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MAGAZINE

ISSUE 2 - APRIL 2018

FEATURING: FABER || FROM VIRAL STAR TO POP STAR || || JOB HUNTING TIPS || || ESSENTIAL SCANDINAVIAN MUSIC || Page 1


CONTENTS & LET TER FROM THE EDITOR

MEET THE TEAM WHO BROUGHT YOU THE MNGR

President Hannah Jane Williams mngr.president@gmail.com

Feature Photography David Jeffrey-Hughes dsjhphotography@gmail.com

Vice President Louis Andersen-Risager mngr.vicepresident@gmail.com

Finance Gabriella Robinson mngr.financemanager@gmail.com

Editor Helena Bodman mngr.editorial@gmail.com

HR Joe Castle mngr.hrmanager@gmail.com

Deputy Editor Devon Potter mngr.viceeditorial@gmail.com

Head of Events Holly Loweth mngr.events@gmail.com

Magazine Design by Sam Vinicombe-Parker samuelparker24@gmail.com

Vice Events Tom Walker mngr.events@gmail.com

Marketing and Social Media Annika Singh mngr.marketingmanager@gmail.com

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PA G E S

PA G E S

PA G E S

4&5

6&7

8–11

LC M A R T IS T S

V I R A L S TA R TO P O P S TA R : K A I L E E M O R G U E & GET TING A JOB IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

INTERVIEW WITH: FA B E R

PA G E S

PA G E S

12&13 14&15 S C A N D I N AV I A N M USI C YO U N E E D TO K N O W

SECONDARY TICKETING & THE MNGR: FIND Y O U R F E S T I VA L

As the academic year draws to a close, we at The MNGR are reflecting on the year we have had since our official launch, in March 2017. The past twelve months have provided us with the opportunities to host a wonderful variety of events and get to know some lovely venues and their helpful staff. Our team has grown and we are lucky to be joined by some brilliantly talented writers, event planners and photographers. So far, 2018 has brought us our first ever print issue, for which we give thanks to the music management department and UWLSU for believing in us and supporting the magazine’s production. April 2018 brings The MNGR’s first ever Blast Radio show, featuring sets from our cover-star Faber, New Age Thrills and more. From this, we hope to launch a new side of our magazine as we produce more video content as the year progresses. On publication of this magazine, we give thanks, once again, to David Jeffery-Hughes for his creativity and dedication in photographing our cover star. We thank Hannah Smith ‘Faber’ for being such a vibrant artist and being truly enjoyable to have as our featured star. Finally, thanks to all our writers, featured musicians and our graphic designer Sam VinicombeParker. Their time and interest is what makes the magazine work. As graduation draws closer, many of The MNGR will soon be handing down their positions to exciting new individuals who are sure to bring new ideas and energy to the committee with them. From myself and the whole team, thank you all for your support throughout our first year, I look forward to seeing what happens next. Helena Bodman Editor

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THE LONDON COLLEGE LIZA WHITE

Liza is a 20-year-old pop singer currently preparing her first ever EP. Her influences include Jorja Smith, Zara Larsson, Halsey and Dua Lipa. Her next gig is at the Notting Hill Arts Club with fellow LCM artists ‘ZETA’ and ‘CIPHERS’. Liza states “When someone wants comforting or to completely run away from the world, for just a moment, I would like to think my music does that in one way or another”. The MNGR is certainly here for that and we’re looking forward to some Pop Ballads.

Z E TA

Taking influence from Taylor Swift and Halsey, Zeta’s pop vocal is infused with a dark ethereal sound that makes her stand out. Her single ‘Bloodshot’ released February 2018, is a relatable track about overcoming mistakes. Her powerful vocals show vulnerability within the bridges of the song, captured by using trills and emotive lyrics. The catchiness of her single has The MNGR excited for the full EP which will be released this June. But, if you cannot wait till then, ZETA is playing alongside LIZA WHITE and CIPHERS at the Notting Hill Arts Club on the 18th of April.

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OF MUSIC: ARTISTS

BEHOP

Behop describe themselves as ‘4 guys faking jazz together’. The band consists of four musicians who have each refined their instrumental skills in a variety of genres, from indie to funk, by playing in multiple bands and events at UWL and beyond. You can see them on April 23rd at The Half Moon Putney, with Chen, Cameron Buckmaster and Klaudia Skwarek and LAG.

DENZEL FR ANCO

Denzel is a hip-hop artist from North London. He recently released his single ‘GOLD’ and its corresponding video. In the song, Denzel opens up about personal and social issues, aiming to reach success by using the struggles he has faced to his advantage. His music fuses his London influences and his well put together style at a professional standard that should be easy to enjoy for any fan of the genre. Words by Helena Bodman and Hannah Jane Williams

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VIRAL S TA R TO POP S TA R : K AILEE MORGUE Twitter/IG: @morguemami Facebook/Spotify/Apple Music: Kailee Morgue

Words by Eethan Bello

A large percentage of today’s music industry is driven by a fickle beast that we know as social media. Social media has affected the way that record labels run their business, from the promotion of artists and their music to signing record deals. Artists exploit their own talent on social media, either with hopes of being noticed or just for the enjoyment of sharing their art. One of those artists who garnered attention and went viral is Kailee Morgue. In 2016, Morgue posted a video of herself singing a song that she wrote titled

“Medusa” and it amassed over 100,000 retweets and likes on Twitter and Instagram. Following her viral video, Morgue stayed popular in the Twittersphere and she gained fans who kept supporting her and her previously posted tracks on Soundcloud. During the summer of 2017, Morgue announced signing a record deal with Republic Records. The four months following her record deal included the release of her first single “Medusa”, and the release of her single was followed by the release of her four-track EP also titled “Medusa” three Page 6

months after. Morgue’s EP was produced by CJ Baran, who has worked with artists such as Panic! At The Disco and Carly Rae Jepsen. Her music style can be described as dream-pop and her voice takes you on a dreamlike and spell-binding trance. The elegance of her voice provides a dark contrast with the lyrics of the songs that she wrote. The “Medusa” EP leaves the listener wanting more from musician, who showcases her ability to create versatile tracks of varying speeds and emotions.


GETTING A JOB IN THE MUSIC INDUS TRY

Words by Hannah Jane Willaims

U S E F U L I N F O R M AT I O N F R O M T H E M N G R T E A M

Graduate Recruitment Bureau With 20 years of experience the GRB hand select entrylevel jobs, for graduates, that are suitable for the areas you choose. Employers also use your CV to help generate an idea of the types of graduate schemes suitable. Arts Jobs – Run by Arts Council The Arts Council have produced a website which displays internships, apprenticeships, parttime and full-time work. Broader than just the music industry, this site offers lots of opportunities for high paid jobs in all creative industries. Employability @UWL The employability service is available up to a year after graduation. You will also receive emails with job opportunities within the industries you select through the arts and media recruitment agency section. Available at: employability.uwl.ac.uk

Picture this, you get to university, you finally know the industry you are interested in, yet people keep asking you “THE QUESTION”. “So, what’s your plan?” Fret no more creatives, as The MNGR has found you some helpful links to find you jobs in the future; and they are not just indeed.co.uk!

Music Match Music Match is a global publication that offers a paid membership, giving you access to exclusive job openings within the music industry. Their online community provides daily updates from the world of film, television, gaming and of course, music. The Unsigned Guide: Largest music directory for networking Available to sign up to at a cost, the unsigned guide offers a directory, that has been running for 10 years, of promoters, lawyers, booking agents and more! Perfect for networking, and for finding individuals to help you better your career as a creative. Page 7

Complete Music Update (CMU JOBS) Available online, CMU Jobs offers links to current jobs being advertised by large companies such as Live Nation, IDOL, AIF and more. Their premium membership provides a valuable service for busy music business professionals, helping you stay on top of a rapidly evolving industry. Careers in Music If you are unsure of the role you are interested within the music industry, careers in music has a step by step quiz to help you discover your options! Available at: https://finder. careersinmusic.com/s3/ music-career-finder


INTERVIEW WITH: FA B E R

Interview by Helena Bodman and Hugo Lagnado

“I FEEL LIKE ‘FABER’ AND ME, HANNAH MARIE, IS TWO DIFFERENT PEOPLE. FABER IS WHAT I WANT TO BE.”

FABER, formerly known as Hannah Marie, graduated London College of Music in 2017 after an impressive three years of show-stopping performances. Almost a year on, she has released her EP ‘I am…’. The seven-track debut features powerful anthems of self-love and female empowerment backed by strong rock melodies and emotive vocals.

MNGR: How would you describe your music? FABER: Soul-fused, pop-rock MNGR: How has your upbringing influenced your work? FABER: I’m from a really musical family, so it would always be on in the house. I didn’t even have to think about it, to be honest, everyone in my family just kinda went into music, even if it was just as a hobby. It was never just one genre. It was a bit of jazz, pop, metal from some sides of the family! So I’ve got a nice eclectic mix and I’m not really into one genre. It was hard actually, to decide what genre I wanted to be as an artist. But it just felt natural. MNGR: You have a wide variety of influences. Who most inspires you? FABER: First and foremost, always, Beyonce. When I was younger, she was always the main influence. I really like Skin from Skunk Anansie, she’s really sick. I really like Nothing But Thieves and P!nk. Who else? Led Zeppelin! Love them. 24/7. MNGR: Your music has strong female empowerment vibes.

Do you think the females in your family have helped with that? FABER: Yes. I think they’re probably stronger than me! I’ve always been the shy one who doesn’t like any kind of heat or confrontation. But my Mum, Sister, Auntie and all the girls on my Dad’s side of my family have always been really outspoken and stand up for anything they believe in, even if it’s just a conflict within the family. Whereas I’m more quiet. They probably influence me more than anything. MNGR: Would you say you channel that into your music, rather than being outgoing in other ways? FABER: I feel like ‘Faber’ and me, Hannah Marie, is two different people. Faber is what I want to be. I’m not quite there yet being confident, on stage is a different me. MNGR: So Faber is your Sasha Fierce? FABER: YES. Definitely. MNGR: You’ve got quite a varied band. What’s your process for picking musicians to play with you? FABER: Honestly, they’ve got to

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be really good in the first place. Second of all, they’re all just really nice people and easy to get along with. If you’re really hard to work with but have a really good skill, the likelihood is I’m not going to choose you. That’s just stress. I really like players that have good stage presence as well, so I can just rock out and jam with them. MNGR: How has living in London changed your artistry? FABER: I grew up in Croydon where it was always pop, rap or grime. It wasn’t until I went to college where I realised ‘Oh my God. There’s another world.’ At college I had rock. It was where I wanted to be and it was sick. College was more quirky and less mainstream than my secondary school. That’s where it all flourished and Uni carried that on. I got to realise there was more than mainstream music, not that I don’t love it. I love pop! MNGR: What made you decide to add a spoken word song to your EP? FABER: I really like a girl called ‘Holly Poetry’ or ‘Holly McNish’. You should check her out, she’s really really cool! I went to see


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her, after seeing her on YouTube; a video called ‘Embarrassed’. I thought it was really cool! At the time and still, I’m going through insecurities and all that stuff. Like everyone is. She really inspired me because she just wrote about what was important. I want to make people feel the way that she made me feel. So my way of doing that was through spoken word because it’s less confusing than trying to make lyrics rhyme and trying to make it a good melody. I was like ‘Let’s just get back down to the root and just say it, figure out what’s important.’ MNGR: Is it important to you, for your music to really mean something, and to have a message for other people, rather than it just being personal? FABER: Yeah, definitely. That’s what I’ve always wanted to do. It wasn’t intentional but it is something I have always aimed for. MNGR: What’s your creation process? FABER: Usually, I’m either in the shower or on the toilet or just about going to bed. In my dreams actually, I’ve made up songs. So I usually make up melody and lyrics simultaneously. Then I’ll either bring it to Tom -pianist Tom- and he’ll write stuff to it because I’m so bad with chords. Or I’ll just go on my little midi keyboard and think ‘yeah that sounds okay’. That’s about it really. I’ll then play around on Logik with drums and stuff or I’ll bring it to the band and say ‘see if you can make up a cool beat to this.’.

procrastinate, literally just do it. Obviously, music is expensive and you’ve got to be prepared to throw some cash out, to get some good quality things. I’m in the mindset now where I don’t care how much anything’s going to cost. I don’t care what people are going to say. I’m just going to do it, and I’m going to do it for me. But yeah, make some good connections. Networking is literally everything. Go to as many events as you can and have your social media on point. MNGR: What can we look forward to next from you? FABER: I got into the quarterfinals for a competition to play at the Isle of Wight, I’ve been applying to other festivals too. But more tunes. I’m so excited to create more now that the EP is out. That’s what’s on the horizon. I am… is available now through all major streaming services.

MNGR: How did UWL help your career? FABER: It was really good for networking. Obviously, I learnt a lot in the modules but, the main point, why I went to uni, was that I really wanted to make connections. It was really good for music business actually, because I lack in that area. MNGR: What advice would you give to musicians graduating this year? FABER: I was such a procrastinator, because I was scared of change. I put things off because I thought people would think ‘Oh she’s vain’ or ‘She’s weird’ but I say ‘The people that matter don’t mind. The people that mind don’t matter’. Do not

Find FABER online at: Instagram and Twitter: @SheIsFaber Facebook: Hannah Marie/ @SheIsFaber

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S C A N D I N AV I A N M U S I C YO U NEED TO KNOW

Words by Annika Singh

N O : S C A N D I N AV I S K M U S I K K D U T R E N G E R Å V I T E S E : S K A N D I N AV I S K M U S I K D U B E H Ö V E R V E TA D K : S K A N D I N AV I S K M U S I K D U B E H Ø V E R AT V I D E

Nelson Can (DK) Do you ever just lie about being in a band to seem cool? Well, the Danish trio, Nelson Can, accidentally did, and here they are now. Starting their musical journey in 2011, the three strong-headed women released their debut album, Now Is Your Time To Deliver, back in 2014, showing off their original psychedelic/ indie sound. The band’s mix of a bassheavy and drum orientated tunes with a noteworthy lack of a lead guitar manifests

Great News (NO) clearly in their latest EP released in 2017. Taking cues from the likes of Florence + The Machine, The White Stripes and Siouxsie and The Banshees, their haunting vocals, yet sweet vintage feels really reflects Nelson Can’s unconventional approach to their music career. Throughout the years, they have supported the likes of Royal Blood, The Black Keys, and most recently JAWS, all whilst running their own record label, Like a Can of Beans Records.

The Norwegian city, Bergen, has truly become a great place to discover new music over the past few years, and they certainly never disappoint. Only formed in 2015, the trio made up of Even Kjelby (vocals, guitar), Ole Einarsen (bass) and Lars Platou (drums) have remarkably already opened up for the likes of Unknown Mortal Orchestra. Taking inspiration from 90s fashion and 80s noise, Great News describe themselves as ‘dazepop’; a statement that

absolutely sits right with them. Having just released their debut LP this year, it’s clear to see that their music immerses in sonic noises with cheerful melodies and dreamy guitar solos. The tracks Wonderfault and You’re Mine are bound to make you move your body and get ready for summer. You can catch them on the line-up for The Great Escape and Øyafestivalen this year.

Rome Is Not A Town (SE) Hailing from Gothenburg (Göteborg), Sweden, the noisy indie/rock quartet, Rome Is Not A Town, have noticeably made a mark on the Swedish rock scene. Catching the eye of co-frontman of alt-rockers Sonic Youth, Thurston Moore, has surely given them that extra push, and with comments like “It’s sorta post-Riot grrl, post NoWave”, it’s no surprise that the band have been compared to the likes of L7, PIXIES and Sonic Youth themselves. The girls’ 2017 released debut album, It’s a Dare, is ultimately the framework of the “in your face” 90s raw rock you’ve been looking for. It’s filled to the brim with imprints of dissatisfaction and pessimistic remarks. The track I’m In A Brand is the epitome of not giving a fuck, while Can You Feel the Rush succeeds in sounding like the title. If you’re a fan of the feeling of genuine rebellious energy, this band is definitely one not to miss.

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Sløtface (NO)

Blaue Blume (DK)

The pop-punk Norwegian revivalists and wonderkids, Sløtface, released their debut album, Try Not to Freak Out, in 2017. The album keeps a perfect blend of rebellious tunes and piercing social commentary, evidently seen in the opener Magazine by challenging the way females are portrayed in the media with their eye-catching lyric, ‘Patti Smith would never put up with this shit’. Compared to bands like Paramore and Be Your Own Pet,

the quartet combines exhilarating pop and gleams of epic punk with vigorously pop culture references. Haley, Tor-Arne, Lasse and Halvard regularly speak up about women’s right and their stance on feminist issues. Following the riot grrrl movement, Sløtface intend to make gigs a safe place for females and change the way young women are presented in the media.

With songs about pure love and yearning, Blaue Blume falls into the category of being the epitome of romantics. The Danish four-piece released their debut album, Syzygy, back in 2015 and is quite a contrast in the Danish music scene that usually favours attitude and aggression. They have specialised in refining traditional sounds into an eerie, unusual, yet simply catchy mixture, reminiscent of the likes of Sigur Rós and Jeff Buckley.

Frontman Jonas Smith’s quivering vocal is almost so angelic it literally embraces your soul, and is certainly the centre of attention here. The breathtaking androgynous falsetto, so intricate and ambivalent, floats over the gloomy, melancholic guitars so perfectly. Drawing inspirations from The Smiths and Morrissey’s love of pathos with bits of melodic structures from Cocteau Twins, Blaue Blume define exactly what alternative art pop is all about.

Sløtface Rome is Not a Town

Great News

Blaue Blume Page 13

Nelson Can


Words by Tom Walker, Devon Potter and Helena Bodman

S E C O N DA R Y TICKETING

“ T H I S I S A M A J O R I S S U E FA C I N G T H E I N D U S T R Y ”

On the 15th November 2016, along with representatives from Ticketmaster and Stub Hub, the lead singer of UK band You Me At Six, Josh Franceschi, spoke in front of the Culture, Media and Sports Select Committee to raise his concerns about ‘ticket touting’. Ticket touting, in short, refers to groups of people who use internet software, such as Botnets, to purchase large quantities of show tickets which enables them to then sell them on for a much higher price. This is a major issue facing the industry in its current state, that is ever growing. Franceschi has previously stated in an interview with Music Week, ‘Money’s been taken out of the industry and put into the hands of people who are only concerned with lining their own pockets’.

The campaign called for the Botnet software to be made illegal, thus making it impossible for secondary ticketing companies to buy up to thirty percent of a venue and sell the tickets at an increased price for profit. He told BBC Newsbeat, ‘We’re playing a very intimate show at Dingwalls in London and we’ve already seen tickets on websites for triple the amount they were supposed to be’. As a singer who is very passionate about the importance of his fan base, he even went as far as selling one hundred re-released tickets to fans in person from a shoe shop in Covent Garden, in order to avoid inflated prices of tickets. In the same interview with Music Week, he said, ‘The main losers are the fans, I don’t want to drive them away’. The original petition, supported by the likes of Mumford & Sons and One Direction, gained 80,000 signatures, which was enough to raise awareness

but not enough for ministers to discuss it in Parliament. However, Franceschi remains optimistic and feels the discussion with the committee is a promising start. Since this, many artists such as Harry Styles and Bon Iver have taken new steps to ensure tickets go to fans. Adding extra security to shows, with a ‘name on ticket’ policy, in order to check that the person attending bought the ticket first hand. This policy aims to discourage secondary selling. Popular theatre shows such as Hamilton have even implemented paperless ticketing strategies. As of February 7th of this year, Google has taken action against these sites, implementing regulations against how these sites are advertised on Google searches, by properly vetting if they are ripping off consumers. For the time being, this will only be applicable to Google advertised sites. However as awareness of this issue grows, more legislation is being pushed for reforms. Page 14

Some regulations that have been put in place have made it necessary that the prices and transferability of tickets be transparent. By making hidden fees and costs public, the secondary sites must also disclose that they are indeed a business reselling the tickets, and the exact location of the seat must be visible. These steps signify the desire for reform and are but the stepping stones of what the music industry will use to rectify this atrocity that has plagued the price of concerts in a most dishonest way. With many industry heavy hitters taking a stand, change is imminent overtime.


THE MNGR: F I N D YO U R F E S T I VA L

Words by Aleksandra Pedrasik

O U R CO M PR EH ENSI V E GU I D E F O R FI N D I N G YO U R P E R F E C T M U S I C F E S T I VA L

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Profile for The MNGR

MNGR Magazine Issue II  

Issue III released on April 2018. Featuring Faber.

MNGR Magazine Issue II  

Issue III released on April 2018. Featuring Faber.

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