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The Mountain Press ■ Sevier County’s Daily Newspaper ■ Vol. 26, No. 290 ■ October 17, 2010 ■ www.themountainpress.com ■ $1.25

Sunday

Request draws some opposition

INSIDE

Forge commissioner questions if city can afford the expense By DEREK HODGES Staff Writer

5Birds beware Houser hopes to revive bird doggin’ on his Kodak quail preserve Sports, Page A8

PIGEON FORGE — Though he believes in the cause and the mission, Commissioner Randal Robinson says he’s not convinced the city can afford to hand over $200,000 to Walters State Community College. Robinson’s comments during a work session last week were the first speed bump in the effort to raise $1 million from local governments, with other Pigeon

Forge officials and county leaders supporting the plan. Walters State President Emeritus Jack Campbell presented the request to commissioners for both governments, and said he also plans to take his message to Gatlinburg and Sevierville officials. He told the Pigeon Forge group the school has the opportunity to get an $8 million grant from the state to build an addition on the Sevierville campus, though that cash comes with the stipulation there be a $1.2 mil-

lion local match. WSCC officials are hoping each of the three cities will contribute $200,000, $400,000 will come from county coffers and the rest will be raised either from private donations or the Walters State Foundation. While several other city commissioners were quick to express support for the request, Robinson sat silent last Monday after Campbell’s presentation. However, he let his reservations be known during the work session. “I really don’t think we know enough about this to make a decision,” Robinson said. “It would be a great thing to do if we could afford it, but I don’t think we can afford it,”

Robinson pointed out city leaders have had to make cuts in the proposed budgets for each of the last few years as the economic crisis pushed revenues down. Further, the city has cut out key purchases and expenditures, including canceling the purchase of new uniforms and not allowing any new hires for the police department. Robinson also pointed out the commissioners earlier in the work session endorsed a request from the Parks and Recreation Department for an additional $600,000 for City Park work, a match for a state grant to complete long-planned work. “Where’s the money coming See Request, Page A3

GOP seems to have upper hand Pratt, Swan seek victory in Dist. 8

5Leaders test skills Leadership Sevier holds annual Team Tailgate Mountain Life, Page B1

By STAN VOIT Editor

State

Eichmann acknowledges the outlook for his candidacy was dim from the very start. “I think I knew that going in, but I had to show there is at least an alternative,” Eichmann says. “I had to give people an option besides a career politi-

It’s hard to imagine that Art Swann won’t be the next state representative from District 8. Even his opponent seems realistic about it. Swann won the Republican Primary over three opponents, and faces Democrat Marvin Pratt of Gatlinburg on Nov. 2. If he wins he will return to the Tennessee House where he served for four years in the 1980s. “I do feel confident,” he said by phone Friday. “You never take anything for granted in this business. I hope I’m doing enough work to win and that people feel comfortable enough with me that I can win.” Pratt, 63, has never run for public office before. “I’m not really a lifelong Democrat,” he said. “I go with what I think is best. I’m not a dyed-inthe-wool Republican or Democrat. I vote more for the man than the party.” Swann says his concerns mirror those of the people he has met: reducing the size of government and creating more jobs. “They want to know what we will do to get people back to work,” Swann said. “It all gets down to priorities. We set priorities in our personal lives when things get tight. We need to

See District 12, Page A2

See District 8, Page A2

Candidates debate job plans Haslam, McWherter deride each other’s job plan Page A6

Weather Today Sunny High: 76°

Tonight Mostly clear

Curt Habraken/The Mountain Press

Early voters look over the sample ballot as they wait for the polls to open Friday. Early voting continues through Oct. 28 at the Voting Warehouse in Sevierville and Thursday through Saturday at Seymour Public Library.

Low: 42° DETAILS, Page A6

Obituaries Addie Mae Brooks, 72 Lynn H. Davis, 76

DETAILS, Page A4

Index Local & State . . . . . A1-6 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . B6 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . A8-12 Comics . . . . . . . . . . . B7-10 Classifieds . . . . . . B12-14 Nation . . . . . . . . . . . . A5

Montgomery faces first challenge By DEREK HODGES Staff Writer You won’t find a lot, or even any, campaign signs in the race for the Tennessee House of Representatives 12th District seat, but don’t assume that means there isn’t a contest. In fact, two Sevier County men are facing off for the seat one of them has held for 12 years in the first battle over the post he has ever faced. On the right is State Rep. Richard Montgomery, a Sevierville Republican who has spoken for the area in Nashville

for six terms, starting with his first election in 1998. On the left, Gary Eichmann is offering Montgomery a rare challenge in a move even he admits is likely futile, but he hopes it at least offers local voters a chance. While Montgomery has done some campaigning, Eichmann admits he hasn’t, blaming that on financial and physical restraints. He lives on a tight budget, and, because of health issues, depends on an oxygen tank to breathe and a motorized scooter to get around. “I’d like to campaign, but I just can’t,” he says.

Still, both he and Montgomery offer reasons why they’re in the race. Those are spelled out below, with the two men listed in alphabetical order to be fair.

Gary Eichmann

As Democrats’ message lags, GOP awaits huge wins Corrections The Mountain Press is committed to accuracy. Please report factual errors by calling 428-0748 Ext. 214.

By CHARLES BABINGTON and LIZ SIDOTI Associated Press Writers WASHINGTON — Two weeks before Election Day, Democrats fear their grip on the House may be gone, and Republicans are poised to celebrate big gains in the Senate and governors’ mansions as well. Analysts in both parties say all major indicators tilt toward the Republicans. President Barack Obama’s policies are widely unpopu-

lar. Congress, run by the Democrats, rates even lower. Fear and anger over unemployment and deep deficits are energizing conservative voters; liberals are demoralized. Private groups are pouring huge sums of money into GOP campaigns. An almost dizzying series of Democratic messages has failed to gain traction, forcing Obama to zigzag in search of a winning formula. With early voting under way in many states, Democrats are trying to

minimize the damage by concentrating their resources on a dwindling number of races. “The poll numbers and the enthusiasm on the right versus the lack of the enthusiasm on the left suggest a pretty big Republican night,” said former Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerrey, who once headed the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. With Democrats in power while the unemployment rate stands at See GOP, Page A3

AP Photo/Ed Reinke, File

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Rand Paul appears with his father U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, Oct. 2 during a campaign event in Erlanger, Ky.


A2 ◆ Local

District 12 3From Page A1

cian.” Eichmann knows he doesn’t have Montgomery’s name recognition. What he does have is a “D” beside his name, with the Democratic designation often all it takes to lose an election in Sevier County. Still, he says he never considered running as an Independent, arguing those who would vote for the same man as an Independent but not as a Democrat aren’t paying attention. Further, he says if he gets only a small number of votes, at least it reassures him that some people appreciated having the chance to mark someone besides Montgomery’s name for the seat. “If I get 600, 700, 800 votes as compared to his 8,000 votes, I’ll be happy,” Eichmann says. Still, his bid isn’t just about offering an alternative to Montgomery. He says he has some real issues with the way the six-term representative has done his job in Nashville. “I don’t see him pushing for Sevier County in the state,” Eichmann says. “When his biggest accomplishments are a couple license plate bills he got passed, that’s not much.” Eichmann says he was pushed into running when Montgomery voted against the teachers’ career ladder, a bill that would have given educators prescribed opportunities to move up in their jobs. That specific action, which Montgomery admitted at the time would likely haunt him, infuriated Eichmann. “I believe in the teachers,” he says. “I believe in the career ladder.” No matter who wins the race, there are some changes Eichmann hopes can be made. He’s pushing for state leaders to consider cutting the grocery tax, even if it’s just by a small amount, because that’s a move he believes could really help some low-income folks in the midst of the ongoing financial downturn. “If you give the people that 3 percent or whatever back, they’re going to be spending it somewhere else,” Eichmann says. “For people who make good money, it’s

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 17, 2010 not such a good deal. But for those who are on a limited income, like I am, that could give them the opportunity to spend that money on other essentials. That money’s not going to go away for the state. Maybe those folks will spend that on buying more fresh food rather than the fattening stuff. That could make us a healthier state and save on health care costs.” On at least one issue Eichmann and Montgomery agree. Both men say the budget will be the biggest challenge for state leaders in the coming years. Eichmann believes there are areas that could take decreases, like cutting down on TennCare fraud and other abuses in state spending, though he worries too many slashes could affect the services citizens get. “Balancing the budget without cutting services to the public drastically is going to be crucial,” he says. Eichmann also proposes ways to bring in more money to state coffers, like stimulating industrial and small business development by offering deals like free land in industrial parks and other noncash incentives.

Richard Montgomery

While he has gone a total of six elections without so much as a single challenge, Montgomery says he wasn’t surprised when he learned he’d be joined on the ballot for the job this year. “I think everybody, eventually, is going to have somebody pick up and run against them. It’s normal,” Montgomery says. “I’m glad I have an opponent this year because it gives the people a chance to weigh-in and let me know how good a job they think I’m doing.” Still, Montgomery recognizes a lot of folks here in Sevier County will vote for him just because he’s the Republican candidate. That “R” on the ballot goes a long way here, as will the fact Montgomery has his record behind him, while Eichmann is a virtual unknown. Montgomery insists he’s still taking the challenge seriously, though,

pointing out he has run newspaper ads and sent out mailers asking for votes. “I’m not taking it lightly,” he says. “I feel like the people want to know their legislator wants the job.” And Montgomery is certain he wants the job. While there were some folks locally who thought he might bow out of the General Assembly after this year, he decided to go for at least one more term in large measure thanks to one issue. “One of the biggest reasons I ran was so that I could be part of the redistricting process,” Montgomery explains, referencing the redrawing of the Congressional map that will occur next year and will be in the General Assembly’s hands. “I think the county needs someone who knows what he’s doing and know people who can help him out down there in Nashville for redistricting.” Though he says his first priority will be ensuring District 1, which includes Sevier County, remains intact, Montgomery makes it clear his hope is that the lines will be structured to give more potential Republican seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. He believes he’ll be joined by two to six additional members of the GOP in the General Assembly who will help make that happen. Beyond redistricting, Montgomery says the state’s obvious top priority will be the budget, with some tough times likely ahead as the economy struggles to recover. “There’s no question about it, it will be the budget,” Montgomery responds when asked to name the biggest chal-

lenge the new General Assembly will face. “I really believe Bill Haslam is going to be our next governor. He’s the type of person I think we need in there because he’s run a business and he’s balanced a budget. I look forward to working with him.” Montgomery says he’ll support Haslam’s promised efforts to battle at least parts of the federal health care legislation and is optimistic the new governor will be willing to give the state’s education funding formula another look. That system was revamped a couple years ago in a move that actually meant Sevier County got less money than it would have under the old one thanks in large part to the elimination of consideration of the local income. Instead, a calculation that relies heavily on tax revenues, which the county has in droves thanks to sales receipts from tourists, hurt the area, Montgomery says. “If you look at the formula statewide, it’s probably fair to 90 percent of the counties,” Montgomery concedes. “We just happen to be a unique county. I hope we can get the powers that be in Nashville to take a look at our problems.” In his time in the Legislature, Montgomery says his greatest achievements are those times when he can look back and know he helped one of his constituents. “I like just trying to help people; trying to pass legislation that is good for the people of Sevier County,” he says. “When we can help the needs of our people, that is always the most rewarding thing.” n dhodges@themountainpress.com

District 8 3From Page A1

set them when it comes to government too. We need to get back to the basics of running our schools as well as we can and seeing our resources going to that, and making sure our resources go to highways because they are so important to our state, particularly in Blount and Sevier counties.” District 8 covers parts of Blount and the Seymour and Gatlinburg areas of Sevier. Swann and Pratt are seeking to replace Joe McCord of Maryville, who did not seek re-election. Pratt favors privatizing parts of government. He specifically mentioned golf courses. Sevierville and Gatlinburg operate municipal golf courses. Pratt thinks those kinds of operations should be turned over to private businesses to run and create jobs. Pratt also says he has gotten feedback from people about the salaries paid to government workers, another reason why he would like to see some functions of government privatized. Pratt has lived in Gatlinburg full-time for about six years, but has owned a house there for 24 years. He spent eight years in the Navy. He and wife of 42 years, Anna, have a son, Marvin III, who lives in Austin, Texas. Pratt sold his businesses and moved to Gatlinburg, but he works now for Hampton Inn & Suites as chief engineer and also appraises classic cars. Swann doesn’t live in Sevier County, but promises to represent it well. “I felt like Joe (McCord) did an exceptional job of representing Sevier County, and

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like Sen. (Doug) Overbey, who represents both Blount and Sevier counties, I don’t see much difference for a legislator to represent both. We have so many mutual ties from a business standpoint. I have always had a strong affection for Sevier County and will try to do the best job I can to represent both counties evenly.” If elected, Swann may be serving at a time when both branches of the Legislature and the governor’s office are controlled by Republicans. When he served before, the Democrats outnumbered the Republicans by 15 in the House. “It will be a nice change of pace,” he said. “I think it will be better for the state. Balance is always good in government, but in a bad economy I think people feel Republicans do better because Republicans understand the dynamics of a business and what drives income.” Pratt said he feels a bit like Gen. Custer running as a Democrat against a Republican in a largely Republican district. “There are some things around here where people ... I don’t know if they are blinded, but they are not aware of all the situations, the ins and outs. I do feel everybody’s situations can be solved if everybody sits down and comes to an agreement. There is an awful lot of conflict between the two parties. That’s a tough nut to crack.” Pratt says he is in the race to win, but admits he has a difficult challenge to do it. Swann, who lives in rural Blount County, served in the House from 1985-89, after spending four years on the Blount County Commission. n svoit@themountainpress.com


Local/Nation â—† A3

Sunday, October 17, 2010 â—† The Mountain Press

GOP

Governors Association raised $10 million in that period.

3From Page A1

Messaging

9.6 percent, “it’s difficult to say, ’Well it could have been worse,�’ Kerrey said. Polls, campaign finance reports and advisers in both parties indicate that Republicans are in line to seize on a level of voter discontent that rivals 1994, when the GOP gained the House majority for the first time in 40 years. Democrats are embattled at every level.

House

AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File

Republicans need to win 40 seats to regain the House majority they lost four years ago. Even some Democratic officials acknowledge that their losses could well exceed that. A GOP takeover would depose Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., as the first female House speaker and force Obama to negotiate with Republicans on every significant legislative issue. Every day brings fresh evidence of Democratic officials virtually abandoning House members whose re-election bids seem hopeless. Republicans are expanding the field to pursue races that once appeared unattainable. In the coming week, Republicans or GOP-leaning outside groups plan to spend money in a 82 House races that they see as competitive or within reach of a last-minute upset. Democrats, desperate to hold their losses to three dozen seats, plan to run TV ads in 59 races in the remaining days. But their chief House campaign committee has recently canceled millions of dollars worth of advertising for struggling Reps. Steve Driehaus and Mary Jo Kilroy of Ohio, Suzanne Kosmas of Florida, Betsy Markey of Colorado and Steve Kagen of Wisconsin. They are shifting some of that money to incumbents once considered

In this Oct. 14, 2010, file photo Republican Senate candidate Sharron Angle, left, and Democrat Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid talk after their televised Nevada Senate debate Thursday in Las Vegas as moderator Mitch Fox smiles. Senate races are extremely close in West Virginia and Nevada, where Reid is battling tea party-backed Angle in a bitter and costly campaign.

Request

said, pointing out members of the police and fire departments often attend classes there. He also resisted the suggestion the foundation should be asked if it can cover the match, arguing that would be tantamount to city officials trying to tell them how to run their business. Instead, he sees the move as WSCC asking the community to continue its investment in the college. “That $200,000 is a gift from Pigeon Forge to benefit our residents and other residents of the county who use that school,� Wear said.

3From Page A1

from?� Robinson asked rhetorically. “How can we take money from Pigeon Forge for this — and I think it’s a great cause, don’t get me wrong — when it might mean we have to take it out of the rainy day fund or borrow it or make other cuts in city services? I think priority No. 1 is Pigeon Forge.� Robinson also wondered if the school’s foundation couldn’t just cover the match itself, rather than asking the cities and county to pay. Commissioner David Wear was the only official to respond to Robinson’s objection. He insisted it’s not a choice between helping city residents or not, given that a host of Pigeon Forge citizens, including a couple of city commissioners, have attended or are attending the school. “I guarantee that campus serves a lot of Pigeon Forge residents,� Wear

safe, such as Arizona Rep. Raul Grijalva. But in a sign of the election’s volatility, they also are helping viable incumbents they had expected to be trailing significantly — South Dakota Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin, for example. The Democrats’ House campaign committee raised almost $16 million in September and has $41.6 million in the bank. That’s a big fundraising advantage over the GOP’s House campaign committee. But the figures are misleading because heavy spending by outside groups, which often hide their donors’ identities, clearly favors Republican candidates.

Senate

To gain the Senate majority, Republicans must hold all 18 of their seats on this year’s ballots while picking up 10 of the 19 Democratic seats. It’s a tough task, but not inconceivable. Democrats trail badly in states where they once held some hope of supplanting Republicans: Missouri, New Hampshire, Ohio and Florida. Kentucky is the only one that’s still close. But Democrats have reduced their spending there, a sign that

Republican and tea party favorite Rand Paul is clearly ahead. Among seats now held by Democrats, Republicans are favored to win open races in North Dakota and Indiana, and to oust Sen. Blanche Lincoln in Arkansas. In Pennsylvania, where Republican Pat Toomey had comfortably led Democrat Joe Sestak in polls, the race has tightened in recent weeks, forcing the GOP to spend more than it had planned. The Republican Party also is pouring am additional $2 million into Illinois, where Republican Mark Kirk has slipped somewhat in polls in his race against Democrat Alexi Giannoulias for Obama’s old seat. That said, Democrats say Wisconsin Sen. Russ Feingold is struggling mightily, and Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet is in a tough fight. Races are extremely close in West Virginia and Nevada, where Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is battling tea party-backed Republican Sharron Angle in a bitter and costly campaign. Democrats are anxiously watching Sens. Barbara Boxer in California

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Democrats risk losing a dozen governors’ chairs they now hold, including those in pivotal presidential states such as Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, Maine and New Mexico. Also possibly falling into GOP hands are Oklahoma, Kansas, Wyoming, Tennessee, Illinois and perhaps Oregon. Democrats have good chances to pick up GOPheld governorships in four or five states, including California and possibly Florida. The Republican Governors Association’s $31 million haul over the past three months enables the GOP to jump into more races. The Democratic

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and Patty Murray in Washington. Private polls show Republicans pulling closer but still trailing. Should Republicans win all the close races and knock off either Boxer or Murray, they may rue the nomination of tea partier Christine O’Donnell, who badly trails Chris Coons in Delaware. That oncepromising state could have provided the 10th GOP win needed to take the Senate majority.

Perhaps nothing has frustrated Democrats more than their yearlong failure to find a message that could puncture the anger of millions of voters who seem bent on punishing the party in power. It wasn’t for a lack of trying. Obama may have charmed stadiums full of voters in 2008, but he and congressional Democrats never recovered from barrages of criticism in 2009 about unemployment, bank bailouts and strong-arm legislative tactics used on issues such as health care. Eight months ago, Democrats boldly predicted that voters would embrace the new health care law once portions took effect, such as the right to keep children on their parents’ insurance plans until age 26. Obama practically dared GOP lawmakers to urge the law’s repeal. “Go for it,� he said in Iowa in March. “If these congressmen in Washington want to come here in Iowa and tell smallbusiness owners that they plan to take away their tax credits and essentially raise their taxes, be my guest.� It didn’t work out that way. By the time the health bill’s first elements became law on Sept. 23, most Democratic candidates were ducking it, and many had to defend their votes amid harsh attacks

from Republican opponents. Democrats turned their energies to framing the election as a series of one-on-one contests about local issues, while Republicans kept portraying it as a national referendum on Obama and the economy. The national theme persisted, so Democrats tried to turn it to their advantage. Obama repeatedly reminded voters that former President George W. Bush had left him with a major recession, failing banks and a rapidly growing deficit. Don’t give the car keys back to those who drove the economy into the ditch, Obama would say dozens of times. In the early autumn, the president and his allies tried another tack: portraying House Minority Leader John Boehner, R-Ohio, as the welltanned face of a party that would let Wall Street run amok while the richest Americans kept enjoying deep tax cuts. In an Ohio speech, Obama cited Boehner’s name eight times. Voters seemed to shrug. Obama and his top aides then tried a new approach: accusing Republican supporters, particularly the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, of funding campaigns with millions of undisclosed dollars, some of them possibly from foreign sources. The group and others angrily denied the allegations, and Democratic strategists said they saw little evidence that the debate was moving voters.

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A4 â—† Local/State

The Mountain Press â—† Sunday, October 17, 2010

Obituaries Lynn H. Davis Lynn H. Davis, 76 of Seymour, died Thursday, Oct. 14, 2010. He was a member of Zion Hill Baptist Church and a U.S. Army veteran. For many years, he was an officer with BrownleeK e s t e r s o n Construction Company in Knoxville. He was active in civic organizations and cancer support groups. Survivors include his wife, Mary Ingle Davis, of Seymour; son, Neil B. Davis and wife Teri, of Alcoa; and son, Scott S. Davis and wife Tara, of Knoxville; three grandchildren. His siblings are Alvin R. Davis and wife Wanda, of Sevierville; Vaughn K. Davis and wife Janice, of Seymour; and Lorraine D. Gibbs, of Sevierville. Several nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to East Tennessee Children’s Hospital, P.O. Box 15010, Knoxville, TN 37901-5010. Funeral service were Saturday in the Chapel of Atchley Funeral

Home, Seymour, with Rev. Floyd Powell officiating. Interment will be at 2 p.m. Sunday in Middle Creek Cemetery. n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com

Addie Mae Lee Brooks Addie Mae Lee Brooks, 72 of Taylor, Mich., and formerly of Knoxville, died Monday, Oct. 11, 2010. She is survived by her children Robert, Mark, and Kelly and was a dear sister to many loving brothers and sisters. She is also survived by seven grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. The family will receive friends 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 18 at Atchley Funeral Home, Sevierville. Family and friends will leave Atchley Funeral Home at 1 p.m. Monday in procession to Fox Cemetery for a 1:30 p.m. graveside service and interment. Arrangements by Atchley Funeral Home, Sevierville.

CHATTANOOGA (AP) — Hamilton County’s attorney contends that a county employee’s private business e-mails on county computers are not public, but the director of the Tennessee Coalition for Open Government disagrees. The dispute comes after the Chattanooga Times Free Press obtained e-mail records that showed public works employee Alan Knowles used his county e-mail account on county time for his private business. Knowles was suspended from his job for five days. Later, Hamilton County Attorney Rheubin Taylor told other county offices that personal e-mails are not public record. “Despite what the county may have said, in view of what we now know that the law provides, we are now going to respect county

employees’ ’personal’ information, communications ... and it will not be released,� Taylor said. Tennessee Coalition for Open Government director Frank Gibson disagrees. He said Hamilton County employees are informed that their electronic communications are county property. An employee handbook says “users should be aware that all data they create on county systems remains the property of Hamilton County. Management does not guarantee the confidentiality of employee’s personal information stored on any device belonging to Hamilton County. Any information stored or sent from a Hamilton County personal computer may become public to the detriment of the user and/or the county.� “There’s no expectation of pri-

vacy, therefore all e-mails should be public,� Gibson said. Bur Elisha Hodge, the state Open Records Office counsel, said personal e-mails are exempt under the state’s public records law. She said the county policy does not say that personal e-mails will be made public, only that they may be made public. Hodge provided a 2005 opinion in the case of Ed Brennan v. Giles County Board of Education that found certain e-mails did not meet the definition of a public record because they were not “made or received pursuant to law or ordinance or in connection with the transaction of official business.� Hodge said the state does not have a definition of “personal� e-mail but defines what type of e-mail is a public record.

n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com

Arrests Editor’s Note: The following information was taken from the intake reports at the Sevier County Jail. All people listed within this report are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law. u William A. Hughes, 32, of Knoxville, was charged Oct. 15 with a warrant from Circuit Court. He was being held. u Travis Keith Inklebarger, 30, of Wartburg, was charged Oct. 15 with a warrant from Circuit Court. He was being held. u Kelsey Lynn Lancaster, 20, was charged Oct. 15 with underage consumption of alcohol and criminal impersonation. She was released on $1,000 bond. u Kendra Rahcel Lane, 34, of 207 Yates Road in Seymour, was charged Oct. 15 with possession of a controlled substance. She was being held in lieu of $5,000 bond. u Russell Dean Leeper, 47, of Knoxville, was charged Oct. 15 with possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and theft (general). He was being held in lieu of $5,000 bond.

County attorney says employee personal e-mails are private

u Jonathan Lee Moates, 30, of 627 Hawk Hollow Road in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 15 with possession of Schedule II drugs. He was released on $3,500 bond. u Catherine Marie Pyrtle, 41, of 621 Sugar Hollow Road in Pigeon Forge, was charged Oct. 16 with DUI, simple possession and possession of drug paraphernalia. She was released on $5,000 bond. u Alicia Leighann Ratliff, 24, of 3642 Marshall Lane in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 15 with DUI. She was released on $2,000 bond. u James William Sams, 42, of Knoxville, was charged Oct. 16 with two warrants from Circuit Court. He was being held. u Clinton Luther Valentine, 49, of Knoxville, was charged Oct. 15 with a misdemeanor warrant from General Sessions Court and theft (general). He was being held in lieu of $2,500 bond. u Charles Daniel Wolford, 28, of 1134 Hemlock Drive in Gatlinburg, was charged Oct. 15 with DUI and traffic violations. He was released on $2,500 bond.

Woman gets 6 years for stabbing rival to death MEMPHIS (AP) — A woman who stabbed her romantic rival to death was given a six year sentence on Friday while the judge called the boyfriend “the real culprit.� Tracy Campbell, 38, had been charged with premeditated firstdegree murder in the May 9, 2009 attack on Lakeisha Dantzler, 31, outside a Dollar Tree in Memphis where Dantzler was a clerk. The Commercial Appeal reports surveillance video showed Dantzler and Campbell in a confrontation outside the store. Campbell went to her vehicle to retrieve a knife and stabbed Dantzler on the sidewalk in front of the store in full view of customers and passers-by. A jury last month convicted Campbell of the lesser charge of voluntary manslaughter. Shelby County Criminal Court Judge Otis Higgs Jr. sentenced her to the

maximum 6 years on Friday, but she will be eligible for parole within 30 days. The judge said 22-year-old Ryan Griggs, who was dating both women at the time, provoked the confrontation by asking Campbell to come to store where he and Dantzler both worked. “This Romeo is the real culprit in this mess,� Higgs said, noting that Griggs once purposely left one woman’s car at the other woman’s home. “He set these two women up and then he acts as if he’s some kind of glorified referee. Why on God’s Earth would he invite one girlfriend to his work where his other girlfriend is at the next register? Maybe he felt two women arguing over him was good for his ego.� Griggs was charged with accessory after the fact and faces up to two years in prison.

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13th Annual Smoky Bear Open Car Show and Silent Auction October 23, 2010, 9a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 p.m. Sevier County High School Proceeds benefit Marketing, DECA, and Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries.

Call Cindy Rule to register 865-453-1076

Mussels being reintroduced to river ONEIDA (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The mussels came from the Cumberland River east of Nashville, where cold temperatures in the tailwaters below Cordell Hull Dam had kept them virtually dormant since the dam was built in 1973. On this day, biologists would be releasing them into the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River, one of the few freeflowing rivers left on the Cumberland Plateau. Once abundant throughout the Tennessee and Cumberland river systems, freshwater mussels today are declining at an alarming rate, mostly because of water pollution and the construction of hydropower dams. The Big South Fork River, which flows through the heart of the 120,000-acre Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area, is one of only a handful of rivers

where mussels still manage to reproduce. Thanks to $144,000 in funding from the National Park Service, biologists in recent weeks have been stepping up efforts to reintroduce mussels to the Big South Fork. Historically, the river was home to 76 mussel species. Today, the combination of natural survival and previous stocking efforts has established 45 species of mussels in the Big South Fork, with 12 of those species listed as federally endangered. Three weeks ago, biologists released 620 mussels in the Big South Fork at the Station Camp crossing. Last week, they released 661 more at the head of an island a few miles downstream. Stored in 12-gallon coolers, the latest batch of mussels represented 17 common species not found in the Big South Fork. Each was deposited carefully on the river bottom in 3 feet of slow-moving water.

2&,,3*)-")!-++3,'27

6470-064'#6 (11&c.+8'/75+% %#0&;c+0(.#6#$.'5

EVERYTHING IS FREE!!

Last year, we had over 6000 people at this event. Join us to show our community that we care about kids! 9'0''&;174$75+0'55%*74%*1414)#0+<#6+10 61*'.275 Great advertising opportunity. Individuals can hand out candy too! What we need: 1. Monetary donations to help with the cost of food, candy, or one of the large door prizes we will be purchasing to give away. Every business or organization who gives a monetary donation of $100.00 or more, will be recognized in a flier that will go into every childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treat bag. Door prizes and candy are also needed. 2. Be at the event and bring a trunk full of candy to hand out. This is great exposure for your business or organization, and its lots of fun! If you, your employees, church members, or anyone you know would like to do this, please send back the registration below by October 26th. &10q6$'.'(6176 Call Holly today if you would like to make a tax-deductible donation in order to advertise your business at this event. If you are planning to donate, please make your tax-deductible donation to: Kodak UMC with a memo: Trunk-N-Treat. Mail your donation to: Kodak UMC, Attn: Holly Roe #SZBO3Et,PEBL 5/ #..6470-5/756$'4')+56'4'&$'(14'1%66* People who are not pre-registered will NOT be allowed to hand out candy at the ball park. Cut out and fill out this registration and send it to: Kodak UMC Attn: Holly Roe 2923 Bryan Rd ,PEBL 5/

Name__________________________ Number of Trunks ________________ Email __________________________ Phone contact __________________________

*Instructions on what time to be there, etcâ&#x20AC;Ś will be sent to you when your registration is recieved.


Nation ◆ A5

Sunday, October 17, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

U.S. studying Australian Internet security program

Iran releases American held for 2 years in Tehran

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government is reviewing an Australian program that will allow Internet service providers to alert customers if their computers are taken over by hackers and could limit online access if people don’t fix the problem. Obama administration officials have met with industry leaders and experts to find ways to increase online safety while trying to balance securing the Internet and guarding people’s privacy and civil liberties. Experts and U.S. officials are interested in portions of the plan, set to go into effect in Australia in December. But any move toward Internet regulation or monitoring by the U.S. government or industry could trigger fierce opposition from the public. The discussions come as private, corporate and government computers across the U.S. are increas-

WASHINGTON (AP) — Iran on Saturday set free an American businessman jailed in Tehran for more than two years on suspicion on ties to an allegedly violent opposition group. Reza Taghavi, 71, hadn’t been charged with a crime and denied knowingly supporting the organization, known as Tondar. “He admitted to nothing and he continues to maintain his innocence,” his lawyer, Pierre Prosper, told The Associated Press in a telephone interview from Tehran after his client’s release from Tehran’s Evin prison. He’s not expected to return to Southern California before the middle of next week. Iranian officials are “comfortable that he was in fact used by this orga-

ingly being taken over and exploited by hackers and other computer criminals. White House cybercoordinator Howard Schmidt told The Associated Press that the U.S. is looking at a number of voluntary ways to help the public and small businesses better protect themselves online. Possibilities include provisions in the Australia plan that enable customers to get warnings from their Internet providers if their computer gets taken over by hackers through a botnet. A botnet is a network of infected computers that can number in the thousands and that network is usually controlled by hackers through a small number of scattered PCs. Computer owners are often unaware that their machine is linked to a botnet and is being used to shut down targeted websites, distribute malicious code or spread spam.

Obama: End tax breaks to stop overseas hiring HWASHINGTON (AP) be using our tax dollars — President Barack Obama to reward companies that is renewing his call for create jobs and businesses Congress to close tax breaks within our borders.” that reward some U.S. comAt issue is a bill that panies with overseas sub- stalled in the Senate last sidiaries, a proposal that month that would end some has raised concerns among tax credits and deferrals for some lawmakers in the U.S. companies for operapresident’s own party. tions overseas. In his weekly radio and Though Obama singled online address, Obama said out Republican opposition, the tax breaks encourage the bill also failed to get supcompanies to create jobs port from some Democrats, and profits in other coun- including Senate Finance tries. Committee Chairman Max “There is no reason why Baucus, D-Mont., who our tax code should active- expressed concern that ? ly reward for creatchange would put the U.S. Did them humans evolve from ing jobs overseas,” Obama at a competitive disadvanape-like creatures ? said. “Instead, we should tage.

AP Photo/ Yasir Afifi

Yasir Afifi shows a GPS monitering device he found on his car in Santa Clara Calif.

Oil change reignites debate over trackers By PAUL ELIAS Associated Press Writer SAN FRANCISCO — Yasir Afifi, a 20-year-old computer salesman and community college student, took his car in for an oil change earlier this month and his mechanic spotted an odd wire hanging from the undercarriage. The wire was attached to a strange magnetic device that puzzled Afifi and the mechanic. They freed it from the car and posted images of it online, asking for help in identifying it. Two days later, FBI agents arrived at Afifi’s Santa Clara apartment and demanded the return of their property — a global positioning system tracking device now at the center of a raging legal debate over

privacy rights. One federal judge wrote that the widespread use of the device was straight out of George Orwell’s novel, “1984”. “By holding that this kind of surveillance doesn’t impair an individual’s reasonable expectation of privacy, the panel hands the government the power to track the movements of every one of us, every day of our lives,” wrote Alex Kozinski, the chief judge of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a blistering dissent in which a three-judge panel from his court ruled that search warrants weren’t necessary for GPS tracking.

? How old is the Earth ? ? ?

?

Did humans and dinosaurs coexist ?

Gatlinburg church of Christ 414 Trinity Lane at Reagan Dr. Downtown Gatlinburg

We invite you to join us as we investigate the evidence.

We invite you The to join us as are we investigate the evidence. lectures FREE and open to all ages.The lectures are FREE and open to all ages.

Featuring Guest Speaker: Featuring Guest Speaker: Brad Harrub, Ph.D.

Brad Harrub, Ph.D.

Brad Harrub currently serves as the co-Founder of Focus Press. In addition, he is the coeditor of Think magazine. He earned a doctorate in Anatomy and Neurobiology. He is Bradcoauthor Harrub currently serves as the in co-Founder the of the book, Diamonds the Rough, & Investigating Christian Evidences. He was anPress. invited Conference on Creationism, he has of Focus In speaker addition,tohethe is International the coeditor of appeared on the television show “Origins.”

BRAD HARRUB

Think magazine. He earned a doctorate in Anatomy andFriday, Neurobiology. He is the coauthor of the book, October 22-24, 2010 Saturday and Sunday, Diamonds in the Rough, & Investigating Christian FRIDAY 7:00 Atheism’s Attack on America (followed by Q&A) Evidences. He was anpm invited speaker to the SATURDAY 7:00 pm The Dinosaur Dilemma (followed by Q&A) International Conference on Creationism, he has SUNDAY 9:30 am Scientific Accuracy of the Bible appeared on the television show “Origins.” 10:30 am 7 Reason We are Losing our Kids 6:00 pm

GATLINBURG CHURCH OF CHRIST

Is Genesis a Myth?

corner of Trinity Lane and Reagan Drive

Friday, Saturday and Sunday, October 22-24, 2010

For more information, call (865) 436-6504 or see our website: www.gatlinburgchurchofchrist.com

FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

7:00 pm Atheism’s Attack on America (followed by Q&A) 7:00 pm The Dinosaur Dilemma (followed by Q&A) 9:30 am Scientific Accuracy of the Bible 10:30 am 7 Reason We are Losing our Kids 6:00 pm Is Genesis a Myth?

GATLINBURG CHURCH OF CHRIST corner of Trinity Lane and Reagan Drive

For more information, call (865) 436-6504 or see our website:

www.gatlinburgchurchofchrist.com

nization, and comfortable that he does not pose a threat to them and that he can leave and go back to the United States,” Prosper said. Iran had accused Taghavi of passing $200 in cash to an Iranian man tied to Tondar. Taghavi, who regularly visits Iran to conduct business and see family, had received the money from a friend in California with instructions to pass the cash to an Iranian, according to Prosper. “I didn’t do anything wrong. Someone just asked me take this money to help someone,” Taghavi told ABC News. “Sometimes I feel relief, sometimes, I feel angry. What happened? Two-and-a-half years for what?” he said.


A6 ◆

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 17, 2010

sunrise in the smokies

TODAY’S Briefing Local n

PIGEON FORGE

Relay For Life meeting Tuesday

Committee and team captains for Relay For Life of Sevier County will meet on Tuesday at The Inn at Christmas Place. Committee members will meet at 5:30 p.m. followed by the team captains meeting at 6:30. Anyone interested in volunteering on the committee or forming a team in welcome to attend. For more information, call event chair Robin Kurtz at 908-5789, or by e-mail at rkurtz@ tnstatebank.com

n

SEVIERVILLE

Emergency panel to meet Oct. 28

The Sevier County Local Emergency Planning Committee will meet at 10 a.m. Oct. 28 at the Sevier County E911 Building on Bruce Street. The LEPC is comprised of representatives from area emergency service agencies and associated groups, which meet on a monthly basis to discuss disaster preparedness and responses to large scale emergencies. n

NEW CENTER

Community fall festival Saturday

Sevier County Fire Department and New Center Baptist Church & Christian Academy will host a community fall festival Saturday. Free admission, free set-up to vendors, free entry to the grill competition and chili cook-off. There will be a bounce house for children, live music, crafts, food, Dare officer, Rescue Squad, bomb robot and more. Call 257-5783 for more information. n

GATLINBURG

Planners to meet Thursday

The Gatlinburg Municipal/Regional Planning Commission will consider final approval of subdivisions on Moyers Drive and Hughes Road when it meets at 5 p.m. Thursday at City Hall. The panel also will review a proposed flood damage prevention ordinance.

n

SEVIERVILLE

Election panel to meet Monday

The Sevier County Election Commission will meet in special session at 4:30 p.m. Monday at the Voting Machine Warehouse, 1145 Dolly Parton Parkway. The commission will set a uniform time for opening the polls on Election Day Nov. 2.

n

SEVIERVILLE

Health department to offer flu shots

Seasonal influenza vaccine is now available at the Sevier County Health Department, 227 Cedar St. Flu vaccine will be offered Wednesday from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Call the Health Department at 453-1032 to make an appointment. The cost of the flu shot is $32. The Health Department will bill traditional Medicare, but no Medicare Advantage Plans or private insurance will be billed for the shot.

top state news

Lottery Numbers

Candidates deride other’s jobs plan By ERIK SCHELZIG Associated Press Writer NASHVILLE — Both Republican Bill Haslam and Democrat Mike McWherter say creating jobs would be their top priority as governor of Tennessee. But Haslam dismisses the cornerstone of McWherter’s plan as unrealistic, while McWherter says Haslam’s proposal lacks specifics. Jobs and the economy have been the top issues of the campaign to succeed term-limited Gov. Phil Bredesen. The state reported an unemployment rate of 9.6 percent last month, equal to the national average. Jobless rates were high-

est in rural areas, topped by 19.8 percent unemployment in Scott County. A poll conducted for the Tennessee Newspaper Network before the Aug. 5 primary found 54 percent of voters said the economy and jobs were their main concerns. McWherter, who owns a Jackson beer distributorship, has pledged to pass legislation based on a new program in Illinois that provides a $2,500 tax credit for every job created by small businesses. A similar plan would be a boon to rural areas where the state’s unemployment rate is the highest, he said. “I know full well this is a pro-

gram that will incentivize businesses to start hiring people back and start growing their businesses again,” McWherter said at a recent gubernatorial debate in Knoxville. Haslam, who was president of the family owned Pilot chain of truck stops before he was elected mayor of Knoxville in 2003, said what’s lacking in McWherter’s plan is a way to pay for it amid the state’s ongoing budget problems. “I’m a Republican — I believe that cutting taxes encourages growth — so I believe in the concept,” he said. “But like everything else, you have to have the details behind it and say how it’s going to work.”

Saturday, Oct. 16, 2010 Midday: 2-1-3 Evening: 0-2-8

6 10

Saturday, Oct. 16, 2010 Midday: 9-5-8-1 23 Evening: 4-7-5-9 25

Friday, Oct. 15, 2010 01-02-04-26-35 4

TODAY’S FORECAST

LOCAL: Sunny Friday, Oct. 15, 2010 09-10-13-31-50 10 x4

This day in history

High: 76° Low: 42°

Today is Sunday, Oct. 17, the 290th day of 2010. There are 75 days left in the year.

Winds 5 mph

Chance of rain

n Last

0%

■ Monday Sunny

High: 78° Low: 47° ■ Tuesday Mostly sunny

High: 75° Low: 47° ■ Lake Stages: ■ Air Quality Forecast: Primary Pollutant: Ozone

Cautionary Health Message: People who are unusually sensitive to ozone may experience respiratory symptoms.

World quote roundup “The poll numbers and the enthusiasm on the right versus the lack of the enthusiasm on the left suggest a pretty big Republican night.” — Former Sen. Bob Kerrey, D-Neb., of expectations in the Nov. 2 elections

“It goes against, ethically, of what you think should be done with remains of humans.” — Bisbee, Ariz., Police Sgt. Benjamin Reyna after the discovery of two open pits filled with human skulls, ribs, femurs and other bones at a cemetery

“They used to have this show called the ‘Twilight Zone.’ That’s how I felt. We were all kind of pacing in the dugout. It was surreal.” — Texas Rangers starter C.J. Wilson after the New York Yankees 6-5 win in Game 1 of the American League championship Friday

The Mountain Press (ISSN 0894-2218) Copyright 2008 The Mountain Press. All Rights Reserved. All property belongs to The Mountain Press and no part may be reproduced without prior written consent. Published daily by The Mountain Press. P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN, 37864, 119 River Bend Dr., Sevierville, TN 37876. Periodical Postage paid at Sevierville, TN.

this date

n Ten

years ago

Ending an emergency summit in Egypt, Israeli and Palestinian leaders agreed to publicly urge an end to a burst of bloody conflict and to consult within two weeks on restarting the ravaged Mideast peace process.

Mountains: Moderate Valley: Moderate

Publisher: Jana Thomasson Editor: Stan Voit Production Director: Tom McCarter Advertising Director: Joi Whaley Business Manager: Mary Owenby Circulation Distribution Manager: Will Sing

n On

On Oct. 17, 1910, social reformer and poet Julia Ward Howe, author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” died in Portsmouth, R.I. at age 91.

Douglas: 971.0 D0.3

Staff

year locally

Friends of the Smokies is part of an online competition sponsored by the Tourism Cares organization that seeks to preserve natural and historic areas. Participants may go online and click for their favorite among seven such sites that include the 19 historic buildings in the Elkmont area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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n Five

years ago

A two-man Chinese space crew landed in China’s northern grasslands after five days in orbit. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi enraged China and South Korea by visiting Tokyo’s Yasukuni war shrine.

n Thought

for today

“The philosophies of one age have become the absurdities of the next, and the foolishness of yesterday has become the wisdom of tomorrow.” — Sir William Osler, Canadian physician and educator (1849-1919).

Celebrities in the news n

Barbara Billingsley

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Even decades after the show ended, Barbara Billingsley expressed surprise at the lasting affection people had for “Leave it to Beaver” and her role as the Billingsley warm, supportive mother of a pair of precocious boys. The actress, who gained supermom status for her gentle portrayal of June Cleaver in the 1950s television series, died Saturday after a long illness. She was 94.


Mountain Views

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peacably to assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” —United States Constitution, Amendment One

■ The Mountain Press ■ Page A7 ■ Sunday, October 17, 2010

commentary

Bittersweet moment for Cheryl Deaton This week the state will name its Teacher of the Year. Two of the nine finalists are from Sevier County: Cheryl Deaton, a teacher at Pigeon Forge Primary; and Karen Kelley, a teacher at Pigeon Forge High. That’s quite a feat, having two finalists from Pigeon Forge schools. I hope I’ll be forgiven if I root for Cheryl Deaton. I’ve known her for more than 20 years. I first met Cheryl when she was a principal at a school in Opelika, Ala., a sister city to Auburn. I was a newspaper editor looking to do some community service work and was invited to mentor at her school. Each week I’d go to the school, collect the child they assigned me to work with and proceed to the library where we would read, do unfinished classroom work or just talk. Deaton was a hands-on principal, wandering the halls and making sure everyone was working and serving students. Deaton later learned of a Next Century Schools program sponsored by RJRNabisco in which schools could seek threeyear grants of up to $250,000 a year to develop and shape the classrooms of the future. With the support of her principal and school board, she went after the money and landed a grant. Deaton and others got a chance to use the money to re-shape the school with special programs, curricula, innovation and outreach. She was chiefly responsible for this. Deaton’s husband, Bill, was an administrator at Auburn University Montgomery, and eventually he landed a dean of the College of Human Resources and Education at West Virginia University. The kids were grown and out of the house, so the opportunity was too good to pass up. Cheryl and Bill headed for Morgantown where they would stay for 10 years or so. In 2001 he retired from WVU and they moved to Wears Valley. Cheryl soon got a teaching position in the Sevier County schools. She teaches fourth grade at Pigeon Forge Primary. The years in Sevier County were good ones. Cheryl has been an educator for more than 34 years. She even taught English in Colombia at one time. Bill was enjoying his retirement and got active in the LeConte Photographic Club in Sevierville. Cheryl would invite him to her class from time to time to show off his amazing ability to spell backwards. Bill Deaton’s health took a turn this year. He died in June, right around the time Cheryl was to learn she was a finalist for Tennessee Teacher of the Year. What a bittersweet moment for her and her two children. On Thursday night in Nashville she will have her children with her, along with principal Nancye Williams, at the banquet during which the winner will be announced. Deaton is the East Tennessee winner among primary school teachers. Karen Kelley is East Tennessee winner among high school teachers. Only one of the nine finalists will be selected. Cheryl has a speech ready to read if she wins. She’ll talk about special students she has known both here and in Alabama. It’s for sure she’ll mention Bill. And if she doesn’t win, she’ll be pulling hard for Karen Kelley — as will I. Sevier County apparently hasn’t had a Tennessee Teacher of the Year in more than two decades. Now we have two in the finals. How nice is that? Cheryl decided to return to the classroom this year despite the loss over the summer of her beloved husband. Those who value and appreciate good teachers and quality education should applaud that decision. She is where she belongs. “One looks back with appreciation to the brilliant teachers,” famed Swiss psychiatrist and philosopher Carl Jung said, “but with gratitude to those who touched our human feelings. The curriculum is so much necessary raw material, but warmth is the vital element for the growing plant and for the soul of the child.” That’s Cheryl Deaton described perfectly. — Stan Voit is editor of The Mountain Press. His column appears each Sunday. He can be reached at 428-0748, ext. 217, or e-mail to svoit@themountainpress.com.

Editorial

Abuse and mistrust Plea deals in nursing home case end sordid episode A crime can be horrific and jawdropping even if nobody gets hurt or killed. An example: the two staff members of a local nursing home who took photos of undressed patients without their knowledge of consent. This is a crime that might have gone unpunished had one of the staff members not left her cell phone at a restaurant. Employees who found the phone and were trying to determine who owned it found the nude photos and called authorities. The investigation led to the arrests of certified nursing assistants April Longmire and Mary Ann Burgess, who were employees of Pigeon Forge Care & Rehabilitation Center. That’s a crime that shocked the public when it came out last year. It caused a great deal of embarrassment to the nursing home and to the families of the patients mistreated in such a manner. Burgess entered a plea agreement earlier this year that calls for a two-

year sentence. Longmire entered a guilty plea last week, hours after Judge Richard Vance refused to drop the charges. Longmire was charged with four counts of willful abuse, neglect or exploitation of adults. There is no plea agreement n her case. And so this unfortunate abuse case comes to an end. The lives of two CNAs have been ruined. A number of patient families have been affected. The nursing home has had to deal with publicity no business seeks out. Formed in 1995 by some concerned citizens, the organization NursingHomeMonitors.org is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of the elderly by fighting abuse, neglect and exploitation in nursing homes. Nursing Home Monitors was formed by family members of nursing home residents who witnessed, first-hand, substandard care and dangerous conditions in nursing homes.

The group, on its website, says it set out to find the causes for the lack of accountability and has been working to improve conditions. The organization supports the use of family-controlled cameras in individual patients’ rooms. Families have to take control of their elderly loved ones’ lives once they enter nursing homes. For most, this will be their final residence. Many are bedridden and unable to care for themselves. They rely on the care and support from staff members. Most nursing homes try to do what’s right in both hiring and care. Sometimes things happen. It only takes the irresponsible actions of one or two, as in the local case, to sully the reputation and aims of the entire facility. The two women who took the photos in Pigeon Forge deserve proper punishment for their actions, including some jail time. They abused patients and misused their positions of trust.

Political view

Public forum Support, coverage for English Beech Springs Baptist Church Mountain tractor show praised members pleased by new pastor Editor: I would like to thank everyone for their help and participation in the English Mountain Tractor Show. A lot of hard work went into putting the show together. We had a great turnout and tremendous support from the surrounding community. I would also like to give a special thank you to Constable George Lawson and Constable Sammy Ayers for escorting our tractor parade and hay ride and to The Mountain Press for the wonderful coverage of the event. Everyone’s support is greatly appreciated. Kristi Thomas Sevierville

Editor: I am wondering if anyone else but me finds it so difficult to be patient and, as the good book says, Psalm 27:14, “Wait for the Lord; be strong and take heart and wait for the Lord.” Some long 15 months ago we at Beech Springs Baptist Church had our pastor leave. We all never imagined that God would lead us on a pathway of search for the man he had chosen for us. In fact there was discouragement, soul searching, and digging down deep in ourselves to find the faith that the man would be found. I am such an impulsive person, always

wanting something now. It was a real test for me. Are there others as I am? Well, I found out the wait was sure worth the time, prayers and soul searching. Our church family this past week was blessed with the man that God had for us: Rev. Richard Compton. To top it off he came with a wonderful wife, Christy, and two great children. We at our church are so glad we did “wait for the Lord..”. Am I bragging? I am sure I am but if you really want to know why I am bragging, come see for yourself Sundays at 10:30 a.m. You will see why we at Beech Springs Baptist Church are saying, “What an awesome God we serve.” Donna M. Gray Kodak

Letters to the editor policy and how to contact us: ◆ We encourage our readers to send letters to the editor. Letters must contain no more than 500 words. No more than one letter per person will be published in a 30-day period. Letters must be neatly printed or typed and contain no libel, plagiarism or personal attacks. All letters are subject to editing for style, length and content. Statements of fact must be attributed to a source for verification. All letters must be signed and contain a phone number and address for verification purposes. No anonymous or unverified letters will be printed. No letters endorsing candidates will be considered. The Mountain Press reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter. E-MAIL LETTERS TO: editor@themountainpress.com or MAIL LETTERS TO: Editor, The Mountain Press, P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN 37864. For questions, call (865) 428-0748, ext. 214. The Mountain Press and its publishers do not necessarily agree with the opinions expressed in letters and columns on this page.

Editorial Board:

State Legislators:

Federal Legislators:

◆ Jana Thomasson, Publisher ◆ Stan Voit, Editor ◆ Bob Mayes, Managing Editor ◆ Gail Crutchfield, Community News Editor

◆ Rep. Richard Montgomery

◆ U.S. Sen. Bob Corker

1-800-449-8366 Ext. 1-5981; 207 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 rep.richard.montgomery@capitol.tn.gov

◆ Rep. Joe McCord

(202) 224-3344; 185 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg., B40A, Washington, D.C. 20510

◆ U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander

(202) 224-4944; S/H 302, Washington, D.C. 20510

1-800-449-8366 Ext. 1-5481; 207 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 rep.joe.mccord@capitol.tn.gov

◆ U.S. Rep. Phil Roe

1-800-449-8366 Ext. 10981; 320 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 sen.doug.overbey@capitol.tn.gov

◆ U.S. Rep. John J. Duncan Jr.

◆ Sen. Doug Overbey

(202) 225-6356; 419 Cannon House Office, Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-5435; 2267 Rayburn Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20515


Sports

Visit: The Mountain Press.com View/Purchase Sports & News Photos

■ The Mountain Press ■ A8 ■ Sunday, October 17, 2010

Birds Beware Local sportsman hopes to revive bird doggin’ on his Kodak quail preserve By JASON DAVIS Sports Editor KODAK — A generation or two ago it wasn’t uncommon for East Tennessee hunters to take a break from their normal deer or turkey hunting to take out there dogs and sniff up some quail. Now, thanks mainly to development and a diminishing regular habit, the prized birds are seen less and less in this part of the state. As a result, bird dogs and the art of quail hunting are becoming a thing of the past. Hopefully, thanks to the efforts of David Houser, 57, of Kodak, that’s going to change. The full-time pastor and part-time sportsman has started the D&T Quail Preserve near River Islands Golf Club in Kodak. “I’ve found a lot of people that have said ‘I’ve never done it but would like to’ or they did it years ago and now they can’t,” Houser said Friday. “Because of our predators here, the coyotes, fox, even housecats are terrible (it’s hard to find native quail). When people mow, they run over their eggs.” So Houser brings in quails raised in captivity in Blount County, and stocks his fully-licensed hunts. On 55 acres of rolling farmland hills hunters can search for quail using either with their own dogs or Houser’s pack of Setters and Pointers. “You pay for the privilege to hunt on the property and see the dogs,” Houser said. “I put out some birds (prior to the See QUAIL, Page A9 Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

David Houser, pictured with his prized English Setter Duke, right, and Joe, an English Pointer on loan, hopes to reinvigorate quail hunting, a sport taught to him by his father nearly a half century ago. SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE FOOTBALL

Newton, replay booth lead Auburn to wild 65-43 win By PAUL NEWBERRY AP College Football Writer AUBURN, Ala. — Cam Newton was unstoppable as always. Still, Auburn needed a couple of favorable calls from the replay booth and one big play on defense to hold off Arkansas and its backup quarterback. Newton, leaving little doubt that he’s a serious Heisman contender, ran for 188 yards, threw for 140 and accounted for four touchdowns, leading the No. 7 Tigers to a wild 65-43 victory over the No. 12 Razorbacks on Saturday in a game that went back and forth until Auburn pulled away in the fourth quarter. The teams set a Southeastern Conference record for most points in a non-overtime game. The previous mark was set in South Carolina’s 65-39 victory over Mississippi State in 1995. Newton led the Tigers (7-0, 4-0 SEC) with three touchdown runs, including a 3-yarder with 8 1/2 minutes remaining that essentially clinched it. He also threw a 15-yard touchdown pass to Emory Blake with 11:44 remaining, giving Auburn the lead for good at 44-43. Arkansas (4-2, 1-2) might have seen its SEC title hopes dashed and also lost its own Heisman hopeful, quarterback Ryan Mallett, who went out in the first half after taking a blow to the head. But Tyler Wilson took over at quarterback and the Razorbacks didn’t miss a beat — not until the fourth quarter, anyway. Wilson completed 15 of his first 17 passes for 270 yards and four touchdowns, the last of them a 23-yarder to Greg Childs that gave the Razorbacks a 43-37 lead with 14:09 remaining. To that point, Wilson’s only

AP Photo/Dave Martin

Auburn quarterback Cameron Newton (2) runs past the defense of Arkansas’s Damario Ambrose (58) in the first half of an NCAA college football game in Auburn, Ala., Saturday. incomplete throws were a dropped pass and a ball he threw away under pressure. It was all Auburn from there. Well, Auburn and the guys upstairs, who already had made a crucial ruling in the first half that preserved a touchdown for the Tigers. After Newton’s scoring pass to Blake, Arkansas picked up one first down and appeared to have another when Broderick Green barreled around right end for 4 yards. As he was brought down by Craig Stevens and Mike Blanc, the ball suddenly popped loose. Zac Etheridge wisely picked it up for Auburn and took off the other way, going 47 yards to the end zone. Then, it was time for the replay officials to do their thing. The video appeared

to show Green putting a knee on the ground a split-second before the ball popped loose and he was rolling over a defender. Apparently, though, that wasn’t definitive enough to overturn the call on the field. Touchdown, Auburn. On the very play from scrimmage, Wilson finally cracked. An ill-advised pass downfield was picked off by Josh Bynes. He returned it 33 yards to the Arkansas 7, and there was no way to stop Newton from there. He rushed up the middle for 4 yards, then finished it off with more carry up the middle. Auburn finally had enough points to hold off the Razorbacks, adding one more touchdown after Wilson’s second pick to win a game that featured a staggering 1,036 yards.

Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

SCHS reserve tailback Luke Trentham rambled 70 yards on a carry late in the Bears’ 49-14 win over Cherokee Friday night. Trentham was tackled at the Chiefs’ 5-yard-line, and the Bears failed to score on the possession. PREP FOOTBALL

Playoff picture begins to clear up for Smoky Bears By JASON DAVIS Sports Editor SEVIERVILLE — Much to the delight of Sevier County fans, the road to the team’s second consecutive IMAC championship got a little easier Friday night. While the Bears were cruising to a 49-14 win over Cherokee, the

Morristown West Trojans were knocking off previous conference unbeaten Jefferson County 21-20. Should all three teams win out from here, the Bears would be atop a three-way tie. “If West wins out, and we win out and Jeff wins out, then it would be a three-way tie,” SCHS coach Steve Brewer said.

“And I think it would be best overall record, which would be us — they both would have three losses.” The three teams will all be favorites for their remaining games. The Bears must become Morristown West fans for their games. If West were to lose to See PLAYOFF PICTURE, Page A10


Sports â&#x2014;&#x2020; A9

Sunday, October 17, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press

Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

Lacy, David Houserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 6-year-old English Pointer, hits on the scent of a Bobwhite Quail during a morning hunt Friday at Houserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s idyllic 55-acre quail hunting preserve in Kodak.

QUAIL

3From Page A8

scheduled hunt), I know where they are, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find them. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a cardio workout for most people. We would leave here, and walk the property and take a break, sit down, eat a snack, drink some water, hunt some more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you come to hunt, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to charge you per gun. For one person you can kill up to 10 quail. You can kill over that if you want to pay more, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll give you a price list when we start. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have extra guns for people if they want to rent them, boxes of shells if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any shells. Birds are not ducks here. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t shoot a big high-powered (shell). This is a 7 1/2 (shell), with shot smaller than BBs. Twelve-guage and 20-gauge is what most people use. And you have to wear orange, either a vest or a hat. Safetyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the number one rule here,â&#x20AC;? Houser said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A half a day hunt is 3 1/2 hours, 8:30 to noon or 2:30 or 3:00 until dark. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday a man and his son came out and took home nine (birds),â&#x20AC;? he continued. Houserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fields are prime habitat for the Bobwhite Quail, and Friday morning, Houser, his wife Teri and son-inlaw Brad Cain set out for a sort of sample hunt. Following Lacy, a 6-year-old English Pointer, it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take the group long to come upon their first quarry. Eyes locked on, tail and left forepaw board-stiff, Lacy pointed out a patch

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re open everyday but Sunday, I believe a man ought to have a day of rest to be with his family and go to church, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not open on Sunday.â&#x20AC;? David Houser, of D&T Quail Preserve in Kodak

of tall grass and weeds on the side of a gently rolling hill â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a perfect roosting site for a covey of Bobwhites, the official state game bird of Tennessee. Sure enough, after just a few seconds of Houser flushing the area with his booted feet, a pair of Bobwhite quails took off like a shot, prompting another shot from Cain. The hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trusty 12-guage found its target and Lacy was on the hunt again, this time for her downed prey. Like the good bird dog she is, Lacy brought the quail back to Houser, soft-mouthing it all the way, to keep the quail perfectly preserved. Once the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hunt is over the birds are cleaned by Houser and later theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in Teriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frying pan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a delicacy,â&#x20AC;? she said. Meat from quail is a healthy meat, low-fat, with few calories and very little cholesterol. Houserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preserve is open from Oct. 1 through March 31. Days of operation are Monday through Saturday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re open everyday but Sunday,â&#x20AC;? Houser said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe a man ought to have a day of rest to be with his family and go to church, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not open on Sunday. But every other day there are

Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

(Above) David Houser fires a clay for his son-in-law Brad Cain to â&#x20AC;&#x153;warm upâ&#x20AC;? prior to a morning hunt in Kodak. At right Houserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 6-year-old English Pointer, Lacy, retrieves a Bobwhite Quail that she pointed out moments earlier. half-day hunts or all-day hunts for people that want to pay for all-day.â&#x20AC;? Reservations are required. Houser provides over 30 years of dog handling and training experience at his customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; disposal as their hunting guide. Cash, Visa, Master Card and Discover cards are accepted. Visit the preserve website at https://sites. google.com/site/dtquailpreserve/ for more information. mpsports@themountainpress.com

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A10 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sports

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, October 17, 2010

Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

Seymour head coach Jim Moore (center) chats on the sidelines during the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game with Morristown East last week. PREP FOOTBALL

After ending one streak, Eagles hope for start of a winning streak By Rich Hailey Sports Correspondent After putting a 14 quarter scoring drought to rest Friday night, the Seymour Eagles would like to start a more pleasant streak, this time of wins. In order to do that, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to win on the road, as they travel to Rogersville to take on the 3-5 Cherokee Chiefs, who are coming off a 49-14 defeat at the hands of Sevier County. Coach Jim Moore knows heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got his work cut out for him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing a lot better. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a good quarterback, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve improved quite a bit. They play a lot of sophomores and juniors, but their sophomore group won the freshman league last year for the first time, so thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good bunch of kids up there.â&#x20AC;? The Chiefs have some challenges of their own. Starting quarterback Ty

Ryans went out of the game against Sevier County with an injury to his left hand and he may not be able to go Friday night. The Chiefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backup quarterback sat out the game with a concussion, so he is questionable as well. Cherokee may wind up starting sophomore fullback Matt Davis at the QB spot on Friday. The turnover prone Cherokees, losing nine in their last two games, will also have to find a way to score on the Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stingy defensive unit, which held Jefferson County to 10 points, and Morristown East to 7. Coach Moore is proud of the progress made by his young defensive unit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve just been playing better all year and, you know, at the start, we had a bunch of young kids, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not young anymore. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got eight games under their belt and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re starting to play a little better. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re reaping the benefits of it.â&#x20AC;?

But there are still some concerns on offense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The frustrating thing about it was this game should have been over in the third quarter,â&#x20AC;? Moore said. Several promising drives were ended by penalties and mistakes, including a first and goal from the nine yard line to start the second half. The offense has had trouble with consistency all season, and that was evident Friday night, but a potential solution emerged as well. Lee Knight had a terrific night running the ball, notching just over 120 yards and a touchdown, blasting through the defensive line with power, and showing some nice speed as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lee had a great game,â&#x20AC;? said Moore. â&#x20AC;?He sure did.â&#x20AC;? If the offense carries that momentum into Rogersville, there could be some fireworks in Hawkins County. Kickoff is at 7:30.

PROFESSIONAL BOXING

Tarverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heavyweight debut a success MIAMI, Okla. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Former 175-pound champion Antonio Tarver outpointed Nagy Aguilera to win his heavyweight debut Friday night. The 1996 Olympic bronze medalist had been working as an analyst for Showtime before returning to the ring almost a year and a half after his last fight, a loss to the younger and faster Chad Dawson. Tarver started slow, then started picking up momentum in the latter rounds. Neither fighter scored a knockdown but each landed solid blows. Judges Duane Ford, Gary Ritter and David Sutherland scored the fight 98-92 in favor of Tarver (28-6).

â&#x20AC;&#x153;With a 17 month layoff and since I am 41 years old, I would give myself an A-plus,â&#x20AC;? Tarver said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a real guy fighting me â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a live guy. He wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to lay down. He took some tremendous shots. Anybody with any less heart would have been knocked out. I take my hat off to Nagy ... he came to win.â&#x20AC;? Aguilera dropped to 16-5 with his second straight loss. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t his fight tonight,â&#x20AC;? Tarver said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think my experience really paid off. We are still here. People doubted me and people think I picked the wrong guy. But he was the right guy for me. If I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t beat Nagy, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t deserve to look at any type

of challengers.â&#x20AC;? In the co-feature, Shawn Porter of Akron, Ohio, won the NABF welterweight championship by stopping Hector Munoz of Albuquerque, N.M. Porter (17-0) dominated from the start, and Munozâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corner finally threw in the towel at

2:05 of the ninth round. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was just the 17th (fight) for me, so I am still learning about the fight game,â&#x20AC;? Porter said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was definitely a big improvement from my last fight (a 10-round victory over Ray Robinson in July).

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Despite the effort we had tonight and the points we put on the board, we still had three miscues

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on special teams, one on punt and two on special teams, which we really canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford this late in the year,â&#x20AC;? coach Steve Brewer said following the Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 49-14 drubbing of Cherokee. Still, the coach did find plenty of bright spots in the blowout. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(QB) Danny (Chastain) got really good protection, our receivers caught the ball, we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t kill ourselves with a lot of stupid penalties and we made plays,â&#x20AC;? the coach said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were sharp in the throwing game and we got some really good work in the throwing game over the off-week and this week, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really pleased at where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at right now.â&#x20AC;? On top of that, the Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; defense played an excellent game, led by big Jake Reppert up front. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s putting together a good year, and our whole defensive lineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s putting together a good year,â&#x20AC;? Brewer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I thought our secondary played well tonight against a guy that can throw the ball well.â&#x20AC;? mpsports@themountainpress.com

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either Seymour or Cocke County and the Bears and leave Sevier County in a tie with Jefferson County, the Pats would be atop the conference, having earned a head-to-head win over SCHS. West should have an easy time with Cocke County in the coming week, as the Fighting Cocks have played no closer than 16 points with any conference rival. The game with Seymour could prove a tougher challenge though. Seymour finally got off the snide Friday night, toppling South-Doyle 21-14 at Benton Householder Field. The Trojans/Eagles game is in Seymour, furthering the Blue and Goldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chance for an upset. And what would please the Eagles more than spoiling the Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; shot at a conference title?

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Sevier Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brad Mason returns an interception 49 yards Friday night against the Cherokee Chiefs. Masonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TD put the Bears up 7-0 on the way to a 49-14 win.

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Sunday, October 17, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

Sports ◆ A11

NASCAR NATIONWIDE SERIES

Keselowski races to 5th Nationwide win at Charlotte By MIKE CRANSTON AP Sports Writer CONCORD, N.C. — Roger Penske really is serious about the Nationwide Series. Brad Keselowski’s dominant first season with the famed car owner is proof. Keselowski put Penske closer to his first NASCAR series title when he pulled away from Martin Truex Jr. on a late restart Friday night at Charlotte Motor Speedway. It was Keselowski’s fifth victory of the season and gave him a 450-point lead over Carl Edwards. Needing Keselowski to finish only 26th over better in the final four races to clinch the title, Penske turned to crew chief Paul Wolfe after the race and reminded him about a conversation before the season. Wolfe wanted to know if Penske, best known for his open-wheel cars and Sprint Cup teams, was dedicated to the lower-tier Nationwide Series. “I guess, Paul, we are, aren’t we?” Penske said, smiling. “We continue to try to let you know that.” After some brief side-byside racing with Truex on the restart with eight laps left, Keselowski pulled ahead and wasn’t challenged. Penske teammate Justin Allgaier finished third, followed by Joey Logano and Clint Bowyer, who started on the pole but had a costly pit-road speeding penalty late. “I’ve never been so disappointed to finish second, to be honest,” Truex said. “We had a good car there in the middle of the race. The long green-flag

R A C E R E S U LT S NASCAR Nationwide-Dollar General 300 Results Friday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (3) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200 laps, 128.4 rating, 190 points. 2. (5) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 200, 114.2, 175. 3. (9) Justin Allgaier, Dodge, 200, 112.5, 165. 4. (4) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 117.1, 165. 5. (1) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 200, 123.1, 160. 6. (10) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 135.9, 160. 7. (7) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 200, 95.2, 146. 8. (15) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 200, 89.7, 147. 9. (2) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 200, 98.9, 138. 10. (14) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 96.9, 139. 11. (21) Brendan Gaughan, Toyota, 200, 85, 130. 12. (19) David Reutimann, Toyota, 200, 89.6, 127. 13. (11) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 97.1, 124. 14. (13) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 200, 74.4, 121. 15. (24) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 200, 82.2, 118. 16. (30) James Buescher, Toyota, 200, 75.3, 120. 17. (25) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 200, 80.8, 112. 18. (39) Josh Wise, Dodge, 200, 62.5, 109. 19. (12) Colin Braun, Ford, 199, 76.4, 106. 20. (34) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, 198, 64.8, 103. 21. (18) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 198, 66.4, 100. 22. (23) Kelly Bires, Ford, 198, 58.1, 97. 23. (43) Eric McClure, Ford, 198, 49.4, 94. 24. (27) David Starr, Chevrolet, 197, 49.2, 91. 25. (35) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 197, 51, 88. 26. (31) Michael McDowell, Dodge, 196, 55.1, 85. 27. (42) Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet, 195, 38, 82. 28. (22) Brian Scott, Ford, 192, 56.9, 79. 29. (16) Steve Wallace, Toyota, accident, 188, 70.1, 76. 30. (38) Hermie Sadler, Ford, 188, 46.9, 73. 31. (40) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 176, 42.8, 70. 32. (37) Jason Keller, Chevrolet, 170, 39.6, 67. 33. (41) Robert Richardson Jr., Chevrolet, accident, 130, 37.6, 64. 34. (20) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, rear end, 118, 58.7, 61. 35. (6) Paul Menard, Ford, engine, 117, 86.5, 63. 36. (32) Michael Annett, Toyota, 73, 34.2, 55. 37. (17) Ryan Truex, Toyota, accident, 72, 61, 52. 38. (28) Kevin Lepage, Toyota, vibration, 25, 39, 49. 39. (29) Shelby Howard, Chevrolet, accident, 19, 36, 46. 40. (26) Mark Green, Chevrolet, electrical, 12, 32.9, 43. 41. (36) Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet, accident, 10, 34.7, 40. 42. (33) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, ignition, 4, 29.8, 37. 43. (8) Parker Kligerman, Dodge, accident, 3, 30.4, 34.

runs were really good for us. Once we pitted and put that last set of tires on it was just a little bit too tight. Just couldn’t quite clear Brad for the lead.” While Danica Patrick posted her best finish in her nine Nationwide races — 21st although she was two laps down at the end — Keselowski had little competition once Kyle Busch had handling problems after halfway through the race. Busch finished sixth and Edwards, closest to Keselowski in the standings, was 13th. “That was awesome,” said Keselowski, in his first full season with Penske. “Our car was really good.” Bowyer, who seemed to have the only car capable of competing with Busch early, was penalized for speeding on pit road with 42 laps left, dropping him to 16th. Bowyer’s penalty came during an odd caution to correct a scoring error. NASCAR acknowledged it mistakenly penalized Brian Scott for a missing lug nut. When they were all accounted for, NASCAR put out the caution flag and allowed Scott to regain his original position. Keselowski didn’t pit and took the lead on the restart — his third lead of the race. He built a 1.5second advantage before Scott wrecked and tore out a chunk of infield grass with 19 laps left to bring out another caution in the 200-lap race. Keselowski earned his 11th career win and topped his four-victory season from a year ago. Patrick continued her learning process.

Making her first start on the big track at Charlotte after running go-karts here as a teenager, Patrick vowed Thursday to be aggressive on the track, if needed. James Buescher wrecked her a week earlier at California to end her chances of a top-15 finish. But Patrick never raced side-by-side with Buescher — and was never a factor in the 300-mile race. She bumped the outside wall early on and kept control of her No. 7 Chevrolet, but she soon fell a lap down after green-flag pit stops. “It seems like every time we have a chance to have a great finish we crash,” Patrick said. “And every time we have a pretty average night we finish and we finish in the 20s.” The previous best Nationwide finish for Patrick, primarily an IndyCar driver, was 24th. She has struggled with the boxier stock cars. “We did our best and we had some high points this weekend,” she said. “That hasn’t happened a lot of other times I’ve been to a track for the first time. We’ll take the high points and take a non-crash home and learn from this new car this time.” Busch, who picked up his 12th series win of the year last week, had handling problems late in the race after dominating early. Busch shot from sixth to first in 23 laps and led for much of the middle of the race until a series of greenflag pit stops put cars out of sequence. After briefly being a lap down, Busch moved to the front with 54 laps to go.

Terry Renna/AP

Brad Keselowski celebrates after winning the Dollar General 300 NASCAR Nationwide series auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., Friday, Oct. 15.


A12 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sports

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, October 17, 2010

SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE FOOTBALL

Murrayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2 TD passes lead Georgia past Vandy, 43-0 By CHARLES ODUM AP Sports Writer

MLB ALCS

A-Rod, Yankees rally in 8th, beat Texas in ALCS ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nolan Ryan hollered from the front row, manager Ron Washington pumped his fist in the dugout and C.J. Wilson kept in control on the mound. Finally, a home playoff victory for the Texas Rangers was within reach. Even better, they were beating their old nemesis, the New York Yankees. And then, Alex Rodriguez and the Yankees did what they do best. They rallied to win, using a five-run eighth inning to down Texas 6-5 Friday night in the AL championship series opener. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was a classic example of us having a tough start for the first six innings,â&#x20AC;? said Rodriguez, who scooted home with the tiebreaking run soon after his two-run single that was nearly a doubleplay grounder. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then a great at-bat and a great slide gets us going.â&#x20AC;? The Rangers still have never won a postseason game at home (0-7). This one hurt the most, since they led 3-0 in the first inning and knocked out CC Sabathia with a 5-0 lead after four. Robinson Cano hit a solo homer in the seventh to begin the Yankeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comeback. Brett Gardnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headfirst dive for an infield hit the next inning started a string of seven straight hitters reaching base against Wilson and four relievers.

Gatlinburg menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5-on-5 basketball

The Gatlinburg Recreation Department is now accepting rosters for the upcoming menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5-on-5 basketball league. The league is open to men 18-and-up and will play Wednesdays from 6-9 p.m. The cost for the league is $250 per team. The deadline to register is Friday, Oct. 22. The league will begin play Wednesday, Oct. 27, and will play until February. Teams will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information call Dave Anderson at 436-4990.

Gatlinburg Co-ed volleyball slated

The Gatlinburg Recreation Department is now accepting rosters for the upcoming Fall 2010 4-vs-4 Co-ed Volleyball League. The league will be open to men and women ages 13 and up and will be held on Tuesday and Thursday nights from 6-9 p.m. The team registration fee is $50. The deadline to register is Friday, Oct. 22. The league will begin Tuesday, Oct. 25, and will run until December. Teams will be accepted on a first-come, firstserved basis. For more information, call Dave Anderson at 436-4990.

Pigeon Forge Jr. League b-ball clinic

There will be a Pigeon Forge Junior League basketball clinic at the Pigeon Forge Middle School this Sunday from 2-5 p.m. The clinic is limited to the first 100 girls and boys in the 1st-6th grades, registration begins at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, and the cost is $20 per player. To preregister for the event, call 654-2105. Special guest coaches will be former UT Vols Damon Johnson and King College womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball coach Michelle Williams. All players will compete in drills and will learn new skills and have a chance to win some prizes. AP Photo/John Bazemore

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray (11) is brought down by Vanderbilt defensive end Theron Kadri (91) during the second quarter of an NCAA college football game Saturday in Athens, Ga. Murray has 12 TD passes and only three interceptions this season. Murray and other starters were pulled late in the third quarter. Hutson Mason took over at quarterback. Thomas, a sophomore, had four carries for 40 yards, including scoring runs of 15 and 9 yards. Larry Smith completed 5 of 14 passes for 70 yards with an interception for Vanderbilt. Zac Stacy led the Commodores with nine carries for 39 yards. Warren Norman had seven carries

for 23 yards. Jared Funk replaced Smith for the fourth quarter. Georgia appeared unsettled in the opening minutes. The Bulldogs called timeouts before their second defensive and third offensive plays. Fans booed when coach Mark Richt sent his field goal team onto the field on fourth and 1 at the Vanderbilt 16. The ball was snapped and Walsh kicked the field goal as Richt called timeout from the sideline â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Georgiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final timeout of the half.

Richt then sent his offense back on the field. Murray ran for the first down but Georgia eventually settled for a 32-yard field goal by Walsh. Georgia had two apparent touchdowns overturned on reviews. After an apparent completed pass from Smith to Mason Johnston and fumble by Johnston, linebacker Christian Robinson picked up the ball and ran about 40 yards into the end zone. Officials ruled a touchdown but the play was ruled an incomplete pass on review.

Tusculum QB leads nation in passing Tusculum College quarterback Bo Cordell leads the nation in passing according to the NCAA Division II football statistics. Cordell is ranked in six offensive categories, while the Pioneers are mentioned in 13 team statistics. Cordell is averaging 419.33 passing yards per game, which is also the best in all NCAA divisions (FBS, FCS, II, III).

How to be in Control of your assets, health and financial legacy â&#x20AC;˘

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Wednesday, October 27 from 9:30-11 a.m. LeConte Medical Center Classroom This complimentary educational seminar is a service of the Dr. Robert F. Thomas Foundation and does not sell any financial product. By attending, you will learn: 1 I  "*)*%$- *!)%(!)$*!$%$!$) !$*%$  -!* ((*%*  Federal estate tax 1  %-!""!$ (!2 .&"%(!$!$&!*/&"$$!$*%%")&%-()%**%($/ "* ( ,$!(*!,)$- ** **%$$)) )!$)*%(%(* %)-!* $%&"$$!$ 1 !,!$*(+)*)$* *(+* %+*&(%*!$* **%$$)) $)-(!$/%+('+)*!%$) %+** ,"!!*/%%+*%)**%+#$*) 1 (*!,+))%"!!$)+($$)*!$,)*#$*&(*!)+(!$+$(*!$*!#) 1 (!*%()$&(*%()$* *-) (*%+!"!*)%- /$%*"($-/)*%#!$!#!0 $"#)( $#.!#!0/%+("/%(/%+(#!"/$ (!*!)% %!  This seminar will be presented by local financial planner Beth Urquhart and estate planning attorney B3F 33FD. Serving as moderator will be Debbie Dowling with the Dr. Robert F. Thomas Foundation providing funding support benefiting patient care at LeConte Medical Center. Refreshments will be provided.

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ATHENS, Ga. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carlton Thomas ran for the first two touchdowns of his career, Aaron Murray passed for two touchdowns and Georgia welcomed new mascot Uga VIII by beating Vanderbilt 43-0 on Saturday. Washaun Ealey led Georgia with 17 carries for 123 yards and a touchdown. Caleb King, who normally shares carries with Ealey, served the first game of his two-game suspension following his arrest for failing to pay a speeding ticket. Georgia (3-4 overall, 2-3 Southeastern Conference) took its second straight lopsided win after four straight losses. The Bulldogs beat Tennessee 41-14 last week. Georgia introduced its new mascot, Uga VIII, a 13-month-old white English bulldog, before the game. Vanderbilt (2-4, 1-2) suffered its 15th loss in the last 16 games in the series. Blair Walsh kicked two field goals for Georgia but missed from 31 yards in the fourth quarter to keep the Bulldogs from taking their largest margin of victory in the series. Georgia beat Vanderbilt 45-0 in 1976. Murray, a freshman, completed 15 of 24 passes for a career-high 287 yards and two touchdowns with no interceptions. He had scoring passes of 4 yards to Kris Durham and 48 yards to A.J. Green. Durham had four catches for 112 yards.

SPORTS BRIEFS


Mountain Life ■ The Mountain Press ■ B Section ■ Sunday, October 17, 2010

Choosing film to see can be tough Did I ever tell you that I used to work at a movie theater? In fact, that was my first real job. Sure, I did a little babysitting, but working at the theater was the first job where I had to report the income to the Internal Revenue Service. At least I hope so. If they needed to know the minute amount of money I made watching a couple of the neighborhood kids, I may be in some trouble. But let’s keep that between you and me if you don’t mind. The movie job was a lot of fun. I got to see all the movies for free, eat all the popcorn I could eat and drink all the soda I could drink. I’m sure it wasn’t good for me physically to do that. The coconut oil they used to pop the popcorn and the salty seasoning probably raised my blood pressure and cholesterol quite a bit. I also got to meet a lot of people, something I love about my current job as well. For the most part, the people I met were pretty happy about a night out at the movie theater. Most knew the cost of the popcorn and drinks was going to be high and were resigned to pay the price, chalking it up as the expense of a night’s entertainment. Others weren’t so happy about paying several dollars for a bag of popcorn that probably only cost pennies to make. And I always dreaded when someone would ask for an empty cup or even just a cup of ice water, because it was company policy that we had to charge the same amount for an empty cup as we would if were filled to the brim with a fizzy beverage. At inventory time we had to count every cup, bag and box of candy in the store room — damaged or ready to sell. The numbers all had to add up to what we’d sold, so that was the reason we were given for selling cups at the same price as drinks. I didn’t like it, but that was my job. So, these days when I go to the movie theater, I’m pretty patient with the folks at the candy counter. I know it’s not all grins and giggles. The work day is divided up by the mad rush as showtime nears and everyone wants to buy their snacks at the same time, and the down times when everyone is in the theaters. The muffled roar of the movies playing and the popping of the popcorn can be quite calming. Our theater had the added benefit of being located in one of the two shopping centers where teenagers cruised on the weekends, so there were a lot of people watching during those downtimes too. These days I don’t get out to the movies as much. I usually end up waiting for them to come out on video, cable or network television. I like to wait to see movies that really benefit from the big screen. As the opening of The Forge Cinemas and the release of several new movies approached last week, there were some conversations about who wanted to see what movies. Not surprisingly, many of the choices were divided up along gender lines. The males wanted to see “Red.” Not being a guy, I had to look up that one. It’s one of those shoot-’em-up, blow-’em-up movies starring Bruce Willis and, of all people, Helen Mirren. The girls in the equation were wanting to see “Life as We Know It,” a romcom as they call romantic comedies in this text-message style of abbreviated language these days. It stars Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel. Now I like a good shoot-’em-up every now and then and Josh Duhamel is a good reason to see almost any movie, but I was holding out for “Secretariat,” the story of the race horse that won the Triple Crown in 1973. I seem to have a thing for true stories with a sports-related theme. Go figure. “Miracle” and “Invincible” are a couple of favorites. “Secretariat” was made by some of the same people who made both movies. “Miracle” is based on the gold medal-winning 1980 U.S. hockey team, and “Invincible” tells the story of Philadelphia Eagles football player Vince Papale. I loved the cinematography of both films and appreciate the choreography it must have taken to re-create many of those scenes. Those are the kinds of movies I like to see in a theater. The romantic comedies I can wait to see on a television screen, and I don’t get into the action flicks so much that I need to see (or hear) an explosion at life-size or bigger-than-life proportions. “Secretariat,” by the way, did not disappoint. You should take the time to see it. If you get out to the movies any time in the near future, I hope you enjoy your experience. Please be kind to the staff at the concession stand. They’re just doing their job and they don’t set the prices. And, above all, please turn off your cell phone. — Gail Crutchfield is the community editor of The Mountain Press. Call 428-0748, ext. 215, or e-mail to gcrutchfield@themountainpress.com.

Gail Crutchfield/The Mountain Press

Organizers of the Leadership Sevier Team Tailgate event were, from left, Tera Cooper, Sande Weiss, Donna Roland, Jeannie Allen, Brenda Tweed and De Ann Turner.

Leadership Sevier hosts 2010 Team Tailgate Leadership Sevier hosted its annual Team Tailgate event Thursday night. It’s an annual fundraiser for the program that works toward the goal of building leadership skills among the citizens of Sevier County while imprinting on them a greater sense of community and improving quality of life through efforts initiated by the members. The first class of Leadership Sevier graduated in 1997; 2002 saw the first Leadership Tomorrow class for young professionals; and there is also the Smoky Mountain Youth Leadership, for local students. Gail Crutchfield/The Mountain Press

Harriet Berrier, left, and Donna Koester study silent auction items, including an original painting by Leadership Sevier alum Rich Benjamin, a project he completed in five days for the event.

Gail Crutchfield/The Mountain Press

Dale Carr, right, makes an attempt to get the “football” between the goal posts during a game of paper football at Team Tailgate. Also pictured are, from left, Lou Weiss, Michael Simonis and Chad Reagan.

Gail Crutchfield/The Mountain Press

Ellen Wilhoit, Kim Ammons and Debbie Dowling chat during Team Tailgate.

Gail Crutchfield/The Mountain Press

Ted Miller and Holly Scott enjoy spending time with fellow Leadership Sevier alum at Team Tailgate.

Gail Crutchfield/The Mountain Press

Don Haynes, Tom Walker and Rich Benjamin catch up during Team Tailgate.


B2 ◆ Local

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 17, 2010

Stink bugs on the prowl, so take precautions The brown marmerated stink bug was accidentally introduced into the United States by packing crates from Japan or China. The first documented specimen was collected in Allentown, Pa. in September 1998. These stink bugs are incredible hitchhikers. More than normal numbers of stink bugs have been reported in the eastern half of the United States. Higher temperatures this summer may be a

contributing factor to the brown marmerated stink bug being able to reproduce at a much faster rate this year. Student housing in West Virginia became the host for thousands of these unwanted guests. Also I found several stink bugs on the outside of my own home. If you would like to see a brown marmerated stink bug, come by the office and we will be happy to show you one. The brown marmerated stink bug is brown with a

diamond-shaped speckled back. The best identification for adults is the white band on the antennae. This stink bug is about one inch in length and can fly. It is not known to bite or carry harmful diseases, but will emit an odor any time it feels threatened. Folks who have experienced this odor are not likely to forget it anytime soon. This stink bug is considered to be a serious pest for fruit and vegetable farmers. The fall tends to be the time of year when

pests like stink bugs, ladybugs and box elder bugs enter homes, businesses and structures to hibernate for the winter. Adults seek out a warm place to over winter. Then, they go into a state of hibernation

Percy Sledge to perform Oct. 23

Submitted Report

 like a  Wednesday, October 27, 2010 Noon – 1 p.m.

1000-0814

AP Photo/Tina Fineberg (file)

Percy Sledge, an inductee in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, will perform in Maggie Valley Oct. 23.

LeConte Breast Center presents

Join J. Michael Rothwell, MD, Breast Surgeon, Wednesday, October 27, 2010, Noon – 1 p.m. for a lunch and learn presentation exploring the 2010 recommendations for your breast health. The cost for the program is $5 for Covenant Passport members and $10 for Non-Passport members. This cost includes a box lunch. The program will be

The best preventative measure is a targeted exterior treatment from your local pest management company. This treatment protects against stink bugs as well as lady bugs (who also emit an odor) and box elder bugs. Act now to protect your home from these invader pest this winter. — Ray Johnson owns Johnson Pest Control in Sevierville. E-mail questions to ray@johnsonpestcontrol.com or visit www. johnsonpestcontrol.com.

Milks winner of ABWA award

Submitted Report MAGGIE VALLEY, N.C. — Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Percy Sledge will perform at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 23 at Eaglenest Entertainment in Maggie Valley. Sledge will forever be associated with “When a Man Loves a Woman.” His voice made him one of the key figures of deep southern soul during the late ’60s. Sledge recorded at Muscle Shoals studios in Alabama, where he frequently sang songs written by Spooner Oldham and Dan Penn. Sledge was among the pioneers of countrysoul, singing songs by Charlie Rich and Kris Kristofferson. “When a Man Loves a Woman” became a huge hit in 1966, topping both the pop and R&B charts. It was quickly followed by “Warm and Tender Love” and “It Tears Me Up,” which were both similar in the style of his first hit. Over the next two decades he continued to tour, and in the late 1980s, “When a Man Loves a Woman” experienced resurgence in popularity, due to its inclusion in movie soundtracks and in television commercials. Following its appearance in a 1987 Levi commercial in England, the single was re-released and climbed to No. 2. Two years later, he won the Rhythm and Blues Foundation’s Career Achievement Award. Opening the show will be his band Sunset Drive. Tickets for the Percy Sledge concert are available at the venue box office, weekdays, noon until 5 p.m., and by phone at 926-9658. Tickets are reserved seating. For more information and a seating chart, visit www.eaglenestnc.com.

and wait for winter to pass. Sometimes the warmth inside can cause the stink bug to become active and fly clumsily around light fixtures. Some preventative measures you can take: Seal windows and doors, replace screens, install weather stripping and door sweeps, use caulk to seal cracks. If they happen to enter, vacuum — do not crush. Always remember to immediately dispose of the vacuum bag outside of the structure.

held at the Fort Sanders Sevier Senior Center at 1221 West Main Street in Sevierville. This lunch & learn is not just for seniors! If you’re interested in learning more about this topic please join us! For more information, or to register, call 453.WELL. Preregistration is required.

www.lecontemedicalcenter.org

The American Business Women’s Association recently presented the Sevier Chapter 2010 Woman of the Year Award to Darlene Milks. Milks was described by fellow ABWA members as someone who gives her all to the organization. She has been a member for seven years and continues to help with new endeavors. Since joining, she has held a position in ABWA with the Sevier chapteror on the ABWA Area Council Board. She is dedicated and gives much of her time to the organization. Milks is active in mentoring young women in the community, continuously helps and encourages the members of the Sevier chapter and is active on a regional and national

level. She runs a business with her husband Tim. A l s o nominated were Milks Michelle Wallace (previous president), Tammy Johnson, Gloria Christiansen and Treva Brodersen. ABWA meets the third Thursday of the month at the Holiday Inn in Pigeon Forge. Networking begins at 6 p.m. followed by a buffet dinner and meeting. To attend, contact a Sevier chapter member.

“I can unlock great information with my finger”


Local â&#x2014;&#x2020; B3

Sunday, October 17, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press

upl and chronicles

One Armed Jimmy Lawson lived full life By Carroll McMahan â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary, do you think I ought to have this runted arm cut off?â&#x20AC;? James B. Lawson asked his sister Mary Butler sometime around the turn of the 20th Century. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, Jimmy, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe you ought to do that,â&#x20AC;? Mary replied. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, Mary, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already had it done,â&#x20AC;? he told her, showing her the empty sleeve. From that time forward, James Brownlow Lawson was widely known as One Armed Jimmy. When Lawson was about 5, his arm stopped growing and caused him a great deal of pain. As an adult, he traveled to Knoxville and consulted physicians at a medical college as to whether or not the use of his paralyzed right arm could be recovered. An examination revealed the arm would never be of benefit. With that being the case, he asked that it be amputated. Lawson was placed under chloroform and the limb was removed before an assembly of students and physicians. One Armed Jimmy Lawson was born in Wears Valley on Sept. 13, 1862. His father, James Dunn Lawson, was a tax collector of Sevier County, a farmer, teacher, gospel singer, and a circuit riding Methodist minister. Also, he founded Vestal M.E. Church in Knoxville and preached the first sermon at the Middle Creek Methodist Church in Sevier County. His mother, Hettie Morton Lawson, was the second wife of the Rev. Lawson. She married the preacher after the death of his first wife, Jane Burns Lawson, who died before the age of 30, leaving the minister with three children. One Armed Jimmy was a linguist, athlete, prospector, amateur astronomer, world traveler and genealogist. As a graduate of Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., Lawson was fluent in five languages. After graduating, he worked in the mines in

Colorado for a few years and served as deputy sheriff in one of the towns of the Creede District. While prospecting in Colorado, he gained a considerable local reputation as an athlete by walking from Manitou Springs to Cripple Creek in half a day, passing over Pikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Peak in a fierce September wind and snowstorm. Though shocked twice by lightning, Lawsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes were not injured and he pushed forward. He scaled the cloud piercing summits far and near and once walked roughly 66 miles, at an average altitude of 10,000 feet in a 24-hour nonstop day, without exhaustion or symptoms of heart failure. A Colorado newspaper, The Teller County Star, reported in 1910 that James B. Lawson, known for his keen eyesight, discovered Comet A-1910 and gave the first notice to the public. This article also stated that Lawson was the first there to note the return of Halleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Comet and made a safe and sane prediction concerning the course of the famous blazing star. One Armed Jimmy arrived in the Philippines late in 1901 and taught there as an employee of the U.S. governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bureau of Education. He was recognized by the government of the Philippines for his service during the cholera epidemic. On one occasion, he and a Filipino rescued three U.S. soldiers who drifted out to sea on an overturned canoe. It was almost dark and very stormy when Jimmyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sharp eyesight discovered the Americans, saving them from an almost certain death. He also shot a shark â&#x20AC;&#x153;big as a saw log.â&#x20AC;? The shark, having defied hooks and guns, terrorized the native fishermen until they were starving for fish. Jimmy watched for the aggressive creature and shot it when it leaped out of the water. Lawson went to Mexico for a mining company and was forced out of the country during his last visit by

Submitted

One Armed Jimmy Lawson and an unidentified tourist in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Submitted

James Brownlow Lawson, while he was a cadet at Norwich University. none other than guerrilla chieftain Poncho Villa. A guerrilla force waylaid him on a trail at the foot of a mountain below the mine. He was severely wounded, captured and condemned to death. He escaped, after being tied and tortured, by chewing through a three quarter inch rope and eluded the sleeping guards during their Siesta. While in Mexico, Lawson became a friend of Austin Peay, the future governor of Tennessee, and served as an interpreter between Peay and the Mexican people. Lawson once traveled around the world on a German steamship. On deck, far out in the Indian Ocean, he met a young gentleman from Siam. Who was descended from an ancient royal family. While engaged in conversation, Lawson learned that the young man was going to America. In fact, he was on his way to attend Maryville College. In the 1904 presidential election, he worked tirelessly in Colorado for President Theodore Roosevelt. After three months of politicking, he visited the St. Louis Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair en route to Tennessee. While there, he visited old friends at the Philippines Pavilion. When Lawson returned to Sevier County for good, he continued to pursue information on genealogy. He had written to the Chief of Records, U.S. War Department, for records on ancestors as far back as 1913. And, in his later years, Lawson visited various relatives and often spent the night. He would stay up past midnight asking ques-

tions and writing everything down on a tablet. When Austin Peay became governor, Lawson approached him about road improvements in Wears Valley. His old friend came through and a new road was built connecting Wears Valley and Pigeon Forge. One Armed Jimmy did not allow his handicap to stand in the way of assisting on the project. He helped dig out the mountain side near the spot known as the Cascades. An enthusiastic supporter in the campaign to establish the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Lawson became a ranger and fire warden. He went around posting signs and asking people to be careful with campfires. He spoke at schools where he fascinated children by saying something to them in a foreign language. The last several years of his life, Lawson resided with his niece, Hettie Butler Huff, and her husband, Newton Huff, along with their children. One day Hettieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son, Claude, accompanied his great-uncle to Gatlinburg. While they were resting on a park bench, two teachers at Phi Beta Phi Settlement School observed the elderly man without an arm. Not wanting to offend the gentleman, one teacher spoke in Spanish to point out the â&#x20AC;&#x153;poor old man with an arm missing.â&#x20AC;? To their astonishment, Jimmy responded to her statement in fluent Spanish. Trying to avoid further embarrassment, the educators addressed each other in French. Much to their chagrin, he continued the

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conversation in French. Since the ladies did not have knowledge of another foreign tongue, they made a hasty exit. One Armed Jimmy Lawson never married. He died on Dec. 30, 1941, at the age of 79, and was buried in the Mattox Cemetery in Wears Valley. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carroll McMahan is the special projects facilitator

for the Sevierville Chamber of Commerce. The Upland Chronicles series celebrates the heritage and past of Sevier County. If you have suggestions for future topics, would like to submit a column or have comments; please contact McMahan at 453-6411 or e-mail to cmcmahan@scoc.org; or Ron Rader at 604-9161 or e-mail to ron@ronraderproperties.com.

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B4 ◆ Religion

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 17, 2010

Public pulpit

Sins from public ministry? It merits some punishment By ALDEN MARSHALL Ministers who preach against sins and are discovered to be practicing the same sins, are often in the news. Every minister has been guilty of this, although we are not all guilty of the same sins. Billy Graham has the habit of praying each morning that God would help him to do nothing that day that would destroy his life’s work. His is an honest prayer, and it is a good example for us all. It is only by the great mercy of God that many of us with tough constitutions are not in jail for murder, or did not desert a military post because of cowardice, or steal because of greed, or had sex outside of marriage because of lust, etc. One cannot read the Bible without seeing that these and other sins are clearly and repeatedly condemned. So if we do them, I hope we sincerely repent and then pray to be holy, and neither excuse such behavior nor support it in others. But since we have all sinned, as the Bible states, should that keep us from a public ministry? Probably at least for a while, if the sins were public that bring dishonor to the name of Jesus Christ. Then if the offender has remorse and a change of behavior, in some cases the individual should be reinstated. But even then the listeners will continue to be distracted by memories of the rebellion against God, long after the sin is abandoned. So I am sure it is much better for all con-

cerned when we preach the truth and live it. If the sins were private or just in the mind, these are offensive to God also, and there is no excuse acceptable to God either. But when the person is contrite and genuinely sorry and repents earnestly and truly wants to honor Jesus Christ, what better person can represent Jesus Christ? Only the naive and those who are yet to be exposed to various temptations can say that they have never had a wide range of selfish and destructive thoughts and attitudes. Such folks then have only a limited range of sinful inclinations! Jonathan Edwards, the president of Princeton who led the first great revival in the USA, wrote many times of his vileness before God, although he led a holy life. Perhaps he was plagued by desires for revenge against those who tried to destroy him, although God says vengeance is mine and I will repay, or maybe he had yearnings for more status or money, etc. It does not really matter, for as Saint Paul had his “thorn in the flesh,” we all have to fight against internal urges that will destroy us if we give in to them. So even the most Godly people must repent a lot (or we will be counted by God as being among the most ungodly). Only Jesus Christ, both God and human, is exempt from the need for repentance. The president of the National Association of Evangelicals was recently found to be involved in an

affair, and removed. This makes me certain that the majority who elected him did not know the difference between the Holy Spirit and a hole in the ground. I fear the same is true of another minister of a megachurch recently who was accused of affairs with four guys, after preaching a prosperity gospel (give money to me, and you will get rich). He was anointed, they said. I do not doubt that, but I have not seen or heard of any evidence of him being anointed by the Holy Spirit. I have seen strutting and arrogance elsewhere in pulpits, as ignorant and gullible folks were caught up in emotion they mistook for the Holy Spirit. So that is a common happening. “He must increase and I must decrease,” John the Baptist said about Jesus. That is a good indication about the motives of the minister, when we see that attitude in action. Then Jesus is lifted up whether we have money or love or status or not, and the first word of the gospel becomes prominent in our ministry. The first word of the gospel is “repent,” by the way. It is loudly absent among those who try to fleece others, and who use others selfishly. From such turn away, and towards those who act justly, who love mercy, and who walk humbly with God. May God help us all to be a consistent part of the latter crowd. — Dr. Alden Marshall is a Presbyterian minister who lives in Gatlinburg.

Mary, Mother of Jesus But standing by the cross of Jesus were his mother and his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene (John 19:25) One of the figures in early Christianity that has captivated many is Mary the mother of Jesus. Her legend has steadily grown throughout the past two thousand years to incredible heights. When we think about Mary, it is likely that much of what comes to mind is based on these later legends. We get a picture something akin to one of the ancient icons: a younger woman, holding Jesus as a baby, quiet, serene, seemingly confident. Yet most of what is believed about Mary comes from pious legends that came far after the New Testament. What can be gained about Mary from Scripture is much more human, and much more compelling. We meet Mary in Matthew 1-2 and Luke 1-2. She is a young Jewish girl living in Nazareth in Galilee, a teenager, betrothed to the local carpenter Joseph (Matthew 1:18, Luke 1:26-27). The angel Gabriel visits her with a most compelling story: with her consent, she will conceive a child through the power of the Holy Spirit, and the Child will be Jesus, the Son of the Most High, the promised Branch of the house of David who will reign over Israel forever (Luke 1:28-35). Mary consents, exhibiting great faith in the God of Israel, and in so doing she proves to be the first person to suffer shame and indignity for the cause of the Lord’s Christ (Matthew 1:19-24, Luke 1:38). She was now the virgin who would bear the Immanuel child (Isaiah 7:14, Matthew 1:22-23)-- a peasant girl from Nazareth! The irony is not lost on her, as is made plain by her song of praise often called the Magnificat-- a declaration of how the humble are exalted and the exalted are humbled through the power of God (Luke 1:46-55). Her wonder only grows as the Child is born. He is born during a visit to Bethlehem, and shepherds come to see the Child after Gabriel declares to them that the Savior, Christ the Lord, was born (Luke 2:6-19). While presenting Him in the Temple, she marveled as Simeon the prophet spoke of the Child as salvation, a Light for the Gentiles, and glory for Israel-- and how He would be the cause of fall and rising for many, and will pierce through Mary’s own soul, so the thoughts of many would be revealed (Luke 2:22-35). Magi came from the east, bearing presents of gold, frankincense, and myrrh, fit for a king, and bowed down before the Child (Matthew 2:11-12). It was a very auspicious start. But what did it all mean? Contrary to what many believe, Mary would go on to have some children with Joseph-- James, Joseph (or Joses), Simon, Judas, and some girls (Matthew 1:25, 13:55-56, Mark 6:1-3). We see Mary again when Jesus is 12 at the Passover festival in Luke 2:41-51. The family left town but Jesus stayed behind, and they spent three days looking for Him, and finally found Him in the Temple, sitting with the teachers, asking them questions, and amazing all who saw Him. Mary cries out to Him in her distress: ‘’Son, why hast thou thus dealt with us? behold, thy father and I sought thee sorrowing’’ (Luke 2:48). His response did not make sense to them: did you not know that I would be in my Father’s house (Luke 2:49-50)? Despite not understanding this, she treasured this-- along with all the past events-- in her heart (Luke 2:51). For most of the rest of Jesus’ life and ministry, Mary His mother does not seem to be present often. She is confident of His divine power and prods Him a bit during the wedding feast at Cana (John 2:1-11). After that event He and His disciples stayed with her (John 2:12). A little later we see ‘’those who were of Jesus,’’ understood to be His family, went out to seize Him because of all of His preaching activity, because they were convinced that ‘’He [was] out of His mind’’ (Mark 3:21). We can be fairly certain that His brothers were involved, since they did not believe in Him at the time (John 7:2-5). Perhaps Mary was unaware of what they were doing and had no part in it; perhaps Mary was not only aware of it but went with them. There is also the episode where Mary and Jesus’ brothers were attempting to speak with Him, and He took the opportunity to teach how His true family are those who do the will of the Father (Matthew 12:46-49, Mark 3:31-35, Luke 8:19-21). The reason for the visit is entirely unexplained. There seems to be a disconnect with all of this. Did Mary not receive all of these statements and signs about who her Son would be? How come she did not understand Jesus’ words in the Temple? Even if she had no part in the actions of her other sons, how could it be that they did not believe in Him? Didn’t she tell them about Gabriel, the promises, and everything else? How can all of this be? Some have speculated that all of this shows that the birth story was a later ‘’add-on’’ to the Gospel; we need not go to such extremes. Instead, let us again consider the expectations of His brothers, at least, and quite possibly His mother also. As good Jews, they were waiting for the Messiah. They would have imagined the Messiah, the King in the line of David, the One who would rule over Jacob, as doing so in a very physical and concrete way. They expected Jesus to be King in Jerusalem, conquering nations and restoring Israel to its glory. Everything Gabriel told Mary could be understood through this perspective. But Jesus was not doing these things. It was clear that God was with Him, and that He had divine power, but He was preaching and teaching about a very different sort of Kingdom. He made it fairly clear that He did not come to overthrow Rome as much as to overthrow the works of the Evil One and sin. Perhaps this is why Mary did not expect to find Jesus in the Temple asking questions; she may have imagined Him to be destined for a throne in Jerusalem, and not among those teaching in the Temple. Having an overfilled house in Capernaum, preaching and teaching, seemed as madness. This was not the expected script! The next time Mary is mentioned is at the crucifixion, when Jesus makes provision for her, commissioning John to care for her (John 19:25-27). We know that Mary is watching her Son die on the cross. It is quite likely that the full effect of Simeon’s words was crashing down upon her (Luke 2:35). As to her faith and confidence in her Son, in the purpose of God for Him, in whether or how the predictions God made were being fulfilled, we know nothing. The next time we do know something is also the last time Mary is mentioned in Scripture. Mary and the brothers of Jesus were part of the 120 who were gathered in the upper room between Jesus’ ascension and the day of Pentecost (Acts 1:12-15). While she might have doubted before, and she most likely did not fully understand the sort of Messiah her Son would be, by now she fully believes and understands. Jesus her Son did not remove the Roman yoke to rule an empire from Jerusalem. He had done far better-- He had defeated sin and death, removing the burdens that no man has ever been able to bear, and was crowned Lord of lords, and King of kings (Romans 5:6-11, 8:1-2, 10:4, Revelation 19:16). Ultimately, Mary’s story is mostly left up to our imagination. We know that she was full of faith in God, willing to bear the reproach of the Lord’s Christ, and was there for her Son from birth to death and even beyond. She certainly understands that He has power from God, but it seems doubtful that she really understood the plan that God established for her Son. Perhaps her confidence at times wavered; perhaps she persevered in belief, even when she did not understand everything and when her children did not believe. She watches her own beloved Son die on that cross, and we can only imagine the heartache she experienced in so doing, and all the more so if she did not fully understand God’s purpose for Him. Yet, in the end, she is numbered among the disciples of her own Son, and is praying with her now repentant children, no doubt that God’s will through Jesus be fully manifest as it would be on Pentecost. We would like to know more about Mary, but we must remember that this is the story of Jesus, not His mother. Yet Mary still encourages us in our faith, for no matter how many internal trials and difficulties she experienced, she began with faith in whom her Son would be, and either maintained or returned to that faith by His death and resurrection. Her faith became better informed as He grew, taught God’s purposes, and then fulfilled them. She was, no doubt, not ashamed to be called His disciple, and neither should we. Let us be encouraged by Mary’s example and serve her Son!

RogerKing Williams, Evangelist Branch Road Church of Christ

560 King Branch Road Located between Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg just 1 mile off the spur WWW. Kbrcofc.org (865) 430-5980 Sunday Bible Study 10 am Sunday Worship 10:45 am Wednesday Bible Study 7 pm

re l i g i o n c a l endar Editor’s Note: The community calendar is printed as space permits. Items must be submitted at least five days in advance. Only noncommercial, public events held in Sevier County will be considered. To place an item phone 428-0748, ext. 214, or e-mail to editor@themountainpress. com. Items may be faxed to 453-4913.

sunday, oct. 17 Middle Creek UMC

Homecoming, Middle Creek United Methodist Church, 1828 Middle Creek Road, Pigeon Forge. Covered dish lunch to follow service. 2162066.

Shape Note Singing

Annual Dollywood shape note singing 2 p.m. Tickets can be picked up at the gate from David Sarten for those singing. 428-0874.

Pro Life Speaker

Pro-life advocate Brandi Lozier speaks at 6:30 p.m., Freedom Harvest Church, Grand Majestic Theater in Pigeon Forge.

Kodak UMC

Shadow Ridge Bluegrass Band at 9 a.m. worship ser-

vice, Kodak United Methodist Church, 2923 Bryan Road.

Flea Market Fellowship Flea Market Fellowship 8-9 a.m. inside Great Smokies Flea Market, W. Dumplin Valley Road. Speaker, Krista Atchley.

Sims Chapel Singing

Bradley Family from North Carolina will sing at 6:30 p.m. at Sims Chapel Baptist Church, Sims Road. 765-0678.

Glades Lebanon Singing

Singing with Faith Trio, 10:45 a.m., Glades Lebanon Baptist Church. 659-3443.

If you are a pastor of a local church that may be interested in writing an article for the weekly Church Page, please contact Diana Spencer at dspencer@themountainpress.com or (865) 428-0748 ext. 213.

Old Time Gospel

Faith Trio singing 6:30 p.m., at Old Time Gospel Baptist Church, Sugarloaf Lane, Seymour.

Carl Ownby & Co.

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Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace Women’s Bible study: n 1 p.m. Gatlinburg Inn. 436-0313.

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Local â&#x2014;&#x2020; B5

Sunday, October 17, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press

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teach them.â&#x20AC;? Area teachers are encouraged to stop by the Chamber during regular business hours to pick up the donated materials for their classrooms. For more information on this program and others, call Erin Moran at 436-4178.

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B6 ◆ Local

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 17, 2010

community calendar Editor’s Note: The community calendar is printed as space permits. Items must be submitted at least five days in advance. Only noncommercial, public events held in Sevier County will be considered. To place an item phone 428-0748, ext. 214, or e-mail to editor@themountainpress. com. Items may be faxed to 453-4913.

sunday, october 17 Middle Creek UMC

Homecoming, Middle Creek United Methodist Church, 1828 Middle Creek Road, Pigeon Forge. Covered dish lunch to follow service. 216-2066.

Shape Note Singing

Annual Dollywood shape note singing 2 p.m. Tickets can be picked up at the gate from David Sarten for those singing. 428-0874.

Pro Life Speaker

Pro-life advocate Brandi Lozier speaks at 6:30 p.m., Freedom Harvest Church, Grand Majestic Theater in Pigeon Forge.

Kodak UMC

Shadow Ridge Bluegrass Band at 9 a.m. worship service, Kodak United Methodist Church, 2923 Bryan Road.

Flea Market Fellowship Flea Market Fellowship 8-9 a.m. inside Great Smokies Flea Market, W. Dumplin Valley Road. Speaker, Krista Atchley.

Sims Chapel Singing

Bradley Family from North Carolina will sing at 6:30 p.m. at Sims Chapel Baptist Church, Sims Road. 765-0678.

Glades Lebanon Singing

Singing with Faith Trio, 10:45 a.m., Glades Lebanon Baptist Church. 659-3443.

Basketball Clinic

Pigeon Forge Junior League basketball clinic for grades 1-6, 2-5 p.m., middle school. Registration 1:30. $20 per player. To preregister call 654-2105.

Old Time Gospel

Faith Trio singing 6:30 p.m., at Old Time Gospel Baptist Church, Sugarloaf Lane, Seymour.

monday, october 18 Weight Loss Surgery

Smoky Mountain Obesity and Weight Loss Surgery Support Group at LeConte Medical Center meets 6:30-8 p.m. in classrooms. 250-9354 or e-mail at Nsg4Him@aol.com.

Angel Food

Angel Food orders: n 2-5 p.m., Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd. 429-2508. n 11 a.m.-5 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245.

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace Women’s Bible study: n 1 p.m. Gatlinburg Inn. 436-0313. n 1 p.m. Seymour Heights Christian Church, Chapman and Boyds Creek n 6:30 p.m., Gatlinburg Call 436-0313 for location

Hot Meals

Hot Meals For Hungry Hearts 5:30-6:30 p.m., Henderson Chapel Baptist Church, 407 Henderson Road, Pigeon Forge. Sponsored by Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries.

Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric Surgery Support Group will no longer meet at Echota Resort Clubhouse. 453-6841 or 712-3287 for location.

tuesday, october 19 Angel Food

Angel Food orders: n 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd. 429-2508. n 10 a.m.-4 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245

Shape Note Singing

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 1 p.m. Ski Mountain Road. 436-6434 for location n 6:30 p.m. Pigeon Forge UMC

Al-Anon Group

Al-Anon Family Group meets 11 a.m. Pigeon Forge UMC. 428-7617 or 680-6724.

Riverbend Concert

wednesday, oct. 18 Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 10 a.m. Sugar Tree Road, Wears Valley. 4284932, n 9 a.m. Wellington Place. 429-5131

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 10 a.m. UMC Pigeon Forge n 2 p.m. Blue Mountain Mist B&B, Pullen Road n 6:30 p.m. Sevierville UMC, Conference Room 850-4685.

TOPS weight loss chapter meets at 6 p.m., Parkway Church of God in Sevierville. 755-9517 or 429-3150.

ABWA

thursday, oct. 19 Arthritis Exercise

Evening With Arts

Medic blood drive noon-6 p.m. at Food City, Kodak.

American Business Women’s Association meets at Holiday Inn Pigeon Forge. Networking 6 p.m. followed by a buffet dinner for $13. Lori Brandel at lori.brandel@suntrust.com or call 323-4642.

TOPS

Pi Beta Phi RIF

Blood Drive

Great Smokies Chapter DAR meets 10:30 a.m. at home of Julia Mitchell, 417 Alderman Road. Mitchell to present musical program. www.greatsmokiesdar.org.

Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries provides hot meals 5:30-6:30 p.m., First United Methodist Church, Sevierville and Kodak United Methodist Church in Kodak.

Scott Inman in concert 7 p.m. Riverbend Campground. Free. Reading Is Fundamental Day, Pi Beta Phi Elementary. Students choose free book. 436-5076.

DAR Meeting

Hot Meals

Kenny Evans in concert 7 p.m. Riverbend Campground. Free.

Sevier County High School Fine Arts Department presents “Evening with the Arts” variety show, 7 p.m. $5 adults, $2 students, 6 and under free. Proceeds go to the Fine Arts Department.

APPL Theater

Celebrate Recovery free Anna Porter Public Library meal 5 p.m., meeting starts showing film “Date Night” at 6 p.m. Kodak United (PG-13), 6 p.m. 436-5588. Methodist Church. Visit crkodak.com or 933-5996. friday, october 22

ABWA

Sevier County monthly Old Harp singing 7 p.m. Middle Creek United Methodist Church. 4280874.

Arthritis exercise classes 9:30-10:30 a.m. Extension office, Mondays and Thursdays in October. 4533695.

Riverbend Concert

Celebrate Recovery

American Business Women’s Association meets at Holiday Inn Pigeon Forge. Networking 6 p.m. followed by meal and meeting.

Alzheimer’s Fundraiser

Alzheimer’s Fundraiser 9 a.m.-4 p.m. today and Saturday, MountainBrook Village, 700 Markhill Drive Sevierville. Crafts, food and fun outside, rain or shine.

saturday, oct. 23 Blowing Cave Church

Blowing Cave Baptist Church auction benefit. Hamburgers/hot dogs 11 a.m-1:30 p.m.; auction 2-5 p.m. Blowing Cave Road off Highway 411.

Pioneer Day

Jones Cove Elementary School Pioneer Day 10 a.m.-4 p.m. with carnival games, hayrides, auction items, food and entertainment.

Car Show

DECA’s 13th annual Smoky Bear open car show and silent auction 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Sevier County High School.

Angel Food

Angel Food distribution: n 8-11 a.m., Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd. 429-2508. n 8-10 a.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 908-1245. n 8:3--9:30 a.m., The Father’s House, 139 Bruce Street, Sevierville.

Gun Carry Permit

Handgun permit class

8:30 a.m., Dandridge Police Department. (865) 397-8862, ext. 26, or 356-7423.

monday, october 25 Arthritis exercise

9:30-10:30 a.m., Extension office, Mondays and Thursdays in October. 4533695.

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace Women’s Bible study: n 1 p.m. Gatlinburg Inn. 436-0313. n 1 p.m. Seymour Heights Christian Church, Chapman and Boyds Creek n 6:30 p.m., Gatlinburg Call 436-0313 for location

Hot Meals

Hot Meals For Hungry Hearts 5:30-6:30 p.m., Henderson Chapel Baptist Church, 407 Henderson Road, Pigeon Forge. Sponsored by Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries.

Riverbend Concert

Clayton Inman in concert 7 p.m., Riverbend Campground. Free.

tuesday, october 26 SCHS Class of 1960

SCHS Class of 1960 lunch at noon, Applebee’s in Sevierville. Meal also at 6 p.m. 363-3472.

PFMS Fall Festival

Pigeon Forge Middle School Fall Festival 5-8 p.m. Activities include singing with Locust Ridge Band, grilling by Tennessee State Bank, carnival games, basket auction, dunking booth.

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AARP driver safety classes noon-4 p.m. today and Friday, Senior Center.

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Appetizers

Main Dish

Apple Jack, Terri Williams Artichoke Dip, John Dougherty Asian Meatballs, Doris L. Gainer Bernie’s Vegetarian Pizza, Bernandine Sikorski Best Ever Chicken Strips, Carol Keathley Blue Willlie, John B. Waters Jr. Jalapeno Pepper Appetizer, Pat Marcum Jezebel Sauce, Barbara Stevens Weeks Meatballs, Patricia Marks Mexican Pick-Ups, Sandy Kimmel Mini Quiche Appetizers, Merle Stevens Party-time Shrimp, Clara Lee Hobby Peta Gena (Pie of Plenty), Carolyn Chavez Popcorn Potpourri, Cynthia Jordan Quick Liver Pate, Pat Marcum Quick Pizza Dip, Linda Hyder 6 Shrimp Dip, Donna Smith-Dougherty

Amazing Chicken and Dumplings, Sara Kane Baked Ziti, Terri Williams Boogertown Chili, John B. Waters Jr. Breakfast Pizze, Linda Rideout Broccoli and Cheese Soup, Chef Steve Carideo Company Beef Stew, Barbara J. Patrick Connie’s Asian Lettuce Wraps, Connie Schaeffer Cottage Cheese Pancakes, Bernandine Sikorski Country Sausage Corn Chowder, Betty H. Cox Creamy Vegetable Soup, Linda Rideout Easy Breezy Sloppy Jo, Sharon A. Ogle Giant Breaded Pork Tenderloin, Eric Walters Mexican Casserole, Debbie Fisher Potato-Sausage Soup, Doris Helton Salmon Pie, Pat Marcum Shrimp Tortellini and Spinach, Barbara Stevens Weeks Ugly Chicken, Dwinita Loveday

Sides Black Beans, John B. Waters Jr. Cornbread Salad, Jane Boling Creamy Mac and Cheese, Eric Walters Greek Salad, Linda Hyder Must Try Broccoli Bread, Becky Seaton Scioto Salad Dressing, Donna Smith-Dougherty Sweet Potato Casserole, Debbie Fisher Vidalia Onion Casserole, Becky Seaton Vol Potatoes, Krista L. Knepp Wilted Salad, Doris L. Gainer Zucchini Bread, Reba Niswonger

Youth

Black Bean Dip, Skylar Walker Cherry Chocolate Chipper Cake, Alexis Valentine Easy Monkey Bread, Colton Lunsford Enchilada Casserole, Payne Meade French Crepes, Niamh Schumacher Fried Mushrooms, Chad Aves Handy Pumpkin Muffins, Victoria Clements Hearty Nacho Dip, Sawyer Lamdin Herbed Corn, Skylar Walker Honey Butter Cookies with Lemon Frosting, Ivy Thorbergson Hot Dogs Wrapped in Bacon, McKenzie Murphy Italian Sausage Cups, Scarlett Fox Poppy Seed Chicken, Preston Meade Reindeer Candy, Amber Watson Sausage-Egg Bake, Victoriam Clements Shirley’s Chicken Tettrazini, Carah McClurg Snickerdoodles, Cheyanne Lavergne Special K Bars, Carah McClurg Spice Bars, Olivia Spangler Spinach Dip, Shelby DeSoto Stuffed Mushrooms with Olives and Feta Cheese, Hannah Clevenger

Name _____________________________________________________ Mailing Address _____________________________________________ City__________________________ State_________ Zip ____________ Phone Number _____________________________________________ Delivery Type:

Mail ________________Pick-up __________________

Number of copies ___ Payment

Method:

<

Check or < Money < Order

< <

Publishes October 29, 2010 Please mail orders to: 119 Riverbend Drive, Sevierville, TN 37876

Desserts Apple Cinnamon Coffee Cake, Dan Berry Apple Crisp, Sharon A. Ogle Banana Delight, Shirley Bogle Banana Split Dessert, Patsy Trentham Better Than Grandma’s Apple Pie, Karen S. Roberts Blackberry Cobbler, Jean Jordan Candy Bar Cheesecake, Clara Lee Hobby Cape Cod Delight, Errol Stevens Chocolate Covered Spanish Peanuts, Sharon A. Ogle Cinnamon Chip Scones, Connie Schaeffer Cousin Don’s Chocolate Cake, Sherry Brandenburg Create a Cookie, Patricia Marks Delicious Make Ahead Fruit Salad, Becky Seaton Easy Chocolate Candy, Doris Helton 5 Cup Salad, Krista L. Knepp Fresh Apple Cake, Jean Jordan Fruit Pizza, Krista L. Knepp Layered Light as a Cloud Cake, Ella Brown Lemon Cake, Stacey J. Helton Mayberry Delight Cookies, Ella Brown No Bake Caramel Squares, Becky Seaton No Fail Fruit Dessert, Becky Seaton Old Fashion Gingerbread, Terri Williams Oreo Cheesecake, Chef Steve Carideo Parisian Apple Crisp, Connie Schaeffer Peachy Peach Cake, Debbie Fisher Peanut Brittle, Jean Jordan Pecan Crunch Cookie, Barbara J. Patrick Pineapple-Orange Fluff Cake, Lisa C. Bergman Potato Candy, Reba Niswonger Pretzel Salad, Terri Williams Pumpkin Pie Squares, Shirley Bogle Self Frosted Cake, Carolyn Chavez Tee Tee’s Fruit Surprise Coffee Cake, Sharon A. Ogle Tropical Banana Roll Cake, Shirley Bogle White Chocolate Cake, Jean Dew Zucchini Chocolate Cake, Karen Berry

Home Subscribers will receive a copy in their

The Mountain Press


COMICS

Sunday, October 17, 2010

1


B8 ◆ Comics

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 17, 2010

2


Comics ◆ B9

Sunday, October 17, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

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The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 17, 2010

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Sunday, October 17, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

◆ B11


The Mountain Press  Sunday, October 17, 2010

Classifieds  B12

Legals 100 Announcements

600 Rentals

200 Employment

700 Real Estate

300 Services

800 Mobile Homes

400 Financial

900 Transportation

A

NNOUNCEMENTS

0107

Edition

Deadline

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Good News In The Smokies

Friday, 10 a.m. Friday, 11 a.m. Monday, 10 a.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. Wednesday, 10 a.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. Friday, 10 a.m.

G

ARAGE /ESTATE SALES

Special Notices

0151 Garage/Estate Sales

Classifieds

Estate Sale Saturday and Sunday October 16 & 17. From 8:00 am to 4:00 pm each day. Take Chapman Highway to 929 N. Knob Creek Road in Seymour.

Corrections

After the first insertion, want ads scheduled to be published again on Tue., Wed., Thu., or Fri. may be canceled or corrected between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. on the day prior to publication. For ads on Sat., due Thu. prior to 3 p.m.; for Sun., Fri. prior to 10 a.m. and Mon., prior to 11 a.m. Notice of typographical or other errors must be given before 2nd insertion. The Mountain Press does not assume responsibility for an ad beyond the cost of the ad itself and shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad for a typographical error.

Deadlines

Edition Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Good News in the Smokies

Deadline Friday, 10 a.m. Friday, 11 a.m. Monday, 10 a.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. Wednesday, 10 a.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. Friday, 10 a.m. Thursday, 10 a.m.

Online

Visit www.themountainpress.com All line ads (other than employment) published in The Mountain Press are placed online FREE of charge. Click on Classifieds for all our listings. Click on Jobs to search our employment listings.

does not recommend or endorse any product, service or company. For more information and assistance regarding the investigation of FINANCING, BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES AND WORK AT HOME OPPORTUITIES, this newspaper urges its readers to contact The Better Business Bureau 2633 Kingston Pike, Suite 2 Knoxville, TN 37919 Phone (865) 692-1600

E

MPLOYMENT

0208

Sales

Timeshare In-House Sales Pro Needed for Gatlinburg area. 30 year old Company needs top in house sales pro. We offer a great working environment, limited supervision and a great commission plan with many opportunities for a bonus. Draw against a commission available for the first 60 days. Currently we have only 1 opening so you must act quickly. You must have a Tennessee Real Estate License. Flexible hours, great opportunity for the right person looking for part-time work. Call Marie to set up an interview 843-238-9000 Sale Professional. Meadows Homes Sevierville is looking for a new team member. Great benefits and incentives. We are looking for someone with the drive to succeed. Apply in person at Meadows Homes of Sevierville, 1056 Dolly Parton Parkway or email resume to pt@mhitn.net.

0212

Professional

COMMUNITY SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE If you would enjoy making a difference in the lives of senior citizens in our community, we!d like to meet you! We are looking for a creative self-starter with excellent presentation skills to educate the community about our non-medical home-care services for seniors. Outgoing people person with respect for others and at least one to two years marketing experience a MUST. Competitive salary plus bonus. Fax resume to (423) 587-5818 or e-mail HISC428@homeinstead.com.

0220

Medical/Dental

General Surgery Practice seeking Part-Time Front Office/ Medical Assistant. Please fax resume to (865) 446-9701, or mail to 744 Middle Creek Rd. Suite 208 Sevierville, TN 37862 Medical office in Seymour now hiring full-time medical assistant. Experience a plus. Fax resume to 865-223-7019

0232

Unauthorized use of The Mountain Press tubes for circulars or any other advertisement authorizes a minimum $250 charge for which the advertiser will be billed. Warning to anyone who is trespassing on Webb Mountain will be prosecuted for criminal trespassing and their vehicle or 4 wheeler will be impounded.

0149

Found

Large, tan, Lab Retriever Mix found behind Bass Pro Shop. Call: (865) 933-4937

Online

Deadlines

500 Merchandise

General Help

Help Wanted: Guides, Office, Sales. Apply in person at 1133 Parkway Gatlinburg. Higher Assist Mgr, Reservationists Laundry, Hskpg & Maintenance. Apply in person at 333 Ski Mtn Rd., Gat MasterCorp Inc., is hiring Housekeepers and Housepersons We offer excellent wages, training, and weekly pay. Must be able to work weekends. Call 865-621-7128 Now hiring full time taxi driver. F endorsements & clean driving record req. Call Tim 865-659-0151. Now hiring in all departments. Apply in person 2708 Parkway, PF. ORNL Federal Credit Union is seeking a part-time teller for our Sevierville Branch. Banking or retail experience preferred. Must have a strong sales and customer service focus as well as excellent communication skills. Must be goal and team oriented. Part-time benefits are available. Please fax resume to 865-425-3303, email staffing@ornlfcu.com or complete an application at our Sevierville Branch. Please include salary requirements. EOE Papa John's seeking Manager with experience. Call 865-428-7600 ask for Mike

0232

A publication from The Mountain Press

Thursday, 10 a.m.

General Help

Personal Care Choices is currently hiring Caregivers/CNAs to provide in-home non-medical care to seniors as well as adults and children with disabilities in the Sevier County area. We are primarily seeking to fill hours on Monday and Friday from 11a.m.-2p.m. and weekends (12 hour shifts). We offer flexible hours and competitive pay. Pre-employment background and drug testing required. EOE. Call 865-681-0999. SALES CLERK $10/hr. Lid'l Dolly's Light #4, PF Seeking marketing and public relations manager for The Great Smokey Mountain Lumberjack Feud. Ideal candidate would have extensive tourism background, dynamic personality, and solid history in marketing. Duties would include all aspects of marketing a start up entertainment venture, public relations, design, and development of ticketing system. Group sales, marketing partnerships, lodging vouchers and charity/volunteer programs. Please submit resume to info@lumberjacksports.com The Salvation Army is in need of paid bell ringers. Please call 908-4010 or come by the office at 806 W Main St to fill out an application. WAREHOUSE & STOCK 10/hr. LID'L DOLLY'S LIGHT 4 PF WonderWorks is now hiring Ropes Course Attendants. Qualified candidates will possess outgoing personality with high energy, adventuresome attitude & strong work ethic. This position has a minimum height requirement of 5 ft. and a maximum weight of 300 lbs. Candidates must be comfortable working in a harness at great heights and be in great physical condition. Apply in person: WonderWorks- 100 Music Rd, Pigeon Forge, TN 37863. EOE.

0252

Retail Help

Job Fair Wed. Oct. 20 1-5PM Hiring Cash & Retail. Apply at Cracker Barrel, 2285 Parkway, PF, Traffic Light #1.

0256

Hotel/Motel

Second Shift 3-11, Full Time Desk Clerk Needed. Call: (865) 908-6949

0260

Restaurant

Now hiring for all shifts. Apply online at: apply.bojangles.com. Now hiring, Cracker Barrel in Sevierville. Several open positions. Full-time & part-time. If interested apply in person Mon Oct 18th from 2pm-5pm. EOE

0264

Child Care

Infant care provided in my Christian home. Excellent References. 865-640-4903 Little Lamb Childcare Wears Valley Road Now enrolling all ages. Mon-Fri. 6:30am-9pm. (865) 453-7470 Sub. Teachers needed. Apply M-F from 9-4 at Lil Kings & Queens Child care Center with 2 locations; Kodak & Sevierville. Call: 933-4850.

0272

People Seeking Employment

Experienced housekeeper & caregiver will run errands, stay home with your loved ones or take to appointments. Call: 453-6065.

0276

Business Opportunity

Candy Vending Business

FOR SALE

Established location in P.F. & Sev.

Local owner, will facilitate the transfer.

Joseph at

(865) 548-1461

Corrections

http://www.themountainpress.com OR, www.adquest.com

0288

All line ads published in The Mountain Press are placed FREE on a searchable network of over 500 newspapers’ classifieds located at http://www.themountainpress.com WANT TO KNOW WHEN A CLASSIFIED ITEM IS AVAILABLE? Go to http://www.adquest/request/ to register your request and we will notify you by e-mail when it becomes available in the Classifieds.

Elderly Care

Home Instead Senior Care is looking for reliable and dependable people to provide in-home companionship and non-medical services to seniors. No medical experience required. To learn more, call our job line toll-free at 1-877-581-5800 or visit us o n l i n e a t www.homeinstead.com/428

P

ETS

0320

Cats/Dogs/Pets

AKC Registered Weimaraners $300 Puppies Males and Females (423) 257-4622 or (423) 747-5990

F

0509

After the first insertion, want ads scheduled to be published again on Tue., Wed., Thu., or Fri. may be canceled or corrected between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. on the day prior to publication. For ads on Sat., due Thu., prior to 3 p.m., for Sun., Fri., prior to 10 a.m. and Mon., prior to 11 a.m.

Household Goods

Queen size mattress set. Still in plastic. $175.00 865-429-0744

0533

Furniture

New 4pc.

Notice of typographical or other errors must be given before 2nd insertion. The Mountain Press does not assume responsibility for an ad beyond the cost of the ad itself and shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad for a typographical error.

0539

Firewood

Oak sawmill slabs $15 for a pick-up load. 933-5894 or 382-7781

0563 Misc. Items for Sale

For Sale

Bedroom Group

A-1 pre-owned dryers, washers, ranges & refrigerators. All with warranty. Cagles Furniture and Appliances

453-0727

453-0727

Dresser, mirror, 4 Drawer chest, headboard. $399 Cagles Furniture and Appliances

0539

Firewood

Mixed wood, $65 a rick, $5 delivery/stacking fee. $45 a rick you haul. 423-532-9799

0220

Bed Bugs making your skin crawl? Kill those blood suckers with Harris Bed Bug Spray. Pigeon Forge Hdw. 428-8898. Ace of Gatlinburg 436-5173.

Medical/Dental

ARM

0410

Farm Market

Chamber's Farms now picking greasy, turkey craw, goose, half runner, peanuts & rattlesnake beans, cantaloupes, green tomatoes, Ambrosia sweet corn on Monday. 423-318-2908 Hay For Sale. 4 x 4 Rolls $10. Call (865) 453-4285 for more information.

M

ERCHANDISE

0151

Garage/Estate Sales


The Mountain Press ď ľ Sunday, October 17, 2010

R

EAL ESTATE FOR RENT

0610

Unfurnished Apartments

1 bedroom apt. in quiet neighborhood. No pets. Call 908-8567 1 BR Upper Garage Apt. hardwood flrs.S/R, W/D, perfect for single or couple. No smoke or pets $400 Mo. + $400 DD. Off Allensville Rd. 865-453-7690

NICE, CLEAN 1 BR / 1 BA IN SEVIERVILLE $380.00 + DEPOSIT NO PETS 865-712-5238 3 BR Apartment for rent in Kodak, $650/mo + deposit. Call Barbara 865-368-5338 A GREAT LOCATION 1 block off pkwy near Walmart. 2BR, 2BA, Carport & patio. A non-smoking environment & no pets please. $550 mo, yr lease. 453-5396.

Townhouse Newly Updated 2BR/1.5BA Covered Parking 7$#ONNsMTH

#ALL  OR  

Quiet country setting 2BR/1BA, stove, ref., D/W disposal/micro., W/D hook-up, club house/pool/picnic area 24hr. maint. Year lease, behind S.C.H.S. Great spacious place to live. Dogs ok with deposit.

428-5227 FINCHUM PROPERTIES Leasing 1 & 2 BR apts. Hardwood floors, plus many extras, 1 year lease, no pets. TVA energy efficient

  s   finchumproperties.com

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN SEVIERVILLE 2 bedroom 1.5 bath townhomes

Call 428-5161

Apartments available 2BD/1BA. Pigeon Forge/Sevierville. 429-3201

Â&#x2122;BJHI=6K:6?D7 Â&#x2122;CD9GJ<H Â&#x2122;CDE:IH '7G$'76 6eea^VcXZh[jgc^h]ZY *)*Je

)'-"*&*, Clean 2 BR/2BA PF. 2BD/ 1.5BA Sev. $525-600 mo + Dep. No pets 865-453-5079 CROSSCREEK 2BR/1BA townhome $470.00 per month 2BR/1.5BA garden $545.00 per month 865-429-4470 In Sevierville 2 BDR/ 1 BA $475 Per Month. No Pets. Call 428-0769

Kodak- 2 & 3 BDR, 2 BA Available Some w/ garages

$500-$750 Mo. + Dep.

NO PETS (865) 932-2613 KODAK: New 1BR/1BA 1100 sq ft. apt. Util incl, internet, directv. $600 mo. 352-563-8009.

RIVERWALK APARTMENTS

SEVIERVILLE On The Little Pigeon River TVA Energy Efficient Attractive professional dĂŠcor Exclusive Screen Porch Room Abundant & Large Closets Washer/Dryer Hook-upâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Small Pet Welcome

1 BR/1BA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 784 Sq. Ft. Starts at $545 2 BR/2 BA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1114 Sq. Ft. Starts at $675 Convenient location within one mile of restaurants, stores and banks.

Please Visit --- Open 7 Days PHONE: 429-4470 www.seviervilleapartments.com Nice Res Area Off Hwy 66 2BD/2BA $875, Free util & Laundry facility. Pets welcome. 1 yr lease, 1st & last. 865-742-2839 Sevierville 2BR/2BA duplex, good location, whirlpool 1 level. $675mth $500 dep. No pets credit ref 865-414-6611 Traditional townhouse 2br 1.5ba Smoke free & pet free. $525 mth + $525 dep. Call 865-428-5781

0615

Furnished Apartments/Houses

1BR/1BA Apt. Wood/tile floors. Grt closets. $650. Dandridge. No smoking. 865-382-1981

0615

Furnished Apartments/Houses

1BR/1BA furnished condo, fp, pool in PF. Trolley stop across the street. $800 mo, incl util, $400 dep. Call 908-0170 Fall Special, Reduced: Creek Place Eff. Studio w/util. $100-$145 weekly/monthly. Clean, Trolley Rt. Gatinburg. 436-2115, 865-567-9232. Furnished 2BD/1BA Apartment. Quiet Location. PF Area. No Pets. $500 mo Ref req & checked. Call after 4pm, leave message. 865-306-1246 Weekly Special! Big Bear Suites. I-40 exit 407. Weekly rates start at $199. 865-225-1719

0620

Homes for Rent

1100 Sq. Ft. House. 1 BR + loft. Beautiful view in Pigeon Forge. $800 mo. 865-696-6900 2-3 BDR Cabins on River, Partially furnished, Water included, No pets, No smoking, References checked. $800 Month + Deposit Call Kerry at (865) 322-5872 2BR/1.5BA, W/D hook-up, water incl, dining rm, lrg living rm, sunroom. No pets. $595 mo, 1st, last & dep. 865-654-7715 3 BDR/ 2 BA in Gatlinburg $1100 Mo. Utilities Furnished, No Pets, 865-436-6313 or 865-850-7043 3 BDR/ 2 BA Newer home, great location in Sevierville. Great room, large laundry room, $850 Mo. 1st & last month + $400 Damage Dep. 202-9340 or 429-4978 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath. 1 car garage on the river near Five Oaks Mall. No Pets. 1yr lease. $800/mo. Call Mark between 7:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m. 865-453-5500.

New 3 BDR/2BA home, 2 car garage with opener, in upscale neighborhood with great location & view + storage. $900 Mo. + Dep. 865-368-6799 3BR/1BA, kitchen/living rm, frig, range, oven, A/C, deck, covered porch, W/D hook-up, new paint/carpet, priv/secluded. Lease req, pet ok, 1st, last, dep req. $795, Gat. Immediate! 436-9811 3BR/2BA GATLINBURG. Trolley route, Glades rd. $950 mo. Lrg garage. 865-654-6702 4BD/2.5BA. New carpet & paint, All appl incl W/D, No pets or smoking, out bldg for wrkshp. Kodak. $975 mo. 1st mo + $500 dep. 932-6734 Beautiful 4BR 3BA home with gorgeous mtn view. Pittman Center area. $1250 mth + dep. 865-712-3730 or 865-712-5808. Country Setting 2 BDR/1 BA full basement, smoke-free, pet free $625 Mo. $625 Dep. 428-5781 Gatlinburg: walk to downtown, trolley. 3BR/1BA, remodeled, $850/mo., 1st/last mo, large yard. 865-661-0152.

Homes & Apts. $640-$1000 mo.

WANDA GALLI REALTY EXECUTIVES 680-5119 or 774-4307

2 BDR/ 2.5 BA

0620

Homes for Rent

Sev. 901 Topside Rd. quiet area, Small 1 BDR house, no C/A or C/H. $375 Mo. + 1 mo. Dep. 239-851-1574

0625

Condominiums for Rent

2 BDR/ 2 BA, 1 car garage, Sevierville, $865 Month. Call: (865) 654-3306

Want to Live in Luxury?... Call Today! 3BR/3BA Executive Condos in Sevierville, 3100 sq. ft. swimming pool, pets welcome, loaded with all amenities.

Call 865-428-5161

Great! 3/2 fully furn, tvs, FP's, lots of amenities. $995 mo. 1st, last, dep. 352-275-4889 Tastefully Furnished, studio condo, Gatlinburg Summit. $550 mo. 865-806-9119.

0630

Duplexes for Rent

2BD/1BA, 1 mi off pkwy, Sev. Appl incl, W/D hook-up, $550 mo, $500 dep. 865-453-7995 2BD/2BA in Sev. Retirement area. Small pet ok. $700 + dam. Carport 865-397-1967 Near the River! 2BR/1BA duplex New carpet/ vinyl $525.00 per mo. 865-429-2962 Spacious 1BR/1BA $495/mo. Excl cond. CH/A, W/D conn., D/W, vaulted ceiling, front porch, rear patio, lawn, trash & city water incl. 705-0387.

0635

Rooms for Rent

$350/mo. 1/2 water, elect. cable/phone. Nice house, neighborhood. Ref. 774-9118 Beautiful Creekside Rooms In Gatlinburg FOR RENT

sWEEKs0RIVATE"ALCONY s*ACUZZI 6ERY1UIET s.O0ETS .O$EP s7IlALLUTLINCLUDED s/THERROOMSSTARTINGATWK s2OOMSWKITCHENSWEEK

NO PETS 865-712-5238 Kodak area on the river: 2BD/1BA, clean, No Pets, $625 Mo. + Dep 865-680-9443 Lease w/ PURCHASE OPTION. 3 Bd, 2 Bath Kodak / Dandridge Only 2 yrs old. 1512 sf. Lease $1,200 month Purchase $169,900. Call 865-712-3819. Lovely, Secluded, Furnished Home with W/D, Hot Tub, Pool Table, 3 BDR, 3 Full Baths, in upscale neighborhood. Annual Lease Required. Dep. Ski Mtn. Gatlinburg $900 mo. plus utilities. 1 Pet with non-refundable deposit. 865-436-0313.

NEW HOMES FOR RENT $650-$1,000 Monthly

865-850-3874 New lease terms for new 4 BR/2.5 Bath upscale home for rent located in prestigious Lakeside Estates, open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, large closets. $1,199/mo. 806-9896.

Price's Camper Lot's For Low Income For Rent (865) 654-8702

R

EAL ESTATE FOR SALE

0710

Homes for Sale

1,250 Sq. Ft. 3/2 Log Cabin, Wears Valley on 3/4 + acre, HT, FP, WD, great location $199,900. (865) 640-7803 2 New homes 3 BR 2 BA, double garage, one on large level lot in Grandview, $149,000. On on nice lot Murphy Farms close in. $157,000. 654-6505 or 654-8184. 4BR/3BA wrap around deck in PF. Hot tub. Range, refrig, micro, W/D. Bought new Jan 08. $190,000. 731-297-3875 6100 sq ft, 5BR/3.5BA double granite throughout, underground bunker, 22 ft ceilings, 25 ft commercial kitchen. This home is AWESOME! Appraised at $820,000. Must have $396,000.Call Scott 865-388-9656

0715

Condominiums for Sale

2 New condos for sale. Owner Financing Available. $189,000, 1,700sf Living, 2 car gar, Jacuzzi, Fpl, Hardwood, All Appl. 865-654-3667 or 865-429-5065

16 + fenced acres nestled in foothills of Smoky Mtns. Gorgeous 360 degree Mtn view w/covered bridge & free flowing streams. Access to cnty water. 423-329-3076 Campsites Full hook up. Near Douglas Lake. $275 mth. 933-5894 or 382-7781. Lot #22 in Hillside Subdiv. on Royal Coachmen Dr. Downtown PF. Awesome view. $75,000. Call 908-0170

0741

Mobile Homes for Sale

CLAYTON IN SEVIERVILLE MOVING SALE 20 HOMES MUST GO MOVING TO ALCOA HWY THE NEW CLAYTON SUPER HOME CENTER

0780

865-970-7355 Misc. Real Estate

For Sale or Rent by Owner 2800 sq-ft workshop building on 5.5 acres 5 min. from Sevierville $700/mo or $115000 (865) 712-5067

T

RANSPORTATION

0804

Boats for Sale

0832

Motorcycles

1980 HONDA, CM200. Beautiful bike, 9800 miles, $1395. Call 865-365-7202.

0868

Cars for Sale

1966 Chevrolet Elcamino, All original $5,500 (865) 908-0584 or (865) 850-3846. 1966 Ford Galaxy. 289 Auto. $2200. Call 865-607-6542. 1991 CADILLAC BROUGHAM 179000 miles. Burgandy . Air conditioning. Leather Seats. Power Windows. Power Locks. VERY NICE RIDE, DEPENDABLE, LOOKS GREAT AND RUNS GREAT! MANY GOOD MILES LEFT! MUST SEE!. $4500 OBO 865-466-1139.. 2001 MUSTANG $4995. AC, DVD. 160K, one owner since new. Well kept. 365-7202. 2003 Subaru Forester, 1 Owner, 116,000 Miles, Moon-Roof, Heated Seats, Many Extras. $6,900. Please Call: (865) 453-7514

0880

Off-Road Vehicles

2004 Hurst Trailer 6x12, good cond. $800 & 2004 Yamaha 660 Grizzley 4x4, runs good. $2800. Sold together or separate. 865-430-7073

F

INANCIAL

1986 Stingray. 19.5 ft. Cuddy cabin w/trailer. New carpet, plugs, water pump, seats, fish finder. $6000. 865-250-9975

0820

Campers/Trailers

2010 Coachmen 24 ft. travel trailer. Fiberglass, all electric, slide-out. $22,500. 865-250-9975

1342

Storage, Indoor/ Outdoor 10X10 or 10X20 SELF STORAGE Convenient Location! 411 South, left on Robert Henderson Rd., 1/4 mile on right at Riverwalk Apts.

0503

429-2962 Auction Sales

0503

Auction Sales

865-429-2962

DOWNTOWN SEVIERVILLE 428 Park Rd.

near trolley stop

Includes All Utilities.

Free Wi-Fi, Cable, Laundry, Kitchens, Clean Rooms, NO PETS.

405-2116

Roommate/ furn room-$100 wk, incl. util. Sev- Boyd's Crk. 865-307-6771,865-365-1089

Gatlinburg Rooms for Rent Furnished, all Utilities, cable, tax included $100 per week Rooms with Kitchens $120 per week

865-621-2941

0665

Vacation Property

Smoky Mtn Cabin for rent. sleeps 6, 2BA. $100 a night, min 3 nights. Non-smoking. 865-591-5628

0670

Business Places/ Offices

3 Offices- 510 ($450), 846 ($550) & 1356 ($1000) sq. ft. S. Blvd. Way. (865) 933-6544

OFFICE SPACE

Nice Office with Warehouse Bay. Sevierville Reasonable Rent 453-6289 or 548-6838 Retail space for rent. $1200 mo. approx 900 sq ft. Next to very active retail shops on Dolly Parton Pkwy. 865-868-0449.

$850/MO. +$850 DEPOSIT

428-3096

Classifieds ď ľ B13

Lots & Acreage

Rent by the week, month, or year. Furnished, plus elec., cable & w/ sewer included. Call for appt.

(865) 453-4028 or (865) 771-5043

3 BR / 2 BA WITH GARAGE IN SEVIERVILLE CITY

2 & 3BR mobile homes for rent Must have refs. No Pets. Call for info

0734

Gatlinburg/Dudley Creek

$650 - $900 month

**NICE, CLEAN**

Mobile Homes for Rent

865-621-2941

W/D, stove, refrigerator, central Heat & Air, $700 MO. + Sec. Dep. Ref & Credit Check No Pets Hwy. 321 Pittman Center Area. 1 BDR Cabin Fully Furnished $175 Week 850-2487

0675

865-850-3874

0675

Mobile Homes for Rent

2 & 3 Bedroom near Douglas Dam, $450-$475 mo + Dep. One on large wooded lot. 933-5894 or 382-7781.

2 BR/ 1 BA Perfect for a couple, no pets, 453-5337 2BD/2BA mobile home, Kodak area. $425 mo, $425 Dep. No pets. 865-382-4199 3BR/2BA Cent H/A, city util, $550 mo, $500 dep. No pets. 865-748-1520, 865-453-3441 4 very nice homes, $400-$550. Kodak + Sevierville. No pets. 865-740-2525 Camper for rent. Elect & water. $385mo. or work to reduce rent. Private lot. 865-323-1007

3BR/2BA $500-$700/mth Boyds Creek Area No pets. 908-8629 Small mobile home. Private, shaded lot. Suitable for 1 person. Stove, Refrig, W/D. Rent $325. 1st, last & damage dep. ($975) to move in. 428-4642

4WO 2!)./2 3().% /.3)4% OWNER TERMS NO QUALIFYING

./ -).)-5-3 ./ 2%3%26%3

SEVIERVILLE, TN

)..%7-!2+%4*%&&%23/.#)49 4. PREMIER COMMERCIAL 13.63 ACRE TRACT FRONTS HIGHWAY 66 3!452$!9 /#4/"%22$  !#1 ROUTE TO THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS

Land has been in same family over 60 years %6%294().'3%,,3&2/-3)4% A very rare opportunity to buy !T)NTERSECTIONOF0IEDMONT2D2OCKY6ALLY2D .EW-ARKET 4.

Land sells in 1 tract to highest bidder 3)4%3 &2/-4(%#524)3 SATURDAY, JULY 10th, 2010, 10:30 A.M. q4%%:%2r&2%.#(%34!4% ,%6%,4/()'(7!9s-/34/&3)4%2%!$94/"5),$/.s42!#4&2/.43!,$%2"2!.#(2/!$&4 !#2%3!43)4%3 :/.%$# ).#")$s!,3/3%,,).'15!,)49!.4)15%42!#4/23!.$-/2% DIRECTIONS: On East side of Hwy. 66, Winfield Dunn Parkway, between Downtown Sevierville and Exit 407 3)4%.EW-ARKET!REA!CRE&ARM of I-40 across from Clarion Inn. TERMS: REAL ESTATE: 10% Deposit day of sale, balance due at closing within 30 days. All successful bid$IVIDEDINTO4RACTS0ARTLEVELPASTURE PARTCOZY ders will be required to sign a note for the deposit amount with the contract, in addition to deposit paid day of FOREST&ARMFRONTS0IEDMONT2D (INCHEY(OLLOW sale. Note shall become null and void when buyer shall complete all requirements for closing as set out in their contract. PERSONAL PROPERTY: Cash or good check day of sale. 2D2OCKY6ALLEY2D 10% BUYERS PREMIUM WILL BE ADDED TO EACH SUCCESSFUL BID 3)4%/LD/RIGINAL,OG#ABIN8pONLEVEL LEADERS IN REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS SINCE 1953 www.McCarterAuction.com Toll Free: LOT&RONTS(INCHEY(OLLOW2D sold@mccarterauction.com 1-877-282-8467 3140 Newport Hwy. 3)4%!CRES,EVEL7OODLANDFRONTING Auc. Lic. #335 Sevierville, TN 37876 Real Est. Lic. #214075 +EARNEY2D AUCTIONEERS: 3)4% Keith Shults Edd McCarter WE SELL THE EARTH 3)4%/LDXp"LOCK"UILDINGONLEVELLOT Brent Shults Chuck McCarter, OWNER TERMS SEVIERVILLE, TN Lisa M. Carroll Auctioneers (865) 453-1600 NEAR0IEDMONT%LEMENTARY3CHOOLON"LUE*AY,N Megan McCarter Cates Keith McGregor, NO QUALIFYING

Apprentice Auctioneer

Amanda M. Williams PREMIER COMMERCIAL

Scott E. McCarter, CAI

3)4%3#/524/2$%2%$ 13.63 ACRE TRACT FRONTS HIGHWAY 66

$)6/2#%!5#4)/. *EFFERSON#ITYON(IGHWAYOVERLOOK ING0ATRIOT(ILLS'OLF#OURSE "UILDERpS$REAM 3TORY5NFINISHED SATURDAY, JULY 10th,(OMEON!CRES!DDRESS.(WY 2010, 10:30 A.M. ,%6%,4/()'(7!9s-/34/&3)4%2%!$94/"5),$/.s42!#4&2/.43!,$%2"2!.#(2/!$&4  *EFFERSON#ITY 4. 3)4% :/.%$# ).#")$s!,3/3%,,).'15!,)49!.4)15%42!#4/23!.$-/2% DIRECTIONS: On East side of Hwy. 66, Winfield Dunn Parkway, between Downtown Sevierville and Exit 407 #1 ROUTE TO THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS Land has been in same family over 60 years A very rare opportunity to buy Land sells in 1 tract to highest bidder

of I-40 across from Clarion Inn. $)2%#4)/.34/3!,%$!94%.43)4%&ROM) %XITGO7ESTMION(WY4URNLEFTON$UMPLIN6ALLEY2D7AT TERMS: REAL ESTATE: 10% Deposit day of sale, balance due at closing within 30 days. All successful bidHIGHSCHOOL'OMITOTENTSITEONLEFT&ROM(WY %TRAFFICLIGHTIN.EW-ARKETTURNBESIDE&IRST"APTIST#HURCH GOBLOCK ders will be required to sign a note for the deposit amount with the contract, in addition to deposit paid day of TURNLEFT'OBLOCK TURNRIGHTON0IEDMONT2D'OMITOTENTSITEONRIGHT7EBSITEFORSITES $IRECTIONS sale. Note shall become null and void when buyer shall complete all requirements for closing as set out in their contract. PERSONAL PROPERTY: Cash or good check day of sale. 10% BUYERS PREMIUM WILL BE ADDED TO EACH SUCCESSFUL BID "59%2302%-)5-7),,"%!$$%$4/%!#(35##%33&5,")$

www.McCarterAuction.com WWW-C#ARTER!UCTIONCOM sold@mccarterauction.com SOLD MCCARTERAUCTIONCOM .EWPORT(WY 3140 Newport Hwy. 3EVIERVILLE 4. Sevierville, TN 37876 %DD-C#ARTER AUCTIONEERS: #HUCK-C#ARTER Edd!UCTIONEERS McCarter Chuck McCarter, +EITH-C'REGOR Auctioneers !MANDA-7ILLIAMS Keith McGregor, !PPRENTICE!UCTIONEERS Apprentice Auctioneer

LEADERS IN REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS SINCE 1953

Toll Free: 4OLL&REE 1-877-282-8467    

!UCTION,ICENSE Auc. Lic. #335 2EAL%ST,IC

Real Est. Lic. #214075

WE SELL THE EARTH

(865) 453-1600 Scott E. McCarter, CAI

+EITH3HULTS Keith Shults "RENT3HULTS Brent Shults ,ISA-#ARROLL Lisa M. Carroll -EGAN-C#ARTER#ATES Megan McCarter Cates *AMES##ATES Amanda M. Williams


The Mountain Press ď ľ Sunday, October 17, 2010

Classifieds ď ľ B14

Games

5JQY7U9JCVqU)TQYKPI+P;QWT 2WORMKP2CVEJ Buster

Paiton & Ethan Whaley

Proud Owners John & Jane Smith

Children of Aaron & Joi Whaley

KFDI,<O H P ,  >C C@

A Page Featuring Your Little Pumpkin Will Be Published Sunday, October 31, 2010 in The Mountain Press $10 for 1 child or pet in photo, $15 for 2 children or pets in photo. All photos must be in our offices by 5 p.m. Tuesday, October 26, 2010.

0

I give my permission to publish the enclosed picture and information in The Mountain Press â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pumpkin Patchâ&#x20AC;?.

Signature _____________________________________________________ Relationship to Child __________________________________________ Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name _________________________________________________ Parentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name ________________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________________ Day Phone____________________________________________________ Method of payment â?? Check $ ____________________________________________________ â?? Credit Card # _______________________________________________ Mail to: The Mountain Press, Pumpkin Patch, P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN 37864

0503

Auction Sales

WHO YA GONNA CALL? If you have a problem with the delivery of your morning The Mountain Press, please call the Circulation Department at 428-0748, ext. 230 & 231 Monday - Friday and your paper will be delivered to you on the same day. Newspapers from calls after 10:00 a.m. will be delivered with the next dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paper. On Saturday, Sunday and holidays you may dial 428-0748 extensions 230 & 231. If complaints are received between 8:00 and 10:00 a.m., papers will be delivered the same day. Newspapers from calls received after 10:00 a.m. will be delivered with the next dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paper. This applies to in-county home delivery only. Sevier Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only Daily Newspaper

1018

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Call: (865) 335-9007 The p/up #, 250451, All Work Guaranteed oris(865) 335-6630 not in our system. Call 430-2599 Please give valid p/up 1156 Heating/Cooling or attach pdf of ad. 1162 Home Improvement Thanks. & Repair

â&#x20AC;˘ Residential â&#x20AC;˘ Business â&#x20AC;˘ Cabins â&#x20AC;˘ Homes â&#x20AC;˘ Licensed, Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured 20 yrs exp. 438-9219

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NEFF & NORTHERN TRANSPORT Mobile Home Delivery & Setup FREE ESTIMATE Licensed, Bonded, Insured   s  

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Local â&#x2014;&#x2020; B15

Sunday, October 17, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press

Submitted

Verbenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Body, Bath & More was named winner of the Small Non-Professional Display Retail in the contest.

Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clause-et was named Large Non-Professional Display Retail winner in Gatlinburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Harvest Festival Decorating Contest.

Submitted

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Burg harvest decoration winners named GATLINBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Tourism has named winners in the 2010 Harvest Festival Decorating Contest. Categories included professionally and nonprofessionally decorated large and small displays in retail, attractions, service, restaurant and lodging divisions. Results of the judging by a panel from the Gatlinburg Garden Club, commissioned by the Office of Special Events: n Large Professional Display Retail: The Village n Small Professional Display Retail: Cupidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Petals Florist n Large NonProfessional Display Attraction: Ripleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aquarium of the Smokies

n Large NonProfessional Display Lodging: Mountain Rentals of Gatlinburg n Large Non-Professional Display Retail: Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Claus-et, LLC n Small Non-Professional Display Attraction: Ripleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Moving Theater n Small Non-Professional Display Lodging: Gatehouse Condominiums n Small Non-Professional Display Restaurant: Jordanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Village Creamery n Small Non-Professional Display Retail: Verbenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Body, Bath & More n Small Non-Professional Display Service: Mountain National Bank n Small Non-Professional Window Display: The Silver Tree n Honorable Mention: Midtown Lodge, Alpine Chalets

Citizens National bazaar Wednesday Submitted Report SEVIERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Citizens National Bank is hosting a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christmas Shopping Bazaarâ&#x20AC;? to benefit Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association from 3-6 p.m. Wednesday. The event will be next to CNBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main office at 130 W. Bruce St. There will be unique gifts in a variety of price ranges, with jewelry, cosmetics,

housewares and more. The event includes hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres, prizes and complimentary gift-wrapping of items from Thirty-One Gifts, Avon, BeautiControl, Premier Jewelry, Willow (formerly Southern Living), Mary Kay, Connectionists Kitchen and more. Call Melissa Huffman at 429-7907 for more information. All proceeds benefit Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association.

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Price does not include tax, title & fees. Not all buyers will qualify for the 0%. Not all vehicles will quality for the 0%. Dealer retains all Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash. Retail Customer Cash, Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, all retail contracts must be ďŹ nanced through Ford Credit, Regional Discount Packages may apply. All incentives may change. Please check dealership for details.

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B16 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Local

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, October 17, 2010

SCHS salute to veterans scheduled in November Submitted Report SEVIERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sevier County High School invites the community to attend the 18th annual salute to veterans. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Smoky Salutes

â&#x20AC;Ś Generations of Freedom!â&#x20AC;? Performances will take place Nov. 4 at 6:30 p.m., and Nov. 5 at 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. The salute will showcase the heritage of freedoms and rights that have been protected throughout

history by veterans. Veterans will also be recognized and honored. The program will include music, dance and a multimedia presentation. For more information, call 4535525.

AP Photo/Jon Elswick

The World War II Memorial in Washington. Local veterans are invited to take a low-cost bus trip to the capital to see it and other sites.

at

Veterans invited to make trip to D.C.

T E L O R V E H C R VOLUNTEE $250 IN GM

Submitted Report Veterans are invited to be part of a trip to Washington to observe Veterans Day. A motor coach will leave the Sevierville Community Center early Wednesday morning, Nov. 10. The trip will include the usual stops for rests and eats. During the travel the time will be filled with games, stories and songs. The coach will arrive in Washington on Wednesday evening for accommodations at a comfortable motel. On Nov. 11, Veterans Day, the group will visit some of the Capitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monuments, including the World War II Memorial, Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall and Tomb of the Unknowns. The trip welcomes any who want to go. The group will leave D.C. Friday morning for the trip back to Sevier County. The cost is $200 per person, double occupancy, and meals are not included. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you are a World War II vet and have not had an opportunity to visit the World War II Memorial and are unable to afford the trip, we have a place for you,â&#x20AC;? said Kenneth Stansberry. Reservations must be made by Oct. 31. Call 577-1157 for more information and to make reservations.

Website lists Gatlinburg among top visitor spots Gatlinburg â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Travelers have selected Gatlinburg as a top family destination and a top destination for fall foliage in the TripAdvisor 2010 Travelersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Choice Destination Awards. Travelers vote online for the awards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re honored to be named one of the top family travel and fall foliage destinations in the country,â&#x20AC;? said David Perella, executive director for the Gatlinburg Department of Tourism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no doubt that the Smoky Mountains in fall are a great sight and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re glad that travelers throughout the country prefer to spend the season in Gatlinburg.â&#x20AC;? Winners are based on

reviews and opinions from travelers on TripAdvisor. com. The top destinations were determined by a combination of travelersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; favorite places and overall popularity. For reviews on Gatlinburg, go to http:// www.tripadvisor.com/ Tourism-g60842Gatlinburg_TennesseeVacations.html. For the complete 2010 Travelersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Choice Destination Awards list, go to www.tripadvisor. com/TCDestinations. TripAdvisor Media Network says it attracts 46 million monthly visitors across 15 travel brands. Sites cover more than a million destinations, hotels, restaurants and attractions.

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MSRP $27,505

99 FORD ESCORT.................................... $3995 99 CHEVROLET MALIBU ......................... $4995 98 HONDA ACCORD ................................ $6995 06 CHEVROLET COBALT ......................... $8995 00 MAZDA MX-5 MIATA ......................... $8995 99 CHEVROLET CAMARO........................ $8995 04 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO .............. $9995 06 DODGE STRATUS SEDAN ................... $10995 09 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER..................... $11995 09 CHEVROLET AVEO ............................. $12995 07 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $13995 09 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER..................... $14995 HYUNDAI SONATA................................... $15995 06 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $15995 09 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $16995 09 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $16995 09 MAZDA 5 .......................................... $16995 09 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $16995 09 CHRYSLER SEBRING.......................... $1899 09 CHEVROLET MALIBU ......................... $18995 07 MERCEDES-BENZ C-CLASS .............. $20995 10 CHRYSLER 300-SERIES ..................... $21995 08 FORD MUSTANG ................................ $22995 94 CHEVROLET TRUC C/K1500 .............. $5995 01 NISSAN FRONTIER............................. $6995 00 CHEVROLET TRUCK VENTURE ........... $6995 96 HARLEY DAVIDSON EG ...................... $6995 97 FORD F150......................................... $7995 03 CHEVROLET TRUCK VENTURE CARGO............ $7995 90 FORD E-350 ....................................... $8995 04 CHEVROLET VENTURE ....................... $9995 01 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 ........... $12995 04 DODGE DAKOTA ................................. $12995 02 FORD ECONO ..................................... $13995 08 FORD ECONO ..................................... $13995 08 FORD RANGER ................................... $14995 04 GMC SIERRA...................................... $14995 04 TOYOTA SEQUOIA .............................. $15995

MSRP $28,465 MSRP $26,305 $2000 CUSTOMER CASH $2500 CUSTOMER CASH OR OR 0.0% APR up to 60 mos. WAC 0.0% APR up to 60 mos. WAC

22,788

*$

25,723

*$

2010 SILVERADO 4WD Z71 CREW CAB

2010 TRAVERSE FW LTZ

#10037

#9992 MSRP $45,430 MSRP $42,145 $5000 CUSTOMER CASH $2000 CUSTOMER CASH OR OR 0.0% APR up to 72 mos. WAC 0.0% APR up to 60 mos. WAC

37,909

*$

PA3633 PA3684 9989B PA3611 PA3688 PA3669 9939B 6981A PI3590 9987A PA3577 PA3687 PA3690 PI3668 PA3615 PA3674

4674

9531AAA PA3677 PI3638D PA3629 PA3671 PA3678 PA3669 PA3605A PA3686 PA3676 10042A PI3647 PA3680 PA3681 PA3682 PA3683

7"/4

8376B 8038B 9957D PI3698A 8647B PI3700

38,661

*$

09 CHEVROLET HHR ............................... $17995 06 CHEVROLET SILVERADO .................... $17995 05 FORD SUPER DUTY F250 ................... $18995 08 NISSAN ROGUE .................................. $18995 07 JEEP LIBERTY.................................... $18995 08 GMC SIERRA 1500............................. $18995 07 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 ........... $20995 99 FORD F450......................................... $21995 08 GMC CANYON .................................... $21995 04 CHEVROLET SSR................................ $24995 02 GMC 4000 ......................................... $24995 08 FORD EDGE ........................................ $26995 10 CHEVROLET EQUINOX........................ $26995 09 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 ........... $26995 06 CHEVROLET SILVERADO .................... $28995 09 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE .................. $43995 09 DODGE JOURNEY............................... $17995 09 CHEVROLET EXPRESS ....................... $18995 06 NISSAN PATHFINDER ........................ $18995 08 MERCURY MARINER.......................... $19995 10 CHEVROLET HHR ............................... $19995 07 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER................ $19995 08 FORD ESCAPE .................................... $20995 05 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN .................... $23995 10 JEEP LIBERTY.................................... $25995 08 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $30995 08 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR ........................ $34995 09 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN .................... $36995 10 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $38995 10 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $38995 10 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $38995 10 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $39995 01 OLDSMOBILE SILHOUETTE ................ $4995 89 CHEVROLET COMM/RV CUT VAN............ $5995 02 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY .......... $6995 07 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN.................. $13995 07 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY ........... $16995 10 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN.................. $20995

COME IN TEST DRIVE, PURCHASE A NEW OR USED VEHICLE OR OIL CHANGE GET A DEER CAMP HAT AND KOOZIE WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. PROGRAM EXPIRES 11/30/10

VOLUNTEER CHEVROLET Certified

USED CARS The Right Way. The Right CarÂŽ

(79 3%6)%26),,%s428-6655 www.volunteerchevrolet.com

SALE HOURS Mon-Fri 8AM - 7PM

volunteer chevy Sat 8AM - 5PM Mobile: mobile.volunteerchevrolet.com TAX, TITLE, TAGS & LICS. FEES EXTRA. W.A.C. DEALER RETAINS ALL REBATES AND /OR INCENTIVES. DUE TO ADVERTISING DEADLINES SOME UNITS MAY BE SOLD. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PROGRAM EXPIRES 11/1/2010. **0.0 APR AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODEL IN LIEU OF REBATES AND/OR INCENTIVES. PRICE INCLUDES $399 CUSTOMER SERVICE FEE.


Sunday, October 17, 2010