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The Mountain Press ■ Sevier County’s Daily Newspaper ■ Vol. 26, No. 283 ■ October 10, 2010 ■ www.themountainpress.com ■ $1.25

Sunday

INSIDE

No delay if bid approved By DEREK HODGES Staff Writer

5Dejected Dooley Vols lose to Bulldogs between the hedges Sports, Page A8

5Ghoulish goodies Get ideas and recipes for Halloween treats Mountain Life, Page B1

PIGEON FORGE — City officials are set to move forward on a project that threatened to slow construction on Birds Creek Road. On the agenda for the City Commission’s meeting at 5:30 p.m. Monday in City Hall is a pair of bids to relocate a water line in the area of Catons Chapel

School. The group is expected to accept the lower of those two and give the go-ahead on the work. That would mean Sevierville firm Charles Blalock & Sons, which also has the contract with the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) for work to realign the road, would be in charge of the effort. Its bid of $118,768.50 was more than $70,000 cheaper than the only other offer submitted. Officials worried the work,

which apparently was not adequately planned for, could hold up the long-awaited effort to improve the road. That project includes straightening out some of the most crooked portions of the road, removing some dangerous shoulder drop-offs and moving hillsides off the road. However, that work can’t proceed near the school until the water line has been moved. While Pigeon Forge Public Works Director Mark Miller hoped the

city could tack the work on to the state’s contract and have it completed as the road work proceeds, avoiding the lengthy delays of engineering and rebidding it, that didn’t pan out. If the Blalock offer is accepted Monday, Miller said the contractor will have to secure insurance for the project and the city will have to hold a pre-construction conference with them before See Bid, Page A4

Breaking the Cycle Domestic abuse victim shares story By ELLEN BROWN Staff Writer

World

End near for Chile miners Drill reaches 33 men trapped underground for 66 days Page A14

Weather Today Mostly sunny High: 83°

Tonight Mostly clear Low: 49° DETAILS, Page A6

For Donna, an East Tennessee woman who was the victim of domestic abuse for more than a decade, the turning point was a broken hip. “I was going into the bedroom to get away from him, and he followed me,” she recalled. “He was saying, ‘Didn’t you hear me?’ He hit my shoulder so hard that I went flat on the floor. He said, ‘What, can’t you get up?’ really sarcastic — and I couldn’t. He called the ambulance, and they came and got me. It turned out my hip was broken in two places. That’s when I decided I needed to get help — or else the next time, it would be a hearse coming for me.” The scenario is all too common today, especially in our region: According to a recent Violent Policy Center report, Tennessee is ranked the no. 5 state in the nation where women are murdered by men (Nevada is ranked no. 1). In the national study, where the victim-to-offender relationship could be identified, 92 percent of female victims were murdered by someone they knew. Of these, 64 percent were wives or intimate acquaintances of their killers. Twelve times as many females were murdered by a male they knew than were killed my male strangers. Donna first met the man who would become her husband when they worked together. “He was married at the time, but they were having problems and he would want to come see me. He wasn’t bad-looking, and I liked the way he talked to me — he was good to me at first.” See Victim, Page A4

Obituaries Liz Kilby Condry, 76 Lee Anne Franklin, 48 Earnest L. McCarter, 24 Lucien R. Seymour, 89 DETAILS, Page A4

Index Local & State . . . . . A1-6 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . A8-13 Nation . . . . . . . . . . . . A5 World . . . . . . . . . . . . A14 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . A3 Comics . . . . . . . . . B7-10 Classifieds . . . . . . B12-14

Photo Illustration by Curt Habraken/The Mountain Press

Domestic violence seems to be on the rise as the economy continues to decline, catching women, children and even some men in its clutches. Support organizations like SafeSpace and Safe Harbor are working to break the cycle.

Abuse at home victimizes children mentally and physically By ELLEN BROWN Staff Writer When domestic violence occurs, children are always hurt if they’re in the home — regardless of whether they’re the physical target. “Children are the hardest part to deal with in domestic violence cases,” said

Laura Brooks, a school resource officer with the Sevierville Police Department. “We’re adults and we can rationalize behavior, but children hold on to that fear. We try and explain to them that adults make mistakes just like kids do, that we argue just like they do — but that still doesn’t make it right, and there are

consequences for their actions, too.” Brooks noted that it’s a situation she sees students go through too often, since domestic violence is “one of those crimes that’s always with us. We have a rash of burglaries and car thefts, but there’s never a ‘down period’ for domestic violence.” In fact, if anything,

it’s on the rise. “Anytime you see an economy like we’re in now, there’s an increase. When there are money issues, that causes stress. With the loss of jobs comes the loss of self-esteem. It’s a community-wide problem.” Brooks added that domestic violence is also a “gender-free

crime.” “It is typically women who are abused, but men are the forgotten victims.” Safe Harbor Child Advocacy Center serves children who have been abused from birth to age 17 in the Fourth Judicial District of Tennessee, which includes Cocke, See Children, Page A4

Seymor church rummage sale benefits sellers and buyers

Corrections The Mountain Press is committed to accuracy. Please report factual errors by calling 428-0748 Ext. 214.

By JEFF FARRELL Staff Writer

Jeff Farrell/The Mountain Press

Merwyn Borders, left, looks over some of the books he was selling at the Seymour First Baptist Church rummage sale Saturday. The event raised money for the church’s missions program.

SEYMOUR — The fall rummage sale at Seymour First Baptist Church proved a popular place to start the morning Saturday. “When they first opened the doors, it was like Dollywood on opening day,” said Murrell Geagley. Geagley was there to pick up comes clothes and other items. He said he actually uses them for charity himself. Local schools don’t have clothes to give out to students who might be in need for different reasons, he said, so if he hears about

a problem in the area he takes clothes out to families himself. The sale drew a good crowd throughout the morning, as people picked over clothes, furniture, old computers and other items. Merwyn Borders was overseeing the sale of books. He acknowledged his last name fit for that role, although he has no affiliation with the book store. The rummage sales have gone on for several years, but he said he thinks the recession has caused more people to take advantage of the bargains. See Rummage, Page A4


A2 â—† Local

The Mountain Press â—† Sunday, October 10, 2010

SMARM banquet fundraiser audience of 350

Stan Voit/The Mountain Press

Stan Voit/The Mountain Press

Pittman Center Mayor Glenn Cardwell, left, Sandra Yorke, Bob Beckwith and Phil Yorke were banquet guests.

Ruth Beagan, Mike Beagan, Danny Beagan and Sarah Wilson were among the hundreds of people who turned out for the Streams of Mercy banquet held Thursday at Holiday Inn in Pigeon Forge.

Stan Voit/The Mountain Press Stan Voit/The Mountain Press

Among those attending the fundraiser for SMARM were, from left, Walter Miller, Jamesena Miller, Aaron Miller and Shirley Miller.

Mariah Treadway, Andrew Farmer, McKenzie Whaley and Ivy Whaley heard Pat Summitt speak and found out about Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries at the fundraiser. Stan Voit/The Mountain Press

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Taking in the Streams of Mercy banquet for SMARM were, from left, Elaine Stokes, Dwight Stokes, Reed Harrell and Patrick Harrell.

7 MILE YARD SALE On Hwy. 411 Sev.

At businesses from Flat Creek Village to Walgreens Nov. 6th, Book your space now. For more info. 865-548-5677


Local ◆ A3

Sunday, October 10, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

Community Calendar Editor’s Note: The community calendar is printed as space permits. Items must be submitted at least five days in advance. Only noncommercial, public events held in Sevier County will be considered. To place an item phone 428-0748, ext. 214, or e-mail to editor@themountainpress. com. Items may be faxed to 453-4913.

Sunday, Oct. 10 Lewis Ogle Reunion

Angel Food

Angel Food orders: n 2-5 p.m., Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd. 429-2508.

Tuesday, Oct. 12 Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 1 p.m. Ski Mountain Road. 436-6434 for location n 6:30 p.m. Pigeon Forge UMC

S.I.T.

Lewis Ogle family reunion, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Mountain Star Lodge, Dolly Parton Parkway. Bring covered dish. 453-2593.

Seniors In Touch (S.I.T.) meets 5-6 p.m. MountainBrook Village, 700 Markhill Drive, Sevierville. 428-2445.

Roaring Fork Baptist

Lions Club

Southern gospel singing with Shannon Bunch, 6 p.m., Roaring Fork Baptist Church, Gatlinburg.

Union Valley Baptist

Sevierville Lions Club meets 6:30 p.m. second and fourth Tuesday at the King Family Library. 4537796.

Revival 7 p.m. at Union Valley Baptist Church with Evangelist Rev, Ronnie White.

Al-Anon Group

New Era Revival

Riverbend Concert

Revival at New Era Baptist Church, 1389 New Era Road, through Wednesday. Tom Lester, speaker.

Monday, Oct. 11

Al-Anon Family Group meets 11 a.m. Pigeon Forge UMC. 428-7617 or 680-6724. Scott Inman in concert 7 p.m. Riverbend Campground. Free.

Wednesday, Oct. 13 Pampered Chef Party

Daughters of American Revolution, Spencer Clack chapter, meets 7 p.m. at King Family Library. Program by Vice Regent Betty Wilson.

Pampered Chef party to benefit Relay For Life, 2-4 p.m., Senior Center. Preorder at www.pamperedchef.biz/gailspantry. E-mail to agrady428@yahoo.com or call 654-9280.

Women’s Bible Study

Garden Club

DAR

Garlands of Grace Women’s Bible study: n 1 p.m. Gatlinburg Inn. 436-0313. n 1 p.m. Seymour Heights Christian Church, Chapman and Boyds Creek n 6:30 p.m., Gatlinburg Call 436-0313 for location

Hot Meals

Hot Meals For Hungry Hearts 5:30-6:30 p.m., Henderson Chapel Baptist Church, 407 Henderson Road, Pigeon Forge. Sponsored by Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries.

Cancer Support Group

Smoky Mountain Cancer Support Group meets 6 p.m., Senior Center. Dr. Michael Rothwell to discuss breast cancer center. 4285834 or 654-9280.

Free Bibles/Toys

Missionaries for Christ John and Sharon Sutton providing free Bibles and toys 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at Sevier County Food Ministries, Old Knoxville Highway. Rain date Oct. 18. 654-0707.

Sevierville Garden Club meeting at noon, King Family Library. Speaker Marlene Forrester, director, Sevier County Fairgrounds. Lunch provided. Board meeting 10:30.

Riverbend Concert

Scott Inman in concert 7 p.m. Riverbend Campground. Free.

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 10 a.m. Sugar Tree Road, Wears Valley. 4284932, n 9 a.m. Wellington Place. 429-5131

Thursday, Oct. 14 Arthritis exercise

Arthritis exercise classes 9:30-10:30 a.m. Extension office, Mondays and Thursdays in October. 4533695 for registration and information.

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 10 a.m. UMC Pigeon Forge n 2 p.m. Blue Mountain

Mist B&B, Pullen Road n 6:30 p.m. Sevierville UMC, Conference Room 850-4685.

Hot Meals

Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries provides hot meals 5:30-6:30 p.m., First United Methodist Church, Sevierville and Kodak United Methodist Church in Kodak.

Shades of the Past returning to Pigeon Forge next year Submitted Report PIGEON FORGE — The Shades of the Past Hot Rod Roundup No. 29 will again be held in Pigeon Forge. The dates for the 2011 “Shades” show will be Sept. 9 and 10. Dollywood/Splash Country will again

TOPS

TOPS weight loss chapter meets at 6 p.m., Parkway Church of God in Sevierville. 755-9517 or 429-3150.

Angel Food

Angel Food orders: n 10 a.m.-4 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245.

Riverbend Concert

J.P. Miller in concert 7 p.m. Riverbend Campground. Free.

Friday, Oct. 15 MOPS

Mothers of Preschoolers through kindergarten and expecting, 9:30-noon, first and third Friday. Childcare provided. Evergreen Church. 428-3001.

Relay Fundraiser

Wal-Mart Relay For Life team selling hog dogs, burgers, nachos, baked goods today through Oct. 17. E-mail to earl1969@ charter.net.

Christmas Bazaar

Christmas bazaar yard sale today and Saturday, 312 Kelly Hills Road, Sevierville, to benefit people of Scott County for Christmas.

Angel Food

Angel Food orders: n 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd. 429-2508. n 1-6 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245.

Candy Sale

Community First Church of God, 131 Palette Circle, Seymour, taking orders for chocolate covered peanut butter footballs until Oct. 15, for pick-up Oct. 29 and 30, 774-5983.

Saturday, Oct. 16 SCHS Reunion

Sevier County High School class of 2000 reunion, 6-10 p.m., River Plantation, 1004 Parkway in Sevierville. $50 couple, $35 person. E-mail to 2000bears@gmail. com or visit Facebook.

host the show. All 2010 winners may be viewed after Nov. 1 at www.shadesofthepast.com. Registration for 2011 will be available on the Web site after Jan. 15. For questions contact Dan Draper, rod run chairman, at (865) 995-2009 or e-mail to dchutsell@yahoo.com.

Arrests Editor’s Note: The following information was taken from the intake reports at the Sevier County Jail. All people listed within this report are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law. u Kevin Catt, 18k of 610 Baskins Creek Road in Gatlinburg, was charged Oct. 8 with aggravated burglary and theft of property worth $500 to $1,000. He was being held in lieu of $5,000 bond. u Timothy Daniel Eltzroth, 21, of 1234 Cherokee Circle Drive in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 8 with shoplifting. He was released on $1,000 bond. u Silas Manterville Gibson, 26, of 870 Flatcreek Road in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 9 with possession of burglary tools, driving while revoked and violation of registration law. He was being held in lieu of $2,500 bond. u Ryan N. Hadden, 28, of 510 Dudley Creek Bypass in Gatlinburg, was charged Oct. 8 with a circuit court warrant. He was being held in lieu of $3,500 bond. u Priscilla Dawn Heater, 29, of 204 Murrell Meadows in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 8 with aggravated burglary and vandalism. She was being held in lieu of $5,500 bond. u Timothy Lee Inman, 54, of Maryville, was charged Oct. 9 with misdemeanor filing a false report to an officer. He was being held. u Joey King, 23, of 1728 Bear Path Way in Sevierville, was charged

Oct. 8 with domestic violence. He was released on $500 bond. u Kala Jean Maples, 42, of 2865 Ridge Crest St. in Seymour, was charged Oct. 8 with a misdemeanor warrant from general sessions court and a second count of violation of probation. She was being held. u Denis Robert Mault, 23, of Grand Junction, Tenn., was charged Oct. 9 with attachment order. He was being held. u Steven Casey McGill, 23, of 564 N. Cunningham Road in Seymour, was charged Oct. 9 with violation of an order of protection. He was released on $1,500 bond. u Ricky Van Murrell, 21, of Lenoir City, was charged Oct. 8 with two misdemeanor warrants from general sessions court. He was being held. u John William Ocuto, 23, of 1160 Winding Road in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 8 with violation of probation. He was being held. u Brian Edgar Silvey, 33, of 206 S. Flatcreek Road in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 8 with a circuit court warrant and theft of property worth

$1,000 to $10,000. He was being held. u Kimberly D. Stafford, 25, of Johnson City, was charged Oct. 8 with violation of probation. She was released. u Jonathan Kevin Stewart, 32, of 910 Hill Hollow Drive in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 8 with criminal responsibility: facilitation of felony. He was being held in lieu of $3,500 bond. u Elmer Kenneth Taulbee, 56, of 561 Mill Creek Road 4 in Pigeon Forge, was charged Oct. 9 with public intoxication. He was being held in lieu of $250 bond. u Arthur Russell Towle, 49, of New Market, was charged Oct. 9 with theft of property worth $500 to $1,000 and theft of property worth $1,000 to $10,000. He was being held in lieu of $1,500 bond. u Dennis Ronald Trentham, 38, of 1411 Woodhaven Drive in Sevierville, was charged Oct. 8 with two counts of theft of property worth $1,000 to $10,000 and violation of probation. He was being held in lieu of $5,000 bond.

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RE-ELECT

Richard Montgomery State Representative

It has been my pleasure to represent the citizens of Sevier County for the past 12 years. I humbly ask for your support again this year in the upcoming election on November 2, 2010. Early Voting October 13th - October 28th.

Thank you, Richard Montgomery Paid for by the committee to elect Richard Montgomery, Treasurer: Ann Montgomery


A4 â—† Local

The Mountain Press â—† Sunday, October 10, 2010

Lane, Howard recognized at fair

Obituaries In Memoriam

In Memoriam

Earnest Lee McCarter

Lee Anne Franklin

Lee Anne Franklin, age 48, of Sevierville, passed away Friday, October 8, 2010. Survivors: husband, John S. Franklin; sons, Matthew Jennings and Jon Beall; step-daughter, Tasha Franklin; brothers, Douglass and Jeff Holliday; special friends, Charlie Cole, Floyd Lafollette, Jay Peppers and Keith Cole; several aunts, cousins, nieces and nephews. Funeral service 11 a.m. Monday in the chapel of Atchley Funeral Home with Rev. Roy Ogle officiating. Interment will follow in Middle Creek Cemetery. The family will receive friends 6-8 p.m. Sunday at Atchley Funeral Home, Sevierville. n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com

Elizabeth Kilby Condry

Forge, the Rev. Bobby Ely officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Elizabeth “Liz� Kilby Condry, American Cancer Society, c/o 76 of Sevierville, died Teri Newman, 3629 Parkway, Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2010. Pigeon Forge, TN 37863 She graduated from Sevier or to the Shiloh Cemetery County High School and East Maintenance Fund, c/o Lanning Tennessee Baptist Nursing Wynn & Claude Huff, P.O. Box School and had a career as a 5288, Sevierville, TN 37864RN in the emergency room at 5288. East Tennessee Baptist Hospital in Knoxville for 35 years. n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com Survivors: son, Jack C. Martin Jr.; sister, Casina Huff; sistersLucien R. Seymour in-law, Eleanor and Shirley Lucien R. Seymour, 89 of Kilby; niece, Kathy Kilby; nephews, Claude Huff Jr. and Mike Sevierville, died Wednesday, Kilby; several great-nieces and Oct. 6, 2010. Survivors: children, Claudelle nephews. Graveside service and inter- and Dewey Sumner, Peggy and ment was Saturday, Oct. 9 Bobby Braden, Edwin and Lisa in Shiloh Cemetery in Pigeon Seymour, Paulette and Mark Klaus, Yvonne and Tony Hays;

Earnest Lee McCarter, age 24 of Sevierville, passed away Thursday, October 7, 2010. Survivors include his wife, Dorothy Michelle McCarter; daughter, McKenzie Marie McCarter; mother, Angelia McCarter; father, Ricky Lee Maples; grandparents, Earnest and Nelda McCarter, Lee and Euritha Maples; sister, Arlena Michelle McCarter; niece, Abbaigail Nevaeh McCarter; father- and mother-in-law, James and Vera Tweedle; several aunts, uncles, cousins and special friends. The family will receive friends 2-4 p.m. Sunday with a funeral service beginning at 4 p.m. at Atchley’s Smoky Mountain Chapel in Pigeon Forge with Elder Ray Matthews officiating. Family and friends will meet 10 a.m. Monday in Smoky Mountain Memory Gardens for graveside service and interment. n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com

17 grandchildren; 22 greatgrandchildren; 1 great-greatgrandchild. The family will receive friends 1-2 p.m. Monday with a memorial service beginning at 2 p.m. at Atchley’s Smoky

Mountain Chapel in Pigeon Forge. Rev. Larry Freeman will officiate. Cremation arrangements by Atchley Funeral Home, Sevierville. n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com

Submitted

The Rev. Earl Lane, left, and Juanita Howard were recognized at Sevier County 4-H Night at the Fair as the organization celebrates 100 years. Lane was the oldest 4-H member present, sharing experiences going back to the early 1940s. Howard was recognized for her 20-plus years of service as a 4-H volunteer leader.

Bid

3From Page A1

work starts. That shouldn’t take long, though, and Miller expects the effort could begin as early as the beginning of next week. Also on the agenda for the Monday session is: n A public hearing to receive comment on the proposed rezoning of a parcel located approximately 550 feet northwest of the intersection of Waldens Creek and Goose Gap roads from R-1 (low-

density residential) to C-3 (neighborhood commercial) n Ordinance 914 enacting that rezoning (second reading) n Ordinance 915 amending Section 414 (“Site plan regulations for special events, festivals and similar activity uses) of the text of the Zoning Ordinance n A request from Eddie Fox to connect to the city’s water system on Waldens Creek Road n A bid for the inspection and cleaning of four water storage tanks.

n dhodges@themountainpress.com

Children

3From Page A1

Grainger, Jefferson and Sevier Counties. “It’s very much a team effort here,� said Jenny Stith, the center’s forensic interviewer. “We try and make it an unbiased interview; we try to get the truth.� Safe Harbor also makes the children’s welfare the no. 1 priority.

Victim

3From Page A1

Then he became more controlling, parking behind her trailer and demanding to know where she had been when she arrived home. “He would literally rip my clothes off and say, ‘Let me see how many hickeys you have on you!’ Anytime I’d try to get away from him, he would come and find me.� In the meantime, he had divorced his wife (which was his third) and continued to see Donna. “I thought if we got married, that maybe things would change,� she said. And for a short time, things did seem to get better: Donna had inherited some money from her father, and she and her new husband used it to make a deposit on a house. Soon, however, Donna began to feel like a prisoner in her own home. “I never knew when he was going to go off about something. I would have to fix his food and set it down for him before I even started fixing mine.� She also found out that he had been renting an apartment with his third wife during this

“We ended an interview early yesterday because the child was too traumatized,� Stith said. “One of the most important things is to believe the child,� added Donna Koester, Safe Harbor executive director. Batterers often abuse their children as well as their partners. According to the American Humane Association, a review of

several studies revealed that 45-70 percent of survivors in shelters reported that their abusers also committed some form of child abuse. It has been concluded from these studies that child abuse is at least 15 times more likely to occur in households where domestic violence is present than in those without adult violence.

time. “She actually called me and told me,� Donna said. “She was outside talking to me while he was inside, sleeping on the couch. They must have had a blow-up after that, because he called and said it was me who he loved and he was coming home to stay.� Donna was angry but felt helpless. “The police had been called out numerous times to our home, but I never wanted to press charges. I was afraid of him, and I had nowhere else to go. I knew that when he got out of jail, he’d be coming for me.� He would even tell Donna’s own family — including her sister — stories to turn them against her, including lies about her having a drinking problem. When she finally left for a hotel after her broken hip had healed, she learned her husband

had been there looking for her. She called the sheriff’s department, which referred her to SafeSpace, an organization providing a safe haven to domestic violence victims since 1976. “I hadn’t heard of SafeSpace,� Donna said. “There are a lot of women who are in my position who don’t know there are places they can go for help.� Representatives from the organization took her to find a new place to live and gave her the resources she needed to get on her feet — and safely away from the man who had abused her. SafeSpace’s mission is to end domestic violence in the lives of all people, especially women and children from Sevier, Cocke and Jefferson counties. It provides emergency shelter, crisis intervention, court advocacy, resource

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Brooks said that signs of domestic abuse are often apparent in children, such as a sudden drastic change in behavior. “Healing can be fun,� said Sharmian McCoy, Safe Harbor clinical director and therapist. “We do different things with the kids, such as sewing and painting. We want to stop the cycle here.�

Catherine B. Sandifer, Esq. Catherine B. Sandifer, Attorney in Tennessee & Florida admitted admitted in Tennessee & Florida

“We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy under the Bankruptcy Code�

referrals and counseling to victims of domestic violence. “She’s really blossomed since she first came to us,� SafeSpace legal advocate Chelsie Dalton said of Donna. “She has her own place now, and she no longer has to go home and feel like she’s walking on eggshells.� Donna also hopes to reconnect with her two daughters — who have children of their own — now that the man who kept them away is out of her life. “I still look behind my shoulder when I go out,� she admitted. “But for the first time in years, I’m happy.� SafeSpace’s 24-hour crisis line can be reached at 1-800244-5968. For more information, visit www. safespacetn.org. n ebrown@themountainpress.com

Rummage

3From Page A1

“We’ve found with the bad economy, the sales not only help us, but they also help a lot more of the people that come here,� he said. Revenues from the sales go to the church’s missions program. That means it can be spent on out of state or even international missions. Right now, the church is helping another church in a poor area of West Virginia convert an old school into a youth center. It also sent aid to Nashville after the floods.

But a lot of the money also stays in Seymour and the surrounding area, according to missions coordinator Frank Enter. “A lot of the money goes back into Seymour, Enter said. “We build a lot of wheelchair ramps for people when we know they need them.� Furniture that’s not sold is stored away and still goes to good use as well, he said. “We take furniture all the time and we put it in a semi trailer so if someone has a fire or something we take it to them,� he said. n jfarrell@themountainpress.com

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Nation ◆ A5

Sunday, October 10, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

Obama hits GOP proposal to cut education spending WASHINGTON (AP) — Offering voters a reason to keep Democrats in power on Capitol Hill, President Barack Obama says Republicans would cut education spending and put the country’s economic future at risk if they had their way. A quality education is paramount, Obama said. He suggested that federal spending on education is one area where he would not compromise. “What I’m not prepared to do is shortchange our children’s education,” Obama said Saturday in his weekly radio and Internet address. Obama has spent much of the past two weeks contrasting a GOP proposal to cut

spending, presumably including on education, with the billions of dollars he’s investing to improve learning from kindergarten through college. That includes money for public schools, community colleges and to help make it cheaper and easier for families to afford higher education for their children. This week, Obama announced a new public-private sector partnership to help match community college graduates and businesses with jobs to fill. The White House also held its first-ever summit on the state of community colleges. In his weekly message, Obama acknowledged that the country faces tight fiscal

for sending lawmakers home for the Nov. 2 congressional elections without voting on a series of expiring Bush-era tax cuts. Obama wants to keep those tax cuts for families and individuals with incomes below $250,000 and impose higher tax rates on everyone else, including the wealthiest Americans. Republicans want to extend all the Bush tax cuts. “The Obama tax hikes are yet another job killing burden that the American people and American employers cannot afford. Raising taxes on anyone in the middle of a recession is the worst thing we can do,” Barrasso said, although the recession technically has ended.

Suicide surge: Schools confront anti-gay bullying

America moves on from spill; coast feels abandoned BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — About 800 miles from the Gulf of Mexico, Dave Edmonds is struggling to remind people about the BP oil spill. There aren’t many magazine covers with photos of oil-drenched birds now that BP has capped its massive gusher at the bottom of the sea. People aren’t looking online for information about the historic spill like they were a few weeks ago. So Edmonds, who lives on the Delaware coast, has started a nonprofit organization to keep the disaster on people’s minds with a website and social networking campaign. “Awareness has dropped. People don’t really care about the people who were affected. They don’t care about the fish life,” said Edmonds, founder of Taking Back the Gulf. For Gulf residents fighting for economic survival, a nation’s short attention span is deeply unsettling, especially with oil still washing ashore. Yet it’s unclear whether Americans are turning their attention elsewhere, or whether it’s just the media that have. Either way, people like Chef Chris Sherrill feel abandoned. “It’s amazing how quickly the American public forgot that this was one of the worst manmade disasters in U.S. history,” he said. His wedding catering and event business in Gulf Shores, Ala., is teetering because few brides are still coming to the beach for weddings. The slight isn’t necessarily intentional. Walking with his girlfriend in a park in Des Moines, Iowa, Michael Gauthier said he wonders about the oil’s lingering impact on the environment, and he fears for Gulf residents. “It’s not in your face every day so you forget about it. Who doesn’t have bills to pay and work to go to? Who has time to think about what’s going on in Louisiana?” said Gauthier, 26.

times, but he said a good education is too important to the country’s future prosperity to do it on the cheap. “At a time when most of the new jobs being created will require some kind of higher education, when countries that out-educate us today will out-compete us tomorrow, giving our kids the best education is an economic imperative,” he said. Republicans devoted their weekly address to what the party says are Obama’s broken promises on jobs, the economy and health care. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., touched on the high unemployment rate, holding at 9.6 percent, and criticized Democratic leaders

AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky, File

U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly, a crew member of the mission to the International Space Station, accompanied by his brother Mark Kelly, right, walks to the rocket ahead of the launch of the Soyuz-FG rocket at the Russian-leased cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Oct. 8.

Astronaut twins to join up in orbit CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The stars may have finally aligned for the world’s only space sibling team. Astronaut Scott Kelly is circling the planet, fresh into a 5 1/2-month space station mission. His identical twin, Mark, will join him next year, if NASA’s shuttle schedule holds up. Together, they will become the first blood relatives to meet up in space. “It’s something we hoped would happen,” Mark said. “It wasn’t done by design. But we’re fortunate. I think it will be fun for us.” ScottistheInternational Space Station’s next commander. He took off aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket early Friday — texting and joking with his brother right until launch. Mark is space shuttle Endeavour’s next commander. He’s due to take off at the end of February and knock on the space station door March 1. It’s currently slated to be NASA’s last shuttle flight. Don’t expect any handshakes when the Kellys unite more than 200 miles up. The 46-year-old brothers — Navy captains and former fighter pilots — have never shaken each other’s hands and don’t plan to start just because the space station cameras

are rolling. Rather, count on embraces and even armwrestling when the hatches pop open between the space station and Endeavour, and the world does a double take.

NEW YORK (AP) — A spate of teen suicides linked to anti-gay harassment is prompting school officials nationwide to rethink their efforts against bullying — and in the process, risk entanglement in a bitter ideological debate. The conflict: Gayrights supporters insist that any effective antibullying program must include specific components addressing harassment of gay youth. But religious conservatives condemn that approach as an unnecessary and manipulative tactic to sway young people’s views of homosexuality. It’s a highly emotional topic. Witness the hate mail — from the left and right — directed at Minnesota’s AnokaHennepin School District while it reviews its anti-bullying strategies in the aftermath of a gay student’s suicide. The invective is “some of the worst I’ve ever seen,” Superintendent Dennis Carlson said. “We may invite the Department of Justice to come in and help

us mediate this discussion between people who seem to want to go at each other.” Carlson’s district in the northern suburbs of Minneapolis is politically diverse, and there are strong, divided views on how to combat bullying. “We believe the bullying policy should put the emphasis on the wrong actions of the bullies and not the characteristics of the victims,” said Chuck Darrell of the conservative Minnesota Family

Council. That’s a wrongheaded, potentially dangerous approach, according to the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network — which tries to improve the school climate for gay students nationwide. “Policies have to name the problem in order to have an impact,” said GLSEN’s executive director, Eliza Byard. “Only the ones that name it see an improvement.” According to a 2009 GLSEN survey of 7,261

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A6 ◆

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 10, 2010

sunrise in the smokies

TODAY’S Briefing Local n

GATLINBURG

Tennis tourney to be Tuesday

The Gatlinburg Chamber of Commerce Foundation will host its first round-robin tennis tournament Tuesday at Mynatt Park. The event will kick off with a tennis boot camp from 12:30-1 p.m. for new players. Registration begins at noon, and the tournament will begin at 1. after a group lesson taught by G. Webb of the Tennis Corner. To enter a team or become a sponsor, call Erin Moran at the Gatlinburg Chamber at 436-4178.

n SEVIER

COUNTY

Entries sought for Relay pageant

The Mountain Press Relay For Life team is accepting applications for its second Holiday of Hope pageant to benefit the American Cancer Society. The pageant will be held Nov. 20 at Country Tonite Theater with age 12 different age divisions competing. Forms can be picked up at The Mountain Press, Country Tonite, Tennessee State Bank and Thomas Photography. The deadline for entries is Nov. 5. For more information or to requests forms call 428-0748 ext. 215 or 262 or e-mail gcrutchfield@ themountainpress.com or tmcgaha@themountainpress.com

n Sevierville

Roe staffers to hold office hours

Staffers from U.S. Rep. Phil Roe’s office will hold office hours in Sevier County from 9-11 a.m., Nov. 16 at the Sevier County Sheriff’s Department. Roe’s staff will be available to assist First District constituents.

State n MEMPHIS

Zoo hopes baby bear is on the way

MEMPHIS (AP) — Memphis Zoo officials are hoping that Haley, its female polar bear, is on the nest. So they’ve given her some privacy in the black bears’ exhibit in the hopes that she is pregnant. “She’ll go over there and make a little den,” said Tiffany Langston, zoo communications specialist. Haley has gained weight and zoo officials have suspected for several months that she might be pregnant.

n NASHVILLE

Fisk proposes revised deal

NASHVILLE (AP) — Fisk University presented a new plan Friday that it hopes will persuade a judge to allow the financially troubled university to sell a share of its modern art collection to an Arkansas museum. The court filing by the school said it was addressing the concerns expressed by Nashville Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle when she rejected an earlier proposal this summer. Chief among those was the concern that the agreement could have allowed the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, in Bentonville, Ark., to take full ownership of the collection if Fisk was unable to meet certain financial commitments. “Under the modified agreement, no transfer of interest away from Fisk or Crystal Bridges may occur without approval of this court,” the brief reads.

top state news

Man accused of killing 6 maintains innocence MEMPHIS (AP) — A man accused of killing six people at a Memphis home maintained his innocence during testimony Saturday, saying he hid under a bed during the slayings and didn’t report them to police because he feared for his life. Jessie Dotson, 35, has pleaded not guilty to six first-degree murder charges and three counts of attempted first-degree murder

in what is being called one of Memphis’ worst mass slayings. According to WMC-TV, Dotson, who was in a gang, took the stand Saturday and testified that he didn’t call police because he risked being killed by fellow gang members. Defense attorneys contend the March 2008 massacre was perpetrated by angry gang members. When questioned by a defense

attorney on Saturday, Dotson said: “Gangs don’t call police.” While under a bed in one of the back bedrooms, Dotson said he heard a lot of noise coming from the front of the house, including a girl screaming. Eventually there was silence, and he said he went to the front room where he saw the victims, including the children, all of whom he thought were dead.

Lottery Numbers

Saturday, Oct. 9, 2010 Midday: 5-4-2 Evening: 4-9-5

11 18

Saturday, Oct. 9, 2010 Midday: 9-5-3-9 Evening: 8-9-7-4

26 28

Friday, Oct. 8, 2010 05-08-19-22-23 3

TODAY’S FORECAST

LOCAL: Sunny Friday, Oct. 9, 2010 24-29-37-48-50 19 x4

This day in history

High: 83° Low: 49°

Today is Sunday, Oct. 10, the 283rd day of 2010. There are 82 days left in the year.

Winds 5 mph

Chance of rain

n Last

0%

year locally

The Cobbly Nob area of Sevier County recently installed a fire alarm system after a blaze there claimed several homes earlier this year. The new alert system is capable of emitting tones audible up to four miles away to warn folks of impending danger.

■ Monday Sunny

High: 83° Low: 50° ■ Tuesday Sunny

High: 82° Low: 52°

n On

this date

■ Air Quality Forecast:

On Oct. 10, 1935, the George Gershwin opera “Porgy and Bess,” featuring an all-black cast, opened on Broadway; it ran for 124 performances. (The libretto was by DuBose Heyward, who co-wrote the lyrics with Ira Gershwin.)

Primary Pollutant: Ozone

n Ten

years ago

■ Lake Stages: Douglas: 973.3 D0.4

Mountains: Moderate Valley: Moderate Cautionary Health Message: People who are unusually sensitive to ozone may experience respiratory symptoms.

World quote roundup “We feel an enormous happiness, now that i’m going to have my brother. When the siren rang out, it was overwhelming. Now we just have to wait for them to get out, just a little bit longer now.” — Darwin Contreras, brother of Pedro, one of 33 miners trapped for more than two months in Chile

“It’s something we hoped would happen. It wasn’t done by design. But we’re fortunate. I think it will be fun for us.” — Astronaut Mark Kelly, who will soon join his identical twin brother and fellow astronaut Scott Kelly on the International Space Station

“It’s amazing how quickly the American public forgot that this was one of the worst manmade disasters in U.S. history.” — Chef Chris Sherrill, Gulf Shores, Ala., of Gulf oil spill

The Mountain Press Staff

Publisher: Jana Thomasson Editor: Stan Voit Production Director: Tom McCarter Advertising Director: Joi Whaley Business Manager: Mary Owenby Circulation Distribution Manager: Will Sing (ISSN 0894-2218) Copyright 2008 The Mountain Press. All Rights Reserved. All property belongs to The Mountain Press and no part may be reproduced without prior written consent. Published daily by The Mountain Press. P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN, 37864, 119 River Bend Dr., Sevierville, TN 37876. Periodical Postage paid at Sevierville, TN.

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Americans Alan J. Heeger, Alan G. MacDiarmid and Japan’s Hideki Shirakawa won the Nobel Prize in chemistry; Russian Zhores I. Alferov and U.S.-based researchers Herbert Kroemer and Jack Kilby won the Nobel Prize in physics.

n Five

years ago

President George W. Bush dined in the French Quarter and stayed in a luxury hotel to showcase progress in hurricane-battered New Orleans.

n Thought

for today

“The opposite of a fact is falsehood, but the opposite of one profound truth may very well be another profound truth.” — Niels Bohr, Danish physicist (18851962).

Celebrities in the news n John

Stamos

MARQUETTE, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan couple convicted of trying to extort $680,000 out of “Glee” actor John Stamos were each sentenced Friday to four years in prison. Allison Coss and S c o t t Sippola were hopStamos ing to receive sentences of less than two years in prison, but U.S. District Judge R. Allan Edgar ordered a stiffer punishment. They were convicted in July of conspiracy and using e-mail to threaten a person’s reputation.


Mountain Views

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peacably to assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” —United States Constitution, Amendment One

■ The Mountain Press ■ Page A7 ■ Sunday, October 10, 2010

commentary

Race to Top to be good for Tennessee I’m not sure it’s entirely fair to rate a school system solely on comparative test scores. Trouble is, people want to know how good the school system they are supporting with their tax dollars really is. Is there a better way? Maybe. Tennessee received some $500 million in federal money for being one of the first states approved for Race to the Top funding. The stimulus law signed in 2009, while scorned by many, contained $4.35 billion for Race to the Top, a competitive grant program to encourage and reward states that put in plans for real education reform. Tennessee officials set out to get some of that money, and thanks to a coalition of state, education and business leaders, they did it. Tennessee and Delaware won the competition’s initial round. So what does it mean? It means half of that money will come to local school systems that come up with innovative, creative and interesting ideas for enhancing their education efforts. The other half will stay with the state education department for such things as professional development, recruitment and retention efforts, and oversight. The money will be used for data systems to track progress and student growth, ways to recruit and keep good teachers and reward the really good ones, and coming up with standards and assessments to measure students and administrators. The state’s plan was endorsed by the Legislature, the teachers union, every local school system and a coalition of businesses. If you ask a manufacturer in this state what his biggest challenge is, he just might tell you it’s hiring people with the skills needed to do the work. Keeping kids in school long enough to graduate with knowledge and skills, then moving them on to technical training or higher ed, ought to be everybody’s goal. You’ve got to challenge students, make them work hard, encourage them and, most of all, teach them. I attended a five-hour seminar in Knoxville the other day aimed at telling journalists about Race to the Top. I came away encouraged. In many states such reforms would have met opposition a almost every turn. Legislators would have questioned it, teacher unions would have fought it and local school systems would have resisted it. Instead, Tennessee led the way with support — almost unanimous support — from all segments of this great state. Tennessee now has the nation’s richest source of data about public education, whether it’s on individual schools, school systems or the state as a whole. Most of it is public record, although assessments of individual teachers are not. There will even be a way for teachers to report their own working conditions. Do they have enough materials? Are their principals supportive? Is creativity rewarded or discouraged? Is the classroom setting in good shape? Those are questions teachers will be able to report anonymously once the state sets up the website. Teacher and principal evaluations may be the biggest sign of progress. In Tennessee there was no requirement that teachers be assessed on a regular basis, and how much that assessment played into the teachers being retained. The new law passed by the Legislature sets a goal of getting students ready for college or career choices. The law requires annual teacher assessments and observation of each teacher several times a year, for at least 10 or 15 minutes each time. Half of the evaluation of a teacher and principal will be based on student achievement. Other criteria include prior evaluations, conferences an observations by superiors. Only teachers of core curriculum subjects will be evaluated like this (not art teachers, PE teachers, music teachers, etc.). Maybe the most controversial part of all this is the weight given to so-called Value Added Assessments. That’s a way of measuring student growth through tests. It’s subjective in a way, and teachers are rightfully nervous about it. Even if a consistently low score on this measurement doesn’t get a teacher fired or denied tenure, it could mean the teacher won’t get a salary boost for doing good work. The teacher union was not keen on this part of Race to the Top, and implementing it has yet to be worked out. In the weeks and months ahead we’ll be doing stories about Race to the Top, on what our local school system is doing to improve standards and evaluate teachers and principals, and what grants our system is seeking. In the meantime, rejoice that our state system of public education is about to get better, if everyone does his part. — Stan Voit is editor of The Mountain Press. His column appears each Sunday. He can be reached at 428-0748, ext. 217, or e-mail to svoit@ themountainpress.com.

Editorial

Smoothing Rocky Top Choosing the next Knoxville campus president critical for UT And then there were five. More than 70 people applied to become the next University of Tennessee-Knoxville president by the Wednesday deadline. A search panel quickly narrowed the field to five with UT Institute of Agriculture chancellor Joe DiPietro and West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission chancellor Brian Noland scoring highest headed into interviews. Now, perhaps more than ever, it is imperative that the Search Committee and, ultimately, the UT Board of Trustees, choose the right man — and in the right manner. The firestorm of controversy following the resignation of Dr. John Shumaker in 2003 and the rocky tenure of Dr. John Petersen remains fresh in the minds of trustees, faculty, alumni and students. Shumaker’s tenure lasted for only about a year when allegations were reported in June 2002 that he had misused university resources. It was also reported that he awarded a $300,000 consulting contract to a long-time

friend without going through the bidding process, and that he had failed to tell the university that he was serving as a trustee for a college in Greece. By August, Shumaker was history. Outraged supporters demanded that process that eventually led to the hiring of Petersen in 2004 be out in the public and totally above board. Petersen, who served until 2009 couldn’t survive a 2008 survey of the faculty showing that 71 percent had “no confidence” or “limited confidence” in his ability to leading the university. Dr. Jan Simek has acted as interim president since Petersen departed. After two consecutive shaky administrations, and with higher education facing a plethora of serious issues, it is critical that the eventual choice be beyond reproach. (Some university supporters, we say only partially tongue in cheek, may feel this is even more important than having the right football coach or whether basketball coach Bruce Pearl can withstand the ongoing

NCAA investigation.) There was great diversity among the list of candidates. University spokesman Hank Dye said the list “includes a wide variety of applicants, some a lot less qualified than others. ... We had said from the beginning we wanted a diverse pool, and it appears we have a lot of diversity in it. We want to have the very best person for the job, and I think you have to be very open in order to be sure you get that.” During two days next week, the search committee will conduct open forums for up to five finalists. Faculty, staff and students were encouraged to submit questions via the Internet to be used during those forums. The committee will then endorse some or all and send the finalists to the Board of Trustees, which is scheduled to vote on Oct. 22. It is a critical time on Rocky Top. The events that unfold over the next few weeks and the man chosen to lead the Knoxville campus can go a long way in smoothing that out.

Political view

Public forum Dream fulfilled thanks to the efforts of local businesses

Editor: Having worked for 10 years in the tourism industry, I sometimes lose the perspective of the impact we make in the lives of our guests. It’s no surprise many of our guests have worked and scrimped an average of two years for the opportunity to enjoy a family vacation. At times the greed some business owners show is deplorable. A daily and exhaustive effort is made to utilize whatever underhanded tactics necessary to grab every last penny before a competitor can. On the other hand, there are local business owners and staff who work tirelessly to make it. Through their ups and downs they find ways to encourage and reward those who aided in their success. In return, employees respond to visitor needs in a more positive manner, and this encourages guests to want to come back. My father and mother divorced early in my years. My mother did what it took to ensure

her six children loved her, to the expense of any of us having a relationship with our father. Turning 21 and having joined the Navy, one of my first ports was close to my father. Finally, the opportunity to build the relationship I always wanted with him. Awkward at first, we soon found I not only looked much like my father, but our personalities were a copy. We shared likes for fixing and building things, cars, and the same political views. The last 10 years we spent over the phone, e-mail, faxing and occasional trips to trace genealogy. Having traced our family to 1040 AD, we felt it was time to take our first vacation together. Growing up without my father, I wanted to go fishing with him. My father, a retired Air Force jet mechanic and Vietnam vet, wanted to fly in a helicopter for the first time. Most of all, we wanted all six children to see their father for the first time in several years. Two months ago my father decided to vacation in Sevierville. Money was tight and activities would be limited. It was through the giving hearts of Dan

Haynes, Scenic Helicopter Tours; and David Berry, Smoky Mountain Angling Adventures, that my father and I were able to reach the dreams we had long shared. Dan’s staff went the extra mile to ensure we experienced their best flight. My father loved the views, the thrill of moving over endless sites, and the way in which Scenic Helicopter staff carried themselves. Gratitude also goes out to Captain Berry, who turned down paying customers to take my father and family fishing on Douglas Lake. He extended himself far above expectations to ensure we all had a memorable adventure. My father was disgnosed with stage 4 cancer not long after that. It was with a heavy heart and many unfinished tomorrows that I laid my father to rest. Through the unselfish acts of Scenic Helicopter Tours and Smokies Angling Adventures, my burden was made somewhat easier by the memories. We fulfilled my dream to fish with my dad and his desire to fly. Charles Rhodes Seymour

Letters to the editor policy and how to contact us: ◆ We encourage our readers to send letters to the editor. Letters must contain no more than 500 words. No more than one letter per person will be published in a 30-day period. Letters must be neatly printed or typed and contain no libel, plagiarism or personal attacks. All letters are subject to editing for style, length and content. Statements of fact must be attributed to a source for verification. All letters must be signed and contain a phone number and address for verification purposes. No anonymous or unverified letters will be printed. No letters endorsing candidates will be considered. The Mountain Press reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter. E-MAIL LETTERS TO: editor@themountainpress.com or MAIL LETTERS TO: Editor, The Mountain Press, P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN 37864. For questions, call (865) 428-0748, ext. 214. The Mountain Press and its publishers do not necessarily agree with the opinions expressed in letters and columns on this page.

Editorial Board:

State Legislators:

Federal Legislators:

◆ Jana Thomasson, Publisher ◆ Stan Voit, Editor ◆ Bob Mayes, Managing Editor ◆ Gail Crutchfield, Community News Editor

◆ Rep. Richard Montgomery

◆ U.S. Sen. Bob Corker

1-800-449-8366 Ext. 1-5981; 207 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 rep.richard.montgomery@capitol.tn.gov

◆ Rep. Joe McCord

(202) 224-3344; 185 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg., B40A, Washington, D.C. 20510

◆ U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander

(202) 224-4944; S/H 302, Washington, D.C. 20510

1-800-449-8366 Ext. 1-5481; 207 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 rep.joe.mccord@capitol.tn.gov

◆ U.S. Rep. Phil Roe

1-800-449-8366 Ext. 10981; 320 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 sen.doug.overbey@capitol.tn.gov

◆ U.S. Rep. John J. Duncan Jr.

◆ Sen. Doug Overbey

(202) 225-6356; 419 Cannon House Office, Washington, D.C. 20515 (202) 225-5435; 2267 Rayburn Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20515


Sports

Visit: The Mountain Press.com View/Purchase Sports & News Photos

■ The Mountain Press ■ A8 ■ Sunday, October 10, 2010

TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS FOOTBALL

A Dawg day afternoon Georgia bullies Vols 41-14 in Dooley’s return to Sanford Stadium

John Amis/AP

Tennessee head coach Derek Dooley kneels on the sideline as Georgia finds itself in the red zone during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday Oct. 9, at Sanford Stadium in Athens, Ga.

Green had six catches for By PAUL NEWBERRY AP College Football Writer 96 yards, giving him 13 catches for 215 yards since ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — his return. Georgia’s struggles were Aaron Murray ran for two touchdowns and threw evident from the normally for two more scores as packed stands at Sanford Georgia snapped a four- Stadium. While officially game losing streak, routing a sellout of more than bumbling Tennessee 41-14 92,000, there were noticeSaturday in a rude home- able chunks of empty seats coming for Volunteers for a game matching two teams seeking their first coach Derek Dooley. “We ran into a moti- win in the SEC. The breakthrough went vated team today,” Dooley said. “When you fumble to the Bulldogs, who four times in the first half, set the tone by holding it makes it hard to hang Tennessee without a score in there with the other on the opening possesteam. We got affected on sion — they gave up scores the road and couldn’t keep right away each game of our composure. We are the losing streak — and not going to win with those marching right down the field the first time they got types of turnovers.” A.J. Green caught the ball. Caleb King broke off a another touchdown pass, his third in two weeks 14-yard run, Murray comsince returning from a pleted a 12-yard pass to four-game suspension for Green, then the redshirt quarterback selling his bowl jersey to freshman a person considered an took matters into his own hands. Looking to his left agent. Georgia (2-4, 1-3 and finding no one open, Southeastern Conference) Murray spotted a huge ended its longest skid opening to the right and since 1990 and provided a took off. He didn’t stop glimmer of hope in a sea- running until he dove into son that has put the heat the end zone for a 35-yard on longtime coach Mark touchdown. Then it was time for Richt. Tennessee (2-4, 0-3) Tennessee to start makmade this one easy on the ing mistakes. Matt Simms Bulldogs, turning it over lofted a pass that was three times, giving up four deflected and picked off by sacks and falling behind Bacarri Rambo, who managed to get one foot down 17-0 in the first quarter. Murray was 17 of 25 for just before he flew through 266 yards passing and ran the bench area and actualseven times for 41 yards. ly leaped over the famous

hedge that surrounds the field. The first of the turnovers led to Blair Walsh’s 42-yard field goal, but the Volunteers were just getting warmed up with their hapless ways. On the ensuing kickoff, Eric Gordon had the ball knocked loose and Derek Owens recovered at the Tennessee 41. Murray struck right away, hooking up with Green on a 33-yard pass. “Our growing pains reared its ugly head today,” Dooley said. “They started drives on our side of the field, and we didn’t handle that well. We need to step up there and make a stop. We are just not stopping anybody right now. I’m not sure if that’s just growing pains. I just think we are not very good right now.” After King was thrown for a loss, Murray hooked up with Rantavious Wooten on a 9-yard touchdown in the left corner to give the Bulldogs a 17-point cushion. Dooley, the son of former Georgia coach and athletic director Vince Dooley, downplayed his return to the city where he grew up and graduated from law school. His father did not attend the game, electing to watch from home because he didn’t want to root for a visiting team between the hedges. See TENNESSEE, Page A11

COMMENTARY AND OPINION

Things may look down for Eagles, but potential is there The Seymour Eagles football team is mired in the longest scoring drought the Blue and Gold has endured since the team started play in 1961. It’s been 14 quarters — three and a half games ­— since the Eagles last scored a point. It’s also the first time in school history that three consecutive shutouts have been recorded against the team. But all is not lost. Watching Friday night’s gut-wrenching 7-0 loss to Morristown East from the sidelines, I could see this squad has definite potential. While the team is dotted with some very talented seniors, there is also a good quantity of gifted younger athletes that are still learning the ropes under coach Jim Moore and staff. Names like Colton Flynn, D.J. Griffin, Corey Todd, Corey Heard, Taylor Overton, Eric White, Brandon White, Trevor Wallace and Bryson Dockery are probably already familiar to Seymour fans, and they’ll only continue to grow more familiar as time passes and they continue to improve. Still, the senior Eagles have a lot to play for this season, and I believe they could actually win out, given the right circumstances. Those circumstances include two things to start. 1) The Eagles defense needs to continue what they showed Friday night. That is excellent effort on most every play. They were on a mission against East, and were it not for one Hurricanes’ drive, they would have shutout a team that’s averaged nearly 30 points a game this season. 2) The offense has to find a way to get the ball in the end zone. I think the offensive woes will begin to work itself out this week as the Eagles host a 1-6 South-Doyle See EAGLES, Page A9

Mary Ann Chastain/AP

South Carolina’s quarterback Stephen Garcia celebrates as he leaves the field defeating No. 1 Alabama 35-21 in an NCAA college football game Saturday, Oct. 9, at Williams Brice Stadium in Columbia, S.C.

Gamecocks snap Tide win streak By PETE IACOBELLI AP Sports Writer COLUMBIA, S.C. — Steve Spurrier finally delivered South Carolina’s biggest win ever. Stephen Garcia threw three touchdown passes, two to Alshon Jeffrey, and Marcus Lattimore scored three times as the 19th-ranked Gamecocks stunned No. 1 Alabama 35-21 on Saturday.

The defending national champion Crimson Tide had won 19 straight game, including last week’s 31-6 rout against Florida, since losing the Sugar Bowl after the 2008 season to Utah. The Gamecocks (4-1, 2-1 Southeastern Conference) had never beaten a No. 1 team in four previous tries. But the Head Ball Coach, in his sixth season at South Carolina, had the players

to beat Alabama using the Tide’s own formula. Garcia and Gamecocks cashed in chances when they got close to the goal line and shut down the best tailback duo in the country, making themselves a factor in the SEC title chase. South Carolina shredded the country’s top-rated scoring defense, putting up the most points on Alabama (5-1, 2-1) since a

41-34 loss to LSU in 2007. The Gamecocks scored four touchdowns when they got inside the ’Bama 20 — double what the Crimson Tide had allowed coming in. Alabama’s Mark Ingram and Trent Richardson were held to 64 yards on the ground as the Crimson Tide tried to rally back, as it had in beating Arkansas See TIDE FALL, Page A12


Sports ◆ A9

Sunday, October 10, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

Seymour sophomore D.J. Griffin makes a move after catching a fourth quarter pass at Morristown during the Eagles’ battle with the East Hurricanes.

Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

Seymour senior quarterback Dustin Fain (17) spots junior running back Corey Todd (22) 10 yards downfield and targets him for a pass during the the Eagles’ 7-0 loss to IMAC rival Morristown East Friday night at Burke-Toney Stadium. The Eagles offense has had great difficulty scoring over the last four games managing just six points over that time.

throwing arm and can make things happen with 3From Page A8 his feet. And receivers Clark and D.J. Griffin have both shown a knack team that’s given up 33 for making some big points per game and plays. hasn’t even faced the Should the offense IMAC’s top two teams. get rolling against rival This offense has plenty South-Doyle, the Eagles of weapons. should score another big Runners Lee Knight, Kevin Kennedy and Corey win over a struggling Cherokee team. Todd are more than With two wins under capable in the backfield. their belts and some conDustin Fain has a strong fidence, I think the Eagles

EAGLES

would have a legitimate shot against Morristown West to end the season. If Moore’s team could roll off three straight wins to end the season with a bevy of experienced underclassmen coming back in 2011, things would certainly be looking up for the Eagles’ future and county football in general. mpsports@themountainpress.com Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

Seymour sophomore Colton Flynn (48), pictured stopping East’s Chase Brunson, is the Eagles’ second-leading tackler in 2010.


A10 â—† Sports

The Mountain Press â—† Sunday, October 10, 2010

NASCAR RACING

NASCAR’s Gilliland right at home in California By JOHN MARSHALL AP Sports Writer FONTANA, Calif. (AP) — David Gilliland’s long, strange run through the NASCAR season has brought him home. It couldn’t have come at a better time. Fighting through a season in which he’s traded the qualifying hot seat with Travis Kvapil for Front Row Motorsports, Gilliland was able to let out a big sigh after returning to Auto Club Speedway. “I’ve already seen a lot of people I know, my friends and family, so that part of it’s always good,� said Gilliland, from nearby Chino Hills. “This track’s special to me. I did most of my racing out of my house, which is about 10 minutes from here, so it’s good to come back and see everybody.� Gilliland came out early to visit everyone so he could concentrate on racing in one the final races of what’s been an awkward-at-times season. Front Rows’ top two cars are comfortably within the top 35 needed to run in a Sprint Cup race, but the team is trying to add a guaranteed spot for a third car. Gilliland and Kvapil have taken turns trying to qualify the No. 38 car, often not knowing who’ll get the call until just before the entries are due. “It’s been a little bit different; it’s been an experience,� Gilliland said. “But all the drivers of Front Row Motorsports, we all realize it’s what we have to do for our team right now to make it better for next year. It’s not the funnest thing to do at times, but we feel it’s the best thing to do for Front Row Motorsports.� Gilliland has gotten the call to qualify the No. 38 car 14 times and has cracked the field all but once. Kvapil is 8 for 9 in qualifying. It hasn’t always been easy for the two drivers on a team that’s not nearly as big as some of the NASCAR giants.

Gilliland and Kvapil don’t always have top-of-the-line equipment, the team typically doesn’t buy the full tire allotment and there isn’t a team of people analyzing data, leaving the two drivers to rely on information from each other. What has helped are their racing styles. Gilliland and Kvapil like similar setups in their cars, so there aren’t a lot of adjustments when the seat-swapping occurs. “Travis and I were teammates before and we have enough confidence where if we’re struggling, we can put his whole setup in, start the race and go into the first corner like we had practiced all weekend,� Gilliland said. Gilliland pulled it off at his home track, qualifying 38th for Sunday’s 400mile race. Seeing his family and friends made it all that more enjoyable. ——— FONTANA DOWN TO ONE: Auto Club Speedway was once a big draw, routinely pulling in 100,000 fans after opening in 1997. Sagging attendance over the past few years — the speedway was about halffull for the last fall race — and a shift in focus by NASCAR have left the track with just one race in 2011. Not everyone was disappointed. “Unfortunately, the crowds just haven’t been what everyone hoped they would be,� Chase driver Jeff Burton said. “With that being said, if there is an opportunity to have a onerace event would be better for a facility, this is an opportunity.� Fontana lost its fall date for a second race in Kansas, leaving the track with just a spring race, on March 27. Cup drivers hope the change will spark more interest among Southern California fans and boost attendance at the one race

that’s left. “As a California native, I’m disappointed to hear it’s losing an event because it’s taken so long for NASCAR to get here,� said Chase points leader Jimmie Johnson, who’s from El Cajon, Calif. “I hate for us to lose a weekend here, but on a national scale and what’s right for the sport, I can see that as well. If we’re not packing the stands, then take the second date somewhere else.� ——— NASCAR ON SOUTH PARK: “South Park� took on NASCAR with its season-opening episode entitled “Poor and Stupid.� Not everyone around the garages had seen the show yet, but most of the drivers had no problem with the idea of being the brunt of a not-so-flattering parody. “I think any time somebody takes the time to make fun of you is a compliment. I don’t think anybody takes offense to that,� said Danica Patrick, who will also appear on “The Simpsons� later this year. “I think we all made history being on ’South Park.’ It’s pretty cool.� Not even Johnson took offense when Cartman, a character on the show, had this to say about him: “I’m a little worried about that Johnson guy — he seems dumber than spit.� “I’ve had multiple text messages saying that I was on ’South Park,’ really, from all of my friends’ kids,� he said. “I’ve got to check it out. I haven’t seen it, but I heard that Cartman’s in a very entertaining sponsored car. I haven’t seen it yet and I can’t wait to.� Patrick was run over by another car and killed at the end of the show, but didn’t seem to mind. “I got killed, I was told,� she said. “Well, you know, some days I feel like that might be the easy road.�

Patrick Hanlon PREP CROSS COUNTRY

Bears shine at Metro meet KNOXVILLE — The Sevier County High School cross country team seems to be hitting their stride as mid-season arrives. “Our veteran runners are coming into good form and our younger athletes are competing great as well,� said head coach Dan Hanlon. This was evident Thursday as the both the bears boys and girls teams finished in top positions at the Victor Ashe meet, part of the Knox Metro High School cross country series. The Sevier County girls team finished second among 17 teams while the boys placed fourth among 22 other regional teams. Leading the pack for the bears were sophomores and team co-captains Hannah Pelham and Patrick Hanlon. Pelham finished 4th overall from a field of 170 on the girls team (22:38) while Hanlon was 5th overall from a field of 242 on the boys team (18:30). “This race featured over 400 high school runners so these finishes are quite good,� said Hanlon. Also competing and scoring points for the speedy bears were Makayla May, Lisa Burke, Courtney Kirby and Skyler Trent. On the boy’s team Brandon Laws, Adam Davis, Corey Ramsey and William

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Sports â—† A11

Sunday, October 10, 2010 â—† The Mountain Press

Rainier Ehrhardt/AP/The August Chronicle

Georgia head coach Mark Richt gestures after Georgia defeated Tennessee 41-14 in an NCAA college football game at Sanford Stadium, Saturday, Oct. 9, in Athens, Ga. Jeff Chiu/AP

Atlanta Braves Rick Ankiel hits a solo home run in the eleventh inning of Game 2 of the National League Division Series baseball game against the San Francisco Giants in San Francisco, Friday, Oct. 8. The Braves beat the Giants 5-4 in eleven innings. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Braves seem determined to delay Cox’s retirement By PAUL NEWBERRY AP Sports Writer ATLANTA (AP) — No matter how many injuries they face, no matter how hopeless the situation seems, the Atlanta Braves are determined to put off Bobby Cox’s retirement as long as possible. Another player went down in Game 2 of the NL division series — and a mighty important one at that. But the Braves shrugged off the loss of closer Billy Wagner and got down to figuring how they can win an NL division series with the San Francisco Giants that is improbably tied at one game apiece. Game 3 is Sunday afternoon before what should be a raucous sellout crowd at Turner Field, where the Braves put up the best home record in the majors during the regular season. “We’ve been a team all year that just rolls with the punches,� said ace Tim Hudson, who will start Sunday. “We still have to go out there and play. Injuries are part of the game and adversity is part of the game. We’re not the most talented club, but I feel like we have the most heart and a lot of guts.� With his team getting home around 9 a.m. Atlanta time, Cox decided to skip the traditional offday workout and let his players get some extra rest. That’s probably for the best. The way things have gone for the Braves, someone might have gotten hurt. Two key hitters, Chipper Jones and Martin Prado, are both out with season-

ending injuries. So is starting pitcher Kris Medlen. Three other pitchers — Jair Jurrjens, Takashi Saito and Eric O’Flaherty — were left off the division series roster because of various ailments. Now, the guy who saved 37 games during the regular season is likely to miss at least the rest of the division series. Wagner injured his left oblique on a fielding play in the 10th inning of Friday night’s dramatic 5-4 victory that evened the series. The Braves must decide if Wagner has a chance to come back in a week to pitch in the NL championship series — should Atlanta even get that far. If so, they’ll likely keep him on the roster and use only 10 pitchers the rest of this series. If not, he’ll be replaced by another pitcher, which would make the left-hander ineligible for the next round anyway. Wagner will be re-examined before Game 3. “We’ve got a tough decision to make,� Cox said. “We’ve got a lot of talking to do.� Saito, who was left off the roster because of an ailing right shoulder, threw a scoreless inning in the instructional league and would appear to be the top candidate to replace Wagner. Jurrjens and veteran Scott Proctor, who spent most of the year at Triple-A, are also possibilities. Cox said he can get by with 10 pitchers if necessary, especially with the emergence of rookie relievers Craig Kimbrel and Jonny Venters. Cox also has Peter Moylan and

Kyle Farnsworth. “We’ll mix and match the seventh, eighth and nine innings,� Cox said. “Whoever matches up those particular innings, that’s who’s going to be out there. We’ll close with whomever. I’ve always thought Moylan could close, and Farnsworth has closed in the major leagues. Venters, no reason why he can’t, as well as Kimbrel.� The bullpen is a major reason this series is all even. Atlanta fell behind 4-0 in the first two innings against the Giants, and starter Tommy Hanson was lifted for a pinch-hitter in the top of the fifth. But six relievers — including another rookie, Michael Dunn — combined for seven scoreless innings while the Braves rallied to tie the game. In the 11th, Rick Ankiel won it with a homer into the bay beyond the rightfield wall at AT&T Park. “They’ve been pretty much our rock all year,� Hudson said of the bullpen. “We wouldn’t have won last night without those guys.� Now, Cox’s long managerial career is assured of lasting at least two more games. He’s sure enjoying the ride. “That’s why we’re so proud of this team,� Cox said Saturday. “They do bounce back.�

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TENNESSEE 3From Page A8

Not to worry. Derek’s team didn’t give dad much to cheer about. The Volunteers looked totally deflated after their last-play loss to LSU the previous week, when they surrendered the winning touchdown after time ran out because a penalty for too many men on the field allowed the Tigers to run an extra play. Tennessee’s only bright spot in the first half came after Simms appeared to headed for yet another sack, but managed to slip away from two defenders and loft a 38-yard touchdown pass to Justin Hunter. But any hope of the Vols rallying was snuffed out by Gordon’s second turnover and the third overall. On a Georgia punt, the ball popped out of Gordon’s hands and right into the arms of Blake Sailors at the Tennessee 37. Murray went to Aron White with a 30-yard pass and, even after an illegal block penalty backed up the Bulldogs, Green hauled in a 22-yard touchdown pass down the middle

“I was disappointed in how we competed. It’s easy to take a loss if you are competing. We obviously weren’t ready emotionally from start to finish.� Tennessee coach Derek Dooley

that made it 24-7. Walsh added a 20-yard field goal for a 27-7 halftime lead. Just about everything went Georgia’s way. On the opening possession of the second half, Murray spun away from a would-be tackler in the backfield, took off running again to his left and managed to stick the ball

over the goal line just before stepping out of bounds. The officials initially ruled him out at the 1, and Walsh kicked through a chip-shot field goal. But the replay booth signaled down to the field just before the snap, took another look at the play and ruled that Murray should get credit for a 5-yard touchdown run. “They were hungry and ready to play,� Dooley said of the Bulldogs. “That’s what we expected Georgia to be like at the beginning of the season. I was disappointed in how we competed. “It’s easy to take a loss if you are competing. We obviously weren’t ready emotionally from start to finish. “

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A12 â—† Sports

The Mountain Press â—† Sunday, October 10, 2010

SCOREBOARD T V S P O RT S Sunday, Oct. 10 AUTO RACING 3 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Pepsi MAX 400, at Fontana, Calif. 9 p.m. ESPN — NHRA, Toyo Tires Nationals, final eliminations, at Reading, Pa. (same-day tape) CYCLING 5 p.m. VERSUS — Paris-Tours, La Loupe to Tours, France (same-day tape) GOLF 7:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Links Championship, final round, at St. Andrews, Scotland 12:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Senior Players Championship, final round, at Potomac, Md. 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, final round, at Sea Island, Ga. 6:30 p.m. TGC — Navistar LPGA Classic, final round, at Prattville, Ala. (same-day tape) HORSE RACING 5 p.m. ESPN2 — NTRA, Bourbon Stakes and Juddmonte Spinster Stakes, at Lexington, Ky. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1:07 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, American League Division Series, game 4, Tampa Bay at Texas (if necessary) 4:37 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, American League Division Series, game 3, San Francisco at Atlanta 7:07 or 8:07 p.m. TNT or TBS — Playoffs, National League Division Series, game 3, Philadelphia at Cincinnati (TNT at 7:07, if Minnesota-New York game 4 is necessary) 8:07 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, American League Division Series, game 4, Minnesota at New York (if necessary) MOTORSPORTS 5 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP Moto2, Malaysian Grand Prix, at Sepang, Malaysia (same-day tape) 6 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, Malaysian Grand Prix, at Sepang, Malaysia (same-day tape) NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader FOX — Regional coverage 4 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage 4:15 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader game 8:15 p.m. NBC — Philadelphia at San Francisco RODEO 9 p.m. VERSUS — PBR, Cooper Tires Invitational, at Columbus, Ohio (same-day tape)

NFL FOOTBALL

NBA PRESEASON National Basketball Association Preseason Glance All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 2 0 1.000 — Toronto 1 0 1.000 1/2 New Jersey 2 1 .667 1/2 New York 0 1 .000 1 1/2 Philly 0 3 .000 2 1/2 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 2 0 1.000 — Orlando 2 0 1.000 — Washington 2 1 .667 1/2 Atlanta 0 1 .000 1 1/2 Charlotte 0 2 .000 2 Central Division W L Pct GB Cleveland 1 1 .500 — Detroit 1 1 .500 — Milwaukee 1 1 .500 — Chicago 1 2 .333 1/2 Indiana 0 2 .000 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB Memphis 2 0 1.000 — Dallas 1 1 .500 1 Houston 1 1 .500 1 N.Orleans 0 0 .000 1 San Antonio 0 1 .000 1 1/2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 2 0 1.000 — Denver 1 0 1.000 1/2 Utah 1 0 1.000 1/2 OklaCity 1 1 .500 1 Portland 1 2 .333 1 1/2 Pacific Division W L Pct GB GState 1 0 1.000 — Sacramento 1 1 .500 1/2 L.A.Clips 1 2 .333 1 L.A. Lakers 0 1 .000 1 Phoenix 0 2 .000 1 1/2 ——— Friday’s Games Orlando 93, Indiana 86 Detroit 115, Milwaukee 110, OT Chicago 107, Washington 96 Miami 103, Oklahoma City 96 Denver 109, Portland 99 Golden State 127, L.A. Clippers 87 Saturday’s Games New Jersey 90, Philadelphia 89 Indiana at Houston, 7 p.m. Charlotte vs. Milwaukee at Green Bay, WI, 8 p.m. Memphis at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Miami at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Dallas vs. Phoenix at Indian Wells, CA, 9:30 p.m.

National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Jets 3 1 0 .750 106 61 N.E. 3 1 0 .750 131 96 Miami 2 2 0 .500 66 92 Buffalo 0 4 0 .000 61 125 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 3 1 0 .750 108 102 Jacksonville 2 2 0 .500 71 111 Indianapolis 2 2 0 .500 117 92 Tennessee 2 2 0 .500 98 68 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 3 1 0 .750 61 55 Pittsburgh 3 1 0 .750 86 50 Cincinnati 2 2 0 .500 79 78 Cleveland 1 3 0 .250 68 77 West W L T Pct PF PA Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 68 38 San Diego 2 2 0 .500 113 71 Denver 2 2 0 .500 87 85 Oakland 1 3 0 .250 76 107 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Washington 2 2 0 .500 73 79 N.Y. Giants 2 2 0 .500 72 88 Philly 2 2 0 .500 95 79 Dallas 1 2 0 .333 54 53 South W L T Pct PF PA Atlanta 3 1 0 .750 93 60 N.Orleans 3 1 0 .750 79 72 Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 50 59 Carolina 0 4 0 .000 46 87 North W L T Pct PF PA Chicago 3 1 0 .750 69 68 Green Bay 3 1 0 .750 106 73 Minnesota 1 2 0 .333 43 38 Detroit 0 4 0 .000 82 106 West W L T Pct PF PA Arizona 2 2 0 .500 58 118 St. Louis 2 2 0 .500 77 52 Seattle 2 2 0 .500 75 77 S.F. 0 4 0 .000 52 103 ——— Sunday’s Games St. Louis at Detroit, 1 p.m. Denver at Baltimore, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Houston, 1 p.m. Green Bay at Washington, 1 p.m. Chicago at Carolina, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Buffalo, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. New Orleans at Arizona, 4:05 p.m. Tennessee at Dallas, 4:15 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia at San Francisco, 8:20 p.m. Open: Miami, New England, Pittsburgh, Seattle Monday’s Game Minnesota at N.Y. Jets, 8:30 p.m.

CHILDREN’S CONSIGNMENT EVENT

TRANSACTIONS FOOTBALL National Football League TENNESSEE TITANS — Released LB Jamie Winborn. Activated LB Gerald McRath from the reserve/suspended list. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Released WR Devin Thomas. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Recalled D Brett Festerling from Syracuse (AHL). ATLANTA THRASHERS — Recalled G Drew MacIntyre froim Chicago (AHL). BOSTON BRUINS — Signed D Zdeno Chara to a seven-year contract extension through the 2018-19 season. CAROLINA HURRICANES — Assigned D Brett Carson, D Bobby Sanguinetti and G Justin Pogge to Charlotte

Sunday’s Games New Orleans at Orlando, 6 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 6 p.m. Cleveland at Houston, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 10 p.m. Monday’s Games Atlanta at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Cleveland at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Utah vs. Portland at Portland, OR, 10 p.m.

(AHL). ECHL ELMIRA JACKALS — Added F Andrew Sweetland to their training camp roster. Released F Chris Auger and D Chris McLean. IDAHO STEELHEADS — Released F Holt Hair, D Jason Fredricks, and D Nick Canzanello. VICTORIA SALMON KINGS — Signed G Riley Gill.

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Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

Seymour coach Jim Moore looks to the sidelines during the Eagles’ 7-0 loss to Morristown East on Friday night at Burke-Toney Stadium in Morristown.

TIDE FALL

3From Page A8

24-20 two games ago, through the air. The Crimson Tide made a charge, getting an odd safety by Garcia, a field goal and a 51-yard touchdown catch by Darius Hanks that turned a South Carolina’s 21-9 lead into a 28-21 ballgame. Alabama’s last chance to tighten things came at the start of the fourth quarter when Jeffery, the SEC’s leading receiver, bobbled a catch into the hands of defensive back Will Lowery for an interception. But Greg McElroy was sacked for a 7-yard loss by Stephon Gilmore and Alabama coach Nick Saban called a fake field goal that didn’t come close to working as offensive lineman Ed Stinson dropped the throw from holder A.J. McCarron.

South Carolina answered back with a 75-yard drive, ended by Lattimore’s 2-yard score with 7:01 left that put the game away. Alabama could not respond and South Carolina fans, as they had after the basketball team beat Kentucky in January and the baseball team beat Arizona State at the College World Series in June, celebrated beating the country’s No. 1 team. Lattimore finished with 93 yards. He also caught

Garcia’s first scoring pass, a 9-yard touchdown in the opening quarter to take the lead for good. Garcia was a tidy 17 of 20 for 201 yards and the one interception. He also picked up a critical fourth-and-1 on the Gamecocks final scoring drive. Jeffery had seven receptions for 127 yards, including TD catches of 26 and 15 yards. McElroy threw for a career-high 315 yards, but was sacked seven times.

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428-5858


Sports ◆ A13

Sunday, October 10, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

Cobey Hitchcock/The Mountain Press

Walter Barber (above) and Ron Durbin (below) pick up some yards for the Gatlinburg-Pittman Highlanders during the team’s 22-14 loss to Fulton Friday night in Gatlinburg.

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Amazing Chicken and Dumplings, Sara Kane Baked Ziti, Terri Williams Boogertown Chili, John B. Waters Jr. Breakfast Pizze, Linda Rideout Broccoli and Cheese Soup, Chef Steve Carideo Company Beef Stew, Barbara J. Patrick Connie’s Asian Lettuce Wraps, Connie Schaeffer Cottage Cheese Pancakes, Bernandine Sikorski Country Sausage Corn Chowder, Betty H. Cox Creamy Vegetable Soup, Linda Rideout Easy Breezy Sloppy Jo, Sharon A. Ogle Giant Breaded Pork Tenderloin, Eric Walters Mexican Casserole, Debbie Fisher Potato-Sausage Soup, Doris Helton Salmon Pie, Pat Marcum Shrimp Tortellini and Spinach, Barbara Stevens Weeks Ugly Chicken, Dwinita Loveday

Sides Black Beans, John B. Waters Jr. Cornbread Salad, Jane Boling Creamy Mac and Cheese, Eric Walters Greek Salad, Linda Hyder Must Try Broccoli Bread, Becky Seaton Scioto Salad Dressing, Donna Smith-Dougherty Sweet Potato Casserole, Debbie Fisher Vidalia Onion Casserole, Becky Seaton Vol Potatoes, Krista L. Knepp Wilted Salad, Doris L. Gainer Zucchini Bread, Reba Niswonger

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Black Bean Dip, Skylar Walker Cherry Chocolate Chipper Cake, Alexis Valentine Easy Monkey Bread, Colton Lunsford Enchilada Casserole, Payne Meade French Crepes, Niamh Schumacher Fried Mushrooms, Chad Aves Handy Pumpkin Muffins, Victoria Clements Hearty Nacho Dip, Sawyer Lamdin Herbed Corn, Skylar Walker Honey Butter Cookies with Lemon Frosting, Ivy Thorbergson Hot Dogs Wrapped in Bacon, McKenzie Murphy Italian Sausage Cups, Scarlett Fox Poppy Seed Chicken, Preston Meade Reindeer Candy, Amber Watson Sausage-Egg Bake, Victoriam Clements Shirley’s Chicken Tettrazini, Carah McClurg Snickerdoodles, Cheyanne Lavergne Special K Bars, Carah McClurg Spice Bars, Olivia Spangler Spinach Dip, Shelby DeSoto Stuffed Mushrooms with Olives and Feta Cheese, Hannah Clevenger

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Publishes October 29, 2010 Please mail orders to: 119 Riverbend Drive, Sevierville, TN 37876

Desserts Apple Cinnamon Coffee Cake, Dan Berry Apple Crisp, Sharon A. Ogle Banana Delight, Shirley Bogle Banana Split Dessert, Patsy Trentham Better Than Grandma’s Apple Pie, Karen S. Roberts Blackberry Cobbler, Jean Jordan Candy Bar Cheesecake, Clara Lee Hobby Cape Cod Delight, Errol Stevens Chocolate Covered Spanish Peanuts, Sharon A. Ogle Cinnamon Chip Scones, Connie Schaeffer Cousin Don’s Chocolate Cake, Sherry Brandenburg Create a Cookie, Patricia Marks Delicious Make Ahead Fruit Salad, Becky Seaton Easy Chocolate Candy, Doris Helton 5 Cup Salad, Krista L. Knepp Fresh Apple Cake, Jean Jordan Fruit Pizza, Krista L. Knepp Layered Light as a Cloud Cake, Ella Brown Lemon Cake, Stacey J. Helton Mayberry Delight Cookies, Ella Brown No Bake Caramel Squares, Becky Seaton No Fail Fruit Dessert, Becky Seaton Old Fashion Gingerbread, Terri Williams Oreo Cheesecake, Chef Steve Carideo Parisian Apple Crisp, Connie Schaeffer Peachy Peach Cake, Debbie Fisher Peanut Brittle, Jean Jordan Pecan Crunch Cookie, Barbara J. Patrick Pineapple-Orange Fluff Cake, Lisa C. Bergman Potato Candy, Reba Niswonger Pretzel Salad, Terri Williams Pumpkin Pie Squares, Shirley Bogle Self Frosted Cake, Carolyn Chavez Tee Tee’s Fruit Surprise Coffee Cake, Sharon A. Ogle Tropical Banana Roll Cake, Shirley Bogle White Chocolate Cake, Jean Dew Zucchini Chocolate Cake, Karen Berry

Home Subscribers will receive a copy in their

The Mountain Press


A14 ◆ World

A way out, at last, for Chile’s trapped miners SAN JOSE MINE, Chile (AP) — A drilling rig punched through to the underground purgatory where 33 miners have been trapped for 66 agonizing days under the Chilean desert, raising cheers, tears and hopes on Saturday. Champagne sprayed and hard hats tumbled off heads as rescue workers pressed close to the drill, hugging each other and shouting for joy. Down in “Camp Hope,” where the miners’ relatives waited, people waved flags and cried as one man energetically rang a brass bell even before the siren sounded confirming the escape shaft had reached the miners. The men are still several days away from efforts to bring them to the surface: the rescue team wants to eliminate even a remote chance of something going wrong on their way up, and plans to carefully inspect the shaft with a video camera before deciding whether to reinforce it. “We feel an enormous happiness, now that i’m going to have my brother,” said Darwin Contreras, whose brother Pedro, a 26-year-old heavy machine operator, is stuck down below. “When the siren rang out, it was overwhelming. Now we just have to wait for them to get out, just a little bit longer now.” The “Plan B” drill won a three-way race against two other drills to carve a hole wide enough for an escape capsule to pull the miners out one by one. While “Plan A” and “Plan C” stalled after repeatedly

AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

A man weeps after it was announced that a drill reached the trapped miners at the San Jose Mine near Copiapo, Chile, Saturday. veering off course, the “Plan B” drill reached the miners at a point 2,041 feet (622 meters) below the surface at 8:05 a.m., after 33 days of drilling. Jeff Hart of Denver, Colorado, operated the drill, and said the entire rescue crew erupted with cheers when the T130 broke through. “There is nothing more important than saving, possibly saving 33 lives. There’s no more important job than that,” Hart said. “We’ve done our part, now it’s up to them to get the rest of the way out.” The milestone thrilled Chileans, who have come

to see the rescue drama as a test of the nation’s character and pride, and eased some anxiety among the miners’ families. But now comes a difficult judgment call: The rescue team must decide whether it’s more risky to pull the miners through unreinforced rock, or to insert tons of heavy steel pipe into the curved shaft to protect the miners on their way up. “This is an important achievement,” Mining Minister Laurence Golborne said, “but we still haven’t rescued anybody. This rescue won’t be over until the last person below leaves this mine.”

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The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 10, 2010


Mountain Life ■ The Mountain Press ■ B Section ■ Sunday, October 10, 2010

You get what you pay for The story of a Tennessee Fire Department that watched as a house outside its jurisdiction burned to the ground has stirred a national debate. Obion County doesn’t have its own professional fire department; apparently there isn’t a volunteer department or there wasn’t one near enough to save the home of Gene Cranick when it burned Sept. 29. The closest professional fire department was in the city of South Fulton. The city had no legal obligation to provide fire protection outside its city limits. Many cities, in fact, will not do so. Their leaders cite the cost, the liability, the chance that taxpayers who are paying for the service could suffer a fire while city personnel are outside their jurisdiction and other issues. The South Fulton Fire Department had warned people living outside the city that it could no longer afford to provide fire protection for free. To continue providing the service, the department asked rural residents to pay a $75 annual fee. Cranick doesn’t deny that he failed to pay the fee. He told reporters he had paid it in past years, but forgot to do so this year. As his house was burning, firefighters watched but did nothing — besides spray down the property of a neighbor who had paid the fee. Because of this, the fire department has been presented as callous, petty, money grubbing and irresponsible. None of that is true. It’s sad that Cranick failed to pay his bill and lost his home. But it’s not the fault of the firefighters, or the city of South Fulton. Yes, a fire truck was present. No, that doesn’t meant the firefighters should have helped. Cranick apparently offered to pay the fee on the spot. As the South Fulton mayor pointed out, if the fire department accepted that transaction, then no one living in he county would ever have a reason to pay for the service in advance. They’d do so when there was a fire. It’s a tough lesson: You cannot assume you have fire protection. In Sevier County, we have a number of communities that are served by volunteer fire departments. To spell it out, that means there are brave men and women who risk their lives to extinguish fires without compensation and usually without the latest or best equipment. The county pays a small amount to each, but that doesn’t cover the cost of operations and equipment — even without counting for wages. The firefighters might be willing to serve at any time, but they also have jobs — and not all employers are willing to release employees to answer an emergency all. Given the unemployment rate, that’s not a risk many would take even if they were inclined. That all came back to me as I watched the debate unfold about the actions of the South Fulton Fire Department. Fire protection isn’t a right. It isn’t free. And you shouldn’t just assume that if you have a fire, a professionally trained, fully equipped department will be on its way as soon as 911 gets a call about it. If you live in a city, that’s going to be true. If you live in the county, it might not be. Volunteers have to be able to get off from work. If they can get away from what they’re doing, they have to get to the department, grab their gear, and get the trucks — then start to your home. Most areas here have mutual aid agreements, meaning other fire departments — including municipal departments — can be called if the primary agency can’t be reached or needs backup. People here also need to look at their neighborhoods. There are many subdivisions in Sevier county where developers paid scant attention to the needs of firefighters. The roads aren’t wide enough for fire trucks to easily be able to navigate. Some are too steep for a truck to climb. Some mountaintop developments don’t have water tanks to give adequate water pressure in the event of a fire. Some don’t have fire hydrants, or the ones that are there are of no use to firefighters. And if people aren’t satisfied with what they learn, they need to decide their answer to the next question: How will they pay for better? Volunteer fire departments in Sevier County can use all the money they can get. They won’t turn away donations. It’s possible to hire a private agency like Rural Metro, but that also comes with cost. When people start hearing about the possibility of a fee from an agency like that, or added taxes to pay for a professional department, some might think it’s too much added cost. But as Gene Cranick learned, it doesn’t seem like all that much when your home is being reduced to ashes. — Jeff Farrell is a reporter for The Mountain Press. Call 428-0748, ext. 216, or e-mail to jfarrell@ themountainpress.com.

Submitted

Sinister Sunset Cocktails, Spooky Crackers with Savory Cheese Spread, Magic Polenta Bites, and Flank Steak on Pumpkin-Shaped Rolls.

Host a Ghoulish Gathering From Family Features Scare up a happy Halloween party to celebrate the spookiest season. Bring out the orange and black linens, spiderweb doilies and skull coasters ... so easy and effective. The entertaining experts from the Wilton Test Kitchen say it’s easier to mix and mingle if you don’t have to juggle a fork. So cast a spell with a savory buffet starring these deliriously delicious recipes. For additional Halloween ideas and directions for making cocktails, eyeball, skull and skeleton candies, and skull pound cake, go to www.wilton.com.

Flank Steak on Pumpkin-Shaped Rolls Pumpkin Rolls: 2 loaves (16 oz. each) frozen bread dough 1 tablespoon butter, melted

Defrost bread dough according to package directions. Brush the cavities of Wilton Dimensions Multi-Cavity Mini Pumpkins pan with melted butter. Cut each loaf into 8 equal pieces; shape into rolls. Place rolls, seam side up, in each cavity. Cover loosely with plastic wrap; leave in warm place until doubled in size (about 45 minutes). Preheat oven to 350°F. Remove plastic wrap from dough. Bake 24 to 26 minutes, or until tops are golden brown. Cool in pan 10 minutes; remove from pan and cool completely. Marinated Flank Steak: 3 tablespoons olive oil 1/3 cup red wine vinegar 3 large garlic cloves, finely minced 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon dried thyme 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 1 flank steak (1-1/2 to 2 pounds)

In shallow glass dish, combine olive oil, red wine vinegar, garlic, Worcestershire sauce, salt, thyme, mustard and pepper; whisk to combine. Add steak and turn to coat evenly. Cover and refrigerate 4 hours or overnight, turning steak occasionally. Preheat broiler to high. Prepare broiler pan with vegetable pan spray. Remove steak from marinade; broil 6 minutes on each side for medium rare. Cover steak with foil and rest 5 minutes. To make bite-size pieces, cut steak into four strips with the grain; cut strips against the grain into smaller pieces. Cut pumpkin rolls in half, fill with steak and favorite condiments, and serve. Makes 16 sandwiches

Graveyard Mini Cakes Cake: 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon instant coffee 1/3 cup boiling water 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar 3 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, melted and slightly cooled 1 cup buttermilk 1/2 cup chocolate chips Topping:

Eyeball Candies, Skull Pound Cake, Witches’ Fingers Cookies, Graveyard Mini Cakes with Skeleton Candies, and Skull Candies.

Submitted

1 cup chocolate chips 1/3 cup heavy whipping cream 1 cup chocolate sandwich cookie crumbs Skeleton Candies

Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray cavities of Wilton Petite Loaf Pan with vegetable pan spray. In small bowl, dissolve instant coffee into boiling water; set aside to cool. In medium bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt; set aside. In large bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each. Add vanilla, chocolate, and coffee; mix well. Add flour mixture alternately with buttermilk, starting and ending with flour; mix well. Stir in chocolate chips. Pour into prepared pans. Bake 16 to 18 minutes or until cake tester inserted into center comes out clean. Cool in pan 5 minutes; remove to cooling grid and cool completely before icing. In microwave-safe bowl, heat chocolate chips and cream for one minute on 50% power; stir to combine. Continue heating at 30 second intervals until chips are melted and combined with cream. Let stand until thickened slightly. Spread the tops of each cake with a layer of chocolate cream; sprinkle with cookie crumbs, pressing lightly into chocolate. Insert skeleton candies.


B2 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Local

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, October 10, 2010

Submitted

Speaker/author Jennifer Sands, left, who spoke at Women of Hope Conference; Nina Bell of Concerned Women of America: Marlene Tidwell of Prayer Alliance for Tennessee; and Joann Jordan, president of Garlands of Grace.

Submitted

Elizabeth Anne Mercer, left, and Joann Jordan at the recent Women of Hope Conference.

Women of Hope Conference features music, speaker Submitted Report The women who attended the recent Women of Hope Conference participated in Cupcakes and Concert. Recording artist Becky Tylka performed. Keynote speaker was Jennifer Sands, who described her spiritual journey from the attacks of 9/11 when she lost her husband, to her latest book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Treasured Faith.â&#x20AC;? She spoke on learning to

abide in Christ. This was a kickoff for Graceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place. Two working mothers have already been given assistance. One was helped in moving from her weekly rental to an apartment with two bedrooms. Furniture, bedding and other things, including money, were given to her. Also, the group was able to help another mother purchase her children shoes and clothing for school. Graceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place is an outreach to the Sevier County

Sevierville streets to close for display work The Sevierville Department of Parks and Recreation will be performing work on Winterfest displays which will mean temporary closures of some streets. Bruce Street, between Forks of the River Parkway and Court Avenue, will be closed to all traffic from 6-10 p.m. Oct. 14. Since traffic will not be allowed on this section, the left turn lane onto Bruce Street at the intersection with Forks of the River Parkway (southbound) will also be closed. The access drive at the Sevierville Municipal Complex will be closed on Tuesday from 6-10 a.m. Citizens desiring access to City Hall, the Chamber of Commerce, Civic Center, Community Center or Police Department may still do so by using the alternate entrances. Use of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bill payment box on the access drive will not be available during this period. City Hall is open from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. daily for bill payment. Water bill payment may also be made at all local banks.

Library to show movies

area, helping working mothers and their children to find hope in clean and healthy surroundings. Sponsors of the confer-

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SEYMOUR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Seymour Library will host free Harry Potter movies for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reel Books: Book-intoMovieâ&#x20AC;? program. The movies begin at 1 p.m. The movies are rated PG or PG-13. The schedule: n Oct. 9: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Potter and the Sorcererâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stoneâ&#x20AC;? (PG) n Oct. 16: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkabanâ&#x20AC;? (PG) n Oct. 23: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (PG-13) n Oct. 30: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenixâ&#x20AC;? (PG-13) For more information, call 577-7511.

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Local ◆ B3

Sunday, October 10, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

upl and chronicles

Jimmy Hardin remembered By Robert S. Allen On Tuesday, Sevier County will observe the 55th anniversary of the death of Jimmy Hardin, a blocking back on the Sevier County High School football team. That day five and onehalf decades ago — and the days immediately preceding and following it — represent some of the saddest days not only in Sevier County’s sports history, but in Sevier County’s history. On Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 1955 the Sevier County High School Smoky Bears renewed a long-standing football rivalry with the Cocke County Fighting Cocks. The popular tilt that year was set on the Smoky Bears’ turf in Sevierville. The game had been reset for Saturday evening rather than the usual Friday night due to torrential rains the day before. This was the only time a game had been postponed due to weather. The Smoky Bears’ stadium was, at that time, situated behind the county fair livestock barn which was behind the high school. A gravel driveway and chain link fence separated the barn from the west end zone. To the rear of the home bleachers on the north side was A.J. King Lumber Co., a part of which is now home to Sevier County’s new state-of-the-art public library. The visitors’ bleachers on the south side separated the football field from the county’s fairgrounds, which also served as the high school’s baseball and football practice fields. This night was clear and crisp — an ideal night for football. This game, like all the others, was well attended by parents of the students on the field, alumni, and local townspeople. There were also a good number of elementary age kids in attendance, anxiously awaiting their future opportunity to wear the purple and white as players, cheerleaders or band members. In addition, there was always a group of regulars who lined a long stretch of the four-foot-high chain link fence on the Smoky Bears’ side and the west end zone. This group of men was made up of local merchants, politicians, police officers, a few players’ dads and other avid supporters. This was the same group who always stood at the double-door entrance of the old wooden high school gym during basketball games. The role of regulars was perfectly re-created in the movie “Hoosiers,” over 30 years later. The games, regardless of the opponent, were always exciting and fun to watch. This was because everyone in the stands and lining the

fence behind the bench. When she saw her son, Mrs. Hardin let out a scream that must still resonate in the minds of all still living who were there that night. Jimmy Hardin fought and hung on until the following Wednesday. He was a high school senior two and one-half months short of his 17th birthday when he died. Two days later, it seemed everybody in Sevier County came to the funeral at First Baptist Church in Sevierville where Jimmy was a member. Hundreds of people — his teammates, the students, their parents, the townspeople, the regulars, everybody — attended the service. The church’s sanctuary was packed and overflowing outside onto the steps and onto Park Road. Speakers had been set up outside so everyone could hear. There was not a dry eye in sight. Jimmy Hardin’s death had broken Sevier County’s heart. That October night and the days that followed altered the order of Submitted things and the perspecJimmy Hardin dressed in his football uniform. tive of many of us who were there. — Robert S. Allen is a retired federal investigachain link fence knew back of the head when tor and Sevierville native the young men on the his helmet was pushed who has authored two field. Everyone had an forward upon hitting the books about Sevier County: attachment of some sort ground. Schoolboy: “Jim Tugerson: with the players or their Jimmy had sustained Ace of the ’53 Smokies” families. Everyone was a suspected concussion friends or relatives with during the game the pre- and “The Perry’s Camp Murders” (with Steve someone. Many attended vious week, but had not the same churches. sought medical attention O. Watson). The Upland Chronicles series celebrates There was a closeness following that game. He the heritage and past of that only the people of a insisted he was fine and Sevier County. If you have small town such as 1955 was determined to play. suggestions for future topSevierville could experiJimmy Hardin loved ics, would like to submit a ence. football. No evidence was There came a moment found to indicate this previ- column or have comments, during this game, howous injury had anything to contact Carroll McMahan at 453-6411 or e-mail to ever, when the excitedo with his death. cmcmahan@scoc.org; or Ron ment and the fun stopped When Jimmy was Rader at 604-9161 or e-mail and was transformed assisted from the field into anxiety, concern with an official under each to ron@ronraderproperties. com. and, eventually, sadness. arm and brought to the Sevier County’s blockbench near the regulars, his ing back, Jimmy Hardin, face showed the pain and would come out of the seriousness of his injury. game with an obvious His mother, along with life-threatening injury, Jimmy’s father, Homer, having been kicked in the had made her way to the

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Anniversary

Renaud Normand and Joan Renaud of Kodak, Tenn. will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary Oct. 15 with a trip to Las Vegas. Normand Renaud and Joan Morin were married Oct. 15, 1960, at Immaculate Conception Church in Holyoke, Mass. The late Rev. Arthur Brodeur officiated. Normand Renaud is the son of the late Medric and Beatrice Lecuyer Renaud. Joan Renaud is the daughter of the late Leofred and Gertrude McLean Morin. Mr. Renaud is retired from the Granby Police, Granby, Mass. Mrs. Renaud is retired from the banking field. They have one daugh-

Submitted

Normand and Joan Renaud have been married 50 years.

ter, Michele Tarr, and two grandsons, Joshua and Robert.

Engagement

Campbell/Parton Brenda and Donnie Tweed and Jeff Campbell announce the engagement of their daughter, Courtney E. Campbell, to Marcus D. Parton, son of Faye and Jerry Parton, and Dena Parton. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Judy and Al Franke, Kate Lawson and Bud Lawson Jr., and Roy Campbell and Penny Campbell. She is a 2006 graduate of Walters State Community College and is attending Tusculum College. The prospective groom is a graduate of Sevier County High School. He is a member of Sevier County Electric System. The wedding will take place at 2 p.m. Oct. 16,

Submitted

Courtney E. Campbell and Marcus D. Parton will be wed Oct. 16.

2010, at Jones Chapel Church, Sevierville. All friends and relatives are invited.


B4 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Religion

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, October 10, 2010

Public pulpit

People of faith can choose between different communities By ARNE WALKER Life is a gigantic buffet table of choices. They run the whole gamut of life. Each day we choose what we will eat and what we will wear. We make entertainment choices and choices that have moral consequences. We make choices that have an impact on today and others that have farreaching consequences. Depending on where we lives and our own economic condition, the scopes of our choices are more or less expansive. For now focus with me on forks in the road choices. These are the ones that make a significant difference in how we live out our lives. Some would say happiness is all about me. Others would claim happiness to be in a life shared. As the old saying goes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;you pay your money and take your choice.â&#x20AC;? My life is committed to calling people to be well-rounded squares. We are to develop our full potential: body, mind, emotions, and soul. The abundant life is chosen when the importance of each is lived out. Many in our society miss the religious opportunity that Sabbath gives us to step off of the treadmill of economic striving or scheduling pressures or commitments that are shortlived in value. We have 52 Sabbath opportunities to focus renewing our total selves. In Sabbath we redefine ourselves as eternally designed being created to live in a vital relationship with God and others. We get outside of ourselves to proclaim the Worthship of the Wholly Other-who is the God who has met us in Jesus Christ. Call it soul care, an important aspect in being a whole person. On Sept. 18, 2010, I led a group often to the top of Mt. Cammerer. Our Jewish friends recognize that we hiked on Yom Kippur. They totally abstain from all food and water for that twenty-four hour period.

The day proves that we are human, for only human beings can say â&#x20AC;&#x153;noâ&#x20AC;? to instinct. Married couples as well refrain from making love. All other creatures are programmed by instinct. We have a choice. This day also develops, in who choose who to observe it, an empathy with people who go hungry out of no choice of their own. Some in the Christian tradition hold onto the value of fasting as well. Yom Kippur is also called the day of atonement. You do not have to fool me that you are someone other than who you really are. You impress me by admitting your mistakes and seeking to learn from them. I can only truly be a friend with real human beings. The major loss of con artists is that you cut yourself off from true friendships. Those who hide behind some pretense make connections with others difficult to impossible. We hold that choice in our own hands. Let us move on to another choice that impacts upon us. People of faith choose between two essentially different communities. One chooses to be part of a covenant community blessed by love and forgiveness to love and forgive. They see themselves as the family of God with a wide latitude of beliefs. These beliefs do not divide but rather enrich. This covenant community is committed to Christ and to each other as they seek to carry out Christâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission as His hands and feet in the world. Support and accountability undergirded by unconditional love are hallmarks of their life together. Our personal family holds a wide variety of political and religious views. We are a family committed to Christ and to each other as we live lives of unconditional love towards one another. We seek to raise our children in an atmosphere that love is something that you give and herein discover the

true joy of living â&#x20AC;&#x201D; vital relationships. We are not business partners that seek to give so that we can get. Our cultures sometimes blind us to this choice. There are other people of faith who belong to an organization. If viewpoints differ, they may leave the organization and head for people who see things the way that they do. We are free to choose how we understand being a person of faith. It is fun to watch people make sacrifices for what they really want and to make excuses for what they do not want. It is hard for some to be a truth teller. My choice is to see truth as arrived at by reason, intuition, and revelation. Reasonable people are fun to dialogue with. If I meet a person and my back hurts that has proved to be my intuition giving me a head-up. Revelation comes as I prepare to preach, for God indeed, speaks if I will listen. More than once I have had someone tell me a departed loved one appeared briefly to them in a time of grief and assured them that they were happy and healthy. Revelation strikes again. God is on the side of love and life. The power of the evil one is directed at convincing us that we are the center of the universe. That power wants to ingrain in us that life is all about us. Again, please hear with me those words that echo in our ears: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You pay your money and take your choice.â&#x20AC;? As for me I choose Sabbath, fasting, being at peace with who I really am, being a person of faith living within a family, and accepting truth conveyed through reason, intuition, and revelation. All of this contributes to my being a well-rounded square. How about your choices? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Rev. Arne Walker is a semi-retired pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America who resides in Gatlinburg.

Living by our Faith Behold, his soul is puffed up, it is not upright in him; but the righteous shall live by his faith (Habakkuk 2:4) Habakkuk has been complaining to God about the sinfulness of Judah - God tells him about the terrible enemy that He is raising up against them, the Babylonians, and the fate that awaits Judah. It is not a pretty picture; one wonders how anyone could survive or be saved in such circumstances! God then makes a contrast between two sorts of people. There are those whose souls are puffed up inside of them. They have all sorts of confidence about their standing before God and their own â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;righteousness,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; but their confidence is entirely unfounded. Their souls are not upright within them. And then there are those who will live-- those who are truly righteous. They are righteous because they live by their faith. When Paul makes his grand theological treatise in his letter to the Romans, Habakkuk 2:4b is the centerpiece of his argument regarding justification by faith. The righteous shall live by faith. In the Roman letter Paul effectively demonstrates how no man or woman could ever be justified in the sight of God by their merits or their works since all have sinned (Romans 1:18-3:20). He demonstrates how Abraham received the promise through faith, and therefore those who inherit the promises are those who are children of Abraham by faith, sharing in the same trust in the One True God (Romans 4:1-25, 9:6-13). Paul quotes Habakkuk 2:4b again in the Galatian letter to demonstrate that no one has ever been justified before God on the basis of the Law of Moses (Galatians 3:11). Moses, David, and the prophets themselves lived by faith. Throughout time, therefore, those who belong to God and please Him are those who live by faith. It was not a matter of ethnic identity, as the Jews vainly believed; it was that trust in God, that confidence in His existence and His rewarding of those who seek after Him (Hebrews 11:6). The righteous, indeed, will live by faith. Nevertheless, there is a minor detail present in the original Hebrew of Habakkukâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words that was not carried over by Paul that remains important. Yes, the righteous live by faith. But â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;faithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; is not just anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith. The righteous one lives by his faith. We all know of people who are able to make it through life on account of the efforts of others. We often call this â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;riding on coattails.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Many children in this world will never have to worry about money or work; their parents are so unbelievably wealthy that they will never have to work. Many people rise to prominence less because of their own talents and abilities and more because of the fame of their parents or other such relatives. There are some people who try to do this in their faith lives. They may have a parent or grandparent who was mighty in faith in Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kingdom, and they try to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;ride their coattails.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; They may start in life accepting what they have been taught. Sure, they believe in God; they have their own faith; just ask them. In reality, too many try to get by with their fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith or their grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith. They have not yet made the faith their own. Jacob is a great example of this. Few had his pedigree-- the son of Isaac, the grandson of Abraham. He certainly did not deserve to be the son of promise, but that was Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice for him (Genesis 25:23). When Jacob was fleeing to Paddan-Aram, God appeared to him in a dream and promised that He would be with him and that he would inherit the promises (Genesis 28:12-15). Jacob was astonished; he understood that God was present (Genesis 28:16-17). He certainly believed in the God of Abraham and the God of Isaac. But notice his vow-- if God will fulfill His promises, then He will be my God (Genesis 28:20-22). Jacob had faith in the God of his father-- but he did not yet have his own faith. In reality, while some people might get the luxury of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;riding the coattailsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; of their parents, grandparents, or whomever else in their physical lives, no one can truly ride the coattails of anyone else spiritually. It will not work. The faith of your father, mother, child, spouse, preacher, elder, or anyone else cannot sustain you. It cannot stand up for you. Sure, it may remain for awhile, when it remains unchallenged and undisturbed. But then the day of adversity comes. Maybe the adversity comes from a television show, a friend, or an educator who challenges the validity of faith in the God of the Bible and in Christianity. Maybe the adversity comes in the challenges of life-- a harrowing illness, failure in various endeavors, unemployment, betrayal by others. No matter who we are, no matter how much money we have or do not have, regardless of our status in life, days of adversity will come that will cause us to question who we are and how we are to be sustained. And it is in those days that faith grows or dies (James 1:2-4, 1 Peter 1:6-7). So it was with Jacob. He made it to Paddan-Aram and began working for his deceitful uncle Laban. He faced terrible adversity and there was no human that was there to advocate for him. He clearly perceived how it was the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;God of his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; who sustained him, protected him, and blessed him throughout those twenty years (Genesis 29-31; cf. Genesis 31:5-9). As Jacob was returning home, having been delivered by God from Laban his uncle and petitioning for deliverance from Esau his brother, Jacob literally wrestles with God (in the form of an angel; Genesis 32:24-31). He is given the name Israel at that time. And after meeting with his brother Esau, Jacob/Israel moves to the area around Shechem. He builds an altar there, and names it El-Elohe-Israel: God, the God of Israel (Genesis 33:20). Jacob now had his own faith. The Scriptures make it clear that we cannot ride the coattails of our spiritual ancestors. Time would fail us if we talked about how for every Gideon there was an Abimelech, for every Hezekiah a Manasseh, and for every Josiah a Jehoiakim. Sadly, the children of some of the most righteous people in the Bible end up being some of the most wicked. The faith of their parents could not save them. Instead, we must be like Jacob. We must make the faith of those who came before us our own faith. We must believe in God and His truth because we have made our investigations and our inquiries and we have been satisfied (Acts 17:11-12). We must be able to make our own defense of our own hope that should be in us (1 Peter 3:15). We must have our own belief, deeply rooted within our own being, so that when we are shaken by trial, we have the resources of faith within us to continue to turn to God for sustenance. The spiritual world around us is littered with the corpses of those who never developed their own faith, and their profession of acceptance of the faith of their ancestors failed them when the difficult times arose. Let us not be like them, but develop our own faith, and live by it!

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B6 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Local

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, October 10, 2010

Submitted

Barry Reed of Seymour is the new bass player for the Lonesome River Band.

Seymourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reed joins band Submitted Report NASHVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Lonesome River Band has named Barry Reed of Seymour to the group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is a great acoustic bass player and singer and adds greatly to the LRB sound,â&#x20AC;? said band leader Sammy Shelor. Reed previously toured with Michael Cleveland and Flamekeeper before taking some time off to start his family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really exited about joining LRB. These guys are great to work with and it has been a lot of fun already,â&#x20AC;? Reed said. The Lonesome River Band has a new album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Still Learning,â&#x20AC;? that is No. 1 for the second month in a row on the Bluegrass Music Profiles Magazine Top 10 National Bluegrass CDs chart, and No. 5 on Bluegrass Unlimited Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top 15 Albums. The new single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Record Time Machine,â&#x20AC;? also made

Tennessee Lottery begins new game Submitted Report The Tennessee Lottery is offering players a new way to win with the launch of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tennessee Cash,â&#x20AC;? a drawing-style game only available in Tennessee. The kickoff jackpot will be $200,000, and future jackpot amounts will be based on sales. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tennessee Cash is a simple and fun new way to give

our players better chances to win larger cash jackpots,â&#x20AC;? said Rebecca Hargrove, president and CEO of the Tennessee Lottery. Additional details about the game: n Drawings will be held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at approximately 11:30 p.m. n Ticket cost is $1 per play. n To play, select any 5 num-

bers from a field of 1 to 35 and one Cash Ball number from a field of 1 to 5. Or, select Quick Pick to have the computer choose the numbers. n If a play matches any of the 8 winning combinations, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a winner. n Overall odds of winning are 1:7. n Tennessee Cash prizes will be pari-mutuel, except for the free ticket prize for the match 2 of 5 from the

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Sunday, October 10, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

◆ B11


The Mountain Press  Sunday, October 10, 2010

Classifieds B12

Legals 100 Announcements

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Warning to anyone who is trespassing on Webb Mountain will be prosecuted for criminal trespassing and their vehicle or 4 wheeler will be impounded.

does not recommend or endorse any product, service or company. For more information and assistance regarding the investigation of FINANCING, BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES AND WORK AT HOME OPPORTUITIES, this newspaper urges its readers to contact The Better Business Bureau 2633 Kingston Pike, Suite 2 Knoxville, TN 37919 Phone (865) 692-1600

Unauthorized use of The Mountain Press tubes for circulars or any other advertisement authorizes a minimum $250 charge for which the advertiser will be billed. Regency Park Home Owners Assoc is now accepting bids for Service/Maintenance contract for 2011 season. Sealed bids are due by Oct 18 to PO Box 6233, Sevierville, TN 37864-6233. Contact Bobby McMillon at 865-255-4778 or email bobby.mcmillon@att.net

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Games

General Help

100+ Tax Preparers Needed Enroll in our tax school if you are not experienced. We offer a $500 signing bonus for qualified experienced tax preparers and qualified bilingual applicants. Visit www.knoxjtax.com for more information, fax your resume to 865.938.2938 or call 865.938.1040. Assistant Manager Position needed for the Sevierville Branch of World Finance Corporation. We offer a competitive salary and a fringe benefit package. Valid drivers license and auto with current insurance required. All interested applicants bring resume to: 970 Dolly Parton Pkwy Sevierville, TN 37862. No phone calls please. Dixie Stampede The Dixie Stampede Management Team is offering a career opportunity for a top notch proven leader in the food and beverage industry. Assistant Kitchen Manager

WHO YA GONNA CALL? If you have a problem with the delivery of your morning The Mountain Press, please call the Circulation Department at 428-0748, ext. 230 & 231 Monday - Friday and your paper will be delivered to you on the same day. Newspapers from calls after 10:00 a.m. will be delivered with the next day’s paper. On Saturday, Sunday and holidays you may dial 428-0748 extensions 230 & 231. If complaints are received between 8:00 and 10:00 a.m., papers will be delivered the same day. Newspapers from calls received after 10:00 a.m. will be delivered with the next day’s paper. This applies to in-county home delivery only. Sevier County’s Only Daily Newspaper

Duties include assisting the kitchen manager in all aspects of food and beverage operations such as interviewing, training, assigning tasks, scheduling, addressing disciplinary issues and other duties as assigned. Additional responsibilities involve coordinating with all departments to ensure a consistently high quality entertainment experience for all guests. This is a "hands on" position requiring a flexible schedule. Two years of related food and beverage experience and ServSafe certification is desired. We offer health, dental, vision and life benefits, 401k with company match, vacation and holiday pay. Submit resume to: Dixie Stampede, Attn: Human Resources, PO Box 58, Pigeon Forge, TN 37868, submit via email to kimh@dixiestampede.com or fax to 865-453-0294. EOE/AA FACTORY STORE MANAGER Lodge Manufacturing Company is looking for a store manager for their Sevierville Factory Store. Founded in 1896, Lodge Cast Iron Cookware is the sole domestic manufacturer of seasoned cast iron cookware, and the oldest family owned cookware company in the country. Candidates must have a stable employment history, ability to build, work with, and lead a quality sales team, extensive retail/merchandising experience, excellent communication skills, advanced computer skills, is decisive and well organized. Cooking experience or cookware knowledge is a plus. Drug testing and background checks are part of the hiring process. Please send a copy of your resume, salary requirements and references to: Attn: Human Resources at PO Box 380, South Pittsburg, TN 37380. Full Time position available for Experienced Sales Person for up and coming retail store, must be motivated and have good communication skills. Email resume to: officex.position@gmail.com Higher Assist Mgr, Reservationists Laundry, Hskpg & Maintenance. Apply in person at 333 Ski Mtn Rd., Gat

0232

Corrections After the first insertion, want ads scheduled to be published again on Tue., Wed., Thu., or Fri. may be canceled or corrected between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. on the day prior to publication. For ads on Sat., due Thu., prior to 3 p.m., for Sun., Fri., prior to 10 a.m. and Mon., prior to 11 a.m.

General Help

Now hiring Delivery Driver/ Service Technician for local propane company. Hazmat and Tanker Endorsement required, Service experience a plus. Pay DOE, full time with benefits. EOE Apply at 1933 Pittman Center Rd- Ste 1 Sevierville, TN. SALES CLERK $10/hr. Lid'l Dolly's Light #4, PF Sales Associates & Key holder Positions: $8.00-$8.50 hourly, 401K available. Must be a great salesperson, dependable transportation, a flexible schedule. Apply at 625 Parkway, Gatlinburg, TN 37738 or 326@earthboundtrading Contact Christie Cook The Sevierville Lodge Factory Outlet Store is looking for a part time sales assistant. Founded in 1896, Lodge Cast Iron Cookware is the sole domestic manufacturer of seasoned cast iron cookware, and the oldest family owned cookware company in the country. Candidates must have stable employment history, extensive retail/merchandising experience and advanced computer skills. Drug testing and background checks are part of the hiring process. No phone calls please. Please send a copy of your resume and references to: Carolyn Carlisle Assistant Manager Lodge Factory Store 105 Knife Works Lane Suite 2 Sevierville, TN 37876 Westgate Resorts 915 Westgate Resorts Rd Gatlinburg, TN 37738 (Across from the Gatlinburg Welcome Center on the Spur. Turn into Little Smoky Road APPLY IN PERSON: MON.-FRI. 9AM-4PM Front Desk Agents Security Officers Cooks Waterpark Supervisor Golf Cart Attendant Telephone Operator Laundry Supervisor Housekeeping Positions Maintenance Positions Painter Grounds Person Night Auditor

Notice of typographical or other errors must be given before 2nd insertion. The Mountain Press does not assume responsibility for an ad beyond the cost of the ad itself and shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad for a typographical error.

0256

THE PARK VISTA a Doubletree Hotel Cook Greeter/Cashier Lounge Server Banquet Server Restaurant Supervisor Restaurant Server Apply in person-HR Dept 705 Airport Road (light #8) Gatlinburg or www.davidsonhotels.com EOE/AA

0260

Restaurant

Howard's, Best Italian, Brass Grill, Bear Creek hiring all positions, managers, wait staff, expo, salads, cooks, office personnel. Apply in person or call Hailey (865) 389-5538.

0288

Elderly Care

Home Instead Senior Care is looking for reliable and dependable people to provide in-home companionship and non-medical services to seniors. No medical experience required. To learn more, call our job line toll-free at 1-877-581-5800 or visit us o n l i n e a t www.homeinstead.com/428

P

ETS

0320

Cats/Dogs/Pets

Chihuahua puppies, 9 weeks old. $100. 865-428-2725 chihuahuas for sale, 2 females and 1 adult. Call 865-428-4685 or 865-385-2647.

F

ARM

M

ERCHANDISE

0220

0256

Hotel/Motel

Medical/Dental

Hotel/Motel

2nd Shift, Experienced Desk Clerk needed. Apply in person between 7am & 3pm Four Seasons Motor Lodge Gatlinburg. Award winning Clarion looking for dependable customer service oriented personnel. Full time Front Desk Clerk. Please apply in person Mon.-Fri. 10a.m.-4p.m. Clarion Inn & Suites, 1100 Parkway, Gat. Best Western Zoder's Inn 402 Parkway-Gatlinburg Hiring Housekeepers Drug Free Work Place Excellent Starting Pay Apply in person No Phone Calls Please Carpet Cleaner Looking for technician to clean carpets. Resort has its owncarpet cleaning machine. Full time, year-round position w/benefits.Tree Tops Resort 865-436-6559

Maintenance & Housekeeping Needed, References & Employment History Required. Fax Resume to (865) 774-0133 or Call (865) 809-2470

NOW HIRING for Experienced Front Desk Clerk. Apply in person at Red Roof Inn, Pigeon Forge.

Papa John's seeking Manager with experience. Call 865-428-7600 ask for Mike

Now Hiring Night auditor/desk clerk. Apply within or call 865-933-8141.

0503

Auction Sales

PUBLIC AUCTION Supermarket Equipment Wednesday, October 13th @ 10:00AM Formerly Kroger Supermarket 5003 N. Broadway Street Knoxville TN 37918 www.phoenixstorefixtures.com Tel:877-413-2202 Auction Conducted By Terry Posey firm #1473 Phone @ 423-593-3224

0533

Furniture

Early 80's CA Paul Bunyan, lrg 4 post bed, dresser w/mirror, Armour. Mattress is incl. Solid wood, great shape. Pictures can be emailed. Chattanooga TN. $1000. 423-883-0390

New 4pc.

Bedroom Group

Dresser, mirror, 4 Drawer chest, headboard. $399 Cagles Furniture and Appliances

453-0727

Furniture Sale-Sat 8-?, Sun 12-? 220 Lexington Plc. kitchen cab, couch chairs rugs.

0539

Firewood

Mixed wood, $65 a rick, $5 delivery/stacking fee. $45 a rick you haul. 423-532-9799


The Mountain Press ď ľ Sunday, October 10, 2010 0563 Misc. Items for Sale

For Sale

A-1 pre-owned dryers, washers, ranges & refrigerators. All with warranty. Cagles Furniture and Appliances

453-0727 Bed Bugs making your skin crawl? Kill those blood suckers with Harris Bed Bug Spray. Pigeon Forge Hdw. 428-8898. Ace of Gatlinburg 436-5173.

R

EAL ESTATE FOR RENT

0610

Unfurnished Apartments

NICE, CLEAN 1 BR / 1 BA IN SEVIERVILLE $380.00 + DEPOSIT NO PETS 865-712-5238 A GREAT LOCATION 1 block off pkwy near Walmart. 2BR, 2BA, Carport & patio. A non-smoking environment & no pets please. $550 mo, yr lease. 453-5396.

Townhouse Newly Updated 2BR/1.5BA Covered Parking 7$#ONNsMTH

#ALL  OR  

Quiet country setting 2BR/1BA, stove, ref., D/W disposal/micro., W/D hook-up, club house/pool/picnic area 24hr. maint. Year lease, behind S.C.H.S. Great spacious place to live. Dogs ok with deposit.

428-5227

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN SEVIERVILLE 2 bedroom 1.5 bath townhomes

Call 428-5161

FINCHUM PROPERTIES Leasing 1 & 2 BR apts. Hardwood floors, plus many extras, 1 year lease, no pets. TVA energy efficient

  s   finchumproperties.com

Apartments available 2BD/1BA. Pigeon Forge/Sevierville. 429-3201

Â&#x2122;BJHI=6K:6?D7 Â&#x2122;CD9GJ<H Â&#x2122;CDE:IH '7G$'76 6eea^VcXZh[jgc^h]ZY *)*Je

)'-"*&*, Clean 2 BR/2BA PF. 2BD/ 1.5BA Sev. $525-600 mo + Dep. No pets 865-453-5079 CROSSCREEK 2BR/1BA townhome $470.00 per month 2BR/1.5BA garden $545.00 per month 865-429-4470 In Sevierville 2 BDR/ 1 BA $475 Per Month. No Pets. Call 428-0769

Kodak- 2 & 3 BDR, 2 BA Available Some w/ garages

$500-$750 Mo. + Dep.

NO PETS (865) 932-2613 New Storage Buildings + Furnished & Unfurnished Cabins For Rent $800 & Up (865) 924-4761

RIVERWALK APARTMENTS

0610

Unfurnished Apartments

1 & 2 BR avail. Some Pets OK. 50s7!4%2 ).#,5$%$ Murrell Meadows 1/8 mile from Walters State College Allensville Road sWalk to lake 2EASONABLE2ATESs654-7033

Traditional townhouse 2br 1.5ba Smoke free & pet free. $525 mth + $525 dep. Call 865-428-5781

0615

Furnished Apartments/Houses

1BD Furn Apartment, all Util incl. $525mo + $200 dam dep. 712-6166 or 712-6727 1BR/1BA furnished condo, fp, pool in PF. Trolley stop across the street. $800 mo, incl util, $400 dep. Call 908-0170 Efficiency (1 room) for rent PF, by trolley, Old Mill area. $100 weekly. Util incl, 250-7740 Furnished 2BD/1BA Apartment. Quiet Location. PF Area. No Pets. $500 mo Ref req & checked. Call after 4pm, leave message. 865-306-1246

0620

Homes for Rent

1 BDR in Cosby beside Park, very private, $350 Mo. $350 Dep. Call (423) 487-3505 1 Bedroom cabin $475 or 2 Bedroom Cabin $625. 865-774-6796 1 BR Cottage Glades Area, All stainless steel kitchen Appliances, W/D Hook up. $550 mo. No Pets 865-207-7527 1100 Sq. Ft. House. 1 BR + loft. Beautiful view in Pigeon Forge. $800 mo. 865-696-6900 3 BDR/ 2 BA in Gatlinburg $1100 Mo. Utilities Furnished, No Pets, 865-436-6313 or 865-850-7043 3 BDR/ 2 BA Newer home, great location in Sevierville. Great room, large laundry room, $850 Mo. 1st & last month + $400 Damage Dep. 202-9340 3 BR 3 BA 2,000 sq. ft. w/attached oversized garage on one acre, Douglas Lake community with boat launch $975 mo. 865-776-4491. 3BD/2BA Nice Home in New Center area, Free Security System $1000mo, $500. sec. dep. Avail Oct 1. 771-0778

1 BR/1BA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 784 Sq. Ft. Starts at $545 2 BR/2 BA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1114 Sq. Ft. Starts at $675 Convenient location within one mile of restaurants, stores and banks.

Please Visit --- Open 7 Days PHONE: 429-4470 www.seviervilleapartments.com Nice Res Area Off Hwy 66 2BD/2BA $875, Free util & Laundry facility. Pets welcome. 1 yr lease, 1st & last. 865-742-2839 On Lake! 1BR Townhome. Electric/H20 included. $150 wk+dep. 865-307-2882 Sevierville 2BR/2BA duplex, good location, whirlpool 1 level. $675mth $500 dep. No pets credit ref 865-414-6611 Seymour Area 2 Bedroom Duplex, 1.5 Bath, Central Heat & Air, W/D Hook-up, No Pets. Call 453-7842

Homes for Rent

NEW HOMES FOR RENT $650-$1,000 Monthly

865-850-3874 Newly Remodeled 3 BDR/ 2 BA Brick rancher, plus 2 car garage & sunroom, central H&A, appliances included. $1000 Mo + $1000 Dep. No Pets, 2490 Douglas Dam Rd. 453-5850 or 654-5850

0625

Condominiums for Rent

Gatlinburg Executive Condo

Downtown, Furnished, 2BR/2BA $1400 per month (865)223-5677 or (865)850-7253

Want to Live in Luxury?... Call Today! 3BR/3BA Executive Condos in Sevierville, 3100 sq. ft. swimming pool, pets welcome, loaded with all amenities.

Call 865-428-5161

0630

Duplexes for Rent

Near the River! 2BR/1BA duplex New carpet/ vinyl $525.00 per mo. 865-429-2962

0635

Rooms for Rent

Beautiful Creekside Rooms In Gatlinburg FOR RENT

sWEEKs0RIVATE"ALCONY s*ACUZZI 6ERY1UIET s.O0ETS .O$EP s7IlALLUTLINCLUDED s/THERROOMSSTARTINGATWK s2OOMSWKITCHENSWEEK

2 BDR/ 2.5 BA

W/D, stove, refrigerator, central Heat & Air, $800 MO. + Sec. Dep. Ref & Credit Check No Pets House in Seymour: 3BR, 1BA, LR, kit., laundry room. Located on dead end street. Quiet neighborhood. No Pets! No smoking. $600/mo. + $500 damage deposit. References required. Please call 865-577-3869. Hwy. 321 Pittman Center Area. 1 BDR Cabin Fully Furnished $175 Week 850-2487

**NICE, CLEAN**

3 BR / 2 BA WITH GARAGE IN SEVIERVILLE CITY

$850/MO. +$850 DEPOSIT

NO PETS 865-712-5238 Kodak 3 BD/ 2 BA house, large yard, garage, basement. 4 years old, well maintained, convenient to I40. $1,100 mo. Call 865-556-4111. Large 1 BDR/1 BA in Seymour Area. Water & Sewer, $450 Mo. $275 Dep. No pets. (865) 654-2519

R

EAL ESTATE FOR SALE

0710

Homes for Sale

2 New homes 3 BR 2 BA, double garage, one on large level lot in Grandview, $149,000. On on nice lot Murphy Farms close in. $157,000. 654-6505 or 654-8184. 2BR/2BA jacq tub, FP, stove, refrig, microwv, dshwshr near schools & hospital. $98,900. 865-984-0141 or 919-4023.

0715

Condominiums for Sale

2 New condos for sale. Owner Financing Available. $189,000, 1,700sf Living, 2 car gar, Jacuzzi, Fpl, Hardwood, All Appl. 865-654-3667 or 865-429-5065

0734

Lots & Acreage

Mobile Homes for Sale

Bank Owned 3BD/2BA DW, new carpet $74,900 MLS 718718/2478 Roberts Rd, Kodak. Natalia 865-207-5145 Webb Property 865-922-5500 CLAYTON IN SEVIERVILLE MOVING SALE 20 HOMES MUST GO MOVING TO ALCOA HWY THE NEW CLAYTON SUPER HOME CENTER

0754

865-970-7355 Commercial/Office

For Lease-Sevierville Office Space 2260 to 3340 sq ft. Call Doug Morgan 865-603-2832 or Sperry Van Ness/R. M. Moore, LLC 865-453-8111

T

RANSPORTATION

0860

Vans for Sale

1990 Chevy Astro Van. Runs Good. $700.00. 865-428-2725

0864

Pickup Trucks for Sale

16 + fenced acres nestled in foothills of Smoky Mtns. Gorgeous 360 degree Mtn view w/covered bridge & free flowing streams. Access to cnty water. $169,900 423-329-3076

1994 Ford F150 XLT ext. cab, too many new parts to list, good truck, $3,500. 865-429-2279.

Lot #22 in Hillside Subdiv. on Royal Coachmen Dr. Downtown PF. Awesome view. $75,000. Call 908-0170

1966 Chevrolet Elcamino, All original $5,500 (865) 908-0584 or (865) 850-3846. 1966 Ford Galaxy. 289 Auto. $2600. Call 865-607-6542.

0741

Mobile Homes for Sale

Bank Owned 3BD/2BA DW, good cond $73,000 MLS 721786/835 Harvest Meadow, Kodak. Natalia 865-207-5145 Webb Property 865-922-5500

0868

Cars for Sale

2008 Impala LS, 4 dr sedan, 21,400 mi. Asking $13,600. Call 286-5478

F

INANCIAL

Classifieds ď ľ B13

L

EGALS

HUD PUBLISHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it il egal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, family status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. State laws forbid discrimination in the sale, rental or advertising of real estate based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We wil not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-669-9777, The Toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

0503

Auction Sales

0503

Auction Sales

865-429-2962

Free Wi-Fi, Cable, Laundry, Kitchens, Clean Rooms, NO PETS.

WANDA GALLI REALTY EXECUTIVES 680-5119 or 774-4307

Small mobile home. Private, shaded lot. Suitable for 1 person. Stove, Refrig, W/D. Rent $325. 1st, last & damage dep. ($975) to move in. 428-4642

0741

Rent by the week, month, or year. Furnished, plus elec., cable & w/ sewer included. Call for appt.

3BR/2BA, 3 yr new, Garage. Close to Hospital. $1000 mo + $1000 dep. Pets w/condition. 865-712-9638. 4BD/2.5BA. New carpet & paint, All appl incl W/D, No pets or smoking, out bldg for wrkshp. Lrg yard, Kodak. 1st, last + $500 dep. $1,100 mo. Neg w/ good credit 932-6734 4BD/4BA Cabin for rent, Sev near Conv Ctr. Game room, jac, hot tub. $1000 mo. 865-940-1162, 865-382-1981 Beautifully, Fully Furnished Home with W/D, Hot Tub, Pool Table, 3 BDR, 3 Full Baths, quiet Peaceful neighborhood. Annual Lease Required. Dep. Ski Mtn. Gatlinburg $900 mo. plus utilities. 732-557-1143 or 865-436-0313. Country Setting 2 BDR/1 BA full basement, smoke-free, pet free $625 Mo. $625 Dep. 428-5781 G'burg, 2 BDR/2 BA House near Trolley. W/D included, $700 Mo. Call: 436-0144 or 239-826-5303. Heart of PF. 3BD/1.5BA, $800 mo. No pets. Credit check & references. 865-335-3191

$640-$1000 mo.

Mobile Homes for Rent

Gatlinburg/Dudley Creek

Nice clean Rm in Res for 1 per furn, W/D, TV, QN Bed, Big Clos, util $100wk 661-7770

Homes & Apts.

0675

865-621-2941

3BR 2BA with full basement + 2 car garage w/ openers. Located behind Sevier County High School $900+ dep. No pets. 2 Homes Avail. 865-368-6799

(865) 453-4028 or (865) 771-5043 SEVIERVILLE On The Little Pigeon River TVA Energy Efficient Attractive professional dĂŠcor Exclusive Screen Porch Room Abundant & Large Closets Washer/Dryer Hook-upâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Small Pet Welcome

0620

DOWNTOWN SEVIERVILLE 428 Park Rd.

near trolley stop

Includes All Utilities.

405-2116

Roommate/ furn room-$100 wk, incl. util. Sev- Boyd's Crk. 865-365-1089,727-403-5571

Gatlinburg Rooms for Rent Furnished, all Utilities, cable, tax included $100 per week Rooms with Kitchens $120 per week

865-621-2941

0645

Wanted to Rent

2/3 BR needed. Must be wheelchair access. Within Sevierville limits. 428-8023.

0670

Business Places/ Offices

OFFICE SPACE $650 - $900 month

865-850-3874 Nice Office with Warehouse Bay. Sevierville Reasonable Rent 453-6289 or 548-6838 Retail space for rent. $1200 mo. approx 900 sq ft. Next to very active retail shops on Dolly Parton Pkwy. 865-868-0449. SHOPS FOR RENT. ELKS PLAZA 968 Parkway, Gatlinburg. 865-436-7550. Wears Valley Scenic Hwy. 321 for rent or sale Office or Retail Super Clean, Log Bldg on .91 acre. Great visibility & parking. Lawn Care, Well Water, Septic included. Asking $1,900 per mo. + dep. Please call for appt: (865) 774-8998.

0675

./ -).)-5-3 ./ 2%3%26%3

ABSOLUTE

RAIN OR SHINE ON SITE

FARM

SEVIER COUNTYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BEST

TOP FARM SALE OF 2010 75 PRIME ACRE â&#x20AC;&#x153;OLD DELOZIER FARMâ&#x20AC;?

BETWEEN SEVIERVILLE & KNOXVILLE, TN ADDRESS: 2059 & 2111 McCleary Rd, Sevierville, TN

()34/2)#"/9$3 #2%%+#/--5.)49

Mobile Homes for Rent

3BD on private property. 3 mi from waterpark. $650 mo. Call 865-428-5204 3BD/2BA on private lot. Lrg kitchen, LR, FP. $550 mo. + water. No Pets. Ref & I.D. Req. 1st + last mo + dep to move in. 748-5741, 748-0792. 4 very nice homes, $400-$550. Kodak + Sevierville. No pets. 865-740-2525

3BR/2BA $500-$700/mth Boyds Creek Area No pets. 908-8629 Price's Camper Lot's For Low Income For Rent (865) 654-8702

(/-%3s,!2'%"!2.3s42!#43 4/!#2%3%!#(

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16th, 2010, 10:30 A.M. ,53('2%%.0!3452%3s#/:9(!2$7//$&/2%34s,%6%,4/ '%.4,92/,,).'s54),)497!4%2s"2%!4(4!+).'6)%73/&4(% '2%!43-/+9-/5.4!).3Also selling farm equipment

TO BE SOLD HIGH BIDDER CHOICE-NO REGROUPING

DIRECTIONS: From Sevierville take Hwy. 66 and turn onto Boyds Creek Hwy 338. Go 6.6 mi., turn right on Jim Fain Road. Go 0.7 mi., and turn right on McCleary Rd. Go 0.4 mi. to auction site. From Knoxville take Chapman Hwy 441 to Seymour, Turn left at Home Federal Bank at traffic light onto Boyds Creek Hwy. 338. Go 5.3 mi. and turn left on Jim Fain Road and follow above directions to auction site. Property Address: 2059 & 2111 McCleary Rd. Sevierville, TN

10% BUYERS PREMIUM WILL BE ADDED TO EACH SUCCESSFUL BID

www.McCarterAuction.com sold@mccarterauction.com

LEADERS IN REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS SINCE 1953

3140 Newport Hwy. Sevierville, TN 37876 Edd McCarter, Chuck McCarter, Auctioneers

Keith McGregor,

!MANDA-7ILLIAMS

Apprentice Auctioneers

Toll Free: 1-877-282-8467 Auction License #335 Real Est. Lic #214075

7%3%,,4(%%!24(

(865) 453-1600

3COTT%-C#ARTER #!)

Keith Shults Brent Shults Lisa M. Carroll Megan McCarter Cates


The Mountain Press ď ľ Sunday, October 10, 2010

Classifieds ď ľ B14 0503

Auction Sales

Saturday, October 16th @ 10:30 AM

B r i a n n a Fa r m s

An Equestrian Paradise In Beautiful East Tennessee

Each tract situated to capture the magniďŹ cent views of the rolling valley and mountains. Abundant wildlife including whitetail deer and wild turkey call Brianna Farms home. Plan your trip today to purchase Brianna Farms at Absolute Auction on October 16, 2010 at 10:30 am.

9 Acreage Tracts Ranging from 5.01 acres to 6.32 acres

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, Oct. 10 and Friday, Oct. 15 from 3 pm to 6 pm or One Hour Before The Sale.

Also offered at this auction is Lot 38, Lyons Creek in Knox County with

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

City Water City Sewer Cable Underground Electricity â&#x20AC;˘ Paved and Curbed Streets â&#x20AC;˘ City Amenities with No City Tax

DIRECTIONS FROM JEFFERSON CITY: Take Hwy 11-E Towards Knoxville. Go approx. 8 miles and turn left on Eslinger Road. Go 1.3 miles to Auction site on the right. DIRECTIONS FROM KNOXVILLE AND SEVIERVILLE: From I-40 exit 407 go N on Snyder Road past Bass Pro and the Smokey Stadium for 2.3 miles. Cross Hwy. 2570 and continue North on Old Dandridge Pike. (Hwy. 139) to intersection of Hwy. 11E. Turn right, go to Eslinger Road, turn right, Auction site is approx. 1.3 miles on right. TERMS: 10% deposit due day of sale, balance to be paid at closing.

10% Buyers Premium will be added to all successful bids.

Jefferson City OfďŹ ce 1418 Russell Avenue Jefferson City, TN 37760 865-475-4242

Dandridge OfďŹ ce 862 S. Hwy. 91 Dandridge, TN 37725 865-397-4214

Mark Jackson, CAI

www.JacksonJackson.Com Toll Free: 1-800-360-5263

Auctioneer

865-548-4215

We Know What Makes You

!

Click

www.themountainpress.com

FIND HIDDEN CASH

Sell your unused household items with....

Rodney Manning, CAI App. Auctioneer

Firm #2789

865-368-1400

Drive A Hard Bargain... Advertise in the Classifieds!

Storage, Indoor/ Outdoor 10X10 or 10X20 SELF STORAGE

Tra s h i t , SELL IT.

... give the Classifieds a try.

428-0746

1342

Call

Convenient Location! 411 South, left on Robert Henderson Rd., 1/4 mile on right at Riverwalk Apts.

428-0746

429-2962

1018

Asphalt/Concrete

Lowest Prices on Sealcoating and HOT crackfilling

865-719-2340 1048

Cleaning Service

Susanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cleaning Service

1144

Handyman

We fix anything, no job too small! Free Estimates

1108

1162 Home Improvement & Repair Tri-County Glass and Door

Davids Nursery 865-428-6198 1120

Fence Installation

STANLEY FENCING

Chain Link Fences Wood Fences Ornamental & Vinyl

All work guaranteed. Licensed and insured.

865-254-3844

Cabin Pressure Washed Caulked, Sealed, Stained Tile & Hard-wood floors Carpentry Repairs

$$ SAVE $$

Before you Pay too much for Repair or Replacement Get a Second Opinion Free Price Quote A:HHL6IIO 6>G8DC9>I>DC>C<

s%XCAVATIONs"OBCAT7ORK s"USH(OGGINGs,ANDSCAPING s0ATIOSs0AVERS -AINTENANCE#ONTRACTS &ULLY,ICENSED)NSURED

Cabins Home Repair

Call: (865) 335-9007 The p/up #, 250451, All Work Guaranteed oris(865) 335-6630 not in our system. Call 430-2599 Please give valid p/up 1156 Heating/Cooling or attach pdf of ad. 1162 Home Improvement Thanks. & Repair

â&#x20AC;˘ Residential â&#x20AC;˘ Business â&#x20AC;˘ Cabins â&#x20AC;˘ Homes â&#x20AC;˘ Licensed, Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured 20 yrs exp. 438-9219

Excavating

1162 Home Improvement & Repair

-+*"-%."--%'

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Local â&#x2014;&#x2020; B15

Sunday, October 10, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press

Winning team in fundraiser donates prizes to B-G Club Submitted Report GATLINBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Gatlinburg Chamber of Commerce Foundation hosted its 11th annual miniature-golf tournament recently, and first place went to Daniel Jennette, Danny Stewart and substitute players Bo Gunnels and Steve Waikel, all playing on the Smoky

Mountain Outdoors team. The team won the overall prize pack, including Dollywood passes, umbrellas from Citizens National, gift certificates to the Gatlinburg Golf Course, breakfast for two at Hilton Garden Inn and tickets to the Wonders of Magic featuring Terry Evanswood. The team chose to donate the prizes

to the Gatlinburg branch of the Boys & Girls Club of the Smoky Mountains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is an honor to help support the city of Gatlinburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest

asset, our kids, and this is another way of helping by Smoky Mountain Outdoors and Smoky Mountain Outfitters,â&#x20AC;? said Jennette, the business owner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These

kids are the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future, and they need our help. So join us in making this the best Boys & Girls Club in the area.â&#x20AC;? Rhonda Morris accepted

the gifts on behalf of the club and plans to put the gifts to good use at the facility. For more information on the Gatlinburg branch call 436-0833.

at

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2010 CHEVROLET COBALT 4DR LS NEW 2009 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT COLORADO 2WD CREW CAB 2010 COLORADO 4WD EXT. CAB 1LT

#9798

Submitted

Daniel Jennette, owner of Smoky Mountain Outdoors, presents Rhonda Morris and the Gatlinburg Branch of the Boys & Girls Club of the Smoky Mountains with all of his teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first-place prizes from the Chamberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 11th annual golf tournament.

MSRP $17,595 $3000 CUSTOMER CASH OR 0.0% APR up to 60 mos. WAC

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2010 SILVERADO 2500 HD 4WD LT EXT. CAB

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Submitted

Beverly Treadaway, Sevier County Soil Conservation District secretary, has been awarded the 2010 East Tennessee District Employee of the Year Award. Matt Ledford, Tennessee Conservation District Employees Association coordinator, presents the award to Treadaway.

Treadaway winner of employee award Submitted report Beverly Treadaway, Sevier County Soil Conservation District secretary, has been awarded the 2010 East Tennessee District Employee of the Year Award. The award is presented annually by the Tennessee Conservation District Employees Association to an employee in appreciation of their support and willingness to assist other East Tennessee District employees and TCDEA. She received this same award in 1999. Treadaway is a Sevierville native. In addition to administrating the Sevier County office, she is responsible for setting up a booth for Sevier County Farm Days, which allows the district office to educate over a thousand fourth-graders about water quality, and protecting and conserving natural resources. She assists landowners in Sevier County with the various sgate and federal programs. She gives presentations in local schools and works at the high schools with RC&D Envirothon projects. She makes sure the Sevier County office has a booth at the fair and at the Sevier County Farmers Co-Op Customer Appreciation celebration each year. Treadaway has been the district secretary for 14 years. For conservation or resource concerns contact The Sevier County Soil Conservation District Office at 4534664, ext. 3.

PA3521 PA3666A 10003A 9822A PA3672A PI3648A PA362A 9642B PA397A PI3697 9996A PA3699 PA3630 PI3228 PA3596 PA3663 PI3623 PI3701 PA3625 PA3627 PI3694A PI3699 9960A

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99 FORD ESCORT.................................... $3995 99 CHEVROLET MALIBU ......................... $4995 98 HONDA ACCORD ................................ $6995 06 CHEVROLET COBALT ......................... $8995 00 MAZDA MX-5 MIATA ......................... $8995 99 CHEVROLET CAMARO........................ $8995 04 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO .............. $9995 06 DODGE STRATUS SEDAN ................... $10995 09 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER..................... $11995 09 CHEVROLET AVEO ............................. $12995 07 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $13995 09 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER..................... $14995 HYUNDAI SONATA................................... $15995 06 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $15995 09 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $16995 09 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $16995 09 MAZDA 5 .......................................... $16995 09 CHEVROLET IMPALA.......................... $16995 09 CHRYSLER SEBRING.......................... $1899 09 CHEVROLET MALIBU ......................... $18995 07 MERCEDES-BENZ C-CLASS .............. $20995 10 CHRYSLER 300-SERIES ..................... $21995 08 FORD MUSTANG ................................ $22995 94 CHEVROLET TRUC C/K1500 .............. $5995 01 NISSAN FRONTIER............................. $6995 00 CHEVROLET TRUCK VENTURE ........... $6995 96 HARLEY DAVIDSON EG ...................... $6995 97 FORD F150......................................... $7995 03 CHEVROLET TRUCK VENTURE CARGO............ $7995 90 FORD E-350 ....................................... $8995 04 CHEVROLET VENTURE ....................... $9995 01 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 ........... $12995 04 DODGE DAKOTA ................................. $12995 02 FORD ECONO ..................................... $13995 08 FORD ECONO ..................................... $13995 08 FORD RANGER ................................... $14995 04 GMC SIERRA...................................... $14995 04 TOYOTA SEQUOIA .............................. $15995

MSRP $28,465 MSRP $26,305 $2000 CUSTOMER CASH $2500 CUSTOMER CASH OR OR 0.0% APR up to 60 mos. WAC 0.0% APR up to 60 mos. WAC

22,788

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2010 SILVERADO 4WD Z71 CREW CAB

2010 TRAVERSE FW LTZ

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37,909

*$

PA3633 PA3684 9989B PA3611 PA3688 PA3669 9939B 6981A PI3590 9987A PA3577 PA3687 PA3690 PI3668 PA3615 PA3674

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09 CHEVROLET HHR ............................... $17995 06 CHEVROLET SILVERADO .................... $17995 05 FORD SUPER DUTY F250 ................... $18995 08 NISSAN ROGUE .................................. $18995 07 JEEP LIBERTY.................................... $18995 08 GMC SIERRA 1500............................. $18995 07 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 ........... $20995 99 FORD F450......................................... $21995 08 GMC CANYON .................................... $21995 04 CHEVROLET SSR................................ $24995 02 GMC 4000 ......................................... $24995 08 FORD EDGE ........................................ $26995 10 CHEVROLET EQUINOX........................ $26995 09 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 ........... $26995 06 CHEVROLET SILVERADO .................... $28995 09 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE .................. $43995 09 DODGE JOURNEY............................... $17995 09 CHEVROLET EXPRESS ....................... $18995 06 NISSAN PATHFINDER ........................ $18995 08 MERCURY MARINER.......................... $19995 10 CHEVROLET HHR ............................... $19995 07 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER................ $19995 08 FORD ESCAPE .................................... $20995 05 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN .................... $23995 10 JEEP LIBERTY.................................... $25995 08 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $30995 08 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR ........................ $34995 09 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN .................... $36995 10 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $38995 10 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $38995 10 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $38995 10 CHEVROLET TAHOE ........................... $39995 01 OLDSMOBILE SILHOUETTE ................ $4995 89 CHEVROLET COMM/RV CUT VAN............ $5995 02 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY .......... $6995 07 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN.................. $13995 07 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY ........... $16995 10 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN.................. $20995

COME IN TEST DRIVE, PURCHASE A NEW OR USED VEHICLE OR OIL CHANGE GET A DEER CAMP HAT AND KOOZIE WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. PROGRAM EXPIRES 11/30/10

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volunteer chevy Sat 8AM - 5PM Mobile: mobile.volunteerchevrolet.com TAX, TITLE, TAGS & LICS. FEES EXTRA. W.A.C. DEALER RETAINS ALL REBATES AND /OR INCENTIVES. DUE TO ADVERTISING DEADLINES SOME UNITS MAY BE SOLD. PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PROGRAM EXPIRES 11/1/2010. **0.0 APR AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODEL IN LIEU OF REBATES AND/OR INCENTIVES. PRICE INCLUDES $399 CUSTOMER SERVICE FEE.


B16 ◆

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, October 10, 2010

Sunday, October 10, 2010  

The Mountain Press for Sunday, October 10, 2010

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