJ LQ 7KH SHU formances  themselves  were  delivered  greatly,  but  with  only   twenty  minutes,  it  seemed  unfair  to  form  any  sort   of  judgment.  If  this  is  the   kind   of   material   we   can   expect   from   this   group,  you  can  bet  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   be  in  the  audience   next  semester.      

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  BRANDON  MISSIG

7KXUVGD\2FWREHU

oracle.newpaltz.edu 9B

A Virtual Slam Dunk By  Andrew  Lief Sports  Editor  |  n02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Âł1%$.´ZKLFK,SOD\RQ;ER[LVWKH best  basketball  video  game  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  ever  played. This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  version  is  the  most  realistic  basket-­ ball  gaming  experience  in  the  seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  history.    Last  year   while  playing,  my  mother  asked  me  if  I  was  watching   a  real  game,  so  I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  imagine  what  her  reaction   will  be  when  she  sees  me  playing  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  edition. Every  player  looks  identical  to  how  they  look  in   UHDOOLIH7KH\DOVRSOD\ZLWKWKHVDPHVSHFLÂżFPR tions  and  have  the  same  celebrations  that  they  perform     in  real  life,  which  makes  the  game  even  more  realistic.     The  â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  Playerâ&#x20AC;?  game  mode  is  essentially  iden-­ tical   to   how   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   the   last   two   years.   Next   year   WKHUHGHÂżQLWHO\QHHGVWREHDQDGGLWLRQWRWKLVJDPH PRGH,WÂśVIXQDWÂżUVWEXWDV\RXNHHSSOD\LQJLWLW gets  repetitive  and  boring.     While   the   visuals   of   the   game   are   incredible,   LWVWLOOSRVVHVVVRPHĂ&#x20AC;DZV3OD\HUVVWLOOVWDQGRXWRI bounds  when  the  ball  is  being  passed  to  them,  which   is  completely  unrealistic.    There  are  far  too  many  kick   ball   and   goaltending   violations   in   the   video   game,   compared  to  an  actual  NBA  game.     The   announcing   team   of   Kevin   Harlan,   Steve   Kerr  and  Clark  Kellogg,  with  Doris  Burke  as  the  side-­ line  reporter,  continues  to  be  solid.    The  only  question   I  have,  which  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  had  for  the  past  few  years  is,  why   is  Kellogg  an  announcer  for  this  game?  Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  college   basketball   announcer   and   now   since   Gregg  Anthony   has  replaced  him,  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  just  a  studio  analyst.    I  know   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  really  a  big  deal,  but  as  an  avid  basketball  fan,   it  just  bothers  me.     The  new  game  mode  this  year,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Path  to  Greatness   featuring  LeBron  James,â&#x20AC;?  allows  you  to  control  Jamesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   future   and   either   re-­sign   with   the   Heat   and   continue   to  build  a  dynasty  or  have  him  leave  Miami  and  try   to  build  a  legacy  elsewhere.  This  was  a  brilliant  idea   on  the  part  of  the  2k14  developers  because  James  is   playing  at  an  all-­time  great  level  and  this  game  mode   will  only  make  people  more  intrigued  about  what  he   decides  to  do  with  his  future  this  summer.     7KHVRXQGWUDFNRIWKLVJDPHGHÂżQLWHO\DWWUDFWVD ODUJHUDXGLHQFHZLWKDPRUH7RSUDGLRIHHODVRS posed   to   last   year   when   the   game   was   produced   by   Jay-­Z  and  featured  mostly  classic  rap  songs.  I  like  this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  soundtrack  just  as  much    just  because  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  weird   and  enjoy  the  popular  music.     Overall,   NBA   2K14   is   a   lot   of   fun   to   play   and   should  be  purchased  by  every  basketball  fan.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

oracle.newpaltz.edu  10B

Once Upon A Poster Show And Sale DESIGN SOCIETY ILLUSTRATES STORIES THROUGH TALENT

By  Suzy  Berkowitz

A&E  Editor  |  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   New   Paltz   Design   Society   told   stories   and   myths   last   week   through   their   annual   Poster   Show   and  Sale. Held  on  Wednesday,  Oct.  23  in  the  Honors  Col-­ lege,  artists  displayed  16x16  and  16x20  posters  both   in  portrait  and  landscape  form  that  were  available  to   order  for  $5  each.   The  student-­created  posters,  23  in  total,  were  in-­ spired  by  classic  literature  such  as  “The  Three  Little   Pigs,”   “Alice   in   Wonderland,”   “Peter   Pan,”   “Where   the  Wild  Things  Are”  and  “Charlie  and  the  Chocolate   Factory.”   While  some  of  the  posters  included  the  title  of  the   story  or  fairy  tale  others  revolved  around  a  well-­know   quote  while  some  simply  included  an  illustration.   The  Design  Society  decided  to  make  this  a  regu-­ lar  event  after  hosting  a  successful  Poster  Show  and   Sale  last  semester  with  the  theme  of  nostalgia.   Members   met   on   a   weekly   basis   at   the   begin-­ ning  of  the  semester  and  decided  on  mythology  as  the  

theme  of  this  year’s  event.   After  the  initial  meeting  when  the  theme  was  de-­ termined,  designers  brought  ideas  and  sketches  to  ad-­ ditional  meetings  and  dedicated  the  time  to  critiquing   each  other’s  work.  Final  posters  were  submitted  as  a   collaborative  effort  between  students.   “We  agreed  though,  that  the  theme  needed  to  be   more  open  than  that,  and  decided  to  make  the  theme   stories   and   myths,”   Nicolette   Seeback,   a   third-­year   graphic   design   BFA,   said.   “Since   our   posters   were   ‘inspired’   by   stories   and   myths,   we   wanted   to   make   sure  that  we  were  creating  our  own  illustrations,  but   that  it  wouldn’t  be  a  challenge  for  the  viewer  to  know   what  stories  and  myths  we  were  referencing.” The   Design   Society   has   been   using   the   Honors   Center   as   their   Poster   Show   and   Sale   venue   for   the   past  two  years  under  the  supervision  of  the  Director   of   the   Honors   College   and   Professor   of   Communi-­ cation  and  Media,  Patricia  Sullivan,  who  said  she  is   “pleased”  to  use  the  space  to  showcase  students’  work. “The   graphic   arts   students   create   exceptional   work,”   Sullivan   said.   “I   look   forward   to   supporting  

their  efforts  at  future  events  in  the  Honors  Center.” Preparation  for  the  show  included  a  mounting  of   the   pieces   that   were   to   be   sold   a   week   prior   to   the   event.   The   only   challenge   artists   faced   was   working   within   the   constrictions   of   a   theme-­based   sale,   ac-­ cording  to  fourth-­year  graphic  design  major  and  Vice   President  of  the  Design  Society,  Erica  Leigh  Montine.   “Designers   work   well   when   there   are   rules   in   mind,  because  it  gives  them  the  opportunity  to  restrict   themselves  and  surpass  themselves  as  well,”  Montine   said.   Regardless  of  the  challenges  some  of  the  students   faced   complying   with   the   guidelines   of   the   show’s   theme,  Seeback  is  amazed  by  her  classmates’  dedica-­ tion  and  said  she  hopes  they  can  continue  to  develop   these  kinds  of  projects.   “Design  Society  isn’t  about  grades  or  rules,”  she   said.  “It’s  about  everyone’s  ideas  coming  together  and   doing  projects  that  are  for  us  that  we  love.”  

Students Get Their Feet Wet For Artistic Purposes

“Wetlands:  Resilience”  is  a  collaborative  exhibition  that  focused  on  the  complexities  surrounding  wetlands  in  the  New  Paltz  area  which  incorporated  student  work   in  the  form  of  photography,  text  and  video.  The  project  was  researched,  produced  and  installed  by  the  students  in  the  Capstone  course  “The  Document.”   The  exhibition  was  featured  in  the  Fine  Arts  Building  rotunda  from  Tuesday,  Oct.  22  through  Monday,  Oct.  28. PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN CAPTION  BY  SUZY  BERKOWITZ

Thursday,  October  31,  2013


oracle.newpaltz.edu  11B

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Falling Into A New Mixtape

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: ANTHONY LORINO

ALBUMS THAT WILL START THE SEASON ON A HIGH NOTE By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­In-­Chief  |  ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  be  honest,  summer  2013  was  a  phenomenal  season  for  music.     Kanye  Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Yeezus  LVDUJXDEO\KLVEHVWZRUNWKHQHZ6DUD%DUHLOOHVDOEXPÂżQDOO\FRQYLQFHGPHVKHÂśVWDOHQWHGDQG%OXH Octoberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Sway  showed  that  the  band  hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  lost  its  touch  since  I  began  listening  to  them  when  I  was  a  freshman  in  high  school.   In  other  words,  releasing  albums  this  season  was  going  to  be  a  tough  act  for  artists  to  follow  after  the  summer.  I  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  sure  if   LWZRXOGKDYHPHDVXUHGXSEXWLWGHOLYHUHGDQGLWÂśVGHOLYHUHGLQGLYLGHQGV Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  great  about  this  fall  is  that  the  strongest  albums  making  the  most  impact  in  the  mainstream  are  by  female  musi-­ FLDQVPDQ\RIZKRPDUHQHZWRWKHPDLQVWUHDPRUDUHUHDOO\MXVWVWDUWLQJWRJHWWKHDFNQRZOHGJPHQWWKH\GHVHUYH +HUHÂśVZKDWÂśVFDXJKWP\DWWHQWLRQWKHVHSDVWVHYHUDOZHHNV

YEAR: Third MAJOR: Digital Media Production HOMETOWN: Middletown, N.Y.

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY? The  electric  guitar.  Because  after  not   getting   a   girlfriend   from   playing   Guitar   Hero  Two,  I  started  playing  real   electric  guitar.   WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY?

Haim

Lorde

Days Are Gone

Pure Heroine

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   in   Jazz   Ensemble   and   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   in   a   band   called  Ammo  Without  A  Gun. WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES?

, ¿UVW FDXJKW ZLQG RI WKH all-­female   trio   when   I   went   WR *RYHUQRUœV %DOO RYHU WKH summer.   I   missed   them   by   a   day,   but   they   were   one   of   the  acts  that  got  some  of  the   most   hype   and   praise   once   WKH IHVWLYDO ZDV RYHU   Days   Are  Gone  shows  why.   Admittedly,  it  reminds  me   a   lot   of   the   music   I   would  

hear   in   Deliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   when   I   was   in  high  school  (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  sure  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   in  the  playlist  rotation  there)   so  it  can  be  a  bit  of  a  PTSD   trigger.   +RZHYHU LWÂśV HDV\ WR OLV ten   to,   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   nothing   way   too  in  your  face  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dif-­ ÂżFXOWWRJHWRXWRI\RXUKHDG Also,   all   of   them   are   really   hot.

<HDK , NQRZ VKHÂśV HY erywhere.   Maybe   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   already  sick  of  her.  I  am  no-­ where  near  close  to  being  so.   Lorde   is   so   talented   and   so  fun  and,  at  16  years  old,   has   already   made   a   name   for  herself  as  being  this  ex-­ tremely   cool   new   face   in   PXVLF , FDQÂśW EHOLHYH VKHÂśV  ,ÂśP  DQG KDYLQJ D

mental   breakdown   weekly   about  what  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  going  to  do   when   I   get   out   of   here   in   May. I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   get   enough   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buzzcut   Season,â&#x20AC;?   one   of   the  songs  on  the  album.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   dark  and  edgy  without  being   WRRKHDY\KDQGHGRUDOLHQDW LQJ 'HÂżQLWHO\ P\ IDYRULWH track  of  the  fall.

Jimi   Hendrix,   Van   Halen,   Eric   Johnson,   Eric  Clapton,  Manuel  Yupa  and   Stevie  Ray  Vaughn.   WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? Marianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Trench,  Radiohead,  West  Mont-­ gomery  and  George  Benson. WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like  to  intern  and  work  my  way  into  WarnerBrothers  records.   ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS?

Janelle Monae

Sleigh Bells

The Electric Lady

Bitter Rivals

Of   all   the   albums   on   this   list,  this  is  the  most  complete   IURP WRS WR ERWWRP (YHU\ song  is  good,  the  storytelling   LVFRKHVLYHDQGDERYHDOOLWÂśV such   a   fun   album   to   get   up   and  dance  to. But   what   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   most   im-­ pressed  with  is  how  there  is   plenty   of   support   on   the   al-­ bum,  with  Prince  and  Erykah  

Badu   collaborating,   but   -DQHOOH 0RQDH QHYHU FRPHV close  to  losing  the  spotlight.   Regardless   of   the   artist,   she   is   collaborating   with,   no   one   outshines   Monae,   RUHYHQFRPHVFORVHWR6KH is   the   star   of     The   Electric   Lady,  as  she  should  be. Janelle,   please   consider   marrying  me.

Sleigh   Bells   has   been   a   regular   on   my   party   playl-­ ists  for  a  couple  of  years  now   because  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  one  of  those   groups  that  is  a  lot  of  fun  to   drink  and  socialize  to.   7KLVDOEXPLVQÂśWYHU\GLI IHUHQWIURPZKDWWKH\ÂśYHSXW out  in  the  past,  which  is  okay   EHFDXVH WKH\ÂśUH GHÂżQLWHO\ better  artists.  

I   always   look   for   how   much   an   artist   changes   and   grows   and   how   that   growth   has  an  effect  on  their  music,   EXW , WKLQN WKHUH LV YDOXH LQ ÂżQGLQJ ZKDW ZRUNV EHVW IRU you  and  sticking  with  that. I   think   Sleigh   Bells   does   that  with  this  album  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   GHÂżQLWHO\ JRLQJ WR EH RQ playlists  for  years  to  come.

Obsess  over  music  and  live  it.  If  you  love  what   you  do,  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  never  work  a  day  in  your  life.   And  follow  your  dreams.  

CHECK  OUT   ANTHONY  LORINO

PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE  WITH   ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   Contact  Suzy  Berkowitz  at  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  

Thursday,  October  31,  2013


12B oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  DEEP  END

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END RICHARD SCHLEIDER

Major: Photography Year: Fourth Inspirations: Camille Pissarro, Anne Brigman, Aaron Siskind, John Pfahl, Jean Nouvel, Jeff Pang, Naoya Hatakeyam

“My intent is to reveal the distinctive and enigmatic qualities often overlooked in a naturally reflected environment, accentuating unusual angles and the transient quality of daylight; characteristic techniques inherent to both Pictorialism and Impressionism. By nature, the strangely alluring mindscapes are distorted and subtly underscore a slippage between the real and the imagined.”

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  RICHARD  SCHLEIDER.  CAPTION  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL  

   9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

POLL  BOOTH   POLITICS

CARTOON BY JULIE GUNDERSEN The  time  of  the  year  where  we  go   to  the  polls  is  upon  us  again.  And  this   year  (like  every  year)  in  New  Paltz,  it   matters. This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  New  Paltz  Town  Super-­ visor  race  features  two  candidates:  Ran-­ dall  Leverette  and  Susan  Zimet.    Lever-­ ette,  the  Chairman  of  the  Town  of  New   Paltz  Police  Commission,  is  running  on   the   principles   of   process   over   politics,   transparency   and   a   collaborative   gov-­ ernment.  Zimet,  the  current  New  Paltz   town  supervisor,  said  her  main  focus  is   to  keep  taxes  down  in  New  Paltz.   The  question  is,  how  many  students   are  seeing  the  names  Zimet  and  Lever-­ HWWH IRU WKH ÂżUVW WLPH" 2Q WRS RI WKDW how  many  had  no  idea  what  their  posi-­ tions  on  local  issues  are  before  reading   WKLVHGLWRULDO" We   at   The   New   Paltz   Oracle   feel   that   every   student   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   registered   to   vote   in   New   Paltz   should   be   educated   RQ WKH YRWH DQG WKHQ VKRXOG GHÂżQLWHO\

be  at  the  polls  on  Nov.  5.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   written   editorials   like   this   before,  many  times  in  fact.  But  we  will   say  this  year  after  year  after  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;your   vote   matters,   especially   in   local   gov-­ ernment  elections.   We   understand   some   students   might   think   they   shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   care   about   this   election   because   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   small   town   affair,   or   they   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   consider   them-­ selves   full-­time   New   Paltz   residents,   but,   in   reality,   we   spend   more   time   at   school   than   we   do   at   home.  The   deci-­ sions   made   during   this   election   do   di-­ rectly  affect  our  experiences  here.   Among   some   of   the   candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   priorities  are  taxes  in  the  town  and  the   town   and   village   master   plan,   both   of   which  are  issues  that  may  not  have  the   most   noticeable   impact   on   students.   However,   each   candidate   has   brought   up  Park  Point  and  lighting  on  Plattekill,   two   issues   that   will   have   a   direct   and   immediate  effect  on  students.  

We  live  on  a  campus  with  students   who  want  to  call  themselves  politically   active,   and   socially   conscious   people.   However,   the   voter   turn-­out   at   every   election   is   abysmal,   with   some   years   not   even   reaching   10   student   voters.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  school  of  7,767.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   too   often   that   we   as   an   activ-­ ist  community  will  care  about  an  issue,   voice   our   support   or   discontent   with   that   issue   and   then   neglect   to   do   one   of  the  most  basic  things  you  can  do  to   make  change  when  it  matters.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   especially   important   for   us   to   participate  and  engage  in  local  govern-­ ment.  As  opposed  to  a  national  election   where  your  individual  goes  toward  the   electoral  count  and  could  potentially  be   meaningless,  your  individual  vote  for  a   JRYHUQPHQWRIÂżFLDOLVFRXQWHGDVDQLQ GLYLGXDOYRWH,WPDWWHUV2QHPRUHSHU son   at   the   polls   this   year   could   swing   the  election  one  way  or  the  other.     We   urge   students   to   not   only   be  

7KXUVGD\2FWREHU

aware  of  political  issues  when  election   day  comes  around,  but  to  be  aware  all   year  of  every  year.  The  greatest  enemy   RISURJUHVVLVDSDWK\2XUKRPHIRU months   out   of   the   year   deserves   time,   energy  and  attention. Regardless   of   how   you   vote,   your   presence  at  the  polls  is  the  least  you  can   offer.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   often   that   students   have   the  opportunity  to  actually  facilitate  the   sorts   of   change   they   talk   about   regu-­ larly.  Do  not  waste  this  opportunity.  

Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the   majority  of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,   op-­eds  and  letters,  excluding  editorials,   are  solely  those  of  the  writers  and  do  not   necessarily  represent  the  views  of  The   New  Paltz  Oracle,  its  staff  members,  the   campus  and  university  or  the  Town  or   Village  of  New  Paltz.


OPINION

10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMNS BEN  KINDLON Features  Editor n02182316@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUZY  BERKOWITZ A&E  Editor

sabbasberkowitz91@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

I   lean   my   face   down   and   push   the   button   that   makes  it  squirt.    Expecting  the  stream  to  go  into  my   mouth,  I  open  wide.  But,  instead  of  shooting  into  my   mouth,  the  liquid  explodes  all  over  my  face,  drenching   it  and  wetting  my  shirt.   Flabbergasted,  I  think,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  are  they  going  to   Âż[WKLVZDWHUIRXQWDLQ"´ I   joined   the   Oracle   as   a   sports   copy   editor   in   Spring   2011.     Long   nights   sitting   at   the   copy   desk   lead  to  mental  exhaustion  and  in  turn  dehydration,  so   staying  hydrated  is  key.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  no  expert  on  water  fountains,  but  I  feel  that  a   hose-­like  jet  to  the  face  is  a  bit  excessive  in  providing   someone  a  casual  drink.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  just  trying  to  wet  my  whistle,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  trying   WRZLQLQDVTXLUWJXQÂżJKWDJDLQVWP\VHOI Am  I  the  only  only  sole  living  entity  that  is  so   concerned  with  the  water  and  plumbing  system  on  the   IRXUWKĂ&#x20AC;RRURIWKH6WXGHQW8QLRQ 68 " Possibly.     But,  that  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  mean  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  alone  in  caring. On  our  second  production  night,  one  of  the  copy   editors  and  I  bundled  ourselves  and  rushed  through  the   cold  from  the  SU  to  my  car  in  the  Route  32  parking   lot.    We  were  chatting  as  we  buckled  and  settled.  In  the   midst  of  our  conversation,  I  broke  off  mid  sentence. Âł:K\GLG\RXMXVWVWRS"´6KHDVNHGPHÂł:KDW GLG\RXMXVWVHH"´ One  Wednesday  later,  back  at  another  production   night,   I   took   one   of   my   many   cigarette   breaks.   I   lit   my  nasty  cowboy  killer,  and  proceeded  to  take  a  look   around.  As   I   turned   from   the   building,   I   saw   in   the   FRUQHU RI P\ H\H D SHDUO\ ZKLWH WUDQVOXVFHQW ÂżJXUH stood   clawing   at   the   second-­story   window   directly   facing   me.   I   turned   back   to   get   a   better   look,   but   it   had  vanished. When   any   of   us   go   to   use   the   menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   bathroom   GRZQDQGDURXQGWKHKDOOIURPRXURIÂżFHLQURRP the  faucet  on  the  far  left  when  facing  the  wall  is  always   running.    Even  if  another  has  just  returned,  and  made   sure  to  turn  it  off,  when  the  next  goes  they  return  with   the  same  news: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  faucet  was  running.  It  was  there.â&#x20AC;? I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  believe  it.    I  wanted  to  be  brave   and  make  her  feel  better.  I  wanted  to  know  what  really   I  had  witnessed.  I  wanted  to  make  myself  feel  better. But  the  time  for  hiding  from  the  truth  is  over.   The   ghost   is   real,   and   here   to   stay.   Happy   Halloween  everyone.

Ben  Kindlon  is  a  fourth-­year  journalism   major.  He  just  wants  to  shred.  He  is  Albany.   Albany  is  him.  

I   realize   the   2013   VMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   were   roughly   two   months   ago,   but   there   are   still   some   components   of   Miley   Cyrusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   notoriously   controversial   performance   that  need  to  be  brought  to  the  surface.   Unlike   many   critics,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   not   going   to   slut-­shame   Miley   and   tell   her   to   put   her   clothes   back   on   or   tostop   being   an   attention  whore.  I  agree  that  she  is  an  art-­ ist   who,   in   the   process   of   shedding   her   previous  skin,  is  trying  on  whatever  feels   remotely  comfortable.   It  just  so  happens  that  the  skin  Miley   is  currently  draping  over  her  body  is  one   many  women  have  tried  to  shed  in  an  ef-­ fort  to  negate  the  racial  stereotypes  they   have  been  plagued  with  for  decades.   Even   though   the   artist   claimed   in   an   interview   with   MTV   days   after   the   VMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   that   the   media   are   â&#x20AC;&#x153;overthink-­ ingâ&#x20AC;?   her   performance,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clear   the   20-­year-­oldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   current   persona   perpetu-­ ates   derogatory   and   insensitive   stigmas   about  women  of  color. Black  women  have  historically  been   treated   as   if   their   bodies   were   not   their   own   and   did   not   deserve   respect.   The   Jezebel   Stereotype,   which   was   used   during   slavery   to   rationalize   the   sexual   relationship  between  a  white  man  and  a   black  woman,  paints  women  of  color  in   a  promiscuous,  almost  animalistic,  self-­ disrespecting  light,  insinuating  that  their   urges  are  beyond  their  own  control.   When  Cyrus  graced  the  VMA  stage   ZLWK KHU WRQJXH EXWW DQG PLGGOH ÂżQJHU

Not  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Just  Being  Mileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; out,  she  ended  up  making  a  more  deeply-­ rooted  statement  than  she  intended  to.   After   having   just   released   her   new   single  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  Stopâ&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one  that  Ri-­ hanna   previously   rejected,   according   to   MTV   News   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   telling   songwriting   team   Timothy   and   Theron   Thomas   that   she   wanted   a   record   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;feels   black,â&#x20AC;?   Miley   quickly   begun   trying   a   new   â&#x20AC;&#x153;ratchetâ&#x20AC;?  persona  on  for  size.   But   such   a   gimmick   that   appropri-­ ates  black  culture  instead  of  celebrating   it  is  one  littered  with  reoccurring  themes   that  many  members  of  the  targeted  com-­ munity  have  tried  their  hardest  to  nullify. Miley   Cyrusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   entire   performance,   which   included   a   one-­sided   interaction   with   a   back-­up   dancerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   behind,   only   perpetuated   the   stereotype   that   women   of   color   (or   â&#x20AC;&#x153;homegirls   with   the   big   butts,â&#x20AC;?  as  the  lyric  states)  have  only  their   bodies  to  offer.   This  pattern,  commonly  seen  in  pop   culture,   also   gives   privilege   to   white   artists   who   strive   to   appropriate   black   culture,   making   their   actions   socially   acceptable   when   juxtaposed   against   the   mediaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   reaction   to   the   same   behavior   from  a  person  of  color.     As  pointed  out  in  a  brilliantly  written   article  on  Groupthink  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Solidarity   is  for  Miley  Cyrus:  The  Racial  Implica-­ tions  of  her  VMA  Performance,â&#x20AC;?  Mileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   entire  persona  was  almost  an  exact  rep-­ lica   of   Rihannaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,   from   the   haircut   and   WKHGRPLQDWUL[VW\OHRXWÂżWVWRWKHÂłJRRG

girl  gone  badâ&#x20AC;?  gimmick.   The   persona,   which   Rihanna   has   been   rocking   for   the   past   three   years   while   receiving   harsh   criticism   for,   is   only   now   being   socially   accepted,   once   adopted  by  Miley. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   not   discouraging   Miley   from   exercising  her  newfound  sexuality.  Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   shedding   her   Disney   skin,   and   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   completely  understandable.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  discour-­ aging  her  from  displaying  minstrelsy  by   associating   this   oversexualization   with   black  female  culture.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  racist,  degrading  and  does  noth-­ ing  but  shift  the  gears  of  progression  into   reverse.   It  may  seem  like  Mileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  VMA  spec-­ tacle  was  just  for  shock  value  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  in   large   part,   it   was.   However,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   unfor-­ tunate   that   many   women   of   color   have   been   taking   leaps   and   bounds   forward   as   successful   forces   to   prove   that   their   value   rests   far   beyond   their   bodies,   the   downright  disrespectful  behavior  of  one   widely-­broadcasted  artist  seems  to  have   shifted  the  movement  several  steps  back.    

Suzy  Berkowitz  is  a  fourth-­year   journalism  major  who  likes  to   waggle  her  tongue.  She  likes  to   jump  up,  jump  up  and  get  down.   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  upset  about  never   getting  to  shop  at  Limited  Too.   That  place  was  gross.  

Send Us A Letter! oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  September  26,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

SPORTS

 11

oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

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By  Andrew  Lief 6SRUWV(GLWRU_N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

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Softball  Players  Make  Scholar-­Athlete  Team  

By  Andrew  Lief

Sports  Editor  |  1#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX

Five  softball  players  were  named  to  the  NFCA  Div.  III  Scholar-­Athlete  team.  Head  Coach  Tony  Ciccarello  said  in  his  13-­year  coaching  career  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  always  had   ¿YHRUPRUHRIKLVSOD\HUVPDNHWKHWHDPHDFK\HDU+HPDGHWKHDQQRXQFHPHQWDERXWWKLV\HDU¶VUHFLSLHQWVDWWKHWHDP¶V¿UVWPHHWLQJWKLV\HDULQ6HSWHPEHU +HVWULYHVWREHDFRDFKZKRQRWRQO\FRDFKHVDWKOHWHVEXWFRDFKHVVWXGHQWV&LFFDUHOORPHHWVZLWKDOORIKLVSOD\HUVHDFKZHHNWR¿QGRXWKRZWKH\¶UHGRLQJLQ WKHLUFODVVHVDQGZKDWWKHLUWHVWVFRUHVDUH+HZLOOGRZKDWHYHUKHKDVWRGRLQRUGHUWRPDNHVXUHKLVSOD\HUVKDYHWKHUHVRXUFHVWKH\QHHGLQRUGHUWRVXFFHHGLQ the  classroom.  

.XOOLVDGRXEOHPDMRULQPDUNHWLQJDQGPDQDJHPHQW7KLVLVWKHVHFRQGWLPHVKHKDVEHHQQDPHGWRWKH1)&$'LYLVLRQ ,,,6FKRODU$WKOHWHWHDP6KHH[SHFWHGWRUHFHLYHWKLVKRQRUEHFDXVHVKHNHHSVWUDFNRIKHUJUDGHVVRVKHNQHZVKHKDG a  high  enough  GPA  to  qualify.    She  is  proud  she  received  this  honor  because  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  be  honored  both  on  and  off   WKH¿HOGDQGLWPDNHVDOORIKHUKDUGZRUNZRUWKLW ³,Q RUGHU WR VWD\ RUJDQL]HG , NHHS DQ DJHQGD ERRN ZKLFK KHOSV PH EDODQFH P\ VFKHGXOH EHWZHHQ DFDGHPLFV DQG DWKOHWLFV´

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Burgess   is   a   communications   disorders   major   and   is   minoring   in   deaf   studies   and   linguistics.   She   said   she   sets   aside   time   during   the   day   for   both  academics  and  athletics.    She  said  Coach  Ciccarello  wants  the  team   WRZRUNKDUGLQVFKRROVRWKH\KDYHDKLJK*3$DQGWKDWKHSODFHVDORWRI importance  on  academics.     ³,¶PJODGDORWRIJLUOVRQWKHWHDPKDYHWKHVDPHPDMRUVRZH¶UHDEOHWR ZRUNWRJHWKHU´

Grande  is  an  elementary  education  major  with  a  concetration  in  math.   It  has  always  been  a  goal  of  hers  to  maintain  a  high  GPA  throughout   college;;  however,  she  underestimated  how  much  effort  it  requires.   She  said  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hard  to  balance  athletics  and  academics  especially   during  their  season.    The  time  constraint  of  being  a  student-­athlete   JLYHVKHUPRUHLQFHQWLYHWRJHWKHUZRUNGRQHDQGPDLQWDLQJRRG grades.  She  said  Coach  Ciccarello  is  a  great  motivator  to  do  well  in   the  classroom.   ³,¿QGEHLQJDFROOHJLDWHDWKOHWHDFWXDOO\KHOSVPHSHUIRUPEHWWHULQ WKHFODVVURRP´

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Traina  is  a  communications  disorders  major  and  is  minoring  in  deaf  studies   DQGOLQJXLVWLFV6KHLVWKDQNIXORIKRZ&RDFK&LFFDUHOORSXWVDFDGHPLFV ¿UVWDQGDOORZVWKHSOD\HUVWRPLVVDOLIWRUSUDFWLFHLIWKH\KDYHWRRPXFK ZRUN  6KH IHHOV WKDW LW¶V EHQH¿FLDO WKDW D ORW RI JLUOV RQ WKH WHDP KDYH similar  majors.    The  oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  who  do  try  to  schedule  classes  together  and  do   KRPHZRUNWRJHWKHU ³0\WULFNWREDODQFLQJDWKOHWLFVDQGDFDGHPLFVLVE\ZULWLQJHYHU\WKLQJ GRZQ,ZULWHGRZQGXHGDWHVDQGWLPHVDQGZKHQ,KDYHDPHHWLQJLQRUGHU WRVWD\RUJDQL]HG´

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5XWFRIVN\LVDFRPPXQLFDWLRQVGLVRUGHUVPDMRUDQGLVPLQRULQJLQ deaf  studies  and  linguistics.  She  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  expect  to  receive  this  honor   and  is  very  proud  of  her  teammates  who  also  received  it.  She  said   WKHZHHNO\PHHWLQJVZLWK&RDFK&LFFDUHOORWRPDNHVXUHVKH¶VLQ FKHFNDFDGHPLFDOO\DUHLPSRUWDQWWRKHUEHFDXVHLWVKRZVKHFDUHV She  is  hoping  she  continues  to  have  success  in  the  classroom  this   year.     ³,EDODQFHDFDGHPLFVDQGDWKOHWLFVE\GRLQJZRUNZLWKP\ WHDPPDWHVRQWKHEXVHVEDFNIURPJDPHVDQGZKHQZHJRWRWKH OLEUDU\WRJHWKHU´

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  ED  DILLER  PHOTOGRAPHY

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

.DWLH5XWFRIVN\VHFRQG\HDUÃ&#x20AC;UVWEDVHPDQDQGSLWFKHU


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13

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volleyball  to  Have  Home  Court    Advantage  By  Abbott  Brant  Copy  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

A   three   match   sweep   by   the   Wom-­ enâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Volleyball   team   in   the   third   round   of   SUNYAC   pool   play   ensured   the   Lady   Hawks   a   regular   season   title   and   FRQÂżUPHG WKH\ ZLOO KRVW WKH 681<$& Championship.   The   team   topped   SUNY   Oswego   3-­1  Oct.  25  before  defeating  both  SUNY   Cortland  and  SUNY  Potsdam  3-­1  on  Oct.    GXULQJ WKH ÂżQDO URXQG RI 681<$& play  at  Buffalo  State.     +HDG &RDFK 0DWW *LXIUH VDLG WKH team,   who   has   an   overall   season   record   of   28-­5   and   conference   record   of   9-­0,   ZDQWHG WR ÂżQLVK WKH VHDVRQ DV VWURQJ as   they   started   and   knew   these   last   few   matches   would   solidify   everything   the   Lady   Hawks   had   been   working   for   all   season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   so   excited   to   be   hosting   SUNYACs  this  year,  it  kind  of  gives  us   a  push  start  that  we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  anywhere   HOVH´ IRXUWK\HDU FDSWDLQ 0DULVVD .LQJ VDLGÂł,WDOVRJLYHVXVDFRQÂżGHQFHERRVW because   we   know   what   we   can   achieve   since  we  earned  the  right  to  host.    Now  

ZHMXVWKDYHWRÂżQLVKZKDWZHNQRZZH are  capable  of.â&#x20AC;? The  Lady  Hawks  debuted  at  No.5  in   the   intitial   NCAA   New   York   Regional   rankings.   They   have   three   wins   against   regionally-­ranked   teams   in   the   New   York  region  and  two  wins  against  teams   that   are   regionally-­ranked   in   other   re-­ gions.     The   regional   rankings   will   now   be   released   on   a   weekly   basis   and   help   determine  which  teams  make  the  NCAA   Tournament.           *LXIUH VDLG WKH KRPH FRXUW DGYDQ-­ tage  that  comes  from  hosting  the  champi-­ RQVKLSZDVDOZD\VDVRXJKWDIWHUEHQHÂżW of   receiving   the   regular-­season   confer-­ ence  title.  However,  it  was  at  Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   match   against   Cortland,   he   said,   where   the  importance  of  a  supporting  crowd  re-­ ally  showed.   The   Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Soccer   team,   who   were   in   Buffalo   to   play   a   game   of   their   own   against   Buffalo   State,   came   to   cheer   on   WKH/DG\+DZNV,QWKDWPRPHQW*LXIUH said   he   saw   a   change   of   drive   and   pas-­ sion  within  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  play.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  sort  of  support  provides  a  bub-­ ble   of   energy,   the   same   type   of   energy  

that   we   have   when   we   play   at   home,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   we   have   that   energy,   it   GHÂżQLWHO\JLYHVXVDQHGJHRYHUZKRHYHU weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  playing.â&#x20AC;?   The  Lady  Hawks  will  face  Potsdam   RU 681< 3ODWWVEXUJK LQ WKH VHPLÂżQDO PDWFK6DWXUGD\1RY*LXIUHVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Either   team   we   face   will   be   com-­ ing  off  of  a  win,  and  either  team  coming   RIIDZLQZLWKWKDWVRUWRIFRQÂżGHQFHDO-­ ready  will  be  dangerous,â&#x20AC;?  he  said,  adding   Buffalo  State  and  SUNY  Fredonia  have   performed   well   within   the   conference   and  will  also  be  stiff  competition  for  the   SUNYAC  title.     *LXIUH VDLG WKH WHDP ZLOO FRQWLQXH WR EH EDFNHG E\ .LQJ DORQJ ZLWK NH\ players   fourth-­year   captain   Carrie   Hack   and   second-­year   outside   hitter   Becca   Borquist,   who   have   progressed   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;very   good   players   to   dominant   forces   on  the  court  over  the  last  few  weeks.â&#x20AC;? Borquist   said   although   the   team   leads   the   conference   and   has   been   per-­ forming  at  a  high  level,  they  are  continu-­ ing  to  work  hard  to  progress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   still   have   improvements   to   make,â&#x20AC;?   Borquist   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always  

something  to  get  better  at,  and  our  hard   work  that  is  put  into  getting  better  allows   for  our  successes.â&#x20AC;? During   practice   the   team   is   looking   to   stay   sharp   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;tinkering   with   a   few   WKLQJV RQ RIIHQVH´ *LXIUH VDLG DORQJ with   structuring     drills   to   be   â&#x20AC;&#x153;opponent   VSHFLÂżF´  â&#x20AC;&#x153;At  this  time  in  the  season,  prepar-­ ing   for   the   SUNYAC   Championship,   your   100   percent   now   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   what   it   was   WKUHH PRQWKV DJR´ *LXIUH VDLG Âł, MXVW tell  them  to  give  100  percent  of  whatever   your  100  percent  is  right  now.â&#x20AC;?   The   team   beat   Vassar   College   3-­1   on  Wednesday  night  in  a  non-­conference   match,   winning   the   three   games   25-­18,   25-­18  and  25-­19.    Borquist  had  10  kills   DQG ÂżYH GLJV ZKLOH .LQJ DGGHG  DV-­ sists.    As   a   team,   the   Lady   Hawks   had   12  aces  and  posted  a  .391  hitting  percent-­ age,  while  limiting  Vassar  to  a  .146  hit-­ ting  percentage.     In   preparation   for   the   SUNYAC   Tournament   the   Lady   Hawks   will   at-­ tend  the  Skidmore  Invitational  Nov.  1-­2,   where  they  will  take  on   Union   College,   .HDQ8QLYHUVLW\DQG6NLGPRUH&ROOHJH

Optimistic  Ending  for  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer  By  Abbott  Brant  Copy  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Soccer   team   ended   their   2013   season   Saturday   with   a   tie   in   double  overtime  to  Buffalo  State. The   Lady   Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   0-­0   score   against   the   Lady   Bengals   was   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   fourth   tie  of  the  season  and  ended  the  1-­8-­2  SU-­ NYAC  campaign  for  the  team.  The  team,   with  an  overall  3-­11-­4  record  for  the  sea-­ son,  was  unable  to  create  scoring  oppor-­ tunities  against  the  Lady  Bengals  despite   putting  18  shots  on  goal.   Head  Coach  Colleen  Bruley  said  the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   record   does   not   demonstrate   the   strides  the  team  made  from  the  beginning   of   the   season   to   their   last   few   contests,   VSHFLÂżFDOO\ DJDLQVW 681< 2QHRQWD SUNY  Fredonia  and  Buffalo  State.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  season  started  out  rough,â&#x20AC;?  Bru-­ ley   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   a   whole   new   team,   whole  new  system.  We  are  in  a  different  

place  now  than  we  were  in  the  beginning.   We  wish  we  had  another  twenty  games  to   play  the  way  we  now  know  we  can.â&#x20AC;?   The   Lady   Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   1-­0   loss   against   Oneonta  Oct.  19  and  2-­0  win  over  Fredo-­ nia   Oct.   20   demonstrated   to   Bruley   and   their  opponents  that  this  was  not  the  same   Lady  Hawks  who  were  competing  at  the   start  of  the  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  had  people  from  the  other  teams   saying   how   they   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   believe   we   were  in  last  in  the  SUNYAC  conference,â&#x20AC;?   Bruley  said.   Players  understanding  their  roles  and   maturing   throughout   the   season,   as   well   as   placing   the   right   people   in   the   right   spots,  are  the  factors  Bruley  said  pushed   the  team  to  a  higher  level  of  competition   DQGDOORZHGSOD\HUVWRFOLFNRQWKHÂżHOG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toward   the   end   of   this   season   we   ZHUHÂżQDOO\UHDOO\FOLFNLQJDQGVWDUWLQJWR ÂżJXUHWKLQJVRXW:HHQGHGWKHVHDVRQRII RQDJRRGQRWHDQG,WKLQNWKDWGHÂżQLWHO\

helped  set  the  tone  for  next  year,â&#x20AC;?  third-­ year   Captain   Eleni  Anselmi   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   year   is   in   the   past   and   we   have   learned   from  it  and  look  forward  to  showing  ev-­ eryone   the   team   we   really   are   next   sea-­ son.â&#x20AC;? Anselmi,   along   with   second-­year   defender   Allie   Festa,   second-­year   mid-­ ÂżHOGHU .ULVWLQD *DQGROIR DQG ÂżUVW\HDU PLGÂżHOGHU6ORDQH/LSVKLHZHUHVWDQGRXW players  of  the  season,  Bruley  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  our  team  played  well  togeth-­ er  considering  that  we  lost  eight  starting   seniors  from  last  year  and  we  are  a  young   WHDP´*DQGROIRVDLG Anselmi   and   second-­year   forward   Chelsea  Weir  led  the  team  in  goals  with   four  and  three  goals  a  piece,  and  respec-­ tively   were   tied   for   the   team   lead   in   as-­ VLVWVZLWKWZR6HFRQG\HDUJRDOLH.U\V-­ WHQ.DQHOHGWKHWHDPLQVDYHVZLWK on  330  shots  faced.    She  also  had  a  1.36   goals  against  average.

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

Bruley  said  while  she  is  used  to  heav-­ ily  recruiting  potential  players  after  a  sea-­ VRQÂśVHQGWKHÂżUVW\HDUVRQWKH/DG\ Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  means  less  new  faces  needed.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   always   worry   there   might   be   someone  out  there  that  could  really  help   the  team,â&#x20AC;?  Bruley  said  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;toning  downâ&#x20AC;?   recruitment  this  year,  adding  that  she  re-­ mains   on   the   lookout   for   a   reliable   goal   scorer  to  add  to  the  2014  roster.   Looking   forward,   Bruley   said   the   team  will  partake  in  group  activities  dur-­ ing   the   off   season   to   further   grow   the   bond  the  Lady  Hawks  have  in  hopes  the   connection   will   continue   into   next   sea-­ son.   The   team   will   also   begin   training   with  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  new  Strength  and  Con-­ GLWLRQLQJ&RDFK*DU\*DOOQH[WZHHN â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   the   last   huddle   after   the   Buffalo   game,   they   talked   about   how   they   are   so   excited   for   next   year,â&#x20AC;?   Bruley   said.   Âł7KH\ÂśUH UHDG\ WR JHW EDFN RQ WKH ÂżHOG and  start  playing  again.â&#x20AC;?  


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With   Martin   Biron   retiring   and   Henrik   Lundqvist   getting   injured   re-­ cently,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  question  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  far   in   the   back   of   all   Rangers   fansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   minds   that  need  to  start  coming  to  the  surface   now;;   What   do   we   do   when   Lundqvist   is  gone? For  years  now,  the  Rangers  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   had   to   worry   because   they   were   lucky   to   not   only   have   one   of   the   best   goal-­ ies  in  the  game,  but  because  Lundqvist   was  drafted  by  the  Rangers  and  grew  to   become  who  he  is  while  in  the  Rangers   organization.   But,  unfortunately,  it  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  forev-­ HUDQGWKHFRQYHUVDWLRQRI¿QGLQJKLPD successor  has  to  be  addressed. So   in   comes   26-­year-­old   Cam  Tal-­ bot,   the   now-­successor   to   Martin   Bi-­ ron.  Talbot  is  2-­1  on  the  season,  losing   KLV¿UVW1+/JDPHWRWKH3KLODGHOSKLD Flyers   and   then   winning   in   overtime   against  the  Detroit  Red  Wings  and  then   LQUHJXODUWLPHDJDLQVWWKH1HZ<RUN,V

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Respect  King  Lundqvist ODQGHUV,QDOOWKUHHJDPHVZKHUHKHKDV JRWWHQWRVWDUWKH¶VSOD\HGYHU\ZHOO6R ZHOOLQIDFWWKDW,¶YHKHDUGRQHSDUWLFX lar  question  several  times. Should  the  Rangers  trade  Lundqvist   and  allow  Talbot  to  grow? ,I \RX DUH RQH RI WKH SHRSOH ZKR asked   this   question,   or   even   gave   this   TXHVWLRQ D WKRXJKW VWRS 6WRS ULJKW now,  cool  your  jets  and  relax.   There  is  a  lot  to  say  about  the  idea   of  giving  Lundqvist  away.  But  letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  be-­ gin  by  talking  about  Talbot. +DV7DOERWEHHQSOD\LQJJUHDW"<HV Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  denying  that  Talbot  has   SURYHQ KLPVHOI WR KDYH WKH WDOHQW DQG VNLOOWREHDFDSDEOHEDFNXSDQGPD\EH a  starter  down  the  line.  But  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  bas-­ LQJ RXU KRSHV DQG SODQV IRU WKH IXWXUH RQ D SOD\HU ZKR KDV SOD\HG RQO\ WKUHH games.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   nowhere   near   enough   time  to  make  any  claim. When  you  look  at  Talbotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  numbers   from  his  time  in  the  AHL,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  good,  

EXW WKH\¶UH QRWKLQJ WR PDNH \RX MXPS RXW RI \RXU VHDW DQG SURFODLP KH¶V WKH VHFRQG FRPLQJ +H SOD\HG  JDPHV last  season  and  had  a  2.63  GAA  and  lost   JDPHVZKLOHZLQQLQJ 7RVXPXSKH¶VDJRRGJRDOLHZKR H[FHHGHGH[SHFWDWLRQVLQKLV¿UVWWKUHH JDPHV1RWQHFHVVDULO\DQHZSKHQRP enon  by  any  means.  And  that  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even   what   bothers   me   the   most   about   the   WDONVRIPRYLQJ7DOERWWRWKHVWDUWHUSR sition  earlier  rather  than  later. ,W LV SUHPDWXUH WR GRXEW DQG FDVW Lundqvist   aside   when   we   are   hardly   a   month  into  the  season.   ,VLWZRUU\LQJWRVHHWKH5DQJHUVQRW SHUIRUPLQJ XS WR ZKDW WKH SUHVHDVRQ H[SHFWDWLRQVZHUH"<HV,VLWWURXEOLQJ" <HV ,V LW VFDU\ WKDW /XQGTYLVW¶V VWDUW to  the  season  has  been  lackluster  com-­ SDUHGWRKLVRWKHUVHDVRQVRISOD\"(K ,KDWHWROHWHPRWLRQVUXOHRYHUDQ\ debate,   but   it   may   not   even   be   that.   /XQGTYLVW LV E\ IDU WKH EHVW SOD\HU

the  Rangers  have  and  is  one  of  the  best   SOD\HUVLQWKHZRUOG,W¶VQRUPDOWKDWD SOD\HU LV JRLQJ WR KDYH D VORZ VWDUW WR WKHVHDVRQDWVRPHSRLQWLQWKHLUFDUHHU While   he   has   had   an   uncharacter-­ istic  start,  no  Ranger  fan  should  forget   what  he  has  done  for  the  team.  He  has   D*$$RYHUKLVHQWLUH1+/FDUHHU has  won  30  or  more  games  every  season   KH KDV SOD\HG PLQXV ODVW VHDVRQ ZKHQ there  was  a  lockout  (and  he  got  closeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; KH ZDV ¿YH JDPHV RII  DQG KDV EHHQ QRPLQDWHGIRUWKH9H]LQD¿YHWLPHVDQG won  the  award  in  2012.   Lundqvist   was   the   one   who   made   the   Rangers   relevant   again   after   years   RIEHLQJWKHODXJKLQJVWRFNRIWKH1+/ Lundqvist  is  the  one  who  has  been  voted   WKH5DQJHUV¶093VHYHQ\HDUVUXQQLQJ Lundqvist   is   the   Rangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   best   chance   DW ZLQQLQJ D 6WDQOH\ &XS /RVLQJ KLP would   be   one   of   the   worst   things   that   FRXOGKDSSHQWRWKHWHDP.HHSWKHNLQJ in  his  kingdom.  

'R<RX:DQW7R:ULWH )RU7KH6SRUWV6HFWLRQ" (PDLOXVDW  Oracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu! Thursday,  October  31,  2013


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

15

BALL IS BACK Southeast  Divison: Miami  Heat:  62-­20 Washington  Wizards:  44-­38 Atlanta  Hawks:  39-­43 Orlando  Magic:  35-­47 Charlotte  Bobcats:  28-­54 Atlantic  Division:     Brooklyn  Nets:  56-­26   New  York  Knicks:  48-­34 Toronto  Raptors:  41-­41 Boston  Celtics:  30-­52 Phildadelphia  76ers:  12-­70

Central  Division: Chicago  Bulls:  58-­24 Indiana  Pacers:  55-­27 Detroit  Pistons:  45-­37 Cleveland  Cavaliers:  42-­40 Milwaukee  Bucks:  34-­38 Southwest  Divison: Houston  Rockets:  54-­28 San  Antonio  Spurs:  52-­30 Dallas  Mavericks:  45-­37 Memphis  Grizzlies:  42-­40 New  Orleans  Pelicans:  38-­44

3DFL¿F'LYLVLRQ:   Los  Angeles  Clippers:  58-­24 Golden  State  Warriors:  52-­30 Los  Angeles  Lakers:  41-­41 Sacramento  Kings:  31-­51 Phoenix  Suns:    13-­79 Northwest  Division:     Oklahoma  City  Thunder:  55-­27 Minnesota  Timberwolves:  45-­37 Denver  Nuggets:  37-­45 Portland  Trailblazers:  35-­47 Utah  Jazz:  26-­52

Finals: Eastern  Finals:    Heat  over  Bulls Western  Finals:    Clippers  over  Rockets NBA  Finals:    Heat  over  Clippers Awards: MVP:  Kevin  Durant Defensive  Player  of  the  Year:  Dwight  Howard Rookie  of  the  Year:    Ben  McLemore Most  Improved:  Enes  Kantor Comeback  Player  of  the  Year:  Kevin  Love Sixth  Man  of  the  Year:  Harrison  Barnes Coach  of  the  Year:  Doc  Rivers

The  Miami  Heat  are  looking  to  win  their  third  championship  in  a  row.

By  Andrew  Lief Sports  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Now  that  basketball  is  back,  every  team  is   hoping   to   make  the   playoffs   and   compete  for   a   championship,  except  the  Philadelphia  76ers  and   the  Phoenix  Suns.    This  should  be  one  of  the  best   seasons   in   a   while,   with   so   many   great   young   players  and  with  so  many  intriguing  storylines.     Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   take   a   look   at   each   of   the   divisions   heading  into  the  2013-­14  season: The   Atlantic   Division   will   be   a   battle   be-­ tween   the   two   New   York   teams,   the   Brooklyn   Nets  and  the  New  York  Knicks.    The  Nets  added   Kevin   Garnett   and   Paul   Pierce   to   team-­up   with   Brook  Lopez,  Deron  Williams  and  Joe  Johnson   WRPDNHWKHEHVWVWDUWLQJÂżYHLQWKH1%$7KHDG dition  of  Pierce  and  Garnett  will  provide  leader-­ ship,  which  will  make  them  one  of  the  best  teams   in  the  Eastern  Conference.    The  Knicks  traded  for   Andrea  Bargnani  who,  if  healthy,  will  be  able  to   knock   down   three-­pointers   when   opposing   de-­ fenses  key  on  Carmelo  Anthony.    If  he  does  get   hurt  again  then  the  Knicks  offense  will  be  noth-­ ing  more  than  isolations  from  Anthony  and  J.R.   Smith.    The   Toronto   Raptors   can   compete   for   the  seventh  or  eighth  seed  in  the  Eastern  Confer-­ ence  as  long  as  they  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  trade  Rudy  Gay.    The   Boston  Celtics  will  go  into  full  rebuilding  mode   and  trade  Rajon  Rondo  once  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  fully  healthy.     The  Philadelphia  76ers  will  be  the  worst  team  in   the  NBA  and  tank  for  Kansasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Andrew  Wiggins.

PHOTO  COURTESTY  OF  FLICKR  USER  XAVIATEIR                    

In   the   Central   Divison   the   Chicago   Bulls   will  go  back  to  their  old  form  with  â&#x20AC;&#x153;#TheReturnâ&#x20AC;?   of  Derrick  Rose  from  a  torn  ACL.  His  return  will   make  them  the  biggest  challengers  to  the  Miami   Heat   in   the   Eastern   Conference.   The   Indiana   Pacers  were  one  game  away  from  the  NBA  Fi-­ nals  last  year  and  while  their  bench  has  improved   with   the   addition   of   Luis   Scola   and   Danny   Granger  returning  from  injury,  their  season  will   end  prematurely  because  of  the  improvement  of   the   Bulls.  The   Detroit   Pistons ZLOO EH WKH ÂżIWK seed  in  the  Eastern  Conference  and  have  one  of   the  best  frontlines  in  the  NBA  with  the  addition   of   Josh   Smith.     The   Cleveland   Cavaliers   will   compete  for  one  of  the  last  playoff  spots,  but  are   still   a   year   or   two   away   with   their   young   core   of  Kyrie  Irving,  Dion  Waiters,  Tristan  Thompson   and  Anthony  Bennett.  The  Milwauke  Bucks  will   not  make  the  playoffs  after  losing  Brandon  Jen-­ nings,  Monta  Ellis  and  J.J.  Reddick.    However,   O.J.   Mayo   will   put   up   big   numbers   and   Larry   Sanders   will   continue   to   be   one   of   the   best   de-­ fenders  in  the  league. In  the  Southeast  Division  the  Heat  will  be   the  best  team  in  the  NBA  again,  but  the  gap  be-­ tween  them  and  the  second  best  team  in  the  east   will  be  closer  this  year.  The  Atlanta  Hawks  will   trade  Al  Horford  to  allow  the  team  to  get  a  bet-­ ter   pick   in   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   draft.     The   Washington   Wizards   will   make   the   playoffs   after   having   a   full  season  with  John  Wall  and  Bradley  Beal.  The   recent   addition   of   Marcin   Gortat   will   provide  

stability  on  their  frontline.    The  Orlando  Mag-­ ic   will   be   better   than   last   year,   but   their   young   team   will   need   to   spend   some   time   developing   and  building  chemistry  before  they  can  become  a   playoff  team.    The  Charlotte  Bobcats  will  again   be  a  lottery  team  because  of  their  poor  drafting   history.     The   Oklahoma   City   Thunder   again   will   be   the   class   of   the   Northwest   Division;͞   despite   Russell   Westbrook   being   out   until   December,   Kevin   Durant   will   put   up   huge   numbers   in   his   absence.    Finally  having  a  full  season  with  Kevin   Love  and  Ricky  Rubio  the  Minnesota  Timber-­ wolvesZLOOPDNHWKHSOD\RIIVIRUWKH¿UVWWLPH since  2004.    After  losing  Andre  Igoudala  in  free   DJHQF\DIWHU¿ULQJ*HRUJH.DUODQG'DQLOOR*DO linari   being   out   for   an   extended   period   of   time   the  Denver  Nuggets  will  fail  to  make  the  play-­ offs.    The  Portland  Trailblazers  will  improve  in   the  second  season  of  the  Damian  Lillard  and  La-­ Marcus  Aldridge  era,  but  will  need  another  wing   player  in  order  to  make  the  playoffs.  The  Utah   JazzZLOOEHRQHRIWKH¿YHZRUVWWHDPVLQWKH league  after  losing  Paul  Millsap  and  Al  Jefferson   this  summer. The   Los   Angeles   Clippers   will   win   the   3DFL¿F'LYLVLRQDJDLQDQGZLOOZLQWKH:HVWHUQ Conference   this   season.    The   additions   of   Red-­ dick,  Jared  Dudley  and  eventually  Emeka  Oka-­ for  when  he  is  bought  out  from  the  Suns  will  al-­ low  them  to  get  over  the  top.    The  Golden  State   Warriors  will  be  the  most  fun  team  to  watch  in  

Thursday,  October  31,  2013

the  entire  league  with  the  trio  of  Stephen  Curry,   Klay   Thompson   and   Igoudala.   Every   basket-­ ball  fan  is  just  praying  Curryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ankles  will  stay   healthy  for  the  entire  season.    The  Los  Angeles   Lakers  will  fail  to  make  the  playoffs  this  season   and  will  attempt  to  sign  LeBron  James  or  Antho-­ ny   next   summer.     The   Sacramento   Kings   will   improve  this  season  with  the  additions  of  Grevis   Vasquez  and  Ben  McLemore  to  go  with  DeMar-­ cus  Cousins,  but  are  still  too  young  to  be  a  play-­ off  contender.    The  SunsKDYHRIÂżFLDOO\JLYHQXS on  their  season  last  week  when  they  traded  Gortat   and  they  are  now  focused  on  the  draft,  with  the   SRVVLELOLW\RIWKHPKDYLQJIRXUÂżUVWURXQGSLFNV The  Houston  Rockets  will  win  the  South-­ west   Divison   because   of   their   acquisition   of   Dwight  Howard  last  summer.    Howard  and  James   Harden  will  become  the  best  guard-­center  duo  in   the  entire  league.  The  San  Antonio  Spurs  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   play  as  well  as  last  year  and  with  Tim  Duncan,   Tony   Parker   and   Manu   Ginobili   being   another   year  older  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  way  they  return  to  the  NBA   Finals.    The  Memphis   Grizzlies   will  not  make   WKH:HVWHUQ )LQDOV DJDLQ DQG ZLOO UHDOL]H ÂżULQJ Lionel  Hollins  was  a  huge  mistake.    The  Dallas   Mavericks  will  make  the  playoffs  after  missing   them   last   year   because   of   a   motivated   season   from  Dirk  Nowitzki.    The  New  Orleans  Pelicans   will   be   much   improved   because   of   the   acquisi-­ tions  of  Jrue  Holiday  and  Tyreke  Evans,  but  will   have  to  trade  Ryan  Anderson  for  Omer  Asik  be-­ fore  they  can  become  a  playoff  team.  


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WHAT’S INSIDE

UNTIL THE END Women’s Volleyball to Host SUNYAC Tournament PAGE 13

A Preview To The NBA Season PAGE 15

MAIN  AND  TOP  PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN   BOTTOM  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR  USER    KEITH  ALLISON

FIELD HOCKEY TO FINISH REGULAR SEASON ON SATURDAY : PAGE 11


"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 85, Issue 7