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Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Boston, MA Permit No. 54523

Vol. XXX · Issue I

Newton South High School’s Student Newspaper · Newton, MA · Established 1984 · June 6, 2013

DOUBLE DOUBLE

South’s chemical health policy targets athletes and leaves students who participate in other extracurriculars free of consquences

By Nathaniel Bolter

I

photo illustration by Kylie Walters

n his freshman year, junior Phillip* held an open house party. It did not go as planned. The party became overcrowded and with more people came more underage drinking. Students were throwing up in the front yard. One of the students became seriously ill from the alcohol. An ambulance was called. When the police arrived, they wrote down the names of the students present and reported them to South’s administration. Phillip, a member of the freshman lacrosse team, was suspended for a quarter of the season. Other members of the lacrosse team who were present at the party were forced to do morning running for the remainder of the season, and those not in athletics ended up unpunished. This discrepancy in consequences was a product of South’s Chemical Health Policy that applies to only athletes. This originates from the mandated policy of the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association (MIAA). Yet in recent years, neighboring schools have expanded upon the MIAA policy in order to eliminate this double standard and applied similar policies to school-sponsored extracurricular activities other than athletics. The MIAA, a non-profit association that governs athletic proceedings, sanctions that at anytime during the school year, including the athletic preseason, athletes shall not use, consume, transport, buy or sell alcohol or any other controlled substance. Minimum penalties are a 25 percent loss of eligibility in interscholastic contests for the first offense and a 60 percent loss for second and subsequent offenses. Although individual schools are not allowed to reduced these penalties,

they are granted the ability to add to the policy or create one universal policy while maintaining the same degree of stringency. According to Principal Joel Stembridge, South has only added the stipulation that athletes are still subject to ineligibility even if they are only in the presence of alcohol. Stembridge said the addition was for the sake of clarity. “A lot of schools have [added the language] ‘in the presence of ’ because it became problematic when people were at the party and then they’d put down the beer ... when the police arrived. Their name appears on the list, but there is a big discussion about whether they were actually drinking alcohol or in the presence of alcohol,” Stembridge said. There is not, however, any language regarding consequences for students who are not athletes. Goodwin Headmaster Charles Myette, a boys’ basketball coach from 1991 to 2004, said he believes the MIAA’s creation of the Chemical Health Policy was wellintentioned. “It definitely was out of concern for safety of kids ... I’m sure [the MIAA was thinking], ‘If a high rate of teenagers are alcohol and drug users, and a growing rate, how can we help?’” he said. Although the MIAA is only able to determine consequences for athletes, the lack of school-authorized consequences for all students is unfair, according to Myette. “I like the idea that students have some accountability and have to watch it but it is singling out a group. That’s the unfair part.” Stembridge said there are logistical reasons for why South does not have a universal policy. “The consequence is important here because ... for athletics the consequence CHEM HEALTH, page 2

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

Army

“Outliers”

Students react to the One School, One Book selection for 2013.

page

3

Students pursue various armies after graduation from South.

page

Appreciation

8

Junior emphasizes importance of being thankful for life’s blessings.

page

21

NEWS 2 GLOBAL 7 FEATURES 8 EDITORIAL 14 CENTERFOLD 16 OPINIONS 20 SPORTS 25


news volume 30

issue 1

page

june 6, 2013

2

Chemical Health Policy targets athletes only CHEM HEALTH, from 1

South Spots compiled by Roar editors

Poetry Slam and Open Mic The Bishop Mackenzie Center will hold a poetry slam and open mic night featuring performances by South students and alumni June 8 at 7:00 p.m. All proceeds from the event will go to benefit children in Ghana. Underclassmen Awards Night A ceremony honoring notable underclassmen will be held in the lecture hall June 12 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Various departments will present awards. Understanding the College Admissions Process On June 17 in the Druker Auditorium at the Newton Free Library, Lanita Foley, a certified educational planner and educational consultant with 15 years of experience in college admissions will teach parents and their teens about how to best navigate the process.

from drinking, as the police are reluctant to discipline students for typical teenage behavior,” Michael said. “I think like 95 percent of the time, whenever police encounter students who are underage and intoxicated or are hosting parties with no parents or doing other illegal substance things, they usually let it slide as long as it’s not outwardly harmful,” he said. Some question the policy’s fairness as well as its effectiveness. Myette said he would welcome more universal enforcement of the Chemical Health Policy in order to spread the message

we think that second category is more fair.” According to Stembridge, the stringent punishments of the Chemical Health is participation in part or a portion of the Policy can be detrimental to some students. season. So for something like theatre, I’m “I like the fact that we have some flexibility not sure that makes as much sense. What around consequences. I think it can be super would the consequence be?” he said. difficult when a student’s best connection Junior Michael*, who has had three to the school is athletics, ” he said. parties shut down by the police, agreed that “Then they’re banned from the imuniversal enforcement presents difficulties. portant games. That becomes really chal“I think [keeping the MIAA policy] is the lenging to keep kids motivated to make easiest way for administration to implement good decisions when the most positive thing a rule that can be effective ... they can’t do in their life has been essentially removed it across the board for all students,” he said. from possibility. ” Senior Patrick Fabrizio, captain of According the football and to Grindle, howwrestling teams, ever, Scituate High however, said he School has implebelieves athletes are mented a policy that singled out not beIn a survey of 134 students, The Roar recieved the following results covers all extracurcause they are easy riculars acctivities targets, but because to circumvent this of their influence in issue. “When stuschool. “I think it dents are ineligible is there [because] to participate in I think athletes are athletics, the stusupposed to kind dents ... have the of be above, they’re right to meet with supposed to kind of the principal to reset an example for quest permission the school,” Fabto either tryout or rizio said. practice with the Stembridge team if it’s in the agreed that more best interest of the should be expected student athlete, the of athletes. “I think team, the coach,” that part of being Grindle said. “And a student athlete most of the time, means that you’re that process is rebeing held to this habilitative for the different standard,” student and they he said, “And if you become eligible.” don’t want to be Brookline held for that differHigh School also ent standard then has a flexible yet don’t try out for this fair and universal team.” policy, according to Assistant Headmaster Scituate High School, which imple- of caution. “I don’t think it’s fair; I don’t,” mented a universal Chemical Health Policy Myette said. “I would say fair would mean Hal Manson. Brookline High School enfour years ago, however, had a different make [the policy for] everybody because forces all MIAA punishments for athletes, philosophy according to Assistant Principal what’s the message — trying to help make but also imposes consequences on other stuElizabeth Grindle. “The premise of [the sure people are not using alcohol and drugs.” dents: mandatory participation in meetings, Myette added that universal enforce- disciplinary hearings and substance abuse universal policy] was that if we hold kids to a higher standard then they will reach those ment of the policy would result in safety and treatment programs. “Chances are that the higher standards,” Grindle said. “And what eliminate a double-standard. “I’d be ok if the disciplinary hearing [for any student] that we’ve found is that more of our students are district along with the community went to is conducted is going to wind up with the eligible and there are fewer students on our try to adopt some guidelines around this,” same or a similar outcome,” Manson said. he said. “And it would be around helping to “If someone was an athlete they would end ineligibility list.” According to Michael, the idea that keep students safe and make good choices. up being suspended for a number of games. alcohol is detrimental to sports performance But it would also level the playing field and If someone were in a play, they’d wind up getting suspended essentially from a numwould discourage drinking even without make it fair for more students than less.” According to Stembridge, in this situ- ber of performances. If someone is in some an official policy. “I think what ... keep[s] students from partying [the most] is not ation a double-standard is acceptable. “It’s other type of extracurricular activity they the punishment for being caught, but the a complex issue, because I’m trying to say would be potentially removed from that actual effect of not being on your game the it’s ok to have a double standard, which is extracurricular activity.” Nonetheless, Stembridge said the next morning when it’s time to focus and kind of weird,” Stembridge said. “I’m not in Chemical Health Policy would not be modiyou still don’t have your head in it.”Michael charge of one standard that gets delivered to fied unless it becomes necessary to have said, “It’s more of a mental setback than a us by the MIAA. But I am in charge of what more rigid rules. “The MIAA policy is not the standard is for everyone else.” fear of punishment.” flexible and that’s not how we do discipline Though it would level the playing As a result of this mindset, Fabrizio here at South, ” Stembridge said, “But I think said there is less of a need to regulate the field, Stembridge said that holding all stuif we got to a point where it was important behavior of athletes than other students. “It dents to the athletes’ standards would be for clarity of purposes to not be flexible on should be at least less common among ath- disadvantageous to the student body. our alcohol policy, then that would be ... a “If you are not participating in athletletes concerned with sports performance, big conversation with a lot of people and I because [all] of these substances ... decrease ics then we have the opportunity to make think we would do that. ” decisions more on a case by case basis, sports performance.” In addition, South’s Chemical Health about what’s best for the student given the Policy is not effective in preventing students circumstances,” he said.”So in most cases *Names changed to protect students’ identities

South Standards Question One:

Athletes must adhere to a punitive chemical health policy, while students participating in other school-sponsored extracurricular activities do not. Does this create a double standard?

NO 70

YES 64

Question Two:

Would you approve of such a chemical health policy for extracurriculars at South?

NO 63

YES 71


news volume 30

issue 1

page

june 6, 2013

2

Chemical Health Policy targets athletes only CHEM HEALTH, from 1

South Spots compiled by Roar editors

Poetry Slam and Open Mic The Bishop Mackenzie Center will hold a poetry slam and open mic night featuring performances by South students and alumni June 8 at 7:00 p.m. All proceeds from the event will go to benefit children in Ghana. Underclassmen Awards Night A ceremony honoring notable underclassmen will be held in the lecture hall June 12 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Various departments will present awards. Understanding the College Admissions Process On June 17 in the Druker Auditorium at the Newton Free Library, Lanita Foley, a certified educational planner and educational consultant with 15 years of experience in college admissions will teach parents and their teens about how to best navigate the process.

from drinking, as the police are reluctant to discipline students for typical teenage behavior,” Michael said. “I think like 95 percent of the time, whenever police encounter students who are underage and intoxicated or are hosting parties with no parents or doing other illegal substance things, they usually let it slide as long as it’s not outwardly harmful,” he said. Some question the policy’s fairness as well as its effectiveness. Myette said he would welcome more universal enforcement of the Chemical Health Policy in order to spread the message

we think that second category is more fair.” According to Stembridge, the stringent punishments of the Chemical Health is participation in part or a portion of the Policy can be detrimental to some students. season. So for something like theatre, I’m “I like the fact that we have some flexibility not sure that makes as much sense. What around consequences. I think it can be super would the consequence be?” he said. difficult when a student’s best connection Junior Michael*, who has had three to the school is athletics, ” he said. parties shut down by the police, agreed that “Then they’re banned from the imuniversal enforcement presents difficulties. portant games. That becomes really chal“I think [keeping the MIAA policy] is the lenging to keep kids motivated to make easiest way for administration to implement good decisions when the most positive thing a rule that can be effective ... they can’t do in their life has been essentially removed it across the board for all students,” he said. from possibility. ” Senior Patrick Fabrizio, captain of According the football and to Grindle, howwrestling teams, ever, Scituate High however, said he School has implebelieves athletes are mented a policy that singled out not beIn a survey of 134 students, The Roar recieved the following results covers all extracurcause they are easy riculars acctivities targets, but because to circumvent this of their influence in issue. “When stuschool. “I think it dents are ineligible is there [because] to participate in I think athletes are athletics, the stusupposed to kind dents ... have the of be above, they’re right to meet with supposed to kind of the principal to reset an example for quest permission the school,” Fabto either tryout or rizio said. practice with the Stembridge team if it’s in the agreed that more best interest of the should be expected student athlete, the of athletes. “I think team, the coach,” that part of being Grindle said. “And a student athlete most of the time, means that you’re that process is rebeing held to this habilitative for the different standard,” student and they he said, “And if you become eligible.” don’t want to be Brookline held for that differHigh School also ent standard then has a flexible yet don’t try out for this fair and universal team.” policy, according to Assistant Headmaster Scituate High School, which imple- of caution. “I don’t think it’s fair; I don’t,” mented a universal Chemical Health Policy Myette said. “I would say fair would mean Hal Manson. Brookline High School enfour years ago, however, had a different make [the policy for] everybody because forces all MIAA punishments for athletes, philosophy according to Assistant Principal what’s the message — trying to help make but also imposes consequences on other stuElizabeth Grindle. “The premise of [the sure people are not using alcohol and drugs.” dents: mandatory participation in meetings, Myette added that universal enforce- disciplinary hearings and substance abuse universal policy] was that if we hold kids to a higher standard then they will reach those ment of the policy would result in safety and treatment programs. “Chances are that the higher standards,” Grindle said. “And what eliminate a double-standard. “I’d be ok if the disciplinary hearing [for any student] that we’ve found is that more of our students are district along with the community went to is conducted is going to wind up with the eligible and there are fewer students on our try to adopt some guidelines around this,” same or a similar outcome,” Manson said. he said. “And it would be around helping to “If someone was an athlete they would end ineligibility list.” According to Michael, the idea that keep students safe and make good choices. up being suspended for a number of games. alcohol is detrimental to sports performance But it would also level the playing field and If someone were in a play, they’d wind up getting suspended essentially from a numwould discourage drinking even without make it fair for more students than less.” According to Stembridge, in this situ- ber of performances. If someone is in some an official policy. “I think what ... keep[s] students from partying [the most] is not ation a double-standard is acceptable. “It’s other type of extracurricular activity they the punishment for being caught, but the a complex issue, because I’m trying to say would be potentially removed from that actual effect of not being on your game the it’s ok to have a double standard, which is extracurricular activity.” Nonetheless, Stembridge said the next morning when it’s time to focus and kind of weird,” Stembridge said. “I’m not in Chemical Health Policy would not be modiyou still don’t have your head in it.”Michael charge of one standard that gets delivered to fied unless it becomes necessary to have said, “It’s more of a mental setback than a us by the MIAA. But I am in charge of what more rigid rules. “The MIAA policy is not the standard is for everyone else.” fear of punishment.” flexible and that’s not how we do discipline Though it would level the playing As a result of this mindset, Fabrizio here at South, ” Stembridge said, “But I think said there is less of a need to regulate the field, Stembridge said that holding all stuif we got to a point where it was important behavior of athletes than other students. “It dents to the athletes’ standards would be for clarity of purposes to not be flexible on should be at least less common among ath- disadvantageous to the student body. our alcohol policy, then that would be ... a “If you are not participating in athletletes concerned with sports performance, big conversation with a lot of people and I because [all] of these substances ... decrease ics then we have the opportunity to make think we would do that. ” decisions more on a case by case basis, sports performance.” In addition, South’s Chemical Health about what’s best for the student given the Policy is not effective in preventing students circumstances,” he said.”So in most cases *Names changed to protect students’ identities

South Standards Question One:

Athletes must adhere to a punitive chemical health policy, while students participating in other school-sponsored extracurricular activities do not. Does this create a double standard?

NO 70

YES 64

Question Two:

Would you approve of such a chemical health policy for extracurriculars at South?

NO 63

YES 71


news

june 6, 2013

Selection Committee chooses “Outliers: The Story of Success” for One School, One Book David Li & Amelia Stern News Editors

The One School, One Book Selection Committee has chosen “Outliers: The Story of Success,” a non-fiction book by Malcolm Gladwell, for this fall’s One School, One Book event. The committee, composed of teachers from various subjects, juniors Hannah Nahar and Andrew Dembling and Julie Sall of the Newton Schools Foundation, started meeting in February to determine next year’s book. Committee members said they are confident students will embrace the selection despite its non-fiction genre. “Outliers” discusses why some people succeed and others do not. According to English teacher and Chair of the One School, One Book Selection Committee David Weintraub, Gladwell argues that success depends upon a complex set of circumstances and opportunities. “The way I see it, the central question that Malcolm Gladwell asks us is: are we responsible in making our own success or are we deluding ourselves to think we have control over our own success?” Weintraub said. “My guess is that most people at South would say

that we have the ability to make our own success; we have the ability to control our own future.” Freshman Gabriela Taslitsky, however, said that the book’s genre could deter readers. “I think it’s going to be hard for students to be interested in it since it’s a nonfiction book,” she said. Nahar agreed that a nonfiction book could be problematic, but said she remains optimistic. “I think people are a little nervous that it’s going to be boring, but there are different kinds of non-fiction, [and] hopefully this one won’t be dry,” she said. Weintraub said he recognizes concerns about non-fiction writing but said “Outliers” was chosen for its potential to have meaningful effects on a wide range of students. “It’s always a challenge with the One School, One Book process — you know there’s going to be a lot of people who aren’t going to like the choice,” Weintraub said. “You hope there are going to be a lot of people who discover something, but we wouldn’t have chosen ‘Outliers’ if we didn’t think that every student couldn’t love a piece of it or couldn’t grow to love it as the book continues.” “Outliers” was also selected for its wide range of appeal, according to Weintraub. “I think ‘Outliers’

3

photo by Yu-Ching Chang

The One School, One Book Selection Committee chose “Outliers: The Story of Success” as this year’s read. is going to appeal to a very broad spectrum of students in school,” he said. Although all students can relate to the book, according to Nahar, the subject matter has particular resonance at South. “I thought it would be a really good choice for our school specifically since there is so much pressure to succeed,” Nahar said. Librarian Jennifer Dimmick said many students will enjoy “Out-

liers” because it can also provide guidance in the turbulent time of adolescence. “The topic of the book will be particularly interesting to kids who are in a time in their lives [where they] are trying to figure out what success means,” she said. Freshman Kieran Fitzmaurice, who has read the book, said that one will gain perspective after reading it. “‘Outliers’ ... makes you think more about the world around you and how it works, and it makes

you think less about the individual people in it,” Fitzmaurice said. According to Weintraub, the book’s new perspectives generate interest and constitute a rewarding read. “You can crinkle your nose[at] the idea of the book, but once you start reading the book you’re going to be drawn into the mystery,” he said. “You’re going to be challenged to think about things in a new way and the experience will be very satisfying.”

Senate passes a resolution decrying club fees Carter Howe & Julia Mount News Reporters

South Senate has unanimously passed a resolution recommending the Newton School Committee to eliminate the $125 student activity, or club, fee, because, according to senators, it hinders club activity and participation. Senate President junior Jack Lovett spearheaded the effort, and the Equal Opportuniy Committee brought the resolution to the floor. “It’s definitely been an issue that’s been close to my heart; I’ve been wanting to address it since the end of my freshman year,” he said. The fee was instituted in early 2011 as a way to collect revenue to defray a $4 million deficit. “The hope was that we would raise a million dollars in extra fees so that we only had to cut $3 million in programs and staff,” chair of the Newton School Committee Claire Sokoloff said. Lovett, the Equal Opportunity Committee and the rest of the Senate worked together to form the resolution, “The Equal Opportunity Committee took up our Student Activity Fee ... and they started to do some research and ... we all put it together and put the resolution out,” he said. Member of the Equal Opportunities Committee senior Wendy Ma said that the committee undertook the issue of club fees in order to represent of student interest. “We felt like we wanted to make a bigger impact on the community, and we were looking at issues that a lot of students brought to us,”

Ma said. The Senate passed the resolution Jan. 17, 2013, but it was readopted with revisions March 28 and sent electronically to the Newton School Committee for consideration April 27. The Board of Aldermen also released a resolution against the fee on May 20 as a part of the operating budget for the next fiscal year. The resolution comprises nine arguments to abolish the club fee. “Our arguments were first that the club fee discourages the creation of clubs in our Newton high school community,” Lovett said. “We thought that in the Newton South community it wouldn’t be a smart idea to discourage people from

fee went on.” Understanding that the fee could disproportionately burden students, members of the Newton School Committee have tried to make the fee more accommodating. “There’s a waiver program and it’s pretty simple straightforward: ... any student whose participation in a club would be deterred because of the fee is encouraged to apply for a waiver,” Sokoloff said. According to Lovett, however, the fee should be waived for all students, as it is no longer necessary. “[The School Committee] passed the override and taxes have [been] raised in this city, [so it is] time to get rid of the fee because if you’re getting more revenue

We want people to keep their faith in the community and feel comfortable joining whatever they want to join without having any of this extra baggage to worry about. - Wendy Ma, Class of 2013 joining clubs.” Sophomore Senator Eli Levine said this argument resulted from clubs’ recent inability to maintain a base of students. “We found that many clubs run by students were shut down or went underground simply because there wasn’t enough interest by students who were going to pay the club fee,” he said. Junior William Su said that he has also noticed the club fee’s effect on participation. “A lot of people have stopped going to clubs because of [the fee],” he said. “I used to go to badminton club with some friends, but a lot of them just dropped out as soon as the

then there’s no point in charging unnecessary fees,” he said. Sokoloff, however, said that while there is no longer a deficit, the budget is still not stable. “Basically the last two years have not had a gap but we have not had extra money either ... so if we cut all of our fees then we would need to make it up elsewhere,” she said. Lovett,though, said that the club fee’s ineffectiveness means that its removal would not be damaging. “[Senate] Vice President [senior Nick Hurney] did look at the budget information, and [the city] expected to get $200,000 in from the fee and only ended up

getting $2,000,” Lovett said. Sokoloff said she acknowledges these shortcomings but maintains that the fee is important. “It hasn’t raised quite what we expected, but there are definitely significant additional revenues coming in from the additional fee,” Sokoloff said. The resolution aims to preserve and improve clubs, according to Lovett. “On the resolution we made three requests: first that they remove the fee; second, if they don’t, that at least they lower the price of the fee and third that if you are not going to do any of those options then at least be more transparent and start spending the revenue that they get on clubs in Newton South,” he said. Ma said she hopes that a response to the resolution will come sooner rather than later. “As soon as possible would be best because we want people to keep their faith in the community and feel comfortable joining whatever they want to join without having any of this extra baggage to worry about,” she said. According to Sokoloff, the School Committee’s verdict, which will come sometime in the next school year, hinges on data that will determine whether clubs are truly struggling under the fee. “We are taking a deeper look at that fee to understand the impact it has on the number of clubs,” she said. Lovett said he has faith the resolution will have a significant impact on the community. “I would like to see this fee taken down as soon as possible,” he said. “Especially for the 2013-2014 academic year, I’d like to see no one have to pay this fee.”


4

news

june 6, 2013

South alumnus Bill Humphrey ‘09 and current South junior Nathan Foster push toward social and environmental change through political activism By Nathaniel Bolter and Sasha Kuznetsova

photo courtesy of the public domain

Bill Humphrey South alumnus Bill Humphrey, who graduated in the class of 2009, was instrumental in the legalization of gay marriage in Delaware this spring. Humphrey founded a Political Action Committee (PAC) called the Delaware Right to Marry PAC, worked for a coalition called Equality Delaware Campaign for Marriage Equality and drafted some of the early legislation. Humphrey is also responsible for the name of the bill: the Civil Marriage Equality and Religious Freedom Act of 2013. The act passed Senate and was signed by Governor Jack Markell

part-time, Humphrey used his influence in college to raise awareness for the gay rights, raising money for the first poll on gay marriage in Delaware. Humphrey joined the Equality Delaware Campaign for Marriage Equality coalition in January 2012, and worked there until the bill was signed May 7. “We got it done, so that was pretty exciting — being in the legislature and watching those final votes and then seeing the governor sign it,” he said. Humphrey, graduating from the University of Delaware in just three years, has experience in national, state and city-

I hadn’t really been involved in the issue before that, but I definitely supported it and thought it would be a great learning opportunity both on the issue and in general in terms of getting campaign experience. on May 7. It will take effect July 1. Humphrey, who was the president of College Democrats at the University of Delaware where he majored in political science, said he created the Delaware Right to Marry PAC out of need for a project.“After the 2010 elections, [the College Democrats] needed some sort of project to work on, and of course for people in college in the United States right now, one of the most popular issues is marriage equality,” he said. “I hadn’t really been involved in the issue before that, but I definitely supported it and thought it would be a great learning opportunity both on the issue and in general in terms of getting campaign experience.” While running the committee

level campaigns and was recently hired as Assistant Editor at www.theglobalist.com, an online publication regarding foreign policy, based in Washington D.C. He said, however, that his political interest stems from his time at South, where he spent three years as a Senator, one of those as Senate president. According to Humphrey his involvement with the marriage equality movement has provided learning opportunities not attainable in the classroom. “Something I’ve always wanted to do is to have the opportunity to see what I can do if there weren’t any restrictions or limitations on me,” he said. “Running my own PAC was a great opportunity to do that.”

photo by Yu-Ching Chang

Nathan Foster Throughout the past school year, junior Nathan Foster has collected signatures for a tax on carbon emissions, which he presented to the office of Representative Joe Kennedy earlier this May. Foster said he began this project in his American literature class as a required “Hero’s Journey” assignment, the purpose of which was to motivate students to pursue a specific interest in depth, according to Foster. Foster dedicated his project to political activism focusing specifically on climate change. “I feel very strongly about the issue of climate change,” Foster said. “I think it’s something that we’re not doing nearly enough about and it’s something that is going to be one of the most important issues of the 21st century for humans in general.” Foster also campaigned for Congressman Kennedy and Senator Elizabeth Warren in the 2012 elections and attended the American-Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) national conference in Boston. According to Foster, this involvement in various social and political movements encouraged his petitioning. Although he has not reached his goal of 1000 signatures, Foster said he considers his progress to be substantial. “I have gotten 913 [signatures] —

which is very impressive. Not quite the goal, but I’m still very satisfied with that,” he said. In May, Foster contacted Kennedy’s office and presented his petition to an aid. According to Foster, the petition was the first the office had received and was met with a positive reaction. In response, Foster said he has been trying to initiate a meeting with Kennedy himself and has invited him to visit South in the future. Foster said that he hopes to improve the South community as well as greater society. “I hope that just the fact that I have been out there collecting signatures has made me marginally increase awareness of the issue of climate change in the South community,” Foster said. Despite his success, Foster said he is unsure about his next step in political activism. “I hope to continue political activism – maybe do another petition or something but I’m not really sure,” Foster said. “I just know that I am really interested and there are a lot of options.”


news

june 6, 2013

Public urination prompts freshman coach’s resignation Yonatan Gazit Editor-in-Chief

After freshmen baseball coach Alby Moscone urinated in the team’s dugout during a game, several complaints were filed with Principal Stembridge that led to Moscone’s resignation. This 2013 spring season was Moscone’s first with the team. Even before the incident occurred, Moscone would swear and behave inappropriately in other ways in front of the players, according to one of the players on the baseball team. Yet his behavior went unreported until much later in the season. The actual urination incident occurred in a game against Weston High School during the bottom of the 4th inning, in which South’s pitchers were walking several batters. During a pitching change, Moscone walked over to the edge of the dugout, moved over the players’ bags

and then urinated. No reports were filed until after a few more games. Moscone never urinated in front of the players during that time, but the frequency of other types of inappropriate behavior did increase. Finally, two of the team’s players went to principal Stembridge with a list of complaints regarding Moscone, including the urination incident. Stembridge notified varsity baseball coach Ron Jordan and coach Moscone himself of these complaints, and upon hearing of the player’s complaints Moscone handed in his resignation. The freshmen baseball team was left without a coach; Director of Athletics and Wellness Scott Perrin filled the void for the team. Eventually, English Teacher Joseph Scozzaro took over for Perrin and stayed with the team until the end of the season. *Sources for this article are kept anonymous under request

photo by Aaron Edelstien

Freshman Brad Weissel bats against Roxbury Latin as interim freshman baseball coach Joseph Scozzaro looks on.

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5

Knoedler to step down as dept. head Fiza Ansari News Reporter

After four years as Fine and Performing Arts Department Head, Jeff Knoedler has decided to step down to the new position of Theatre Department Head for the 2013-2014 school year in order to spend more time working with students and on productions. Knoedler said he is stepping down because he grew tired of his responsibilities as the Fine and Performing Arts Department Head, as they reduce time spent with students. “Teaching and interacting with students is at the center of what I love and the administration [aspect] was taking away from direct student interactions,” Knoedler said. Former Fine Arts Department Head, Benjamin Youngman, said he resigned from the position four years ago due to similar reasons. Youngman said he experienced difficulty managing administrating and teaching simultaneously. “As an educator, you need to find what feeds you and keeps your battery running,” Youngman said, “For me, I found it impossible to find a balance and so I decided just to pursue teaching music.” Following in Youngman’s footsteps, Knoedler said that he plans on spending more time as a theatre teacher. “Theatre will be my main focus,” Knoedler said. “I want to see kids grow and learn through theatre and the last four years [that] became less and less what my job was about.” English and Theatre Arts teacher James Honeyman agreed that face-to-face student interaction goes hand in hand with teaching, rather than administrating. “If you don’t get enough classroom time with students, then what’s the point?” Honeyman said. He also said that from a teacher’s perspective, he understands Knoedler’s decision. “I admire and respect [Knoedler’s] opinions and if I were in his place, I would have done the same,” Honeyman said. Junior Sophie Cash, a member of South Stage, also said that she understands Knoedler’s decision and said that Knoedler’s administrative tasks as Fine and Performing Arts Department Head have hindered his job enjoyment. “Mr. K is a great acting teacher also a very competent and patient department head,” Cash said. “However, I do think that the job as the head is really stressful and is not as rewarding to him ... and sometimes it might have gotten in the way of the things he prefers, like teaching, directing ... and student interaction.” Sophomore Samuel Fidler agreed that Theatre Department Head would be more suited to Knoedler. “I think it’s a good decision for him because he definitely values the classes he teaches for theatre, and there are definitely people more qualified to handle all three disciplines equally,” he said. Knoedler said that he hopes for continued success in the performing arts department. “I hope the department continues to produce and encourage the excellent art and theatre at South and utilizes its greatest strength: student performance.” Knoedler said. Freshman Kate Pozner said that Knoedler’s decision to emphasize teaching complies with Knoedler’s personality and love for students. “[I see him as] a teacher. Not even a teacher really, a mentor. I spend a lot more time with him than the other kids in my class so I see him more as someone who can hang out with you and help you along the way.” Pozner said. “I mean I spend a majority of my time with him and the other kids in his office; they’re my family really.”

-Delivers the latest absent teacher information Download It For Free! photo by Sofia Osario

Knoedler gets animated in a demonstration.


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news

No clear path of action in Syria conundrum Oliver Xie

Politics and Points of View

Following the widespread use of chemical warfare in WWI, the disastrous effects fueled public animosity against these Weapons of Mass Destruction. Since then, there have been multiple efforts to prevent future use of chemical warfare, the most successful being the Geneva Protocol, a treaty prohibiting the use of asphyxiating or poisonous gases in warfare. Over the past few weeks, however, evidence of the usage of lethal gases has been mounting to such levels that even Obama can not turn a blind eye; Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has specifically noted that Syria has used up to 200 chemical missiles for the specific purpose of slaughtering its citizens. What exactly is happening in Syria right now? Simply put, there’s a bad guy named Bashar al-Assad who is/was the dictator of Syria. In the midst of the ongoing Arab Spring, a massive revolution that has toppled multiple governments in the Middle East, a civil war erupted in Syria. This conflict has gone for more than a year, and as it prolongs, the country is being destroyed: artillery shells lie on the ground and gaze up at the destroyed infrastructure that now has the scattered holes of swiss cheese and crumbles like blue cheese. During the rebellion, however, the United States has been mainly neutral. While it has provided non-lethal aid to the Syrians, it’s quite obvious that a free cracker and some band aids from the United States isn’t going to end the war. This neutrality may change. Ever since the use of chemical warfare, which Obama has indicated is a “red line,” the Syrian government may have to now deal with the United States. On the other hand, rhetoric is not comparable to action. While the United States did say that chemical warfare is “a game changer,” the White House is peevish about repeating what happened in Afghanistan; another failed attempt at “democratizing” a country will make the U.S. look bad, to say the least. Additionally, the United States is in debt. We currently owe the world a few trillion dollars; each year, we add on about a trillion more to that looming debt. Although Paul Krugman, Nobel laureate and head economist of the International Monetary Fund, argues that debt doesn’t matter, large deficits hurt consumer confidence and lead to economic downturn. I really do not have an answer for what we should do. Currently Syrian rebels is work with multiple terrorist groups including Al-Qaeda, the terrorist group responsible for 9/11. But intervention could be good; if the U.S. were to engage in the rebellion and Bashar Al-Assad were to be overthrown, the United States could claim some credit for the benevolent actions and create pro-American sentiment in the region. Yet, if the United States does intervene but rules with too heavy of a hand over the government that would replace the current dictatorship, anti-American sentiment could expand massively, especially with Al-Qaeda cheerleading those that oppose American efforts. Finally, if the U.S. joins but fails to overthrow AlAssad, well, that would be awkward...

june 6, 2012

After AP exams, more student autonomy Sasha Kuznetsova Sr. News Editor

In order to give students the chance to explore and reflect on studied material in greater depth, Advanced Placement (AP) teachers at South have loosened up the curriculums of their classes and given students more autonomy after administration of the standardized AP exams in May. Though no required lesson plan is required for classes following the exam, all AP teachers are expected to continue teaching their courses for the remainder of the school year. Due to the early graduation of seniors, the duration of each course is dependent the grade level of the students taking it. Teachers whose classes include s e n i ors are given a few weeks to conclude the year, while

also assigned a final paper to his junior history class. Each student was given the liberty of researching any historical subject and was expected to present it to the class at the end of the year. “They’re allowed to write on an aspect of history that they really want to research,” Stein said, “I’ve had some pretty interesting proposals so far, people talking about, you know, looking at the influence of the human rights movement on Bebop or something like that.”

O n the contrary, junior Marina Rakhilin’s AP Russian Language and Culture teacher Lucinda Leveille does not conclude with a final project, but continues regular study of the language until those that are the end of the year. “[In] composed of juniors AP Russian we go along, receive a month. and we don’t have concrete AP Literature and Composition graphic by Olivia Hamilton plans, but we just continue teacher Ashley Anderton, who teaches learning the language and seniors, said that given the days off and the experiencing it as much as possible,” Ranature of the rest of the school year, she khilin said. receives very little time to explore anything AP French Language and Culture new on a final assignment. teacher Judith McGraime concludes her “There’s Memorial Day, so we lose a senior class with a final assessment that ties day there, the week after the AP Lit exam together material learned over the course is still AP week so a lot of my students are of the year. “The AP course in French is out of class then so I don’t even count that structured around 6 cultural themes which week - I end up with about two weeks total,” we have looked at separately over the course she said, “It’s not enough time to really do of the year,” McGraime said, “I’m going to ... much - but I usually just spend that time fit in ... one French film and have a written doing the senior paper.” assessment based on applying those themes Anderton said that she considers the to the film, so that it will somehow still be required ten page senior paper to be an in line with what we’ve been doing all year.” adequate activity for the conclusion of the According to McGraime, with the school year as well as high school as whole. old format of the AP exam, students found “The AP exam is not the end-all-be-all of it harder to reflect on the material they senior year English. I feel that the last year learned as a whole, and instead were assigned of highschool English should not end with presentations on their hobbies towards the the AP exam - it’s better if it ends with an end of the year. exercise which is what the senior paper is, and “In the past the AP exam was different, reflecting on your experience and yourself it’s the second year it has been this way... there as a student and learner before you go off was no real thread to draw through it [and] to college,” Anderton said, “So I think it’s a you just sort of looked for … culminating nice sort of culminating activity of the end activities,” McGraime said. of your high school English career.” “Sometimes I had students teach a AP US History teacher Eugene Stein lesson to the class about a hobby, or a tal-

ent that they have, I had students who were musicians come in and talk to us about how you learn to play the guitar or someone who liked to cook would come in and show us a recipe and follow it in French - we had presentations like that.” Stein agreed that AP teachers generally conclude their course by giving their students an opportunity to pursue any subject that personally interests them. “Most people tend to do a project, or some sort of paper project, it tends to be the final thing to allow them to explore something that they find interesting,” he said. According to junior Kelsey Yee, students in Jordan Kraus’ AP Biology class exhibit more autonomy in their final project, in which they are required to design and conduct an experiment of their choice. “Literally in Bio we’re doing whatever we want [Dr Kraus] is letting us take the reins,” Yee said. However, Rakhilin said that the Russian course continues by a set curriculum and does not provide students with more control over their studies. “We still have to learn things that we want to cover before we finish our Russian experience and thats not really going to change,” she said. Both Yee and Rakhilin mentioned that despite the projects, their AP US History classes had become a lot less stressful after the exam. “There is no more build up [to the AP exam],” Rakhilin said, “We have decided our own topics [for the final projects] so a lot of it is mostly new material but its also just for fun.” Stein agreed that there was much less pressure int he classroom after the completion of the exam. “ “I think that the students have earned a certain amount of calming to the end of the year,” he said. Yee added that she was aware beforehand that a less pressuring atmosphere would be present after the exam. “I knew that after the APs were over in History, I wouldn’t have to take any notes, I knew that we were going to watch movies for a week,” she said. McGraime added that she does not consider it particularly beneficial to study new material after the exam. “ I don’t think [teaching new material] is [beneficial],” she said, “That’s why I’m recycling what we’ve done all year in a different format with the application to the film - because absolutely not. They don’t need for anything.” Rakhilin agreed that an independent research would be hard to administer in a language class due to lack of motivation, but that it is successful in her history class. “I think it really depends on the class itself, because if it is a language - you can’t really have a liberal independent study program unless the people are very dedicated, and after the pressure of the AP is gone, you’re not going to be motivated to learn on your own,” she said. “In US history of course, any sort of independent research project is a nice break from what you have been doing all year and it’s less cramming, and, in general, more self motivated.”


june 6, 2013

news

7

A Glimpse of the Globe Sri Lanka: what is actually happening? For centuries, the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, known as Ceylon until 1972, has been divided between two racial and religious groups: the Tamils and Sinhalese. The Tamils are a largely Hindu group with Islamic and Christian minorities; the Sinhalese are almost all Buddhist, and they make up the majority of the Sri Lankan population. The tension between these two groups peaked in the late 20th century but still remains heightened. Currently, a precarious ceasefire keeps both sides at bay. The conflict between the Tamils and the Sinhalese boils down to the basic argument of who settled the land first. Both sides claim to have initially settled the island and thus be the “more deserving” inhabitants. Before colonial interference from Europe, the two ethnic groups lived — for the most part — in harmony. Although the Spanish were the first to reach the island, the British were the main colonizers of the 19th century. During this time of elevated presence, the British brought Tamil workers from Southern India for cheap labor. To the

Sinhalese of the island, this migration presented itself as British favoritism of Tamils. In 1948 Sri Lanka gained its independence from the British colonizers. Unlike in the rest of Southeast Asia, the British were much more willing to give Sri Lanka its independence and helped lead the population toward autonomy. This aid, however, deprived the country of a unifying drive for independence. The newly formed Sri Lankan government — comprised of a Sinhalese majority — passed legislation that quickly deprived nearly one million Tamil workers, brought over by the British, of citizenship. The Tamil political party, also known as the Federal Party, fought these and many more anti-Tamil pieces of legislation with little to no success. The bias in government not only angered the Tamil minority but also effectively silenced them in politics, making it much easier for the Sinhalese to further their own political agendas. The government later passed legislation that recognized Sinhala as the only official language of Sri Lanka and made no reference to Tamil. Peaceful

protests organized by the Tamils were met by violent responses from the Sinhalese communities; the police and other government officials did little to stop the violence. These protests progressed into riots in later years as a response to the violence, causing furthur escalation on both sides. In the late 1960s, tensions rose even higher as the government failed to stop large scale anti-Tamil riots that killed over 1,000 people. The Tamils took on a much more radical and militarized form of resistance in the following decade. The Federal Party, which had before approached change through peaceful political protests, urged its youth to rise up in violence. Another group to rise in prominence was the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), known also as the “Tamil Tigers,” a militant Tamil group fighting for equal rights. LTTE was not alone in gaining eminence, though; over 36 different Tamil militant groups arose throughout the 1970s. The period leading up to 1983 was marked by increased militarism and violence on both sides. But on June 23rd, 1983, the LTTE ambushed an army patrol, killing 13 soldiers. Civil

war raged in Sri Lanka for the next 20 years, as the government deployed forces in Tamil-controlled north and east Sri Lanka to try and neutralize the LTTE. Attacks against non-military targets occurred on both sides, and the Tamils incorporated suicide bombings into their means of attack. Up until the early 2000s, Tamil and Sinhalese officials made several attempts at peace talks, all of which deteriorated. In 2003, a Norwegian-mediated ceasefire was called. But the conflict ignited again by 2006. By 2009, the Sinhalese government controlled most of the Tamil territory and declared the LTTE defeated. Elections were quickly held, yet again, the Sinhalese gained the power in the government because they were a majority of the population.The UN accused both sides of committing human rights violations and called for an investigation in 2011 into atrocities against citizens on both sides. Today, Sri Lanka is in a precarious balance between the two sides. The government walks a very thin trying to mediate between the Sinhalese and the Tamils.

Nonsensical news: Monkey Feet: Do you have them?

Have you ever seen one of your friends do something like this? If you have more than 13 friends, the answer to that question is most likely “yes”. According to a BBC article, scientists have found that about one in every 13 people have ape-like feet. When a boring old human foot leaves the ground, it has many ligaments and fibers that hold the bones together, but when an ape

foot leaves the ground, the foot is much floppier due to a lack of those ligaments. This translates into having a very bendy middle part of the foot. One way to figure out if you are in fact that lucky one out of thirteen is to record yourself walking and observe how floppy the middle of your foot is. If you do find that your foot is bendy, don’t feel shy to show the video tape to all your friends, they’ll be envious of your ligament-free feet.

A common case of pencil-head

A medical mystery of a 24-year-old man inch in Afghanistan who suffered for years from pencil headaches, runny noses and eyeseight lodged in problems was finally cured. his head for 10 The ailment was a years. According to the common case of pencilBBC article, the man recalled head. The doctors falling once as a child and getting a found a four pretty serious nosebleed. 5

Kim Watch:

News this week New Jersey Senator Frank Lautenberg died at age 89 as the oldest senator and last WWII veteran to be elected to Senate. Following criticism from subordinates about lack of leadership skills during Boston Marathon Bombing, Boston Fire Chief Steve Abraira handed in his letter of resignation. Protests in Turkey that begun as peaceful environmental demonstrations escalated into anti-government riots after being met with fierce resistance by government forces. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg was sent a letter filled with ricin, the same toxin sent to President Obama In Northeast China a fire broke out in a poultry processing plant, killing 119 workers.

Fun and informational.

Anything and everything someone needs to know about either Kim

There are nine subtle differences between these two photos. Can you spot them all?

Just to Clarify The Armenian Kim The Pregnant Kim The Celebrity Kim

The North Korean Kim The Maybe Pregnant Kim The Celebrity Kim


features volume 30

issue 1

june 6, 2013

page

8

graphic by David Gorelik

Students enlist in various armies after South Shelley Friedland & Feli Kuperwasser

Features Editor, Features Reporter

W

hile many of his current classmates start college in the fall, taking on numerous courses and hectic schedules, senior Max Milliman will be facing a different obstacle: becoming a Marine. “It’s something I’ve always been interested in,” Milliman said. “I feel like it’s the best way to better yourself and to help others … The job I selected is intelligence. So basically, I’ll just be covering every single facet of intelligence in the Marine Corps.” Milliman is only one student who has decided to join a branch of military service after his graduation from South. According to Milliman, military service is about gaining “a sense of self entitlement, a sense of self-conscience [and] a sense of self-improvement.” Other seniors planning to serve in either the U.S. military or the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) after graduation agreed with Milliman. “I’m very Zionist, and I want to protect my country,” senior Tal Grutman, who will be serving in the IDF after he graduates, said. While Israeli citizens are required to serve in the army, Grutman said serving has become somewhat of a tradition in which many people take pride. “My whole family is in Israel, my whole life is in Israel. Almost everybody [serves in the IDF], so it’s considered almost like a rite of passage to serve in the military.” According to Grutman, the Israeli army, while strenuous, builds a sense of community and patriotism. “They say … the army breaks you apart so that they can

build you back the way they want you … to his native country. so they can build you back better,” Grut“I’m excited. I’ve been waiting for man said. a chance my whole life to move back to Guidance counselor Aaron Lewis Israel,” he said. “The army is a really good said that there are many reasons why way for me to integrate myself [back] into people would choose to join the country’s Israeli society because I’ve been here for a army at a young age. long time.” “I think people feel good about According to senior Gali Cohen, serving their country, and they feel ... that who will be serving in the IDF, the biggest the military can give them some direction challenge of joining the army will be movin life,” he said. “They also give good ining away from her family. centives for getting money to go to school, “[I am] scared ... It’s tough leavso if kids want to go back to college, those ing the family behind, but I mean, like, it are good ways to get funding for that. And would be the same if I went to college. I also … it’s a good way for some kids to would still not be living at home; it’s just support themselves.” that now I’m going to the other side of the Senior Stephen Periera, who will serve world,” she said. in the Marines after graduating, said he is Milliman said his family supported looking forward to the opportunity to protect his decision to enlist, and while he will be his country. missed, his rela“[I’m entives just want listing] to serve what is best for my country [and] him. to give them back “They’ve what they have always kind of given to me.” known that I Lewis also was going to said that being in [serve], but now the army can be that it’s really - Tal Grutman, Class of 2013 a very beneficial starting to come experience for true, and really those who serve. start[ing] to take “[Being in the army is] like a job. You’re off, they’re okay with it,” he said. “They just getting paid, you’re getting experience, [and] wanted me to make the right decision.” you’re getting ... a direction [while] serving Cohen said that she has experienced your country. Some people feel really good similar support and even pride from her about it. For some people it’s a life changer, family in response to her decision to join something that they need,” he said. the IDF. Periera said he hopes to get “more “All of [my family members have discipline and strength, [both] personally gone to the IDF]. My brother’s there right and mentally” over the course of his eight now … they all have stories … they’ve all years of active duty and reserve duty in the had different experiences. [My family is] Marines. very proud,” she said. Grutman, who was born in Israel, While all four seniors have received said he is looking forward to moving back respect and support from their family

I want to protect my country ... My whole family is in Israel, my whole life is in Israel.

and friends on their decision to go into the armed forces, none is sure of what the future holds after serving. Periera said he hopes to take college courses both during and after his service. “My plan is to take classes online while I’m serving so that ... I will pay little or no money on loans and stuff. And then after … I’ll go to regular college for two years,” he said. He also said his goal is to one day make it into law enforcement. “[After college] I wanna try and become part of the law enforcement, either FBI or state police,” he said. The length of service is another source of uncertainty, according to Grutman. “If I serve in infantry, I will be there for probably two and a half years. If I get accepted into an elite unit, then they can ask me to sign for anywhere between four and six years,” he said. “If you get into something like really intense, sometimes you can sign forever. Right now I’m keeping my options open, but maybe [I will move back to Israel].” Cohen is also unsure of her plans after the IDF. “I have no idea [of my plans for after the army]. I might stay in Israel and go to college there, I might come back here,” she said. “I have to do two years [in the army]. I’m hoping to become an officer and stay for more, but it really depends what my job is.” Milliman said that while he does not feel ready for college yet, he eventually hopes for a career outside of the military. “After the Marines, I’m probably going to do something in the medical field ... I’d want to be a paramedic or a firefighter EMT,” he said. “It really depends on how my life plays out ... I do want to strive for other goals in life besides just being in the Marines for the rest of my life.”


june 6, 2013

features

9

Recipe foR

SUCCESS photo by Katie Asch

Cooking teacher Jon Orren uses his past experiences to draft new lessons and enhance his class Sophia Fisher & Maia Fefer

read; he’s very knowledgeable,” she said. In Daurio’s opinion, Orren is very invested in his field. “In his work, you can see his passion,” Daurio said. “Just hearing him talk about his life in the food industry and what he has done, his eyes lit up,” Daurio said. “He seemed really excited and wanted to share that. He wanted to share his joy of food and cooking with everyone else.” Dolan agreed. “He’s really, really passionate. He loves what he does. He loves teaching kids about food,” she said. Orren said that working with students is rewarding for him. “Teaching is that area that I really find invigorating,” he said “It’s great to see those ‘aha’ moments where someone realizes that they’ve done something right...To watch a student expe-

numerous restaurants here in the Boston area.” Yet after many years, Orren realized that cooking in restaurants was not the life for him. Such long hours and juggling so many dishes at the same time exhausted him, he said. “Restaurant work is really long hours… On the mental side of it, you also have to be the type of person that has a strong organizational mind,” Orren said. “There is certain type of person that thrives in that situation. They sort of thrive in adrenaline…What I found is when things would get really busy, I would get a little bit flustered. It got to the point where it was causing me anxiety.” After working in many restaurants, Orren experimented with many various

things I should look at or people I should talk to,” he said. Several students agree that Orren Features Editors has a vast knowledge on an array of topThe scent of students’ cooking is ics, especially cooking. “He just seems to rarely limited to Jon Orren’s classroom, have a very comprehensive knowledge of the smells regularly extending to adjacent things,” senior Dan Kaufman, leader of classrooms and higher floors. the Sustainable Agriculture Project (SAP), When students need help mastering said. “Whenever you broach a subject with a certain recipe, South’s cooking teacher him, he has some knowledge of it and Mr. Orren offers not only his cooking some vantage point on it.” expertise but also his support with an Eventually finding a job at the extensive knowledge of and passion for American Jewish World Service, Orren cooking. helped run grants programs in Russia and Orren succeeds in making classes Ukraine. “We would give money to sort applicable to everyone regardless of their of small community project that were skill level in cooking, according to senior addressing issues of human rights of civil Ana Daurio, aspiring chef and teaching society or education or community develassistant. in Orren’s International Cuisine opment,” he said. “So that’s a whole other class, said. “I think he gives side of my career that people both [aspiring chefs and don’t really know about.” Teaching is that area that I really find invigorating. It’s great to regular students] what they Orren is also interneed,” Daurio said. “And ested in a wide variety of see those ‘aha’ moments where someone realizes that they’ve done most people, including me, activities, especially outdoor something right... To watch a student experience that is so fulfilling. tend to be really comfortable hobbies. “I love [gardening] BY YOONCHAN CHOI in the classroom and I think and other hobbies. I enjoy - Jon Orren, Family and Consumer Science teacher it is really fun. No one is bebike riding. I do a lot of ing left behind.” camping. I love games,” he Orren’s welcoming personality is rience that is so fulfilling.” cooking jobs, from catering and writing said. “Even as an adult I have friends where very helpful for connecting with and Orren’s passion for cooking perfor food publications to owning a pickle we get together for game night.” teaching students, Jennifer Dolan, a fellow haps began in his youth, when he started company named Wheelhouse Pickles. Orren’s passion for bettering his teacher in the Family and Consumer Scicooking, according the Orren. With both Orren majored in Russian at Colum- community, nature and innovation conences department, said. “He’s extremely pa- parents at work until late in the day, Orren bia University and used his Russian skills tinues on today, according to Dolan. “He’s tient. He just has a very calm personality,” would frequently have to prepare food for at a job supporting human rights. “Human creating two new classes for next year, and she said. “And I think that’s really imporhimself. rights was always a really strong passion of [S.A.P.] has really flourished,” she said. “He tant when you’re working with teenagers, At first, he made whatever was easimine. I was going to college [in New York takes these small ideas and makes them that he can be really patient.” est and most convenient, but he soon grew City] and there were a lot of human rights really great and makes them happen.” Freshman Marie Strasser, who is bored and curious about other culinary organizations and other social justice nonAlthough Orren has worked at South visiting from Germany for the second options. “I started cooking kind of by neprofit organizations...I searched around for just three years, he has already created semester, said that Orren is a thorough cessity. I would be forced to fend for myself looking for some that were in need of a three new programs: the Culinary Arts teacher. “He explains things so much that and get snacks. At first I made easy stuff, Russian speaker,” he said. Exploratory, where students can learn to you cannot not understand him,” she said. like microwavable pizza. Then...I would Orren now uses his knowledge of the run a real restaurant as well as cook for it, “He is very passionate about food and start making things I saw on T.V., improfood industry to help a range of students, a Chemistry in Cooking class and an Interinteresting to listen to.” vising stir-fry,” he said. Baurio said. “He has been kind of like a mediate International Cuisine program. Dolan agreed with Strasser. “He’s As Orren grew older, his interest in mentor to me, even more than a teacher… Two years ago, Orren also helped really [educated] when it comes to culinary food turned into a career. “I’ve done a lot he has also helped me learn more about start S.A.P., a group of [topics]. He’s very academic—he likes to of cooking in restaurants. I’ve cooked at the industry and gave me advice on what about 20 students who ORREN, 12


10

features

june 6, 2013

What iS South faculty doing thiS Summer? South teachers look forward to a summer full of new experiences and relaxation By Carly Meisel

Suzanne Westhues

John Lawless Custodian John Lawless plans to spend the summer relaxing and fishing in the Charles River and nearby ponds. Lawless said that he fishes with his nephew and hopes that the activity stays in his family for years to come. “Fishes are a sustainable resource. It’s a recreational thing. I want to make sure we return the fish to their natural habitat so my ... grandchildren will be able to fish,” he said. Lawless also plans to spend time with his wife and travel to New Hampshire for day trips.

Alex Palilunas Math teacher Alex Palilunas is going to teacher summer school at Brookline High School this summer. He said he also did this last year and that it was a positive experience overall. “It’s a calculus course. It’s great because the class sizes are not greater than ten students,” he said. Palilunas also said that he hopes to go to Maine. “I usually spend about a week or two in Maine with my old friends from high school. We go to Acadia [National Park],” he said.

David Weintraub English teacher David Weintraub plans to have a relaxing summer with the new addition to his family, daughter Audrey. “I want to slow down and get to know my daughter in a more concentrated way,” he said. Weintraub said that his summer plans are different than past summers, a change he is looking forward to. “I am very excited because I’ve worked over the summer for many years... I’m devoting my time [this summer] to leisure and family and fun,” he said.

Writing center coordinator and English teacher Suzanne Westhues plans to travel to Finland with her family in August. Westhues said that she and her family would find time to relax while there. “We rent a cottage in the middle of nowhere where we can get back to nature... We swim in the lake, pick berries,” she said. She attributed this sense of tranquility to the Finnish culture. “Fins have a great respect and regard for individual space,” she said. “I’m looking forward to it.”

Kara Veley Guidance counselor Kara Veley plans to spend her summer with her two children, four-year-old Ava and one-year-old Bree. She will be working in the ELL office. Veley said that she thinks this will be a positive experience overall. “I’m looking forward to the opportunity to talk to students and families, and my rusty Spanish [will] get less rusty,” she said.

Karen Sobin-Jonash Ceramics teacher Karen Sobin-Jonash said that she has a very eventful summer coming up. “I’m taking an online course ... about developing creativity in the classroom. I’m also taking a course after school to make sure I keep up with my knowledge of the arts,” she said. In addition, to these educational activities, Sobin-Jonash said that her family is going on an extended hiking trip. “We’re going hiking through the Maritime Alps. It’s a 100-mile hike in two weeks,” she said.

Jennifer Dimmick Librarian Jennifer Dimmick is planning to travel to Spain with her family this summer. She has traveled around Western Spain during previous summers, visiting various countries including France, Italy, Germany, England, and Ireland. Dimmick said that she is excited to return to that region. “I’m looking forward to experiencing the sights, culture, language, food, and wine,” she said.


june 6, 2013

features

GOING THE DISTANCE

Relationships: Togetherness is Key

Several seniors discuss the role that distance played in selecting their ideal college

graphic by Mika Gross

Nicole Yu & Maggie Zhang Features Reporters

Senior Yoonchan Choi will be traveling over 2,500 miles this fall to attend the University of Southern California. Choi and several other seniors said that a college’s distance from Newton had little influence over their decision to attend. For some, however distance was a major deciding factor. For senior John Deng, who is going to Brandeis University, the proximity of the university to his home was a significant part of his decision to attend. “It was a really huge factor for me because for all the colleges that I applied to … they were all in the Boston area,” he said. “I did not apply to a single college out of state.” According to college counselor Barbara Brown, almost all the students that come to her consider distance when choosing their colleges. “Lots of students start off thinking they want to be as far away from home as possible, and then as it gets closer [to graduation] they tend to decide they may want to be a little bit closer,” Brown said. “It’s a very important part, also how comfortable they feel about being away from

home.” Deng said that even though several students choose to attend college out of state, most choose to stay in or around Massachusetts. “Usually you get [a] few that want to get out of Newton, [who] want to get out of where they have lived their entire life, and basically they only apply to colleges really far away,” he said. “[It is] a giant choice for them … but other people, like me, just want to stay in the area they’ve lived in. They want that security, and they choose colleges that are closer to home.” According to Deng, going to a college close to home is both convenient and comfortable. “When you go to a college close to home … you know that no matter if you are sick or injured or just homesick, it is just a really close drive home,” he said. “[I feel] safe to know that I am changing environments, but I still have the opportunity and the chance to go home if I need to.” Senior Mina Willet, who is going to the University of British Columbia (UBC), said that distance was not a deciding factor in her choice of college. “I wanted to explore all my options ... but I decided that even though [UBC]

was the farthest school that I applied to, it had the best opportunity and the best programs for me out of all my options,” she said. For senior Laura Kessel, who is going to Rice University in Houston, Texas, the decision to choose a college out of state was just by chance. “It … happened to be where it was. I didn’t really pay much attention to it,” Kessel said. “I just sort of found schools that I liked, and it just happened to be that this one was in Texas.” Kessel added that she looks forward to the opportunity that distance gives to experience new things and to become more independent. “I can just go and be by myself. I don’t really have much intervention by my parents,” she said. “I think it’ll be interesting because it’s definitely [a] different culture in Houston, so it’d be interesting to be in that sort of [environment], around those different kinds of people.” Willet said that for her, being far from home will be difficult. “I know that it’s going to be really hard for me to be so far away from my family,” she said. “But I think no matter where you are, [college is] going to be a lifestyle change.”

Library visitors increase, circulation lags Sophia Fisher & Maggie Zhang Features Editor, Features Reporter

Despite South’s library seeing a 107 percent increase in student flow over the past nine years, the number of books the library offers has halved in that time, and last year fewer than 2 percent of the books were checked out. Several students said that the atmosphere of the library has developed into one of social interaction rather than one of focused studying and checking out books. During especially busy blocks in the library, junior Daniel Ehrlich chooses to relocate his studying efforts away from the place usually considered quiet. “Not enough people can sit [because] there are people everywhere ... standing [and] milling around tables,” Ehrlich said. “It’s loud because everybody’s trying to talk over each other … Sometimes the library’s empty, and sometimes there’s so many people that I have to leave.” Junior Nikita Roy said that she believes many students do not use the library to check out books at all, but find other reasons to go. “[Students] go [to the library] for studying, to socialize or computer reasons,” she said. When students enter and exit the library, sensors record the movement. During the 20022003 school year, the number of students who entered the library reached 62,550. In 2011-2012, patron count exceeded 129,000 — the 107 percent increase from nine years prior. The decrease in number of books at the library is a possible cause of relatively low circulation rates. A South librarian for 12 years, Ethel Downey said the library had about 30,000 books in circulation when she started working at South, but only 15,000 today. Ehrlich said that low circulation rates are not the fault of the librarians. “You can’t blame the librarians for problems that they aren’t causing,” he said. “They should be trying to get students to read, but at the same time, a lot of it is out of their hands.” According to English teacher Corinne Popp, who has

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taught at South since 1999, the school library has increased in popularity over the years. “The number one primary change is the number of students in the library,” she said. “It used to be kind of an underused, quieter place, and now when you go in there, it’s overflowing.” Sophomore Yulan Li said that library’s computers are important assets for students and that the library would benefit from buying more. “[Computers] are useful … because at home sometimes I don’t get resources that I can get to…so I have to use the library’s computers to do it,” she said. Even when students do check out books, they usually get the books for class rather than outside reading, according to Roy. “For classes I’ve had to [check out a book]. But I’ve never actually done it for any other reason,” she said. According to Yi, lack of book variety in the library is not to blame for low checkout rates. Yi checks books out both for outside reading time and for classes. “[The variety] always keeps me interested. I’m not sure if [getting] more books is a good idea,” she said. “It might be just because people don’t really have that time to be reading books.” Roy said that lack of time prevents her from perusing the library’s aisles. “I don’t have time to look at the books,” Roy said. Freshman Amanda Michel agreed, and said that she cannot finish books by the time the library requires them to be returned. “I just don’t have enough time to read the book in a certain amount of time,” she said. Popp acknowledged students’ challenges with time management but asserts that a more reading-based English curriculum could help increase students’ reading time and — perhaps — library circulation. “Having a curriculum, especially in English class, that requires independent reading ... is really important, and it gives kids a chance to just read books they’re comfortable with,” she said. Li said that although circulation rates are low, she finds time to sit in the library quietly reading novels. “I just sit down, read and enjoy,” she said.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Every issue, The Roar publishes a different anonymous student’s perspective on relationships. The views expressed in the “Relationships Column” do not reflect the official views of The Lion’s Roar, nor are they intended as a guide or source of advice for others. The first movie my boyfriend and I ever walked out of was “Snow White and the Huntsman.” The movie featured Kristen Stewart as a rather lackluster heroine, creepy Scottish dwarves and a cheesy romance between Snow White and the “huntsman” himself. Needless to say, it was terrible. About halfway through the second hour, I turned to my boyfriend and announced that I couldn’t stand the film any longer and that we had to leave. Looking more than slightly amused, he laughed and replied, “Good idea. Let’s go.” After we left “Snow White and the Huntsman,” walking out of movies became a regular habit: “Step Up 4: Revolution,” “Taken 2” and “The Bourne Legacy.” We did not stick around to see the end of any of these. Granted, we made fairly poor choices in movies, but I doubt that that was the real reason we ditched so many. Looking back, I suspect that every time we decided to walk out of a theater, we we were doing it because we were not actually getting much out of each other’s company by sitting in front of a screen. Although movies may have been a good way to ease the pressure of a few early dates, the moment we made up our minds to ditch was often the spontaneous gesture that banished any remnants of awkwardness we had still been feeling. Finding something that we both disliked was surprisingly gratifying, but not just because we disliked it. We had finally found something in common when we didn’t know each other all that well. Five or six unfinished movies later, my boyfriend and I were planning to go off to another theater on a Saturday evening. As we were getting ready to leave, he confessed that he was starving and vaguely mentioned the overpriced movie theatre popcorn. Money was tight as always, so I suggested we cook before the movie. Until that evening, I did not know that he could cook. The hour we spent frying omelets in my kitchen reaped both a good meal and a satisfying feeling. This was more fun than walking out of a movie; rather than just sharing our distaste for a film, we had accomplished something constructive together. By the time dinner was over, we had missed our movie, but neither of us was disappointed. That night made us realize that no matter what we were doing, we could have fun as long as we were together. A few weekends ago, we chose to see “Silver Linings Playbook,” a movie we had both wanted to see since its release. Even though we watched it in possibly the most ancient theater in the country and the fuzziest picture quality that I have ever seen, we sat through the entire thing without wanting to leave. And we held hands the entire time.


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features

Orren inspires students with passion, experience ORREN, from 9 cultivate the garden behind South and sell or eat their harvest. “I find it very peaceful and meditative to be working outside in nature. It seems like sort of a natural fit that a school should have a garden because they are pretty to look at,” Orren said. “It’s a way to show a physical manifestation of a school’s pride for its environment and its community.” Baurio said that S.A.P. has proved to be a success for many students. “I think that the farm club is really popular among a lot of students, and I think it is a great way for students to experience kind of grow their own vegetables and stuff like that. Orren’s Culinary Arts Exploratory class allows students to work at a real restaurant and learn the skills required to be part of the food industry. “We started [the exploratory] because we wanted to make sure that the school is offering some vocational kind of instruction that is useful, very useful to a lot of students in the school,” Kaufman said. According to Orren, the new classes were created to give students more ways to learn more about what they really enjoy doing or are struggling with.

june 6, 2013

“Cooking [in] Chemistry was born as out of a desire of teach some principles of chemistry in just a different way to see if we can reach some of the students who either are having a little bit of difficulty with chemistry or...who want to learn more about chemistry through cooking,” Orren said. In Daurio’s opinion, both classes are going to expand the department and allow students who love to cook to have more cooking opportunities and learn more, especially if they are planning of going into the food business as a career, Daurio said. “I think that it is a great idea because a lot for students have taken all the cooking classes and if they happen to be really into cooking, and are looking for something a little more challenging. I think that these new classes are going to be a lot of fun,” she said. “They are going to really reach out to those kids who might actually want to go into the food business.” Dolan said that Orren’s motivation and progressiveness is appreciated by students and staff alike. “He’s very innovative,” Dolan said. “He’s always looking to see what’s next.” Daurio agreed that Orren loves what he does. “In his work, you can see his passion.”

Congratulations, Volume 29 Senior Staff! Volume 30 thanks you for your beauty, congratulates you on your achievements in high school and wishes you the best of luck in college and beyond!

Andreas Betancourt James Wu Jenny Friedland

Joe Joseph

Ravi Panse


june 6, 2013

features

Mon Henglin is...

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Every issue, The Roar randomly selects a student and explores what makes him or her unique.

photo by Katie Asch

Senior Mon Henglin traded his dedication to gymnsatics for a more fulfilling discipline: parkour By Caroline Zola

In March, senior Mon Henglin visited the sprawling deserts and bustling cities of Morocco with other students from his senior Modern Global Communities class. Mon spent much of his childhood and adolescence training as a gymnast, so senior Benyamin Meschede-Krasa, a friend of Mon’s who also went on the trip, believes Mon was able to parlay his gymnastic skills into ambitious hiking excursions through the desert. “[In Morocco, Mon] just really wanted to climb on a bunch of rocks ... so whenever we saw huge rocks while we were hiking, we would go and climb them,” Meschede-Krasa said. “Because he’s a crazy gymnast, he has pretty much a fear of nothing ... He would just do crazy things like take what other people see as unnecessary risks, but he would be fine. He knows his limits.” In addition to tackling various feats of strength and gaining international experiences, Mon recently made the transition from being a dedicated gymnast to a student learning to balance extracurriculars while maintaining a strong connection to his passion for thrill-seeking and engineering. Mon practiced and competed in gymnastics locally and nationally from first grade to junior year when he decided to quit. Mon said that his decision to quit the sport ultimately stemmed from pressure and long hours. “At my peak, I was putting 20 hours a week into [gymnastics], and my coach was really serious about it,” Mon said. “He wanted me to put in more,

but I didn’t have the ability to balance that with school and friends and everything. It was just too much for me.” After quitting gymnastics, Mon took up a new discipline: parkour. The website americanparkour.com defines parkour as the physical discipline of training to overcome any obstacle within one’s path by adapting one’s movements to the environment. According to the website, parkour movements typically include running, jumping, vaulting, climbing, balancing and quadrupedal movement. Mon said that he was initially introduced to parkour by a friend who had also quit gymnastics. After the introduction, his passion for the sport ignited immediately. “I had never had a different hobby [besides gymnastics], so it was very difficult for me to find what to do with my time,” Mon said. “Then one of my friends who also used to do gymnastics showed [me] parkour, and he took me to one of these things called a jam ... where a bunch of people get together and do [parkour]. Anyone can go, anyone can do anything. I just loved being there, so I started doing it.” According to Mon, parkour has immense appeal because its freedom allows him to work on his own time and to motivate himself. “[Parkour is] not as structured [as gymnastics], so I can learn whatever moves I want to learn and I can do them however I want to on my own schedule,” he said. “I’m still committed to it, so it’s not like I’m just blowing it off,

[but] since there’s nothing forcing me to [practice], it’s completely intrinsic.” Additionally, Mon said that the relative ease of monitoring progress as well as the inherent danger also makes parkour attractive. “There are a lot of tricks you can learn, like wall flips and jumps off of stuff. It’s easy to kind of gauge how much better you can get; like first I can jump eight feet, now I can jump 10 feet,” Mon said. “Also, I’m somewhat of a thrill seeker, so the danger aspect of it is appealing.” According to Victoria Frothingham, Mon’s mother, the parkour community positively affected Mon. “[Mon] talks about the community of parkour, so again it’s a different type of emotional interaction in a way,” she said. Quitting gymnastics also gave Mon more time to socialize with friends at South, Mon said, enabling him to maintain a strong friend group. Senior Scott Cohen said he is fascinated by Mon’s gymnastics skills. “He now can use his skills as a gymnast in other ways. He uses his ability to do flips and stuff like that for Powderpuff cheerleading,” he said. “He has some really impressive abilities that we all really like to see from time to time. He’s never cocky about it ... he’s never self absorbed about it, but he’s always willing to share and help other kids learn.” Hema Roychowdhury, Mon’s physics teacher, said that both Mon’s friendships and physical abilities leave lasting impressions. “He has this cool set of friends in class with whom he hangs out and has

fun. He’s very smart ... and he can do crazy handstands,” Roychowdhury said. “I will never forget that ... I’ve seen him walk down from this floor all the way [downstairs] on his hands ... and that is unbelievable.” Mon also has more time to try new experiences. This year, Mon said he was able to work with the Robotics team to explore his interest in engineering. “I really like building things. When I was a kid, I would build with Legos or make construction paper action figure type things, so I was just, like, ‘I like science and I like building, so why not try engineering?’” Mon said. “And then I tried Robotics, and I liked the work I did there.” Next year, Mon will study engineering at the University of Maryland. The trip to Morocco also proved to be a learning experience, Mon said. “To go to Morocco and meet the nomads and see how they live is just so different and so much more interesting than anything I’ve done. I think that’s why I liked it so much, because it was so new,” he said. “It was really interesting just to get to know the locals and see how they live and get some of their ideas on life.” Overall, Mon said that the decision to quit gymnastics sparked a change in him that enabled him to accomplish and learn a lot during his senior year. “I just changed in general because I’ve had more time for social interaction,” Mon said. “Before, I was very quiet, I didn’t talk to a lot of people; I didn’t have a lot of friends. And now, I’ve come out of my shell.”


editorials volume 30

issue 1

page

june 6, 2013

The Cat’s

Meow All the news that’s fit to print ... and then some!

New “Super Clubs” promote increased campaign funding This year’s Newton South elections proved to be the most expensive in South history, with the funds spent totaling just over $10,000. The main cause for this record spending is the school’s new legislation regarding “Super Clubs,” which allow candidates to receive unlimited donations of campaigning desserts, specifically cupcakes and brownies, without having to disclose their donors. Although there is no concrete proof, speculated donors include South Senate President, Eim Lovven-It, the PTSO and even a few donations all the way from the top, Principal Soel Jembridge. One student in particular, sophomore Macon Damonee, who gave out 56.638 percent of brownies consumed during the elections, stated that he is a strong advocate for keeping the Super Clubs. “If people want to let out their inner baker for the sake of a good political cause, who should tell them no? All Super Clubs do is let people help a candidate they believe in,” he said. Underdog junior candidate Nochanz Tuwin, however, believes that the new Super Clubs allow certain students to gain influence over the candidates. “I’ve been approached before with offers of huge amounts of frosting covered brownies,” she said. “There are some shady meetings happening in library study rooms during free blocks. The race has changed from being about the students to being about the desserts.”

Senior class prank prompts North to begin constructing curling rink In response to the new Newton South pool, Newton North High School decided to build an olympic size curling rink. The Class of 2013, on Friday, May 31, pulled the annual Senior Prank by placing a pool on the fourth floor, otherwise known as the roof. Later the same day, North announced it would immediately begin building the curling rink; a project they had been meaning to undertake for quite some time. Despite several allegations, North stated that the installment of the pool at South had no effect on its decision to suddenly begin construction on a project without any records prior to the 31st. The contractor hired to complete the project, Bob The Builder, claimed to be able to build the structure. “[Due to copyright laws, Bob’s quotation cannot be used],” he said. North Principal Frank Lee claimed that the rink is necessary to maintain the student body’s morale. “Frankly, every student deserves a shot at happiness. Last year, we had three kids attend North from Canada,” he said. “And to be frank, they deserve a chance to play their native sport.” The curling rink is scheduled for completion in August 2025, and will cost the city about 1.5 times US GDP. Overall, Newtonites agree that the rink is a necessity for the high school, and accepted a 500 percent tax increase to afford the costs.

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Club, sports fees have unclear intentions and results Newton South has an across the board fee for any extracurricular activity a student partakes in, ranging from sports to Speech and Debate. The Roar believes that the discrepancies in enforcing the fees suggests how unreasonable they are for most cases. There are two main fees implemented at South: club fees and sports teams fees. The Roar acknowledges the need for sports teams to have fees due to the low budgets and need for equipment yet still thinks that the current price of the fees are exorbitant and disproportional to the extra funds the sports teams are receiving from the school. Fees currently are as high as $300, yet coaching salaries are low and equipment is at sub-standard conditions. It is tough, therefore, to assume that all the money from the 20 or more kids on a team is going directly towards benefiting that team. Regarding club fees, however, The Roar believes that Newton South has only implemented these as a means to get more money for the administration and not to the club itself. It seems slightly unfair to force

some students, who wish to partake in an extracurricular activity, to fund the school’s supplies or programs while pardoning other students from having to pay simply because they chose not to join a club. This inequality, The Roar believes, is something unacceptable and should be abolished. South should laud those students who are willing to give up time out of their day to participate in something extra that the school offers, not punished and fined for it. All clubs, regardless of whether or not they actually require money to run, have their members charged for being in that club. Exempli Gratia, the bridge club that was formed last year had its members charged over $100 just to play bridge once a week. The Roar staff finds this outrageous. In addition, the high prices of club fees may deter students, who otherwise would be very active in some extracurricular activities from even joining certain clubs. One solution that The Roar has put forward is to determine the price of a certain club’s fee on a case by case basis. If a club costs the school no money, then

that club’s members should be pardoned from having to pay a fee. This way, the students aren’t discouraged from joining clubs and the school loses no money. The intentions of the club fees are made even more suspicious due to their lack of enforcement. Many members of The Roar acknowledged the fact that although club fees are brought up in many clubs, for the most part they go unpaid. Also, there seems to be no repercussion for not paying the fees. In sports, however, an athlete can’t play or practice with a team until they have paid their sports fee. This discrepancy in enforcing the fees’ payment makes it seem as though club fees really are not an integral step in making a club run, and instead are just extra money the school would love to use. Fees in general are incredibly high at the moment, with an athlete having to pay $300 just to play their sport. The Roar believes that if the administration isn’t willing to abolish fees completely, then the least it can do is begin to lower them to make extracurricular activities and sports more affordable for everyone.

Editorial Policy

The Lion’s Roar, founded in 1984, is the student newspaper of Newton South High School, acting as a public forum for student views and attitudes. The Lion’s Roar’s right to freedom of expression is protected by the Massachusetts Student Free Expression Law (Mass. Gen. Laws Ann. ch. 71, Section 82). All content decisions are made by student editors, and the content of The Lion’s Roar in no way reflects the official policy of Newton South, its faculty, or its administration. Editorials are the official opinion of The Lion’s Roar, while opinions and letters are the personal viewpoints of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Lion’s Roar. The Lion’s Roar reserves the right to edit all submitted content, to reject advertising copy for resubmission of new copy that is deemed acceptable by student editors, and to make decisions regarding the submission of letters to the editors, which are welcomed. The Lion’s Roar is printed by Seacoast Newspapers and published every four weeks by Newton South students. All funding comes from advertisers and subscriptions. In-school distribution of The Lion’s Roar is free, but each copy of the paper shall cost one dollar for each copy more than ten (10) that is taken by any individual or by many individuals on behalf of a single individual. Violation of this policy shall constitute theft.

Corrections:

In reference to issue Issue VIII, Volume XXIX of The Lion’s Roar The staff of The Roar would like to apologize for not exercising good journalistic judgement in the publication of several facetious remarks about Bashar Al Assad. The jokes were in no way meant to offend, and The Roar fully recognizes the gravity of the situation in Syria. The Roar also apologizes for a major misprint of the crossword puzzle, which was impossible to complete because half of the clues were for a different puzzle. Please continue to read The Roar as we strive to improve our publication. As always, email any and all comments and suggestions to srstaff@thelionsroar.com


june 6, 2013

FROM THE

Editor’s DESK Kylie Walters Editor-in-Chief

On Saturday, June 1, I turned 17. I took SAT subject tests in a 90-degree classroom and later played in one of the most physically challenging softball games of my life (all 17 years of it.) Long story short, my team lost to Lynn Classical and we were eliminated in the first round of the state tournament for which we had worked so hard to qualify. It was the best birthday of my life. In the few days that have followed Saturday, numerous people — far more than I expected — have approached me and said something along the lines of, “You took SATs and were eliminated from the tournament on your birthday? That sounds terrible.” Absolutely. Taking two subject tests on my birthday was horrible, and I’m not sure I will ever emotionally recover, but the many people who tried to offer condolences for my supposedly failed birthday were strongly mistaken. In the bottom of the sixth inning, Lynn was up 6-1. Their hotheaded coach had stopped swearing and they began to relax, confident that their victory was in the bag. The fighting spirit of our team was stronger than ever, though, and before

editorials

15

Editor considers fleeting youth, significance of softball experience Lynn knew it, we had bases loaded. For my team, getting that far was One of our show-stopping freshenough, and we all knew that what we men got up to bat and knocked two runs accomplished that day was the perfect in with a hit to centerfield and another manifestation of our team’s strong spirit. player reached home on a throwing error. Softball for me is not just a sport.My We screamed on the bench as the blood teammates and I share much more than pounded in our heads. 6-4. New game. wins and losses. From team butterflies, Completely exhausted but not ready to to doughnuts, to t-shirts with one of our give up, we held Lynn to six runs. In the bot- coach’s faces on them, we share it all. We tom of the seventh, share the underwe scored again on standing that four an error. They were years isn’t nearly When I step between the clearly rattled, and long enough. We the sure win that powdery white lines of the share softball and they had been exall the traditions softball field, I feel like a kid that come with it. pecting disappeared from sight. Every year, again — free to throw away For those two no matter how final innings, the the stress of teenage worries. caught up I am in heat didn’t matter. other pursuits, the We forgot that our start of the softball strongest hitter was at a dance recital, and that season always triggers a change in me. the odds were against us. For those innings, Now, almost done with my third year of we were truly proud as a team. high school, I wonder how one thing can Our scoring streak eventually ended be so consistently consuming. just shy of bringing us into extra innings, I have changed immensely since I or to victory, but it was pretty much irfirst started softball in elementary school. relevant at that point. Visions of our team For one thing, I no longer sport a fresh leaping up in celebration of our jaw-drop- bowl cut. ping victory faded and the oppressive heat As I made the transition from started to feel real, but I didn’t really care. regrettable haircuts to the unpleasant Our coaches didn’t care either. years of middle school and to the present,

Join The Roar!

softball is one of the only fragments of my youth that I have carried with me. (I unfortunately no longer read the “Captain Underpants” series or watch “Cyberchase.”) And now, as the seniors prance into post-high school life, I find myself more and more aware of my fleeting youth. When I step between the powdery white lines of the softball field, I feel like a kid again, free to throw away the stress of teenage worries. Upon graduation next spring, I can save photos and memories of games like the one against Lynn, but I will never be able to relive my youth or the simple moments in softball that make the game so enjoyable. As most of my close friends know, I believe that my severe fear of life’s finiteness enhances its beauty. Similarly, I have realized that in my future I will likely not be able to rush out to the softball field for a daily break from the madness of the world, and this makes me appreciate the present so much more. In the last year of my high school experience, I will remind myself that no matter how frustrating school can seem, never again will I get a chance to be that goofy, lanky-looking kid at third base.

Volume 30 The Lion’s Roar Newton South High School’s Student Newspaper The Lion’s Roar 140 Brandeis Road Newton, MA 02459 srstaff@thelionsroar.com

Editors-in-Chief Yonatan Gazit

Monday J Block Room 1201

Kylie Walters

Managing Editor Dina Busaba

Business and Production Manager

Chief Copy Editor Julie Olesky

Jordan Cohen-Kaplan

Section Editors News

Sasha Kuznetsova Nathaniel Bolter David Li Amelia Stern

Centerfold

Faith Bergman Hyunnew Choi

Graphics Managers David Gorelik Olivia Hamilton

Sports

Features

Carly Meisel Parisa Siddiqui Sophia Fisher Maia Fefer Shelley Friedland

Faculty Advisers Ashley Elpern Brian Baron Paul Estin Thomas Murphy

Jack McElduff Darren Trementozzi Lizzie Fineman

Opinions

Veronica Podolny Jack Rabinovitch

Photo Managers Katie Asch Dylan Block Sofia Osorio

Aaron Edelstein


COMING TO THE REAL WORLD

62% percent of high school graduates in the United States that enroll in colleges or universities *

By Faith Bergman

92%

percent of Newton South High School graduates that enroll in colleges or universities **

H

igh school is the final stepping stone for many students on their path into the real world; the training wheels come off and a host of new responsibilities falls upon the graduates. Even though they may not be entirely independent of their parents, after high school, these teenagers get their first taste of what it is like to be responsible for oneself. When asked about how well South prepares students for the responsibilities after high school, most students agreed that although South is different from the real world in many ways, the school and faculty help prepare students for what comes after graduation. Senior Shawheen Rezaei said South helps students develop better time management skills. “I feel that my time at South has showed me who I am at South and how to balance academics with your social life. I feel that they prepared me pretty well, to be honest,” he said. Senior Michelino Kenny believes that South’s environment is not a very good representation of what the real world is like because of its location. “We live in Newton, which shows up on lists of the most affluent places to grow up. I consider myself lucky to grow up here but I don’t consider it accurate of what the real world is like,” he said. Rezaei also said that although South is unable to give students an environment similar to those after high school, it has prepared him for the real world “I think South is not what a real representation of the world is like, but then again it doesn’t need to be,” he said. “There’s lots of injustice and poverty in the real world, and South has given me a strong foundation that will prepare me to face the real world.”

graphic by Hadas Rosen

Senior Maggie Whalen also believes that South I’ve had very good teachers. I’ll miss [them] a little but can’t prepare students for the future because it is only a at the same time I’m really looking forward to going to high school. “So I think in that way South prepares you college and whatever lies beyond that,” he said. for the real world but in another sense it is high school, Scott said the teachers at South care not only about so it’s never going to be like the real world. We are not yet their classes, but also about the extracurricular groups independent or supporting ourselves, but I think South they help run. puts you in positions that simulate the real world and “One thing is that we have teachers who are very that’s what is so lasting and helpful,” she said. passionate about their clubs and activities, like the speech According to Vice Principal, Mary Scott, South team, the sports teams, Asian Student Organization, graduates “are well mock trial, Water prepared [to act as Aid International, adults]. They come Habitat for One thing is that we have teachers who out thinking for Humanity and many are very passionate about their clubs and themselves, and they more,” she said. activities, like Speech Team, the sports are able to see many “They allow students sides of a situation to be passionate teams, Asian Student Organization, Mock and decide the best about something Trial, Water Aid International, Habitat course of action.” and work hard to W h e e l e r reach their goals.” For Humanity and many more Housemaster According to - Mary Scott, Vice Principal Josepha Blocker said Whalen, the teachers that a large part of at South may push students’ success after kids, but in the long graduation comes term the pressure from their teachers throughout all four years at South. will prove being helpful. “The one complaint everyone “I think teachers here are really invested in students always has about South teachers is that they give too much success. I know that teachers communicate with students work, and sometimes maybe that is true, but I feel like I and their families often both personally and through email, am prepared for college because of that, and know that encouraging students to ask for help, through J block or without South’s dedicated teachers I would be no where online,” she said. close to where I am today,” she said. Kenny agreed with Blocker, attributing part of his Scott also said that South’s rigorous academics help success to the teachers he has had. “I’ve been lucky that students with work after high school. “I certainly think

South prepares students for the rigors of college. Many of our students report that the first year of college is easy compared to South,” she said. Blocker believes however, that South does more than just prepare kids for the academic aspects of life after high school. “I think that housemasters and counselors work really hard when students have had disciplinary issues or have made mistakes in or out of school to work with them to see the ‘teachable moment’ in the situation, and everyone makes mistakes,” she said. “We try and make the mistakes that students make into a conversation about how to make good choices for the future.” According to Kenny, South has helped him develop skills that will be useful beyond just college. “I think what I’ve learned the most is that at South, if you’re looking for something you can find it— you can find teachers that can help you. Its about initiative. If you want something it won’t arrive itself,” he said. Rezaei said that his overall experience at South, overall, has given him the tools needed to succeed after high school. “I feel that South has prepared me to take on college and life after college,” he said. “I feel that South has definitely taught me that there are plenty of opportunities available but I just need to go out and look for them myself.” Whalen added that her time at South has been memorable. “I am so excited to go to college next year, but I know a part of me is going to miss the people I’ve met here,” she said. “It’s very strange to be done with high school, but I am so grateful for the amazing four years South has given me.”

The Roar conducted a survey of 134 students, asking them if they thought South prepared them for college

84%

percent of South students believe that South has prepared them for college and the future. *According to Bureau of Labor Statistics **According to NSHS Profile 2012/13


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june 6, 2013

centerfold

A L OOK BACK A T SOUTH

Alumni reflect on how their experiences at South continue to influence their current lives

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Jaclyn Freshman ‘12 Graduate

ecipient of the 2012 Phi Beta Kappa award, graduate Jaclyn Freshman said that as she dedicated herself to the demanding workload at South, she learned to be realistic about what she is able to handle and that she should specifically focus on her true interests. “South offers a lot in terms of academics and extracurriculars, but you really have to choose what you’re passionate about and follow that path, because you can’t really balance everything,” she said. Freshman said that keeping up with South’s rigor also enabled her to gain academic skills that have been helpful for her classes at Yale University. “Depending on your major, you may not actually apply what you learn from your high school classes. What you take away from South is the work ethic and the study habits,” she said. “In college, its more up to you to do your work. You’re going to be in lectures with 200 kids, and all you’re going to

A

ccording to ’11 graduate Laura Haime, who is currently studying business at Babson College, South gives students a firm foundation of education — particularly in writing — that is benefical in college. She said that even though there is a large amount of stress that accompanies the high academic pressure at South, she now has a unique perspective about tackling the workload of college. “I think that the biggest complaint at South is that there’s a lot of stress and competition in terms of everyone having to … have high grades, but now that I’m out of [high school], [I see that] it’s really something that was so special and beautiful about South,” she said. “It definitely prepares you in terms of knowing how much you want to work [in college]. You know that what you give is what you take, and you’re not scared to show that you’re going to do what it takes to succeed.” Although this work ethic left Haime feeling ready for the

A David Schlenker ‘09 Graduate

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By Hyunnew Choi

academic challenges of college, she said she did not expect to interact with students with such different viewpoints from her own.“I wasn’t prepared to see how close-minded some people are. Newton South has really helped me to have an open mind, so it’s hard to talk to people with closed minds and see how they think that way,” she said. “You just have to think of why they think the way they do.” Haime also said that though it is important to live up to the standards at South that help students prepare for college and the future, students should embrace the high school experience for its valuable lessons and memories. “From the moment you enter South till the moment you leave, there’s a constant focus as to where you’re going once you leave. Everything ends up working out, though,” she said. “If you focus all of your experience in high school trying to prepare for [the future] and control it, you’re just going to miss out on your time at high school.”

s ‘09 graduate David Schlenker prepares to spend the next three years teaching in Turkey and in North Carolina, he said he will be taking his experiences and lessons learned from South to these places. According to Schlenker, he could pursue these teaching opportunities because South allowed him to explore his interests before starting at Skidmore College. “You are able to find your passion earlier here at South because there are so many electives,” he said. “[The options] allowed me to start exploring, even in a public education system that is very rigid.” Schlenker was involved in extracurriculars such as the speech and debate, theatre and volleyball at South. He said that participating in these activities significantly contributed to his development in high school. “[Extracurricular opportunities] are allowing students to find their passion and grow not only as a student but also as a person. It’s so important to have this holistic education where it’s not just

hen ‘08 graduate Varun Ramadurai started working in finance after graduating from Davidson College, he found himself having to juggle the many demands of his job; he said, however, that he felt prepared to manage these tasks because of the skills he learned from his four years at South. “Organization skills are needed everywhere. I have to work 40 to 60 hours a week, and between booking appointments and making sure you’re on time, you have to keep track of all those things,” he said. “I learned how to manage my time from athletics and doing my work [at South]. Ramadurai said he praises the way South prepares students for time constraints but criticizes the way it emphasizes colleges in terms of their names or rankings.“It’s a good thing that college is highly emphasized at South, but some people lose sight of the whole process,” he said. “People don’t just go to college for the name. There’s scholarship money, athletics

have is a midterm and a final. So if you don’t keep up with your work, it’s all on you.” Aside from the variations in the type of classes that are available at Yale, the student population at college is significantly more diverse and representative of the real world than the students at South, according to Freshman. “The population in Newton doesn’t really represent what the whole country is like. Coming to Yale, I’ve met people from around the country and around the world, so it’s an eyeopening experience.” Freshman added that she feels as though she had significant advantages going into college compared with her classmates at Yale because of the lessons and support she got from the faculty at South. “[The teachers] really push you along the way,” she said. “Once you get to college, you’ll remember that and hopefully you’ll be able to use what they taught you.”

Laura Haime ‘11 Graduate

bookwork, ... which was something that was always encouraged here at South.” Although Schlenker partook in a range of activities, he said that the students he met through these extracurriculars remained largely separate. He added that the South community could benefit from making the effort to integrate different groups of students. “Because people at South sometimes feel that pressure to be the best, it can polarize them to really excel in what they do,” he said. “It’s good to excel in what you’re doing, [but] at the same time, … people can learn a lot from having a sports player in a show or having a theatre kid on a sports team because there are overlaps and you can make connections.” Schlenker said that students have the potential to become successful if they choose to take advantage of South’s resources. “There are so many opportunites and [so much] support for you that if you continue to find those support systems and do what you really love, you’re going to do really well in the world.”

and a lot of other things. If you’re competing with so many top leveled kids at South, you lose perspective.” He also said that because people in Newton often have “everything handed to them,” South students end up choosing to only do things that they want to do, which he feels is not realistic for college. “College is about getting out of your comfort zone and doing things that you may not like,” he said. “Little things that get you out of your comfort zone will make a big impression down the line.” Ramadurai said that South students tend to be judgmental due to the heavy focus on academics and competition; he hopes, however, that students will be able to appreciate the diverse talents of their classmates. “It’s important to take a step back and look around you and realize there are so many good, awesome people at South. Maybe you won’t be friends with all of them, but you should probably give credit to the fact that they’re going to do awesome things in the world.”

Varun Ramadurai ‘08 Graduate photos by Sofia Osorio and Katie Asch


june 6, 2013

centerfold

19

THE

COLLEGE

CRAZE

South’s college-oriented environment adversely affects the learning atmosphere, encourages senior to take a gap year

graphic by Alex Cohen

Rose Taylor

Centerfold Contributor Back in September 2009, when I was a freshman, much of Newton South was different. There weren’t picnic tables in the courtyard off the cafeteria, for one. The paper edition of Denebola still printed its catty, senior-slumping “View From the Top” columns, sometimes with newspaper articles attached. The corner outside the photo room still housed a constant, rotating assembly of weirdly beautiful, artistic humans who never seemed to have class, and the glossy pages of Leo weren’t even a ghost behind Mr. Weintraub’s glasses. Freshmen did not communicate exclusively via iMessage, relying instead on a complex system combining echolocation, carrier pigeons and an intricate vocal cord movement sequence known as “speech.” But not everything has changed over these past years. The Roar’s intimidatingly large graduation issue, the high pastry density in classroom parties before Christmas break and of course, the tense, unrelenting thrum of college talk — all of these things have remained reassuringly consistent. That last aspect has held remarkably steady in the years between 2009 and now. Over my four years of high school, the college process has gone from grand, far away and terrifying to grand, close by and terrifying, but for some reason, we’ve liked talking about it the whole time. My first experience with college

preparation came the first week of freshman year, when the newly-hired Mr. Stembridge — then still known by his last name — called us to the field house for an assembly. Of the three pieces of advice he gave, the last one stood out: “Talk to your guidance counselor,” Mr. Stembridge told us, “because in three years, when you need a guidance letter for college, you’ll want it to be good.” Indignant, frizzy-haired freshman me was outraged. Wasn’t there enough on our plates without thinking about a process that was years away? Shouldn’t building a good relationship with a school-based adult be encouraged independently of its value as an admissions boost? And, more importantly, why hadn’t Mr. Stembridge told us to use high school to figure out what makes us happy? He suggested that we take advantage of South’s extracurricular activities, but because he followed that tip with application advice, we had no choice but to view even our afternoons as boxes to be checked off on the Common App of the Distant Future. Mr. Stembridge wasn’t the only one extolling résume-building over happinessseeking. Over the next four years, teachers and guidance counselors and even peers

told me a lot about grades and honors classes and SATs and APs and getting into college, but very, very little about enjoying things. Of course, I exaggerate. Mr. Stembridge’s welcome speech wasn’t all collegefocused, and I’ve known plenty of teachers and classmates who care far too much to be merely playing an admissions game. But even so, high school has felt more like a march to the next thing than like an experience in and of itself. In theory, that’s okay. A few years of blood, sweat and tears in exchange for an acceptance letter from Happiness University sounds like a decent deal. But in practice, this system is ridiculous. It turns learning into a chore, into something to be slogged through for four years, which isn’t necessarily a transformation that undoes itself after graduation (this is an example of the Overjustification Effect, a concept that I had to memorize for the AP Psychology exam and toward which I have no affection or interest). It overvalues measurable aspects of learning and undervalues the intangible components that make intellectual engagement fun and rewarding. We have the latter at South, but it’s impossible to produce enough sleep and brain-space for them to be appreciated under the onslaught of the former.

High school has felt more like a march to the next thing than like an experience in and of itself.

These problems aren’t our school’s fault. Less measurable ways of deciding who gets into college are by nature... well, hard to measure, so they’re discouraged from the top down. Whoever its supporters, the current system makes it hard to like learning for learning’s sake and makes it even harder to find what parts of school make us happy. I say this as someone who’s done pretty well with things as they are; I got good grades and got into a school I like by memorizing the causes of schizophrenia, putting the right limits on definite integrals and identifying Shakespeare’s syntactical inversions. These are fine skills to have, but, although I succeed at developing them, I don’t get pleasure from practicing them. My school-related smiles come from making connections between subjects or constructing sentences that say exactly what I want them to or effectively rebutting someone’s argument in class. All of which is why I’m not going to college next year. Instead, I’m training and teaching at a St. Louis-based circus studio and sleeping eight hours a night and reading whatever books I want. I’m remembering why I like learning and thinking and moving. Maybe I’m even having a little fun. No matter what, I’m not going to school. That way, when I get to college, I’ll be able to learn properly, with my whole brain, unencumbered by the shadows of guidance letters or admissions wishes or anything but the quest of joy.


opinions volume 30

issue 1

page

june 6, 2013

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graphics by Maggie Zhang

Three students examine different ways for students to effectively spend their summer — studying to get ahead in school curriculum, getting a job to earn money or just relaxing

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Nathaniel Fleming

ummer school — two words that many students dread and fear. Summer vacation is supposed to be three months free of school, so why would anyone want to spend it studying? Summer school is the sort of thing parents force their kids to go to as a last resort for a failing student. But is summer school really that bad? Most kids envision summer school as simply an extension of normal school that will prolong the school year into vacation. Students assume that they won’t be able to have any fun because they’ll be spending their entire summer studying. But there are plenty of summer school programs that don’t last longer than a few weeks and are very different from traditional high school. The classes are smaller, or even one-on-one, which allows the teachers to be more personal and develop a teaching style better suited to the students. Many summer school programs are made for students to improve in a single subject in which he or she is strugging. Instead of jumping between subjects every hour, students spend multiple hours on one, making it much easier to learn and improve. Summer school can also help students improve on important academic skills like test taking. Even if you’re doing just fine in school, summer school is a chance to get ahead and lighten your workload during the school year. A few weeks of summer school could be great preparation for a particularly challenging honors class or any class you’re worried about. Another benefit of studying over the summer would be having more time during the year for out of school activities and extracurriculars. You don’t have to spend your entire summer studying, and it doesn’t have to be a painful experience. You might even be pleasantly surprised about the subject you’re studying. Compared to the traditional school year, summer school is more relaxed, more focused and sometimes even fun. It makes the typical school year easier and will leave you with more free time.

Jack Rabinovitch

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hen the last bell of the school year finally rings, the students exhale a sigh of relief and happiness. With the fast pace of the modern world, the portion of the year known as summer vacation is being sucked up by work and boredom. As we get older, our responsibilities catch up with us, and we are often thrown into a world with fun being inversely proportional to tangible rewards. Although we all hope that we get jobs that are gratifying and maybe even fun, the ability to fully focus on ourselves diminishes as we grow up. Responsibilities to our employers, our clients and our staff take precedence, along with the responsibilities to one’s spouse or children which may lay ahead. So how does one take advantage of this opportunity, this blank slate of time that is summer vacation? Many people will use the summer to get ahead in their school work or to find their first job and to experience what it is like to be an adult. My suggestion, though, is that people should use their time away from school to make memories, stories and adventures. One’s experience with working will help out later in life, and an extra course under the belt can’t hurt; however, neither of those are solutions to summer boredom. But remember: when you are older, you will have little time for spontaneous adventures. Whether it be some exotic camp, a camping trip, a road trip with friends or a hike through Appalachia summer experiences offer a world of opportunity. Even without resources like money, people can create their own fun. If you asked me to recall one specific week from last year’s school year, I wouldn’t be able to do it. But if you asked me to recall one week from the summer before, I could talk for hours, telling every little detail about my job on a wolf sanctuary in Colorado. That experience changed me more than an entire year in school did. Take those opportunities when you can. Make memories because life as we know it is short.

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Charles Zou

very school year, students eagerly await summer vacation. When the time finally comes that students are free from school, many want to spend the whole summer just relaxing and having fun. Doing nothing seems great for the first few days, but after a while, I personally get bored out of my mind. In theory, one summer of just relaxing sounds like fun, but actually attempting to have this summer is futile. Friends go to camp and travel, and spending time alone grows increasingly boring. I think the best thing to do during the summer is get a job. Working during the school year can be problematic, as it can increase stress, especially when it comes to proper time management. Over the summer, however, students typically have much more free time. Last summer, I helped my sister-inlaw in her lab. Although it wasn’t technically a job as I did not get paid, I learned a lot about how a lab works. The experience was beneficial, unlike mindless sunbathing. Summer jobs are also helpful for exploring future professions. For example, if I wanted to go into the medical field, I would already be familiar with aspects of a lab. The application process is grueling and stressful, so it’s good to learn how to fill out an application and prepare for interviews before it’s actually necessary. Working teaches you how to deal with coworkers and superiors, because working with peers is difficult and taking on certain challenges will make it easier. One of the biggest perks of having a job is making money. Relying on parents for money results in parents having control of how money is spent. If I started to have my own income, I would be able to decide how my money is used. Money earned from work can be saved to ease the financial burden of paying college tuition or to go on a shopping spree. Getting used to working early makes it easier for students to carry a job. Although hanging out and relaxing during summer vacation may seem enticing, students who get jobs ultimately get the most out of summer.


june 6, 2013

opinions

21

Student reflects on the importance of patriotism unprovoked by tragedy

photo by Yu-Ching Chang

Dina Busaba Managing Editor

When it was announced that Osama Bin Laden was killed, my Facebook newsfeed flooded with statuses declaring the strength and greatness of America. Some statuses went straight to the point: “USA! USA!” Other statuses, however, addressed other possible threats to the country: “That’s what you get when you try and mess with America.” On Sept. 11, 2001, I was five years old. I don’t remember the nation’s reaction to the attack beyond the sadness because I was so young. But people typically come together in the midst of a tragedy and support one another. The Boston Marathon bombings united not only Bostonians but all Americans. Support came from all around the nation in the form of signs, tweets and donations. The hashtag #BostonStrong started trending on Twitter, and once again, my Facebook newsfeed overflowed with pride for our country. For the first

time in my life, the unity and patriotism that people demonstrated inspired me. The unfortunate irony is that we only feel proud of our nation, city or hometown when a tragedy strikes. Only when something that we love is threatened do we begin to appreciate it. We feel fear, and from this fear stems relief when everything turns out all right. We need to appreciate what we have during the good times as well, though. Sitting in the park on a sunny day, when everything feels right in the world, I want to be able to tweet or instagram something with the tag #BostonStrong, because even in peace, Boston is strong. We don’t acknowledge that enough. Threats to our way of life don’t have to always be man-made. Natural disasters like tornadoes or hurricanes also cause devastation that encourage communities to come together. The tornado in Oklahoma is an example — we hear these terrible stories about scasualties, and although the feeling is selfish, we feel grateful for the fact that it’s not us, yet we also feel con-

nected to the victims. We cry with and for the victims; we as Americans, as human beings, sympathize with those like us. I am grateful for what I have. I’m grateful for the good school system in Newton, the proximity of Newton to Boston, the sometimes-underwhelming skyline and the tolerance within the city. Along with many residents of Newton, I live a very privileged life. Although some are more privileged than others, every person has something to appreciate. When the bombs exploded, Boston as we knew it stopped for a moment. Transportation shut down, businesses closed and streets were blocked off. People called their loved ones, checked in to make sure they were okay and knew how much they are loved. Tragedy inspires love. That’s the sick and twisted truth. When people aren’t thinking about what they appreciate, they don’t appreciate anything. Active appreciation is the first step toward natural appreciation during happy times. Feeling pride in who I am and where

I’m from manifests itself in other aspects of my life: I’m happier, more confident, more loyal. Adele sang it best in her song “Hometown Glory.” The song doesn’t mention any danger, threats or violence; her hometown is beautiful simply because it is her hometown. To me, everyone should feel that way about where they’re from. The bombs may go off and we might feel love for our home then, but the sun will always shine and the flowers will always bloom and friends will be with us. We can feel happy about our lives and what’s in them without having to balance the happiness with a range of negative emotions. Happiness doesn’t have to come from comparison or possession. It should come from inner peace and appreciation for what you have. The next time you’re with friends, laughing about somthing silly, joking and getting a break from stress, feel free to advertise your happiness. There’s nothing wrong with someone loving the way things are when things are going right.

Political awareness needed in times of apathy Nathaniel Bolter Sr. News Editor

often.

“I don’t really care about politics.” I hear this too

Eventually, it takes on a new tone, as if the speaker is expressing disinterest in a sport or a hobby, and it becomes an acceptable concept. But a casual denouncement of our system of government is still a denouncement, and those six words are a surrender of our way of life. Care for our government is the backbone of our country. In a representative democracy, if the citizens are apathetic toward politics, then what beliefs are we representing? We elect others to carry out our ideas, but that does not mean we have no responsibility. We need to have ideas upon which those elected can act. If we do not take it upon ourselves to be invested in our own governance, we cede all of our power, all of our influence and all of our ability to make a difference. When we do not care, we do not hold our elected officials accountable, thus allowing them unchecked power to do as they please without consequence and reducing the citizenry to an ineffectual mass. When we don’t care, elections become superficial popularity contests inundated in the art of deceiving the uninformed and indifferent voter.

We don’t care about politics though, so why bother with the issues? “I don’t really care about politics.” Those six words are a surrender of our way of life. Those six words spring from a feeling of entitlement, that one can live in this country, under this government, and reap its benefits without any civic engagement. With those six words and that entitlement we cede not only our indirect power through our elected representatives but the right to protest our present situation. There’s a kid in every class who will refuse to study for the test and then complain about receiving a bad grade. When we don’t care and we complain, we are that kid. A complaint about the state of our country loses all credibility when it comes from someone who could do something to change the situation but just doesn’t really feel like it, from someone who doesn’t care enough to act but whose entitlement tells him or her that he or she has been wronged nonetheless. It boils down to laziness and a disregard for civic duty. We are too lazy to inform ourselves, to care, and so we don’t answer the call of our civic duty; we walk away from it as the world passes us by. We may think we love our country, but when we say we don’t care about politics, we don’t. We just like living in it.

“I don’t care about politics.” Those six words are a surrender of our way of life. We could continue to think like this but I don’t think we’re going to like the results; when a government deteriorates, it’s never pretty. We Americans are a stubborn people, and shortcomings, deceit and corruption have shaken our faith in politicians. But they will only change once we do. We have to understand that being informed is not tedium; it is arming oneself to make a difference. We have to see voting not as a chore but as a means to propagate and perpetuate our beliefs. We have to hold our elected officials accountable, for they are a representation of ourselves, and we care if they portray us unfavorably. We have to care. We have to fight for our ideas and convictions. We have to realize that we are our country; we’re not just living in it. On Nov. 6, 2012 there were voters in Florida who waited in line for six hours to cast a vote in a race that was already decided. They knew this. “I don’t really care about politics.” I think we do. It may be easier to pretend we don’t care about politics and to live our lives, naive and negligible, subject to those who do. But I think we do care. Our care might be dormant — sleeping — but sleep is not death, and though we’ve been asleep, we just need something to wake us up. Well, America, the alarm clock is ringing.


22

opinions

june 6, 2013

Growing

Pains

Sophomore reflects on the way physical age and internal age differ, and the resulting consequences

By Vivian Li

A

lmost any time I’m with my mother, there is always at least one person who we encounter will mistake us for sisters. My mother and I are very similar not just in our features, but also in our height and sometimes, our clothes. On the phone, our voices sound the same. We laugh with the same laugh and smile with the same closed-lip smile. But those traits are where the our similarities end. One look at my mother and one would have thought that she had finally found the fountain of youth, for she does not show any visible sign of aging. Still looking as youthful as she was in her early twenties, my mother demonstrates youthful spirit of a teenager. She exudes the playful innocence that usually only occurs in childhood. From a young age, I’ve admired my mother. In a way, she was exactly like me, but she was also represented everything I wanted to be. I found myself wearing the vintage clothes that she has long discarded in an attempt to act her age. From my entire childhood to now, I have always wished that I was older so that I could act the age that I had always felt I was internally. My internal maturity had long surpassed my numerical age and I found myself unable to connect with people at school, leading to a feeling of constant isolation. Shows like “Toddlers and Tiaras” and “Teen Mom” being publicized on national television highlights the constant debate of whether or not young girls are being pressured to mature too fast for their age. In “Toddlers and Tiaras,” young girls are being dressed to look much older than their actual age. Throughout the transtition of adolescence, the sped-up aging process results in misinformation, such as the idea that in order for a girl to be “mature”, she will have to wear makeup and be scantily clad. In Disney World, the Bibbidi Bobbidi Boutique attracts and welcomes young girls. The customers emerge from the castle with glittery face paint, painted nails and fancy hairstyles, resembling J.Lo in her early days or a go-go dancer.

graphic by David Gorelik

These young children are superficially pushed to age faster and to grow up until —suddenly— they are thrown into high school. Many who mature early, either internally or physically, have felt at a loss sometimes when choosing their friends. It is much harder to find someone who is intellectually compatible because these people are ahead of their peers. Sometimes, I feel different from people my age because of differences of interests, and I thus feel isolated. A constant struggle of being slightly ahead of the maturation process exists. I feel exasperation towards my peers, as if I am a schoolteacher trying to explain the same thing over and over to her unresponsive students. This experience leads to my silence and withdrawal, losing the ability to properly socialize with others. There are also those who feel as though they are too

different when the people around them are advancing in ways that are different from them. In our society, the ideal teenager is going out to drink, have sex and do drugs. When teens are not committing these acts, they can feel immature or naïve compared to their more experienced friends. The point is that maturation is a physiologically based level of wisdom that may or may not have a direct correlation with age. Some who are younger feel that they are older and mentally wiser than those who are their age. Others who are older feel that they are mentally younger. Even though I sometimes felt left out in conversations with friends or my parents, I have learned that maturing at my own pace may not be such a bad thing. I feel that no one should ever succumb to the pressure to have to be at the same level as one’s peers. Maturity is based on personal experience and it is like a pair of shoes — what others feel is right for them may not always be right for you. Personally, after watching shows on television about young girls being paraded like show dogs on stage, I would argue to keep children as children. Even though I matured sooner, I would want children to be the way they are, not pageant queens or living out their parents’ dreams for them, but as innocent little kids. Once that childish naiveté is lost, it can never be recreated.

The customers emerge from the castle with glittery face paint, painted nails and fancy hairstyles, resembling J.Lo in her early days or a go-go dancer. young or too naïve, as if everyone is growing older without them. When I was much younger, I remember feeling like this during the last few years of elementary school. My parents were immigrants from China, and they were unable to help me adapt to a complex English vocabulary. As the oldest child, I was the guinea pig for my parents. They were unsure of what they should teach me at which age. Many things were not discussed openly, such as where they had come from, which is drastically different from America where everyone is very open. I still remember that in fifth grade, I thought I wasn’t as smart as the other people in my grade because my peers had an impressive vocabulary. I remember my first health class, as I was shocked at the lack of information provided by my parents. When more mature children hit the awkward stages of middle and high school, some feel left out or


june 6, 2013

arts review

23

NBC’s TV show “Community” about dysfunctional adults attending community college offers smart humor Ariel Neumann Opinions Contributor

I recently started watching the show “Community.” At first, I wasn’t sure that I would enjoy it; I had heard little about the show. After the first few episodes, however, I was instantly hooked. “Community” is a great, smart comedy that constantly walks a thin line between relatability and absurdity to hilarious effect. Although it has a small cult following of enthusiastic fans and has received a largely positive reaction, “Community” has relatively fewer viewers than it deserves. This small audience has resulted in threatened cancellation of the show for several seasons in row. Fortunately, “Community” has once again been renewed and will be returning for a fifth season. Longtime fans of the show are — of course — thrilled that “Community” has been given another chance to live up to its mantra of “six seasons and a movie,” but the show’s renewal also gives those who haven’t seen it a chance to view it. Anyone who hasn’t seen “Community” should definitely consider checking it out — the show is extremely funny and warrants much wider popularity. Set in a dysfunctional community college, “Community” is at once relatable and ridiculous, unafraid to be strange and even to make fun of itself at times. The show centers on former lawyer Jeff Winger, played by Joel McHale, who is forced to enroll in Green-

dale Community College after his law degree is revealed to be fake. As the result of a failed plan to seduce fellow student and former political activist Britta, he forms a Spanish study group which soon grows to include himself, Britta and five other students: bored millionaire Pierce, TV and movie expert Abed, overachieving study-drug abuser Annie, former high school jock Troy and single mother Shirley. “Community” follows the weekly antics of the group as they attend fake classes like History of Ice Cream taught by high-strung teachers. It constantly pokes fun at pop culture, referencing and incorporating TV and movie tropes. The show even makes fun of itself on occasion, as characters not only comment on scenes in other shows and movies but also on the plot devices and characterization employed by the show’s own writers. This perpetual self-deprecating metahumor that “Community” employs is one of the show’s best aspects, along with the willingness to be incredibly confident in its weirdness. “Community” is unafraid to take risks that many other shows would balk at and as a result has episodes that take place in everything from Claymation to film noir to videogame-like settings. The characters in the study group are excellent, hilarious and also occasionally sincere. Although even the moral revelations in these

graphic by David Gorelik

moments of sincerity are subject to the shows constant self-mockery, each of the characters undergo some sort of transformation throughout the series, most notably Jeff, who starts as an insincere narcissist and later becomes increasingly aware of the importance of caring for others. The outrageous minor characters — like the pun delivering, cross-dressing Dean Pelton and the mentally unbalanced Spanish teacher turned student turned security guard turned amnesiac Benjamin Chang — also add to the show. There are a few drawbacks to “Community,” most notably that the creator, Dan Harmon, was not directly overseeing the show in season four. This situation brought down the show’s quality somewhat in the most recent season compared to previous ones, but fortunately, the show bounced back in the last few episodes and Harmon was rehired. Overall, “Community” is a hilarious show: entertaining, smart, relatable and incredibly funny, and it is one that definitely deserves all of its viewers and more.

Students should mix fashion and comfort Ian Greer

Opinions Contributor Coming off the heels of a somewhat sultry power trip of a Fall 2013 fashion week, we must travel back in time to the first weeks of September when the designers are showing their Spring/Summer 2013 collections around the world. Spring 2013 crept into New York; the collections showed signs of not only a more sophistocated and modern woman, but also a vibrant and happy one. Clean lines paired with vibrant colors and ultra light fabrics seemed to give the season an air of confidence without losing the effortless glamour people in the fashion industry covet. This transformation in the fashion world has left fashionistas with a dilemma: Should they go for the summery yellow Dolce&Gabanna frock or the navy oversized Jil Sander coat? These questions have plagued the fashion industry for months now, and the decision has been made. If Spring 2013 and Fall 2013 had a love child, that baby would represent the atmosphere of the industry at the moment. To further examine this creation, we take a look into the star-studded red carpets of the annual Metropolitan Costume Institute Gala (Met Gala) and Cannes Film Festival. The theme of the Met Gala this year was “Punk: Chaos to Couture,” a fitting theme for the popularity of black clothes seen for Fall 2013 runways. Some guests who fittingly rebeled against the theme, however, wore more feminine

sillhouettes adorned by embellishments must think rationally; wearing a jersey and cutouts. maxi skirt and a denim button down In more recent events like the knowing you have two classes on the third Cannes Film Festival, taking place on May floor is simply absurd. Students need to 15th, there have been a stay comfortable without losing the multitude of trendability to wear the clothes we want. setting looks. Some people reading this may be thinking, I’m not famous, nor am I rich, so how does this apply to me? Well, my dear freshman, instead of wearing (too) short shorts and crop tops for the next month, I beg you to consider that this fashion season is more about individualizing the trends rather than following them directly. Options With the include (but are not school’s poorlylimited to): maxi timed air conditioners and skirts with bold prints, heaters blasting, we have no idea graphic by Olivia Hamilton multiple prints with what to wear on a daily basis. dulled down colors, easy breezy Chanel’s Resort 2014 collection, beautiful smock dresses or loose shorts which showed on May 9th, married the and a blouse. two seasons perfectly, taking the shapes All of these choices offer practicality of somber Fall but editing and recreating and comfort while balancing trendiness them in lighter whites, taupes, florals and and personal style. As high schoolers, we navy. Now, I’m not saying that a $3000

Chanel summer suit is the right way to go, but it is very much a midpoint between the two seasons. It can be easy in the summer to want to shorten everything because of the heat. Although it is important to keep cool, certain ways of dressing make it so that you don’t have to sacrifice proportion. There should be a balance between the fit, length and general weight of the pieces that comprise any outfit. In the summer when most girls pair any top with denim short shorts, an outfit can look a little strange due to the exposure on the bottom half of the body. Not only do I not want to see your butt but I also don’t want to see your butt and your belly button at the same time. An easy way to remedy this bareing is by balancing the length of your shorts with the length of your top. If you want to show off some midriff, shorts should be a little longer. I’m not saying wear capris, but maybe a looser fitting “boyfriend” short with a cool print, a paper bag waist, gladiators and a crop top — a perfect outfit for any summer day. Summer dressing is hard, especially when the fashion industry doesn’t know if we should be wearing black maxis or pleated chiffon tea length skirts. But there is no reason to be scared; Forever 21 will knockoff everything on the runways into cheaper clothing. Hey, at least you’ll look great and won’t need to take the elevator up to the third floor.


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june 6, 2013


sports volume 30

issue 1

page

june 6, 2013

25

SOFTBALL SOARS

Lions softball qualifies for the state tournament after best season in years By Yu-En Chang and Lizzie Fineman photo courtesy of Michele McDonald

The Lions celebrate a finished inning. With new training regimens and experienced coaching, the team acheived one of its best records in years and qualified for the state tournament.

For the past three seasons, confidence on the team,” she said. South’s softball team has finished “The plays that didn’t used to go either one or two games shy of our way are going our way and qualifying for the state tournapeople are tougher … We walk ment. This season, however, a little taller this year than in the proved to be different. past.” The Lions finished the Although the whole regular season with a record of 12-player roster contributes to 14-6 and a strong seeding for the Lions’ victories, freshman the tournament. After finishing pitcher Kim-An Quinn has espewith a 9-11 record last year, both cially excelled this season. Quinn coaches and players were motipitched for the squad last year as vated to push this year’s team to an eighth grader and, according reach at least a .500 record, which to players and coaches, has made is the minimum for tournament tremendous strides in her skills. qualification. With a strong start, Alper said that the amount the team qualified in game 12 and of progress Quinn made came as tack on more wins as the season a surprise to her. “I wasn’t aware progressed. of the leaps and bounds that Kim A number of factors has made in improving her pitchenabled the team to exceed past ing,” C she said. “She works really, BY YOONCHAN HOI records, according to players. Sto- really hard in the off-season.” ries of failed attempts at reaching The addition of former Babthe postseason motivated freshson College softball star Nicole man Monica Cipriano. “I really Latini to the coaching staff has wanted to make the tournament also been a catalyst for the team’s because I kept hearing stories success, according to coach Dave about how close the team had Salett. come to qualifying in the past,” “Nicole joining our team Cipriano said. “Also, I knew some made a huge difference ... There’s of the seniors already, and really nothing like having a young wanted them to be able to make female role model who’s a great playoffs for their senior year.” player herself,” he said. “[It’s South has had strong important to] give the kids a persoftball teams in the past, but this spective on what it’s like to play in year, senior captain Maya Alper a close game when you’ve actually feels that the team has got a hold done it, and Nicole has done that of more aspects of the game than and has been able to impart her in previous years. “Everything experience onto the team.” has sort of fallen into place for The players believe that us. We’ve had good teams the last Latini has brought new intensity couple of years ... but this year it’s to the sport. Several returning just been a whole different air of varsity players participated in

rigorous weekly workouts under her guidance. Latini said that this offseason strength and conditioning had notable effects on the team from the start of the season. “You could just tell how strong they were; their conditioning was up. At first they kind of laughed at what I expected of them, then they realized ‘wow … this is actually going to help me with softball,’” she said. “The work that they have put in in the offseason, I think it showed. And in those big games … they have the endurance to stay in those games and their energy is up … I think that has done a world of good for them.” Salett agreed and said that the team’s hits, throws, speed and general strength have all benefitted from this training. Quinn also said that training and conditioning in the offseason was a main contributor to the team’s success on the field. “During the offseason, we had a lot of strength and conditioning training, which made us more prepared for the season to come and we were all setting goals to do well this season,” she said. In addition to noticing increased physical strength, Latini said she has seen significant growth in mental toughness. “I think it’s helped them mentally ... they’re now realizing that they are able to accomplish things that they weren’t able to accomplish before,” she said. “Whether it’s mental or physical ... they’re definitely tuned in, in that aspect.”

Because of the positive results from the offseason workouts, the several members of the squad already plan on continuing their training early in the coming year. The strong team chemistry and positive attitudes on the team also contribute to their accomplishments. According to Salett, the girls’ positive outlook on their season has had great effects on their success. “They have a very good outlook on what sports are about, and they very easily get over difficult times ... They’re very easy to coach, and they’re a pleasure to coach,” he said. “The girls have a great attitude. They don’t put a lot of emphasis on winning or losing. They work hard in practice, and the chemistry on the team is like nothing you’ve ever seen. Everybody gets along with everybody and I think that also goes a long way to getting winning results.” For Cipriano, the great team bond takes a lot of the pressure off her shoulders. “For me, knowing how friendly everyone is allowed me to go on the field and not second guess myself because I was nervous of what the rest of the team would think,” she said Even with the loss of three seniors next year, the Lions hope to improve in the 2014 season. According to Quinn, expectations are anything but low for next season. “The team can still be playing at the level we are at now, and hopefully even a higher level,” Quinn said. “It’s hard to imagine

next year without the seniors, but I think we can definitely be just as good, or maybe better if we work as hard as we did this year.” Salett hopes to have more players participating in clinics during the offseason, so that next year the team can better compete with elite softball programs in the Dual County League. “My goal is to get a couple of wins against those teams, and I believe that it will happen ...The philosophy on the team is to work hard, get better at your skills and have a great time,” he said. “We don’t make winning a goal, that’s just a result of everything else.” Latini also hopes to make the South team into an elite program while still keeping the sport fun for players. “If they continue to work hard, there’s no reason that they shouldn’t be extremely successful going forward,” she said. Although she is sad to be leaving the team, Alper is excited to see the team’s successes in the coming years. “I’m upset I won’t get to be apart of it, but with Kim ... she has three more years on this team, and I can’t wait to see what she does,” Alper said. “It’s not about one person or one player, it’s a team effort, and everyone can contribute, from freshman to senior and top to bottom.” After a spirited comback against Lynn Classical in the first game of the tournament on June 1, the Lions were eliminated with a 6-5 loss.


26

sports

june 6, 2013

ON GUARD Students trade books for boards and protect lives as pool or ocean lifeguards during the summer

By Robby Fineman and Dan Rozensweig-Ziff Many students at South spend their summers relaxing at pools or beaches. Instead of enjoying the cool water of summer, this year several students — whether it be at a summer camp, a local pool or even the pool at North — are lifeguarding. Some students gravitate toward lifeguarding because it provides several benefits. Freshman Eli Braginsky decided to lifeguard at Camp Young Judea this summer for the salary and experience. “It’s a good summer job because you can make some pretty good money, make some new friends and, who knows, maybe even save some lives,” he said. Several student lifeguards at South believe that lifeguarding is a useful life skill. Junior Parker Olson, who has lifeguarded at Gath Memorial Pool, Newton North High School and Camp Coniston in New Hampshire, recommends lifeguarding to other students because he thinks it is a useful ability to have. “[It’s] a good life skill to have so you can save peoples lives when they’re in danger,” Olson said. According to South lifeguards, the reputation that lifeguarding has does not show how difficult becoming a lifeguard is. Students must pass a test in order to be certified. The test involves performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on an artificial dummy, swimming for 500 meters without rest and treading water for five minutes. Olson says that the test is “difficult for non-swimmers, but as long as you can swim, [becoming a lifeguard is] not the hardest thing in the world.” Braginsky agreed that lifeguarding is a challenging task. “It takes a lot of work, getting certified and other stuff, to actually become a lifeguard, so it’s not that easy if you’re just starting out,” he said. Along with the difficulties of the test, students also have to consider that other people’s lives are in their hands. Senior Rachel Hurwitz, who lifeguards at Camp Eisner in Great Barrington, believes that though the job can at times be boring, it prepares students for urgent situations. “It can definitely be scary, especially when kids are goofing off and being dumb,” Hurwitz said. “But I feel confident

that I know what to do in an emergency.” According to Hurwitz, staying in the moment is absolutely critical. “Being a good lifeguard is all about being 100 percent on and paying attention,” Hurwitz said. With the long hours and heat of a summer day, it is easy for lifeguards to lose focus over the course of their shift. That one minute of spacing out, however, could be the instance in which one of the swimmers at the pool needs help. Several students said this need to stay focused is precisely what makes lifeguarding so difficult. Olson attributes his constant focus to him saving the lives of two people over the course of his lifeguarding career. According to him, lifeguarding makes him feel “serious and powerful” to be able to spare these lives. Though the job can be tough on students, according to Irina Kader, Briginsky’s mom, parents also appreciate their children committing to something important. “[Lifeguarding] isn’t always exciting, but having to follow through with the commitment can be a valuable life skill,” she said.

photo by Katie Asch


sports

june 6, 2013

27

Seniors help bring volleyball team to victory

By Jack McElduff & George Morgan Sr. Sports Editor, Sports Reporter

photos by Aaron Edelstein*

South seniors led the volleyball team to a stuning victory in three succesive sets against Lincoln-Sudbury on May 17.

The Class of 2012 offered the Newton South boys volleyball team a large contribution of fresh talent, bringing the Lions to the Division I South sectional final last year. After the Class of 2012 graduated, many questioned whether this team could still manage to continue being among the states’ best, but that was before this year’s team rose above expectations in the DCL, heading towards yet another state tournament. The boys’ volleyball team finished their home schedule on Friday, May 17 against the Lincoln-Sudbury Warriors. The Lions dominated in all phases of the match, using a balanced scoring attack and shutdown defense to beat Lincoln-Sudbury 25-9, 25-12, 25-7. Before the game, the Lions’ nine seniors were honored as they prepared to play in their final regular season game. What was possibly their final game in the field house, the team’s seniors put in maximum effort and gave

it their all form start to finish. When all was said and done, seniors Paul Vasiloff finished with 11 kills, senior Ben Snyder with 11, and Zach Halpryn added another 10. The Lions came into the first set strong, scoring eight uninterrupted points in the start of the match. Halpryn and Snyder halted all of the Warriors’ attacks during their starting streak with a series of blocks and stuffs early on. This lead helped set a tone for the rest of the game. Vasiloff added four kills in the first set, ending the first set by a score of 25-9. Lincoln-Sudbury opened up the second set with a 3-1 lead. The Lions, however, were quick to tie up with Snyder and Halpryn’s quick succession of kills. The Warriors came as close as 7-6 in favor of the Lions in the second set, but that was before a degrading nine point run that included four more kills from Vasiloff, who finished the second set with six points. Later points

by sophomores Joe Esbenshade and Jared Chin helped push the set out of reach for Lincoln-Sudbury. The Lions kept up the scoring and blocking to defeat the Warriors 25-12 in the second set. The third set was similar to the first two with Halpryn and Snyder, whose combined 10 of the Lions’ 25 third-set points helped push South’s lead. Their work was coupled with stellar sets by sophomore Jared Chin. Late points from sophomore Brendan Duggan and senior Zach Litchman, who scored the final two points of the match, all but sealed a victory The Lions wrapped up their regular season against Brookline on Monday, May 20, and headed off into the playoffs. The team and its seniors made a great run, ending their season in the playoffs with a 2-1 loss against Needham High School on June 3.

South Scoreboard

Team

Last Game/Meet

Next Game/Meet

Record

Softball

Loss to Lynn Classical

N/A

14-7

Baseball

Loss to Central Catholic

N/A

10-10

Boys Lacrosse

Loss to Newton North

N/A

9-10

Girls Lacrosse

Loss to Newton North

N/A

5-11-2

Boys Volleyball

Loss to Needham

N/A

20-3

Boys Outdoor Track

1st Place DCLs

N/A

7-1

Girls Outdoor Track

All States

N/A

7-1


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sports

june 6, 2013

Spring season brings new beginnings for athletes Brendan Duggan Sports Columnist

Spring is all about starting over. Neighbors shovel the last few mounds of snow, and farmers ready their fields for spring and summer to come. It is primetime for recharging and getting back to work. Although the school year may be drawing to a close, it is most definitely primetime for sports. The snow and slush from early spring is long gone and sports now take center stage. Every day, students are seen around school sporting their jerseys and uniforms, and you can always expect to see the Red Sox, Celtics or Bruins on any given night. As far as high school sports go, there is baseball, lacrosse, softball, tennis, track and field and volleyball. For South, these sports are among the most successful programs we have, as several of those teams have made tournament appearances this year, — Congratulations to all teams and players that made it to the postseason. In professional sports, America’s pastime, baseball, is starting up. The Red Sox, though few expected it, have risen to the top of the spectrum in Major League Baseball. Old stars have shown up in the form of David Ortiz and Jon Lester, and the Fenway experience (now in its 101st year) has never been better. NBA and NHL playoffs are in full swing. In my opinion, the NBA and NHL playoffs are the two most entertaining sports to watch. No one cares how many regular season games a team won, or how many hat tricks someone scored. It’s a new season, and the intensity and stakes are higher than ever. An 8-seed can take down a 1-seed, which we have seen in recent years. Superstars emerge. Players who can handle the pressure, the boos from opposing crowds and the controversial calls from the referees are the real stars. The Celtics and Bruins, who both punched tickets to the playoffs this season, captivated us. Amidst all the stress of school and extracurriculars, we know we can turn to these games for an escape. Sports are packed with jaw-dropping comebacks and intense rallies that never cease to amaze viewers. The Celtics looked all but dead after an injury-plagued regular season, and the first three games of the playoff series with the Knicks didn’t help. Then they won game four, a back-and-forth overtime triumph. When the Celtics proceeded to close a 26-point deficit in game six, they captivated a region. Although the thrilling night ended in a loss, this team showed us that seeds, rankings and stats are essentially meaningless when crunch time comes around. The Bruins, down 4-1 to the Toronto Maple Leafs in the third period of game seven, pulled off a comeback for the ages, which was was reminiscent of the Red Sox in 2004. Talk about bringing together a city that has been through so much over the last few weeks in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings. So, to wrap up, go see a Sox game, cheer on your classmates as they take on the postseason, catch a game on TV and stay posted on the happenings in the professional realm. Spring is in session.

photo courtesy of Kristin Spink

Football players demonstrate dedication with early morning practices and newfound drive to win well before fall sports begin

A

By Sam Detjen and David Kim

lthough many fall sports do not start their practices until late in the summer, South football players have already suited up to prepare for the fall season. The team has been holding captain’s practices at 5:30 a.m. on Wednesdays and Fridays. Due to Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association rules, coach Ted Dalicandro is not allowed to be present, nor were the extra practices his idea. “[Neither] myself nor the coaching staff at South decided to start football practice early,” Dalicandro said. “The captain and parents with some volunteers have created weekly volunteer football workouts.” Junior captain Kevin Dober said that regardless of the early start time and voluntary status of the practices, many players attend. “About 25-30 kids attend early morning practice before school,” he said. Coaches and players alike hope that with these practices, they can usher in a winning mentality. “The biggest change has been a change in character and commitment. We have more guys who aren’t just going to accept losing without doing something about it,” junior captain Erik Manditch said. “That’s something we didn’t have a lot a couple of years ago.” Dober agreed with Manditch. “I see these spring practices and workouts as the beginning of a shift in mentality of the football team,” he said. Junior captain Drew Levine is confident that these early practice sessions are already having their desired effect. “The football team has already more dedication this year than it has ever had while I’ve been at South. We have a great

group of captains as well as a ton of guys that are also dedicated to getting better,” he said. “We have a new level of confidence and a ton of experience and talent returning for next year.” Dalicandro agreed, and said the most notable change has been in the mentality of current players. “There is not a change in the program, but a change in the commitment of our players,” he said. With preseason practices already underway, many players are beginning to set goals for the coming season. “Well, like every team our goal is to win a championship, but that is a step-by-

I see these spring practices and workouts as the beginning of a shift in mentality of the football team. - Kevin Dober, Class of 2014 step goal,” Levine said. “Right now all we want is at the end of next season, we know there is nothing more we could have done, we couldn’t have worked harder and we gave it everything we had.” Several of the captains have targeted making the playoffs as a realistic goal. “The goals for our upcoming season are to win more than last year, get better each and every day as a team and hopefully have an opportunity to make the playoffs,” captain Jake Alexander said. Manditch agreed that the playoffs are becoming closer and closer in reach.

“Winning the state championship just might not be the expectation for us right now,” he said. “What I will say is that with the new playoff system and with more guys dedicated and driven, it is a goal for us to make the playoffs.” Dalicandro said this attitude change on South’s football squad began with last season’s senior class. The 2013 seniors were “a great group of unselfish, committed players who were more interested in winning games than creating their own highlight tapes or where they were going to go play in college,” he said. “We had a 300% increase in wins from 2011 to 2012.” Dalicandro said that specifically Brian Spink, Sam Houston-Read, Patrick Fabrizio, Lucian Cascino, Matt Roberts and Mike Sugrue helped pave the way for this change. Despite the loss of the motivated senior players, the attitude among the team remains strong, with the early morning spring practices already showing this. With South due to face powerful teams such as Acton-Boxboro, ConcordCarlisle, Lincoln-Sudbury, Waltham and Westford, the Lions need to start strong. According to Dalicandro, this is what makes the early morning practices so important. “Most of the players on these other teams have to workout at 5:30 a.m. because they play a winter and spring sport,” Dalicandro said, “I would like to see us more competitive versus these other teams.” With players already demonstrating this dedication to making South football a competitive force in the Dual County League, Dalicandro is optimistic for the future of Lions football.


june 6, 2013

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fun page

june 6, 2013 By James Wu

ROSSWORD 1

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Nathaniel has always shown talents as a street journalist


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Baseball Unlimited is a 7,500 square foot hitting and pitching facility that specializes in individual and group recreational instruction for baseball and softball. Baseball Unlimited also provides state-ofthe-art equipment for maximum training develop-

Batting Cage Rentals 1/2 Hour Non-Member $30 1/2 Hour Member $20 1 Hour Non-Member $50 1 Hour Member $30

Personal Instruction 1/2 Hour Non-Member $50 1/2 Hour Member $35 1 Hour Non-Member $100 1 Hour Member $70

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THE LION'S ROAR 30-1  
THE LION'S ROAR 30-1  
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