The Dairy | June 2021

Page 1

THE DAIRY JUNE 2021

Virtual Farm Walk 2021 The winners of last year’s NDC & Kerrygold Quality Milk awards, Richard Starrett and family from Donegal will host this year’s Farm Walk.

ndc.ie

NDC launches new Marketing Campaign

Where dairy fits in a sustainable diet

NDC recently unveiled a new marketing campaign bringing the story of Irish Dairy farming to the consumer.

If you are trying to eat more sustainably, we have some tips to consider.

Gunn Family, Carrowglogher, Strokestown, Co. Roscommon (Aurivo Co-op)

Cheese Delights Food writers Patrick Hanlon and Russell Alford – aka GastroGays – recently went on the lookout for Ireland’s most comforting cheese recipes.


PRIDE FROM THE GROUND UP

Irish dairy. It’s not just part of your everyday life, your family’s breakfast, your mid-walk latte. It’s part of your heritage. For 5,000 years we’ve been producing outstanding dairy right here in Ireland. Fifty centuries of caring for the land, the animals, the people. A tradition that, today, as ever, delivers a product both nutritious and sustainable. That’s a tradition we can all be proud of.

ndc.ie

Milk is a source of calcium, protein, vitamins B2 and B12, iodine and potassium. Irish cows are predominantly grass-fed and 99% of the water used to produce milk is supplied by natural rainfall.


June Twenty One

1

WELCOME Ireland is blessed with the perfect conditions for dairy production, with a temperate climate and plentiful rainfall enabling a grass-based system that is the envy of the world. It’s thanks to this that Ireland’s dairy industry is one of the most carbon efficient in the European Union. Ireland’s dairy is produced off grass resulting in emissions running at half the global average. But while our grass-based, family-farming system is both natural and environmentally sustainable, the dairy sector cannot take anything for granted when it comes to climate change. We are acutely aware that whilst we have one of the most carbon efficient dairy farming systems in the EU, we still have more work to do to improve Ireland’s agricultural emissions. At the end of March, the Irish Government published a revised Climate Action Bill, committing the country to “pursue and achieve, by no later than the end of the year 2050” carbon neutral status, including a reduction of 51% in the total amount of greenhouse gas emissions within 10 years. Together with every other sector of Ireland’s economy and society, dairy farmers and producers have an important role to play in helping Ireland meet these very ambitious targets. Ireland’s 18,000 dairy farmers are responding to the climate challenge, taking actions large and small to reduce their carbon footprint, improve their sustainability and protect the biodiversity on-farm whilst also delivering nutritious food for Irish and international markets and ensuring ongoing economic viability for family farms. There are also many exciting developments beyond the grass and soil that dairy farmers are embracing, including a focus on Economic Breeding Index (EBI) of their herd to make it as efficient as possible, as well as the roll-out of solar panels and energy efficient systems on-farm. Irish dairy farmers are also continuing to play a central role in protecting and improving our precious rural biodiversity, planting native hedgerows and trees, offering pollinator patches for bees and wasps, and by protecting watercourses via the ASSAP scheme. While it is heartening to see the work being undertaken by dairy farmers across the country, there is more to be done. The next step is to mainstream all of these actions – which taken together can have a really significant impact on farm emissions – onto every dairy farm across the country. Up and down the country, experts from Teagasc, the co-operatives, the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine and industry associations are standing ready to assist farmers to implement these proven actions on their farms. And, as always, we are seeing farmers talking to and teaching other farmers on sustainable methods – something which even has continued throughout the Covid-19 pandemic with the use of technology, even as many other industries have been halted.

Taking a practical, win-win approach to sustainability, where both the farmer and environment benefit, is the key to widescale adaption, further reduction of emissions in the sector and ongoing farm sustainability. Our journey is continuing as environmental sustainability does not have a finish line or cut-off point. There will always be more to learn as we strive to meet the challenge of a changing climate and continue to provide a source of sustainable, healthy and nutritious food for generations to come. By doing so, we’ll ensure that Ireland’s dairy farmers will continue to deliver natural, healthy and sustainable dairy, now and into the future. By acknowledging the resilience of the sector & farmers that maintained production throughout the pandemic, providing nutritious dairy products for 45 million consumers while growing its economic impact. This resilience is what will underpin our collective environmental response. ZO Ë K AVA N AG H Chief Executive


TOGETHER FROM THE GROUND UP

We’ve always been in this together. As a family. Or as a village. Or as an industry. Because as Irish Dairy Farmers, we’ve a lot to be proud of. A heritage and tradition begun 5000 years ago. And a future that stretches out in front of us. Bright. Hopeful. And resolute. We’re a part of the people we farm for and they’re a part of us. We’ve always been in this together. Never more so than today.

ndc.ie


June Twenty One

3

CONTENT S 20 NDC launched new Marketing Campaign 4 Kellie Harrington & Philly McMahon Join Forces

22

New NDC publication on Vitamin K

23

GAA stars announced as campaign ambassadors

Moo Crew Dairy and Eating Sustainably

6

Larry Hannon elected NDC Vice Chair

8

EU dairy organisations support Foodservice sector

Nutrition News

PRIDE FROM THE 24 GROUND UP

10

Irish dairy. It’s not just part of your every life, your family’s breakfast, your mid-wa It’s part of your heritage.

For 5,000 years we’ve been producing outstanding dairy right here in Ireland. Fifty centuries of caring for the land, the the people.

A tradition that, today, as ever, delivers a both nutritious and sustainable. That’s a tradition we can all be proud of.

26 Where dairy fits in a sustainable diet ndc.ie

A Day in the Life of Majella McCafferty Cheese Delights

12 Virtual Farm Walk 2021 Virtual He@lthFest reaches 18,000 teenagers

14

Cook In At Home

16

Date for your Diary

18

28

Milk is a source of calcium, protein, vitamins B2 and B12, iodine and potassium. Irish cows are predominantly grass-fed and 99% of the water used to produce milk is supplied by n

30


4

Philly McMahon

The Dairy


June Twenty One

5

JOINING FORCE S During the recent pandemic lockdown, Irish schoolchildren attending DEIS schools (Delivery Equality of Opportunity in Schools) received healthy eating food packs containing fresh fruit, vegetables and dairy. To support the programme and roll-out to schools, the NDC and Bord Bia joined forces to create a series of new educational videos, targeting DEIS schools. These videos featuring new ambassadors, All Ireland GAA footballer Philly McMahon and World Champion Boxer Kellie Harrington empower primary school children to adopt healthy eating habits while promoting the importance of physical activity. The videos are a joint collaboration between the Food Dudes and School Milk Scheme programmes. To view the videos visit www.moocrew.ie

Kellie Harrington


6

Moo Crew DAIRY & E ATING SUS TAINABLY To coincide with a full reopening of schools Moo Crew resource packs were delivered to almost 400 primary schools following the Easter break. Resource packs included updated Teachers’ Guides with a new lesson plan ‘Dairy and Eating Sustainably’, and Dairy and Eating Sustainably Challenge sample packs. Schools were encouraged to partake in the Moo Crew Eating Sustainably Challenge during National School Milk Week (17th-21st May) and share their success on social media to win spot-prizes. To find out more visit www.moocrew.ie/dairy-challenge

The Dairy


“Nice to see you again”... It’s always a good time for serving customers.

Eoin Clusky, Bread 41, Pearse Street, Dublin 2

The content of this promotion campaign represents the views of the author only and is his/her sole responsibility. The European Commission and the European Research Executive Agency (REA) do not accept any responsibility for any use that may be made of the information it contains.


The Dairy

8

Larry NDC VICE CHAIR ELEC TED Dairy farmer Larry Hannon from Ballitore, Co. Kildare was recently appointed vice chair of the National Dairy Council (NDC), he represents the National Milk Agency and has been on the NDC board since April 2019. Larry has taken over from outgoing vice chair, John Murphy, who recently stepped down from the NDC Board. Larry has been a dedicated Avonmore farmer since taking over the Hannon farm in 2003, and comes from a long tradition of family farming. He is the former chairman of the Fresh Milk Producers group – which represents over 1,000 Glanbia suppliers – and is the current vice chair of the IFA National Liquid Milk Committee.

Hann


June Twenty One

non

9


10

The Dairy

EU DAIRY ORGANISATION S SUPPORT FOODS E RVICE S EC TOR NDC is running a new EU-funded campaign this year designed to support the foodservice industry which has suffered considerable losses during the last year of the global pandemic.

Kieran Doherty, Owner, Nancy’s Barn, Ballyliffin, Co Donegal.


June Twenty One

11

Eoin Clusky owner of Bread 41, Pearse Street, Dublin.

Together with France, Belgium, Denmark and Northern Ireland, the NDC will build an integrated marketing, PR and advertising campaign to support the sector. The programme will include an advertising campaign capturing seven well-known cafes and artisan food producers around Ireland who champion dairy products every day in their food offering - from cappuccinos to carrot cake and all-butter croissants. The NDC will be working with a major foodservice provider to deliver a special training programme on dairy and nutrition for staff and customers. A selection of the cafes photographed are featured here and will be displayed online, in print and on billboards across Ireland over the summer months.


12

Virtual Farm Walk 2021

The Dairy


June Twenty One

13

Richard Starrett and Family.

The winners of the 2020 NDC & Kerrygold Quality Milk Awards, Richard Starrett and family from Donegal will host this year’s Virtual Farm Walk. The event will be held at 11am on Tuesday 29th June live from the farm. This event organised by Teagasc, with the support of Aurivo Co-Op, the National Dairy Council and Ornua, will celebrate the excellence of Irish dairy farming.

The Starrett farm in Lifford Co. Donegal is a true family operation where Richard resides with his parents, his wife Wendy and children David, Holly and John. Richard believes sustainability is the biggest and most important aspect of farming and is focused on improving the sustainability of his farm. For further information please visit www.teagasc.ie/virtualmilkwalk


14

VIRTUAL HE@LTHFE S T RE ACHE S 1 8 ,0 0 0 TE E NAG E R S How do you keep thousands of teenagers entertained and inspired!? This year’s HealthFest event was brought to over 18,000 students and teachers virtually for the first time as ‘He@lthFest’. The NDC used an interactive online platform to deliver credible information and demonstrations from Irish experts in the areas of physical activity, nutrition and mental wellbeing. Participants also had the chance to visit exhibitor stands; win prizes by climbing a leader board based on their engagement levels; and take place in a virtual scavenger hunt. Over 8,500 tuned in on the event date, with 9,500 additional logins to the event platform in the month after the event, where they could access the talks and exhibitor stands. The virtual information stands showcased vital information for this age group, including booths from St Patrick’s Mental Health Services, Bodywhys, SpunOut, Sport Ireland Institute, Careers Portal; as well as a number of NDC member co-ops. For further information on HeathFest 2021 and to view the talks, you can visit www.healthfest.ie

The Dairy


Open for business... Feels good to be opening doors.

Deboragh and Nicola, Minetta Deli, Sutton, Dublin 13

The content of this promotion campaign represents the views of the author only and is his/her sole responsibility. The European Commission and the European Research Executive Agency (REA) do not accept any responsibility for any use that may be made of the information it contains.


The Dairy

16

Cook In At Home NDC sponsored the recent series of Cook In with Mark Moriarty on RTE ONE to highlight the launch of our new marketing campaign, From the Ground Up. The second series was another great success and Mark cooked up lots of delicious and accessible recipes for people to try at home with Irish dairy starring in most of his dishes. We hope you enjoy this selection of recipes from the show.

Bacon Mac & Cheese SERVES 4 INGREDIENTS

200g macaroni, par boiled in salted water 100g bacon lardons 20g butter 20g flour

750ml milk 150g white & red cheddar mix 20g parmesan cheese, grated

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1/2 chicken stockpot Juice of half a lemon Salt & Pepper

METHOD

1.

Cook the bacon lardons in a heavy based saucepan, until crispy and golden all over. Remove from heat and add milk, allow to heat up to a simmer.

2.

In a separate pot, melt the butter. Add the flour and cook until blonde in colour and bubbling.

3.

Add the warm bacon milk, and whisk constantly until thickened and bubbling. Remove from the heat and add 100g grated cheddar mix and 20g parmesan, mix till glossy and smooth.

4.

Season the sauce with chicken stock pot, mustard, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

5.

Add the macaroni and mix, transfer to oven proof dish and bake for 20mins at 180c until bubbling and golden and serve.

ndc.ie


June Twenty One

17

Brioche Garlic Bread MAKES 1 L ARGE LOAF INGREDIENTS

For the butter:

For the glaze:

1 packet fast action yeast

100g butter

1 egg yolk

4 medium eggs

6 cloves garlic

2 tbsp cream

20g grated parmesan

For the brioche dough: 400g strong flour 40g sugar 5g salt 100ml milk

100g butter (soft to touch)

Chopped parsley Salt, pepper

METHOD

1.

To make the garlic butter, mix butter with the grated garlic, parmesan, parsley, salt and pepper. Roll into small balls and chill in fridge.

2.

Place the flour, sugar and salt in a mixer and mix to distribute.

3.

Warm the milk to just above hand temperature, add in the packet of yeast, add to the dough.

4.

Add the eggs one by one and mix on medium speed for 5 minutes, then add butter and mix for a further 10 minutes until the dough is shiny and glossy. Place in a greased bowl and allow to prove for minimum 4 hours, but ideally overnight.

5.

6.

Brush a baking tin with softened butter

7.

Stuff the dough with the butter balls and roll into rough golf ball sized shapes, on a floured workbench. Place these in the baking tray, don’t worry about the gaps.

8.

Cover in clingfilm and prove in a low 50c oven for 30 minutes until doubled in size.

9.

Mix 1 egg yolk with 2 tbsp cream, and brush the top of the bread lightly with the glaze.

10. Bake at 175c for 12-15mins until golden. 11.

Finish by brushing with more butter and sprinkle with salt, thyme, crispy garlic and chives.

Next day roll the dough on a floured surface, into a sausage shape and cut into 8 x 60g chunks.

ndc.ie

Crème Caramel SERVES 4 INGREDIENTS

60g sugar

4 large eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

40g water

2 egg yolks

500ml milk

Low fat oil spray

30g caster sugar

100ml cream

METHOD

1.

Warm 4 ramekins in a low oven, remove and spray heavily with a low fat oil spray or similar.

7.

Pour the custard mix into the ramekins on top of the now hardened caramel, be generous, it should fill 80% of the ramekin.

2.

Melt the sugar and water in a pot and allow to boil, swirl the pot regularly but do not mix with a spoon.

8.

Place on a tray with some boiling water around the ramekins and cook at 100c for 45-50mins.

3.

Once the mix turns amber, remove from heat and wait 1 minute until it’s mahogany in colour.

9.

Once the custards are set with a tiny amount of wobble, remove and allow to return to room temp.

4.

Pour a thin layer of the caramel into the bottom of each ramekin and allow to cool at room temperature.

10. Place in the fridge, ideally overnight, or for at least 4 hours to allow the caramel layer to soften into the cream layer.

5.

Mix the eggs, yolks and sugar until smooth.

11.

6.

Warm the milk, cream and extract until just above hand temperature, pour over the eggs and mix until smooth, don’t over whisk or create too much air.

Release with a warm knife around edges and turn out onto a plate with the caramel sauce around it.

ndc.ie


The Dairy

18

Date for your Diary

Nutrition & You: Talking to the Experts Book your place! Thursday June 17th Nutrition is a popular topic, with celebrities, friends and neighbours all having an opinion on what’s in and what’s out! It can be difficult to separate fact from fiction! To address this, ‘Nutrition & You: Talking to the Experts’ is a free online event which will provide you with evidencebased and accurate information on a wide range of nutrition topics. The event, brought to you by the Irish Nutrition & Dietetic Institute (INDI), in collaboration with the National Dairy Council (NDC), will bring together expert dietitians to discuss a range of topics across the life stages, including: Weaning and Feeding Toddlers; Sports Nutrition; Healthy Ageing; Body Weight and Healthy Food Relationships; Gut Health; and Sustainable Eating. Simply register your details at www.nutritionandyou.vfairs. com and join us for a morning of insightful conversation on nutrition matters that matter most to you!


WE HAVE AN APP FOR THAT! Thanks to the contribution of a range of stakeholder experts, we now have a tool which is intended to provide clarification on common Q&A’s. Our Dairy A to Z app comprises accurate answers to over 185 commonly asked questions raised in relation to our Dairy business. We see this as a starting point with the ability to expand the tool to provide further expertise on emerging topics as well as industry notifications when necessary. You can download the app from your app store – search for Dairy A to Z - or you can find the same information on our website ndc.ie under Dairy FAQ. Download the Dairy A to Z app today

ndc.ie


The Dairy

20

Fortifying Consumer Trust in Irish Dairy Farming

The NDC recently unveiled a new marketing campaign bringing the story of Irish Dairy farming to the consumer. As consumer trust in food origin and production methods becomes more crucial, the NDC is moving back to the foundations of why Irish dairy produce is some of the best in the world. The new campaign aims to highlight the importance of Irish Dairy farmers to our everyday lives. It’s not something that many consumers spend a lot of time thinking about but every drop of milk, spoonful of yogurt or crumb of cheese has been lovingly guided on its way to your plate. ‘From The Ground Up’ is a recognition of the connectedness inherent in a natural product – from the soil, to the pasture, to the herd and finally to the consumer. That connectedness is something that Irish Dairy Farmers are justifiably proud of. The campaign calls into focus the rich heritage and tradition of those farmers, with print executions featuring real farmers and their families, linking the journey from farm to fork, with the television and radio strengthening and building on the story that connects us all through the best dairy produce the world has to offer. It’s a strong and confident approach to highlighting the importance of dairy in the country, an approach that echoes the attitude of our Dairy Farmers.

“Our focus now needs to shift to the production system – this is where the knowledge gap is today. In 2020, we took the opportunity to capture the ‘Voice of the Farmer’, in addition to our regular consumer sentiment research. We learned that growing consumer concern with the environment and climate change combined with extensive media reporting of emissions targets is putting increasing pressure on our dairy farmers. More than ever, we need to get back to the building blocks of production and tell that story to the consumer through the voice of the farmer”. ZO Ë K AVA N AG H Chief Executive


June Twenty One

The widening gap between parlour and plate has resulted in a loss of consumer connection to the land. NDC’s new campaign From the Ground Up aims tell to the story of Ireland’s dairy production system and the modern farming practices that protect the land and support a sustainable farming system for future generations. Research carried out by the NDC last April showed that 71% of Irish people believe that Ireland’s climate is suitable for dairy production and 77% believe outdoor grazing is more climate friendly. While Irish Dairy’s nutritional and taste credentials is held in high regard, we need to build trust in our production system. Leveraging our consumer insights and our learnings from our previous consumer-facing product campaigns, we will now tell the stories of Irish Dairy farmers, ensuring that they have the support of the nation, the ‘social licence’ to produce this globally renowned product in a sustainable manner here in Ireland. Ireland was made for dairy production – our climate lends itself perfectly – and our ability to produce dairy sustainably here is second to none.

21

We want to ensure that everybody knows this. Our new TV ad has recently been running on all major TV stations and prime time slots for Irish viewers and on radio, digital and print. We have also created a series of billboard executions which will appear in the summer months in line with easing of restrictions and more movement around the country. Our website has also been given a new look and feel - please visit www.ndc.ie


22

The Dairy

NUTRITION NE WS New recommendations highlight dairy as an important food group for older adults In May, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) published updated scientific recommendations on dietary guidelines for older adults. The report highlights that the over 65s are the fastest growing age group in Ireland and that specific nutrition considerations are key in supporting healthy ageing. Age related declines in bone and muscle tissue are among the factors related to decreased mobility and frailty, making adequate intake of particular nutrients even more important for this age group. Protein contributes to the maintenance of bone and muscle mass and was therefore identified as a key nutrient for this age group. The report highlights that older adults need a more protein-dense diet than the general adult population and that dairy foods provide high-quality protein. In addition, dairy foods were recognised as being easy for frail older adults to consume.

“Currently over 70% of older adults are falling short of the recommended three servings a day, but these new guidelines help to shine a light on the nutritional value of dairy, which will hopefully encourage greater uptake of this important food group.”

Calcium is needed for the maintenance of normal bones and the report recognises its role for optimal bone health in older adults. Dairy products were identified as the predominant source but it is also available from fish and plant sources such as wholegrain cereals, pulses, nuts, seeds and dark green leaves. However, the guidelines advise that calcium from plant sources is generally less bioavailable than that from animal sources. The FSAI reports low status of folate and the related B vitamins (i.e. vitamin B12, vitamin B6 and riboflavin) commonly occurs in older adults; and is associated with a higher risk of diseases of ageing (including cardiovascular disease, cognitive dysfunction and osteoporosis). Improved B vitamin status is associated with better health outcomes in older adults and the report identifies milk and dairy foods as an important contributor to B vitamin intake. Indeed, milk and dairy were recognised as the best provider of riboflavin. The National Dairy Council welcomed the new scientific guidelines for older adults. Nutrition Manager, Dr Marianne Walsh said that the recommendations highlight the important role that dairy can play in contributing to the intake of several key nutrients. She said that milk, yogurt and cheese offer a convenient and affordable source of nutrition, with three servings recommended daily. An example of a serving is 200ml of milk, 125g of yogurt or 25g of cheese.

Leading Race Horse Trainer Jessica Harrington pictured on her stud last year, Jessica is an NDC ambassador helping to raise awareness of osteoporosis and the importance of having adequate calcium in the diet as we get older.


June Twenty One

NE W NDC PUB LIC ATION ON VITAMIN K

23

Dairy Nutrition Forum is a scientific publication produced by the NDC, with the objective of keeping health professionals and those in the industry informed regarding relevant dairy research. The latest edition focuses on vitamin K. This nutrient is often overlooked and is not well explored compared to other well-known nutrients, such as vitamin D. However, there has been a resurgence of interest in vitamin K in recent years, with research showing its potential as a hidden link in bone and cardiovascular health. As fermented foods such as cheese are a good source of vitamin K, this publication aims to highlight dairy’s role and raise the profile of vitamin K. As interest in vitamin K grows, it will be important for the industry to be aware of opportunities in product development.


The Dairy

24

GAA stars announced as ambassadors for the “Everything starts with milk” campaign in conjunction with National Dairy Council GAA players Grace Walsh, Cian Lynch and Con O’Callaghan are this year’s sports stars appointed as Milk Ambassadors for the ‘Everything starts with milk’ initiative, a European Milk Forum campaign encouraging Irish consumers to drink more Milk as it supports optimum performance.

a campaign ambassador for Everything Starts with Milk. The campaign’s ability to educate people on the importance of diet and nutrition to perform their best is so important, not just for athletes but for young people starting to establish their own health goals - whether it’s for training at school or to feel fitter and more confident.”

The National Dairy Council caught up with the ambassadors at the Naomh Olaf’s GAA club Dublin to find out more about how their passion for their sport and dedication to a balanced and nutritious diet, helping them perform their best on the pitch.

Grace will be taking part in events and providing professional insight of her training throughout the year. She shared how she aims to use her ambassadorship to represent positive role models in sport saying – “This year I hope to bring insight into how I take my health as seriously as my physical training when I’m off the pitch. Strength and ability to play camogie at a top level takes practise and hard work, so having a diet rich in proteins, calcium and vitamins is important. It helps me to keep my energy levels up during a match and is an aid to recovering afterwards.”

All Stars camogie player of the year nominee, Grace Walsh is joining the campaign in between rotas as a clinical nurse at St Vincent’s hospital. Grace has shared her delight at being selected as an ambassador of the campaign stating – “I’m so pleased to be selected as


June Twenty One

25

Kilkenny Camogie star Grace Walsh, Dublin GAA player Con O’ Callaghan and Limerick Hurler Cian Lynch.

Limerick hurler Cian Lynch shared how he continues to maintain his healthy diet and hurling skills off the pitch, which keeps him mentally and physically in shape for the next foreseeable game, saying – “I enjoy finding ways to integrate training into my day like playing road hurling or doing drills in the garden. “The important thing for me is a healthy balanced diet of protein, calcium and vitaminbased foods. I choose milk as my supplement of choice to keep my body in good condition and to stay hydrated after I train.” The National Dairy Council and the EU welcome Dublin County footballer, Con O’Callaghan to join this year’s campaign. His passion for his sport makes him an excellent role model for the campaign and he looks forward to using his ambassadorship to encourage young people to eat well and take part in sport saying –

“I’m delighted to be working with a campaign that encourages people to make healthy choices and inspire them to find ways to stay active. This campaign is valuable to anyone who wants to know more about the nutritional benefits of milk, which is so accessible to everyone, and how it’s such a key component in fuelling your body effectively for training and in day-to-day life.” The National Dairy Council is also delighted to welcome boxer Kellie Harrington back as a campaign supporter.


26

Where dairy fits in a sustainable diet If you are trying to eat more sustainably, here are some tips to consider: Include an abundance and variety of fruit and vegetables These should form the basis of the diet and should be included in meals and snacks across the day. Vegetables, salad and fruit provide fibre and a wide range of vitamins and minerals for good health. Enjoy a rainbow of colours, as the natural variety of colours in these foods provides a range of protective nutrients. In season, locally sourced produce is the best choice.

Include wholegrains and high fibre carbohydrates Examples include wholegrain bread, porridge oats, brown rice or local potatoes with their skins left on. These unrefined foods are important for providing energy and fibre, which supports metabolism and a healthy digestive system.

oost nutrient intakes with moderate B amounts of dairy Best known for their calcium content, milk, yogurt and cheese also provide a wide range of other essential nutrients including protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin A, B vitamins, potassium, phosphorus, iodine and zinc. In Ireland, most adults fall short of the recommended 3 servings per day. Examples of a serving are: a 200ml glass of milk; a 125g pot of yogurt; or a 25g piece of cheese. Did you know that Ireland is among the best places in the world for sustainable milk production? Irish dairy farms have one of the lowest carbon footprints in the world. Our mild, wet climate makes grassland one of the most successful crops in Ireland. Cows convert human-inedible materials such as grass into affordable nutritious dairy foods, which make a valuable contribution to a healthy, sustainable diet.

The Dairy


June Twenty One

27

Include legumes and nuts; moderate amounts of eggs, poultry and fish; and small amounts of red meat Recognised for their protein content, this is a diverse food group. Protein is an essential nutrient across our life stages, with several important functions. These foods also provide a range of micronutrients, such as iron. The notable message for these protein-rich foods is to choose different foods on different days (2 servings per day) and be mindful of the appropriate portion size. Examples of a serving include: ¾ cup cooked beans, peas or lentils; 2 eggs; 50-75g cooked meat (including poultry), 100g cooked fish or tofu; or 40g unsalted nuts or seeds.

Drink enough water Drinking-water from the tap is the most sustainable choice, as it avoids packaging. Fluid requirements vary but most adults need about 2-2.5 litres per day. This equates to about 8 glasses of fluid, with the rest coming from food. Remember that alcoholic beverages and soft drinks should be limited. They contribute to greenhouse gas emissions like other foods and drinks, but they are not necessary for health.

Try not to consume more than you need Eating excess food is a form of food waste and contributes to weight gain. With over 60% of Irish adults overweight or obese, excess intake is something that we need to address for health, sustainability and economic impact. Be mindful of appropriate serving sizes. Avoid highly processed, prepackaged foods and foods that are high in fat, sugar and salt.

Reduce food waste One third of the world’s food is wasted every year, with €400-€1,000 worth of food ending up in Irish household bins annually! Here are some tips to help reduce your food waste: • Plan ahead – plan a weekly menu before food shopping • Prepare the right amount – measure portion sizes needed • Use leftovers in other recipes e.g. leftover mashed potato can be transformed into a tasty potato salad • Use all parts e.g. vegetable scraps can be added to a stock • Consider preservation e.g. pickle vegetables or freeze berries • Avoid disposable utensils such as plastic cutlery or cups • Recycle, reuse and compost where possible To find out more about the principles of a sustainable diet and where dairy fits, download the National Dairy Council’s free booklet on Eating Sustainably (www.ndc.ie/ publications). The booklet is endorsed by Healthy Ireland and the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute with practical tips on lifestyle choices that can make a difference.


The Dairy

28

A Day in the Life of Majella McCafferty Farm Profitability Specialist at Aurivo Co-op Growing up on a farm I gained a great passion for the farming life. From a very young age I could be found in sheds and fields with animals in Co. Leitrim. I always wanted to work with animals, especially cattle. I took on a part-time job as a teenager working in a rural, large animal veterinary practice. I found this job incredibly rewarding and the experience reaffirmed my ambition to develop a career in large animal veterinary nursing and agricultural business. I gained extensive experience in small and large animal medicine during my studies in Dundalk IT where I completed a Bachelor of Science Degree in Veterinary Nursing. During this time, I worked on a dairy farm and large animal veterinary practice. Combining the experience gained in both, I developed a great dedication and admiration for the dairy industry. I returned to study in Dundalk IT / Ballyhaise Agricultural Collage and completed the BSc. (Honours) in Sustainable Agriculture. I was awarded Irish Student Veterinary Nurse of the year in 2015 and received the President’s Business Award for Overall Enterprising Student of The Year by combining my knowledge gained in veterinary practice, the agricultural industry and business management. I carried out internships in Teagasc with B&T Dairy Advisory and completed training courses in Teagasc Moorepark. I previously worked as the Farm Development Advisor for LacPatrick Dairies Cooperative Society and following the merger I worked for Lakeland Dairies Co-operative Society.


June Twenty One

In 2020 I commenced the role as Farm Profitability Specialist for Aurivo Co-operative Society.

29

What does an average day look like?

I am very lucky to have a very varied job so two days are rarely the same. In 2018 I worked alongside LacPatrick Some days I will be working on Dairies milk supplier Darran McKenna, specific issues on certain farms such the first NDC & Kerrygold Quality as mastitis control, water quality or Milk Awards winner in Co Monaghan. farm development. I also work with In 2020 I worked with Aurivo milk our focus farms and discussion groups supplier Richard Starrett the first throughout the region. I represent NDC & Kerrygold Quality Milk the co-op in several industry working Awards winner in Co. Donegal. groups such as Animal Health IrelandCellCheck The National Mastitis What are your responsibilities? Control Programme and The Irish Johnes Control Programme. The In my role as Farm Profitability national programmes implementation Specialist, I work with Aurivo milk groups develop strategies on topics suppliers to help them make their important to the dairy industry, they farms more sustainable. I focus on are a collaboration between all the the three pillars of sustainability economic, environmental, and social. stakeholders and shown what is possible when there is an industry I believe my role is to be a resource wide approach. I take great pride in for all our milk suppliers to help them the fact Aurivo is a farmer owned and run their business more sustainably. run co-operative which has the best I run discussion groups for our milk interest of its shareholders at heart. suppliers to develop their skills and focus on areas they want support with. What is the best thing about In normal times I would also plan and your job? manage on-farm events unfortunately no on-farm events have been held My role gives me the opportunity since January 2020. I have adapted to create positive change within the by developing webinars on topics businesses of all the suppliers I work such as milk quality, animal health with. The work I do with our farmers and milk recording. helps create the highest quality dairy products for our customers. I take Part of my role is to develop resources great satisfaction from this and it for our milk suppliers to use an motivates me to continue to develop example of this is the microbiological our milk suppliers. I like the fact that culture and antibiotic sensitivity each day brings different challenges. testing service. I helped develop Meeting and working with new people with Farm Labs. The service allows each day, positively influencing, and milk suppliers to culture the bacteria creating change in farm businesses and identify which organisms or that benefits our suppliers, the pathogens that are causing mastitis customers, and the co-operative. on the farm alongside identifying any We have a great team here at Aurivo antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics and if you have a passion for the dairy that may be present. This also reduces industry is it is a great place to work. the use of antibiotics. This is one of We are consistently challenged and the tools alongside data that is used given the chance to develop in our in problem-solving on farm issues. roles. This is the perfect job for me to be! I am also responsible for the ASSAP programme within the Co-op. The What are the challenges? programme works with farmers to improve water quality in their local Some of the upcoming challenges area. This is a collaboration between will be climate change, environmental Teagasc, Co-ops, local county regulations, and antimicrobial councils, scientists, and farmers. resistance at herd level. There has been really encouraging results from the project.

The challenge in my role is to transfer the knowledge to our farmers so they will engage with the key messages and ultimately change on farm practices to meet these challenges. To successfully overcome these challenges there will need to be significant changes in on farm practice, such as adoption of clover in our swards, using protected urea and switching from reactive to a proactive practice approach. I have no doubt the industry can overcome these challenges, but it will take the combined efforts of every stakeholder in the industry. Where do you see yourself in five years? I can always see myself working in the dairy industry no matter what the role. I want to gain more knowledge about the factors that cause people to change behaviour and social science aspect. I plan to complete additional training and development in the areas of people management, leadership and change management. I will be continuously upskilling, learning and growing. I have completed training in Lean Management, I thoroughly enjoyed it, and i would like to add to the knowledge gained to date. What skills do you think you need to succeed in your role? The Agricultural Science degree is the foundation of my skills. It has provided me with technical knowledge, communications and networking skills that are essential in my role. Communicating effectively is very important as I deal with a wide range of people in my role. The ability to think outside the box and see different situations from different perspectives enables you to problem-solve more effectively, which ultimately will lead to the best outcome for our milk suppliers.


The Dairy

30

Cheese Delights

As part of our EU Cheese Your Way campaign, Food writers Patrick Hanlon and Russell Alford – aka GastroGays – recently went on the lookout for Ireland’s most comforting cheese recipes, to find out what’s cooking, melting, and bubbling in homes across Ireland. The competition was inspired by Ireland’s love of cheese and our curiosity to try out more varieties. In a recent EU-funded survey 53 per cent of people stated they are curious to discover more cheeses but Ireland’s firm favourite at 64 per cent is cheddar. Here, we feature the winning recipe as well as some other favourites. METHOD

Courgette & Cooleeney Arancini Balls with Arrabbiata Sauce Overall Winner of the NDC and EU Cheese Your Way Cheesy Comforts Competition 2021 Sinéad Henry Bezy. There is a little bit of work involved with these lads but they are worth it! I often see myself making a risotto as an excuse to recreate these delicious balls of cheese delight. Any leftover risotto screams Arancini Balls. They can be stuffed with a variety of fillings but in my opinion, cheese is a must. I have experimented with many different cheeses but the creaminess/nuttiness of Cooleeney is a winner for me as it oozes out unapologetically. Any type of brie or camembert also works a treat.

1. To make the risotto, heat up the olive oil in a large pan and sauté the onions and garlic until soft. Add the courgette and continue to cook for a few more minutes. Add the risotto rice and cook for one minute. 2. Pour in the white wine and continue to cook for two more minutes. In a separate pot, heat the stock over a low heat and add the thyme and bay leaf. It is important that the stock is hot as you add it into the rice. Continue to stir the risotto and gradually add the vegetable stock as the rice absorbs it. At this stage, if you have a parmesan rind, add it to the risotto as it adds an additional cheese flavour. Continue gradually adding stock, stirring until the rice is cooked. The time can vary but takes approximately 20 minutes to cook the rice. The amount of stock you need will depend on your rice. If the rice is too dry, add more stock until it is fully cooked but still has a bite.

3. Add the parmesan cheese and season with salt and pepper. Remove the parmesan rind at this stage (if added). The rich arrabbiata sauce and melting cheese is a match made in heaven and I would happily eat a plate of these for 4. Once the risotto is cooked, you can either eat it! dinner. In the absence of travel, why not try this recipe and or allow it to cool to make your Arancini Balls. pretend you are eating them on the bustling streets of Naples. 5. To form the Arancini Balls, scoop a portion of the INGREDIENTS 2 eggs, lightly whisked cooled risotto into your hand. Place a chunk of Cooleeney S E RV E S : 4 - 6 150g plain flour Cheese in the centre and shape it into a ball. Repeat with 300g panko breadcrumbs the remaining risotto and cheese. Place in the fridge for Risotto: (if you cannot find panko about 10 minutes to help them keep their shape. 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil you can use ordinary 2 cloves of garlic, minced 6. In three separate bowls, place the flour, whisked egg breadcrumbs) 2 shallots, finely diced and panko breadcrumbs. Firstly, lightly coat the Arancini Sunflower oil (for frying) 1 courgette, Balls in flour, then coat in the whisked egg and finally coat finely chopped Tomato Arrabbiata Sauce: in the panko breadcrumbs until they are fully covered. 80ml white wine 1 tbsp olive oil Repeat until you have used up all the risotto. 500g risotto rice 3 cloves of garlic, minced 7. Heat the sunflower oil in a deep pan until it reaches 1500ml vegetable stock 1 fresh red chilli, finely about 180 degrees. Deep fry the balls for about 4 minutes (add a bay leave and some chopped on either side (or until fully golden). You may have to fry fresh thyme) ½ a bunch of fresh basil, the balls in batches. Drain any excess oil on kitchen paper. 70g Parmesan Cheese, roughly chopped finely grated 400g tin of chopped 8. To make the arrabbiata sauce, place garlic, chilli and (keep the rind) tomatoes. basil stalks in a pan over a medium heat with the olive oil Salt and pepper Salt & pepper and fry for two minutes. Add in the tomatoes, season with salt and pepper and cook for 10 minutes over a mediumArancini Balls: To serve: low heat. Blend until smooth. 200g Cooleeney Cheese, Tomato arrabbiata sauce cut into small chunks Parmesan cheese 9. Serve the Arancini Balls immediately with the (including rind) Fresh parsley, tomato sauce, grated parmesan cheese and lots finely chopped of fresh chopped parsley.


June Twenty One

31

4. When base is ready allow to cool a little before adding Ricotta mixture. 5. Meanwhile roll up about ¾ of other packet of ready rolled puff pastry then whilst still rolled slice into half inch rounds Put the mixture into the cake tin- spreading evenly Slightly loosen the pastry rounds – some may even unroll but that’s ok Place the pastry rounds on top of pie making sure not to leave any gaps (it doesn’t have to be perfect) This will give the pie an interesting top instead of a plain flat one! 6. Beat up the other egg and brush over the top of the pastry. 7. Bake in oven for 15/20 mins or until golden brown.

Pastizzi Pie 2nd prize winner of NDC and EU Cheese Your Way – Cheesy Comforts Competition 2021 Heather Heath. My inspiration for this pie came from me living in Malta for 6 months. They use Ricotta cheese a lot for both savory and sweet dishes. One of their most popular dishes was called Pastizzi which is a bit like a Maltese Pastie and was delicious. The Mother of the family I stayed with was a wonderful cook and I remember many a dish she cooked with Ricotta so making my own pie using Ricotta cheese has brought back some very fond memories of my time in Malta and a bit of a tribute to Mrs. Cachia who only died recently at the age of 93! INGREDIENTS S E RV E S : 6 - 8 500g Ricotta Cheese 300g Feta cheese (cubed) 300g Spinach 4 Tbsp Pesto (or more to taste)

2 Eggs Salt & Black Pepper to taste 500g Puff Pastry (2 pkts of Ready Rolled)

METHOD 1. Grease a cake tin with butter (9.5 inch by 2.5 inches deep) Set oven to 180 degrees Use one packet of puff pastry to line bottom and sides of cake tin Bake blind for 15 minutes (or until slightly golden) As base is cooking prepare filling: 2. Mix together in a large bowl Ricotta cheese, Feta Cheese, Pesto, Spinach (wilt spinach first in a pan with a little butter and then remove excess moisture – I pat it with some kitchen roll) and 1 egg. 3. Mix all these ingredients well.

Irish Fondue 3rd prize winner of NDC and EU Cheese Your Way – Cheesy Comforts Competition 2021 Pierre Dogliani. This recipe is inspired by my love of cheese, of my country and the country I now live in (Ireland). As a French, cheese has always been an important part of our meal, and we were having (and still have!) cheese at the end of each meal. For this competition, I have chosen to recreate a fondue, using only products from Ireland, especially the cheese, as the amount of high-quality Irish cheese was a really nice surprise when I moved here. INGREDIENTS S E RV E S : 4

INGREDIENTS S E RV E S : X X

Fondue: 100g of smoked Drumlin from Corleggy Cheese 100g of Drumlin from Corleggy Cheese 100 g of Boyne Valley Bán Farmhouse cheese 1 garlic clove 1 shot of Jameson whiskey 1 spoon of Wholegrain Irish mustard 150 ml of Guinness

To dip in: Diced bread (I have made a Guinness bread) Diced roasted vegetables (I used some diced beetroot, carrot & potato)


The Dairy

32

METHOD 1. Cut all cheese in small pieces, or to grate it. 2. Put the Guinness, mustard and Jameson in a pot, peel and add the garlic clove, bring it all to a boil Step three: add all the cheese and lower the heat, mix continuously until all the cheese has melted.

Cooleeney cream: 20g Irish butter 200ml double cream 100g Cooleeney Irish farmhouse cheese (I leave the rind on it but you can remove if you prefer)

3. Dip in whatever you like and enjoy! 4. While cooking, you can finish the Guinness, and take another one while eating the fondue! Otherwise, a light red such as a Beaujolais would pair perfectly!

To serve: Toasted pine nuts Wild garlic pesto (homemade) Parmesan crisp (optional)/ grated parmesan Green salad leaves (I like purslane leaves)

METHOD 1. To make the pasta: Sift the flour and salt into a bowl. Make a well in the centre and gradually add most of the beaten eggs. Mix into a dough using your hands, adding the remaining egg if needed. If the dough is still too dry add a few drops of water. The pasta dough should not stick to your hands, it should just come together. 2. Knead the dough for a few minutes until smooth. Cover with cling film and allow to rest for 30 minutes. 3. To make the filling, cook the peas/broad beans in a pot of salted boiling water for two minutes. Using a hand blender, combine all the remaining ingredients to the bean puree and season to taste. Set aside to cool.

Spring Ravioli with Wild Garlic Pesto and a warm Cooloneey Cream 4th prize winner of NDC and EU Cheese Your Way – Cheesy Comforts Competition 2021 Una Quinlan. This dish is delicate, comforting and most importantly full of delicious Irish & European cheeses (Ricotta, Parmesan and Cooleeney farmhouse cheese). I have recently jumped on the wild garlic bandwagon and my foraging exploits have led to various wild garlic creations. In looking up different ways of using the golden green stuff, I have arrived at my Spring Ravioli. This dish has everything- homemade pasta, Irish cheese cream, bright vegetables and of course some local wild garlic pesto. This dish reminds me of sunshine, refreshing white wine and alfresco dining! INGREDIENTS S E RV E S : 2 A S A M A I N A N D 4 A S A S TA R T E R

INGREDIENTS S E RV E S : 2 A S A M A I N A N D 4 A S A S TA R T E R

Pasta: 200g Italian ‘00’ flour (or plain flour) 2 eggs (medium), lightly beaten Water (if needed) Pinch of salt

Filling: 50g ricotta cheese 100g peas 100g broad beans Zest of half a lemon Handful of breadcrumbs (if filling is too wet) Salt & pepper

4. To make the ravioli, I use a pasta machine which makes life easier. It can also be done using a rolling pin (or wine bottle!) which requires a lot of patience. Divide the dough into four equal pieces. Roll out the dough using the different settings of the pasta machine until it is extremely thin but still durable. If the dough becomes too sticky, sprinkle with some flour. 5. Once, the dough has been rolled out, cover it as it can dry out quickly. You can cut it into circular shapes using a glass jar or round pastry cutter. 6. Fill each circle with about ½ - 1 tsp of the filling. Damp the edges with water and cover with another circle of dough. It is nice to seal the ravioli with a fork around the edges. Your hands can also do the trick by pinching the edges tightly. Just be careful not to overfill the raviolis or they might burst when cooking. 7. Place your completed ravioli on a floured surface and ensure they are covered until ready to be cooked. Repeat until all the dough is used. 8. To cook the ravioli, bring a pot of water to the boil and add 1 tsp of salt. You may need to cook the ravioli in batches depending on the size of your pot. Cook for approximately 2-3 minutes or until al dente. 9. To make the Cooleeney Cream, simply place all the ingredients in a saucepan and gently heat until the cheese is melted. If you want a smooth consistency, you can place the cooked sauce through a sieve to remove any rind. 10. Serve the ravioli immediately. Pour the warm Cooleeney Cream at the base of the dish, top with the cooked ravioli and drizzle with some wild garlic pesto, extra virgin olive oil, toasted pine nuts and parmesan. 11. Do not forget to chill the white wine. You have earned it!


Open for business... Feels good to be opening doors.

Hugh Galloway, Hugo’s, Lahinch, Co. Clare The content of this promotion campaign represents the views of the author only and is his/her sole responsibility. The European Commission and the European Research Executive Agency (REA) do not accept any responsibility for any use that may be made of the information it contains.


@NDC_ie

#FromTheGroundUp

NDCIreland