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Dashboard Indicators Spring 2012

on the Status of Women at IU Bloomington Prepared by the Office for Women’s Affairs


Welcome

to the 2012 Dashboard Indicators on the Status of Women of the Bloomington campus of Indiana University, which we are providing as part of the celebratory events of the 40th anniversary of the Office for Women’s Affairs’ (OWA) mission. Dashboard Indicators provide a snapshot of some of the important issues that OWA and the university have always been concerned with, including women’s leadership, faculty composition, faculty recognition, composition of the staff workforce, as well as enrollment and persistence data for students. While there are many other areas that data and time constraints did not allow us to include, the available indicators provide an opportunity for readers to examine progress made as well as challenges that remain. In keeping with the sage that “one picture is worth a thousand words,” we have provided graphics that illustrate striking evidence of the successes and challenges concerning the status of women. As with any good inquiry, the data also raises new questions about mechanisms, opportunities, constraints, existing policies as well as practices and goals that, we hope, others with long-standing interests in these areas in addition to those who are newly empowered by the current data will, indeed, take up in the future. OWA is very grateful to Dr. Eric Mokube, who serves OWA as the Director of the Savant Program, Research and our Fiscal Officer. His leadership has been very important in data gathering and analysis. Furthermore, we wish to express gratitude as well to members of our Faculty and Staff Advisory Boards and current OWA staff, who offered advice about what we should include, coupled with comments on earlier drafts of the document. We are also grateful to previous OWA Deans, their team members and allies in the university as well as Bloomington communities, on whose shoulders we stand. Last, but certainly not least, we are especially grateful to the Office of the Vice-Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs (VPFAA), Office of Affirmative Action and University Human Resource Services (UHRS), for providing the data that we have utilized to configure the Dashboard Indicators. Finally, we thank each of you in advance for taking time out of your schedules to examine, peruse and to offer your comments on the data as you work individually and collectively to improve and to move forward the standing of Indiana University by elevating the status of women faculty, staff and students.

Yvette M. Alex-Assensoh, Dean The Office for Women’s Affairs (OWA) Spring 2012

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Statewide Demographics

I. Statewide Demographics by Gender Figure 1: State of Indiana Population Data by Gender Male

Female

51%

50.8%

2000

2010

Source: Indiana State Gov. website; US Census data spring 2012.

Women comprise a majority, which has decreased slightly over the last decade.

Figure 2: Racial and Ethnic Profiles of Women in Indiana 2000

African American

2010 4.7% 2.8%

4.4% 1.6%

Asian American Hispanic American Indian White

43%

45% 0.1% 0.5%

0.1%

0.8%

Source: Indiana State Gov. website; US Census data spring 2012.

The proportion of women of color has increased over the last decade with the exception of American Indians. The percentage of white women has decreased slightly since 2000.

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Women’s Leadership

II. Board of Trustees at Indiana University Figure 3: Women Members of the Indiana University Board of Trustees Male

Female

21%

18%

1970/711979/80

17%

1980/811989/90

26%

1990/911999/00

2000/012009/10

Source: Board of Trustee website; http://www.indiana.edu/~trustees/trustees/academic-years/1850-1860.shtml. Spring 2012.

Since the 1970s, women have comprised less than 30% of the Board of Trustees membership, with percentages dipping below 20% in the 1980s and 1990s. From 1970 to 1980, 4 of the 18 trustees were women. From 1980 to 1990, 2 of the 11 trustees were women. From 1990 to 2000, 3 of the 19 trustees were women. From 2000 to 2010, 5 of the 19 trustees were women.

III. Academic Administrative Positions Figure 4: Gender Distribution of Appointees Holding Academic Administrative Positions (2000-2005) 2000-01

100%

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

80% 60% 40% 20%

Chairperson (23/67)

Dean (5/9)

Assoc. Dean (13/24)

Chancellor (3/7)

Sr. Admin. (4/5)

V. President (0/3)

Chairperson (28/75)

Dean (6/9)

Assoc. Dean (13/24)

Chancellor (2/8)

Sr. Admin. (2/5)

V. President (1/3)

Chairperson (21/69)

Dean (5/12)

Assoc. Dean (13/21)

Chancellor (2/8)

Sr. Admin. (1/4)

V. President (1/4)

Chairperson (17/80)

Dean (3/15)

Assoc. Dean (15/22)

Chancellor (2/7)

Sr. Admin. (0/4)

V. President (1/3)

Chairperson (16/71)

Dean (4/13)

Assoc. Dean (13/25)

Chancellor (3/7)

Sr. Admin. (0/3)

Male

V. President (0/4)

0%

Source: VPFAA spring 2012. Data were provided by the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs (VPFAA) in Spring 2009 and 2012. The categories are defined as follows: Vice President includes Provost and Vice Presidents. Senior Administration includes Associate Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts and Associate Provosts. Chancellor includes Vice Chancellors and Associate Vice Chancellors. Deans include only Academic Deans and Associate Deans include only Faculty appointed to Associate Dean positions.

Figure 5: Gender Distribution of Appointees Holding Academic Administrative Positions (2005-2010)

Percentage of2005-06 women in academic 2006-07 leadership positions 2007-08 on the Bloomington campus 2008-09 has not yet reached 2009-10 50%. In100% fact, there is volatility within each year and across positions. While we see some level of stability at the lower levels of administration, including Chairpersons and Associate Deans, there are still disproportionately more 80% women at the Associate Dean than the Dean levels. Also, over the 10 year-period under review, there has been approximately only a 10 % increase in the Chairperson level. 60% 40% 20%

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Figure 5: Gender Distribution of Appointees Holding Academic Administrative Positions (2005-2010) 2005-06

100%

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

80% 60% 40% 20%

Chairperson (25/75)

Assoc. Dean (17/22)

Dean (4/12)

Chancellor (N/A)

Sr. Admin. (8/10)

V. President (1/4)

Chairperson (25/76)

Assoc. Dean (17/23)

Dean (4/14)

Chancellor (N/A)

Sr. Admin. (9/12)

V. President (2/4)

Chairperson (25/71)

Dean (4/12)

Assoc. Dean (21/23)

Chancellor (N/A)

Sr. Admin. (6/10)

V. President (2/4)

Chairperson (28/72)

Assoc. Dean (15/22)

Dean (6/14)

Chancellor (1/7)

Sr. Admin. (5/11)

V. President (0/2)

Chairperson (24/65)

Assoc. Dean (15/24)

Dean (5/12)

Chancellor (1/6)

Male

Sr. Admin. (6/7)

0%

V. President (0/3)

Women’s Leadership

3/67)

3/24)

)

)

3)

8/75)

3/24)

)

)

3)

1/69)

3/21)

)

)

4)

7/80)

5/22)

)

)

3)

6/71)

3/25)

)

4)

)

Male

Source: VPFAA spring 2012. Data were provided by the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs (VPFAA) in Spring 2009 and 2012. The categories are defined as follows: Vice President includes Provost and Vice Presidents. Senior Administration includes Associate Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts and Associate Provosts. Chancellor includes Vice Chancellors and Associate Vice Chancellors. Deans include only Academic Deans and Associate Deans include only Faculty appointed to Associate Dean positions.

Percentage of women in academic leadership positions on the Bloomington campus has not yet reached 50%. In fact, there is volatility within each year and across positions. While we see some level of stability at the lower levels of administration, including Chairpersons and Associate Deans, there are still disproportionately more women at the Associate Dean than the Dean levels. Also, over the 10 year-period under review, there has been approximately only a 10 % increase in the Chairperson level.

Racial and Ethnic Profiles of Women in Academic Administration Figure 6: 2000-2001 V. President

100%

Sr. Administrator

Chancellor

Deans

Associate Deans

Chairperson

75% 50% 25%

White (14/66)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (1/1)

Asian (1/2)

African American (0/2)

White (12/23)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/0)

Asian (1/0)

African American (0/2)

White (4/11)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/1)

Asian (0/1)

African American (0/0)

White (2/5)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/1)

Asian (0/0)

African American (1/1)

White (0/3)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/0)

Asian (0/0)

African American (0/0)

White (0/2)

American Indian (0/1)

Hispanic (0/0)

Male

Asian (0/0)

Female

African American (0/1)

0%

Source: VPFAA spring 2012. V. President includes Provost and Vice Presidents; Sr. Administration includes Associate V. Presidents, V. Provost and Associate Provosts; Chancellor includes V. Chancellors and Associate V. Chancellors; Deans includes only Academic Deans; Associate Deans includes only academic appointments.

Figure 7: 2009-2010

At the highest levels of administration, women were unrepresented, although they have served as Associate Deans and Chairpersons. ThereSr.were also racial differences, Indians, Latinas, Asian and African V. President Administrator Deanswith American Associate Deans Chairperson 100% American women holding fewer positions than their white counterparts. 75% 50% 25%

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0)

2)

0)

2)

0)

0)

0)

1)

0)

0)

1)

1)

Male

Figure 7: 2009-2010 V. President

100%

Sr. Administrator

Deans

Associate Deans

Chairperson

75% 50% 25%

Faculty Composition

White (23/65)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/2)

Asian (0/6)

African American (2/2)

White (17/22)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/0)

Asian (0/1)

African American (0/0)

White (3/10)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/1)

Asian (1/0)

African American (0/1)

White (6/8)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/0)

Asian (1/0)

African American (1/2)

White (1/4)

American Indian (0/0)

Hispanic (0/0)

Male

Asian (0/0)

Female

African American (0/0)

0%

Source: VPFAA spring 2012. V. President includes Provost and Vice Presidents; Sr. Administration includes Associate V. Presidents, V. Provost and Associate Provosts; Chancellor includes V. Chancellors and Associate V. Chancellors; Deans includes only Academic Deans; Associate Deans includes only academic appointments.

Women are now serving at higher levels of administration as Vice Presidents as well as Senior Administrators. They continue to serve, at slightly higher rates as Deans, Associate Deans and Chairpersons. There is very little racial diversity in academic administration.

Figure 8: Women Tenure/Tenure-Track Faculty (1969-2010) 100%

Full Professor Associate Professor

80% 60% 40%

Assistant Professor

20% 0% 1969

1979

1989

1991

1996

2001

2006

2009

2010

Source: IU Library Archives and IU Fact Book.

The highest percentages of female faculty are concentrated in the Assistant Professor rank, while the lowest percentages are found in the full Professor rank, where faculty have the ability to exercise the most influence and authority.

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Faculty Composition

Figure 9: Full-Time Academic by Gender (2000-2011) 100%

80%

Male 60%

40%

Female 20% 2000 30%

2001 31%

2002 32%

2003 36.1%

2004 36.8%

2005 37%

2006 38.5%

2007 39.1%

2008 39.5%

2009 39.9%

2010 40.9%

2011 41%

Source: VPFAA data provided in spring 2012. Full-time academic faculty includes: Librarians, Researchers, Visiting Scientist, Academic Specialists, Clinical Faculty, Lecturers, Acting Professors, Adjunct Faculty, and Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty.

While men comprise the solid majority of full-time faculty on the Bloomington campus, the data also show a steady increase in the hiring of female faculty, with the sharpest increase happening between 2002 and 2003.

Figure 10: Full-Time Women Faculty of Color (2003-2011) 6%

Black 5%

Hispanic

4%

Asian

3%

American Indian

2% 1%

Multi Ethnic

0% 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Source: Disaggregated data by gender and race are available only in 2003 and beyond.

With the exception of the Asian women of color category, almost every other category was flat. African American women saw an increase of only 0.3% from 2003 to 2010; for Hispanic women that number increased by only 0.2% and for American Indians it moved upwards by 0.03% within the same period.

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Faculty Composition

Figure 11: Part-Time Faculty By Gender (2000-2011) 100%

80%

Male Female

60%

40%

20% 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Source: VPFAA data provided in spring 2012. Full-time academic faculty includes: Librarians, Researchers, Visiting Scientist, Academic Specialists, Clinical Faculty, Lecturers, Acting Professors, Adjunct Faculty, and Tenured/Tenure-track Faculty.

There is virtually no gender difference in the distribution of part-time faculty.

Figure 12: Part-Time Women of Color Faculty (2003-2011) Black Hispanic

5% 4% 3%

Asian 2%

American Indian Multi Ethnic

1% 0% 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Source: VPFAA data provided in spring 2012. Black is both native and foreign born; Hispanic is both native and foreign born; Asian is both native and foreign born. The Multi Ethnic category began in 2010 for faculty reporting more than one ethnic group.

With the exception of the Asian women and the multi ethnic categories, almost every other group’s representation was flat. It mirrored the pattern for full-time faculty (see Fig. 10).

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Faculty Composition

Female Faculty Retention Data for Select Years Figure 13: Women Faculty Resignations (2003-2009) 100% 80%

Full Professor

60%

Associate Professor

40%

Assistant Professor

20% 0% 2003 Total 32%

2004 Total 41%

2005 Total 29%

2006 Total 34%

2007 Total 40%

2008 Total 41%

2009 Total 33%

Source: Office of Affirmative Action report to the BFC, spring 2010.

Resignations among female faculty have generally been highest at the rank of Assistant Professor, which is consistent with the national trends. What is troubling about the IUB data are the resignations by tenured faculty at the Associate and full Professor rank. There is a suggestion from anecdotal data that resignations are due to a variety of issues, including better offers from other universities, climate issues at departmental levels and lack of suitable employment for spouses.

Figure 14: Women Faculty Resignations by Ethnicity (2003) Full Professor

100%

Associate Professor

Assistant Professor

75% 50% 25%

White (1)

Indian American (0)

Hispanic (1)

Asian (1)

African American (3)

Total Women (6)

Total Men (10)

White (0)

Indian American (0)

Hispanic (0)

Asian (1)

African American (2)

Total Women (3)

Total Men (3)

White (0)

Indian American (0)

Hispanic (0)

Asian (1)

African American (0)

Total Women (1)

Total Men (8)

0%

Source: Office of Affirmative Action report to the BFC, spring 2010.

There are racial differences in faculty resignations. The majority of African-American and Latinas resigned after obtaining tenure. There is not a clear pattern of resignation among white women. Among Asian women, the data are more mixed, with a majority resigning before tenure in one year, but most resigning after obtaining tenure.

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Full Professor

100%

Associate Professor

Assistant Professor

75% 50% 25%

White (4)

Indian American (0)

Hispanic (0)

Asian (2)

African American (0)

Total Women (6)

Total Men (11)

White (1)

Indian American (0)

Hispanic (1)

Asian (0)

African American (0)

Total Women (2)

Total Men (2)

White (2)

Indian American (0)

Hispanic (0)

Asian (0)

African American (0)

Total Women (2)

0%

Total Men (7)

Faculty Recognition

Figure 15: Women Faculty Resignations by Ethnicity (2009)

Source: Office of Affirmative Action report to the BFC, spring 2010.

There are racial differences in faculty resignations. In 2009, there was no resignation among African American women. In contrast, the majority of whites and Latinas resigned after obtaining tenure. Among Asian women, the data are more mixed, with none resigning at the full and Associate Professorial rank, but two resigning at the Assistant Professorial level.

IV. Gender Composition of Faculty Recognition at IUB William Patten Foundation Figure 16: Gender Distribution of William Patten Foundation Winners (1970-2009) Male

Female

17%

1970-1979 (5/25)

12.5%

1980-1989 (7/49)

20%

1990-1999 (7/28)

27%

2000-2009 (10/27)

Source: The William T. Patten Foundation website http://patten.indiana.edu/formerLecturers. Spring 2012

Women continue to comprise a small minority of the William Patten Foundation lecturers invited to campus, although there have been improvements over the years.

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Faculty Recognition

Figure 17: Named Professors/Endowed Chairs By Gender (2000-2011) 100% 80%

Male

60% 40%

Female 20% 0% 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: VPFAA at IUB spring 2012. Named Professorships are a means of recognizing and honoring outstanding faculty in the colleges and schools. Such faculty are expected to exemplify standards of excellence in the performance of teaching, research and service within a specific discipline/profession.

Men comprise almost 80% of the named Professors/Endowed Chairs, while women comprise 20%. With the exception of modest improvements at the beginning and at the end of the decade, very little has changed.

Figure 18: Racial and Ethnic Profiles of Women Who Hold Named Professor/Endowed Chair Positions (2000-2010) White African American

100% 80% 60%

0%

Asian 40%

0%

Hispanic 20%

0%

Other

0% 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: VPFAA at IUB spring 2012. Named Professorships are a means of recognizing and honoring outstanding faculty in the colleges and schools. Such faculty are expected to exemplify standards of excellence in the performance of teaching, research and service within a specific discipline/profession.

No Asian, Latina or Native American female faculty member has been appointed to a named professorship or endowed chair. In 2009, one black female professor was appointed to a named professorship/endowed chair and in 2010, another black female professor was appointed to a named professorship/endowed chair. In 2000, there were 12 white female professors appointed to named professorship/endowed chairs and the number has grown to a total of 38 in 2010.

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Faculty Recognition

Figure 19: Special Professors by Gender (2000-2010) 100% 80%

Male

60% 40%

Female 20% 0% 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: VPFAA spring 2012. Special Professors includes Distinguished, Provost, Chancellors’ and College Professors.

For the last decade, women have held about 20% of the Special Professorships on campus, while men have held the remaining 80%. Little has changed over the last decade.

Figure 20: Racial and Ethnic Profiles of Women Who Hold Special Professorships (2000-2010) White African American

100% 80% 60%

0%

Asian 40%

0%

Hispanic 20%

0%

Other

0% 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: VPFAA spring 2012. Special Professors includes Distinguished, Provost, Chancellors’ and College Professors.

There are no Asian, Latina/Hispanic or Native American female special professors on the Bloomington campus of Indiana University. From 2000 to 2007, there was a single African American female who held the status of special professor. Eight white female faculty held the status of special professor in 2000 and that number has grown to 15 in 2010.

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Staff Data

V. Women Staff Figure 21: Full-time Non-Academic Women Workforce by EEO Category (2000-2011) 100%

Professional

80%

Clerical

60%

Technical 40%

Skilled Craft 20%

Service Maintenance

0% 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2010

Source: Data from the Office of Affirmative Action. All data are from October 1 frozen files, spring 2012.

Women staff members are disproportionally represented among the lower-paid clerical category and underrepresented among the higher paid skilled craft and professional categories. The EEO categories are based on the Salary Grade and the job responsibility they are related to. “Full-time” is defined as someone who works 40 standard hours/week. This may be a person who has 2 jobs that each requires 20 standard hours of work/ week. “Part-time” is anything less than a total of 40 standard hours/week. For benefit status see this link: http://hr.iu.edu/enroll/video.html

Figure 22: Racial and Ethnic Breakdown of Full-time Nonacademic Women Staff (2000) Professional

Clerical

Technical

Skilled Craft

Service Maintenance

Total Men 912/ Women 923

Total Men 150/ Women 1169

Total Men 190/ Women 134

Total Men 438/ Women 30

Total Men 474/ Women 346

African American (21)

African American (23)

100% 75% 50% 25%

White (322)

Indian American (1)

Hispanic (6)

Asian (8)

African American (8)

White (30)

Indian American (0)

Hispanic (0)

Asian (0)

African American (0)

White (125)

Indian American (0)

Hispanic (2)

Asian (5)

African American (2)

White (1113)

Indian American (3)

Hispanic (10)

Asian (20)

White (862)

Indian American (4)

Hispanic (12)

Asian (24)

0%

Source: Data from the Office of Affirmative Action. All data are from October 1 frozen files, spring 2012.

In 2000, white women held a majority of all staff positions and the representation among women of color is very low, especially the technical skilled craft categories. of Full-time Figure 23:inRacial andandEthnic Breakdown

Nonacademic Women Staff (2011)

100% 75%

Professional Total Men 1262/ Women 1229

Clerical

Technical

Skilled Craft

Service Maintenance

Total Men 166/ Women 1031

Total Men 175/ Women 111

Total Men 364/ Women 27

Total Men 476/ Women 240

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Figure 23: Racial and Ethnic Breakdown of Full-time Nonacademic Women Staff (2011) 100%

Professional

Clerical

Technical

Skilled Craft

Service Maintenance

Total Men 1262/ Women 1229

Total Men 166/ Women 1031

Total Men 175/ Women 111

Total Men 364/ Women 27

Total Men 476/ Women 240

75% 50% 25%

Multi Ethnic (0)

Native Hawaiian (0) White (214) Indian American (1)

Hispanic (8)

Asian (8)

African American (6)

Multi Ethnic (1)

Native Hawaiian (0) White (26) Indian American (0)

Hispanic (0)

Asian (0)

African American (0)

Multi Ethnic (1)

Native Hawaiian (1) White (105) Indian American (0)

Hispanic (2)

Asian (2)

African American (0)

Multi Ethnic (11)

Native Hawaiian (0) White (983) Indian American (3)

Hispanic (8)

Asian (12)

African American (17)

Multi Ethnic (22)

Native Hawaiian (1)

White (1104) Indian American (1)

Hispanic (14)

Asian (49)

African American (38)

0%

Source: Data from the Office of Affirmative Action. All data are from October 1 frozen files, spring 2012.

In 2010, only the professional category reflected a measure of improvement in the representation of women of color. The clerical, skilled craft, technical and service maintenance categories were basically the same as they were a decade ago.

Student Data

VI. Student Enrollment Figure 24: Enrollment Data for Graduate and Undergraduate Students by Gender (1970-2010) Graduate Men Undergraduate Men

100%

80%

60%

Graduate Women Undergraduate Women

40%

20% 1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

Sources: Office of the Registrar; IU Archives—Enrollment Statistics spring 2012.

Women’s enrollment surpassed the enrollment of their undergraduate male counterparts in the 1990s, but is currently at par with men. Women graduate enrollment is basically on par with men at the aggregate level.

14


Student Data

Figure 25: Percentage of Undergraduate Minority Women Enrollment to Total Undergraduate Enrollment (1980-2010) 80% 60% 40%

20% 0% 1980

Total 21873 Minority Women 2066

1990

2000

2010

Total 24911 Minority Women 2428

Total 25623 Minority Women 3099

Total 30422 Minority Women 4661

Source: Office of the Registrar; IU Archives—Enrollment Statistics spring 2012.

Figure 26: Undergraduate Enrollment Among Women of Color (1980-2010) African American

Total 2006 100%

Total 2428

Total 3099

Total 4661

1990

2000

2010

80%

Hispanic American Asian American Indian American

60% 40%

20% 0% 1980

Source: Office of the registrar; IU archives—Enrollment statistics spring 2012.

Asian women have experienced an increase in enrollment patterns. Black women, who had the highest enrollment record among minority groups in the 1980s, continue to see their numbers decline. Latina and Native American women’s enrollment patterns have decreased and flat lined, respectively. Overall, the student enrollments are certainly not proportionate to growth among women of color in the state.

15


Figure 27: Degree Conferred at IUB by gender from 2002-2011 20022003

100%

20032004

20042005

20052006

20062007

20072008

20082009

20092010

20102011

20112012

80% 60% 40% 20%

Source: University Institutional Research and Reporting website http://www.iu.edu/~uirrr/reports/standard/degree.

Earlier in the decade, women were surpassing men in the percentage of degrees conferred at the bachelor’s degree level and were at par with men at the master’s degree level. The gender gap is also closing at the doctoral level.

Design and layout by

16

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

Bachelor’s

Doctorate

Master’s

0%

Male Female

Bachelor’s

Student Data

Degree Completion

Dashboard Indicators  

A series of data about the women at Indiana University

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