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Katy Fisher

FISH SPECIES


Saltwater/Marine

Species #1

Bat Ray Myliobatis californica

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Chondrichthyes

Order: Myliobatiformes

Family: Myliobatidae

Geography and Habitat: The Bat ray is found in muddy or sandy sloughs, estuaries, bays, and kelp beds in the eastern Pacific Ocean. This species can also be found in the Galรกpagos Islands.

How they feed: Bat rays use their pectoral fins to move sand. This helps them to find mollusks, crustaceans, and small fish. Their teeth are flat and are tightly packed into rows that are for crushing and grinding prey.


Body Form: The Bat ray is a distant relative of the shark. Its body is somewhat triangular shaped, with wing-like pectoral fins. This species has a venomous spine in its tail, and only uses it when attacked or frightened.

Swim Style: Bat rays swim gracefully, flapping their pectoral fins like a bird. This helps them move with ease in order to find prey. Mouth Position: subterminal, inferior

Saltwater/Marine

Species #2

Hawkfish Anthias Serranocirrhitus latus

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Serranidae

Geography and Habitat: The Hawkfish anthias is found in coral reefs in the West Pacific, from Indonesia to Southern Japan and Tonga.

How they feed: Hawkfish usually perch themselves on rock or coral and stay super still. Then, they dart out quickly to grab prey.


Body Form: The Hawkfish anthias is very small in size, growing up to 13 centimeters in length. Its dorsal fin fans out along its back.

Swim Style: The Hawkfish anthias is a quick species that uses its fins to dart quickly to avoid predators and to catch prey. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Pinkbar Goby Amblyeleotris aurora

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat:

Species #3


Pinkbar gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The PInkbar goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The Pinkbar goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Great

Species #4

White Shark Carcharodon carcharias

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata


Class: Chondrichthyes

Order: Lamniformes

Family: Lamnidae

Geography and Habitat: Great whites can be found in the coastal surface waters of all the major oceans. There are greater amounts of great white sharks in the United States, South Africa, Japan, Oceania, Chile, and the Mediterranean. Most of shark research is done in Dyer Island, South Africa, where one of the densest populations of these sharks are found. How they feed: Great white sharks are carnivorous. They prey on fish, sea turtles, sea otters, and sea birds. They are ambush hunters, and attack most of their prey at the surface of the water. The carcass is then dragged to the bottom and eaten.

Body Form: The great white has a robust, large, conical snout. Their skin displays countershading and their bone structure is actually made of cartilage.

Swim Style: This species swims upright at fast speeds. Since the great white can never rest, it is constantly moving. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #5


Ocean Sunfish Mola mola

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Tetraodontiformes

Family: Molidae

Geography and Habitat: Ocean sunfish can be found in tropical and temperate water around the world. They mainly stay in the depths of the ocean except when they swim to the surface to have parasites removed by other fish. How they feed: A sunfish’s diet mainly consists of jellyfish. They consume large amounts to maintain their bulkiness. They might also eat salps, squid, crustaceans, small fish, fish larvae, and eel grass.

Body Form: The sunfish has quite a unique body shape. The caudal fin is replaced by a rounded clavus. The body is oval shaped and the pectoral fins are small and fan shaped. Male sunfish can reach up to 14 feet across the fins.


Swim Style: This species swims upright with its dorsal and anal fins vertical. However, they tend to sometimes bask horizontally. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #6

Humpback Anglerfish Melanocetus johnsonii

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Lophiiformes

Family: Molidae

Geography and Habitat: The humpback anglerfish can be found in the deep seas of tropical to temperature waters at depths of up to 6,600 feet. How they feed: Humpback anglerfish use their luminescent organ, called the esca, to lure prey in the dark environment in which they dwell. They barely use any energy when feeding by using the lie and wait method.


Body Form: The humpback angler fish has a large, round body with two pectoral fins that are located on the sides of the fish. They have huge heads with mouths that hold a fanglike set of teeth. Their esca extends in front of their mouth. While the female anglerfish can grow up to 3 feet in length, the males are much smaller.

Swim Style: This species swims upright and has an upward facing mouth. Mouth Position: superior

Saltwater/Marine

Species #7

Nurse Shark Ginglymostoma cirratum

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Chondrithyes

Order: Orectolobiformes

Family: Molidae

Geography and Habitat: Nurse sharks are bottom dwelling sharks. They are found in tropical and subtropical waters on the continental and insular shelves. They live in reefs, channels bewtween mangrove islands and sand flats.


How they feed: Nurse sharks feed at night. They spend a lot of their time rifling through the bottom sediments in search of food. They eat mainly crustaceans, molluscs, tunicates, sea snakes, and other fish including sting rays.

Body Form: Nurse sharks are fairly flat so that they can move easily along the ocean floor. Swim Style: This species swims upright with its dorsal fin vertical. It swims faster at night to catch prey, but during the day they are inactive and prefer to rest in groups of up to 40 individuals. Mouth Position: sub terminal, inferior

Saltwater/Marine

Striped Bass Morone saxatilis

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Species #8


Family: Moronidae

Geography and Habitat: Striped bass are native to the Atlantic coastline of North America from the St. Lawrence River to the Gulf of Mexico to Louisiana. How they feed: Striped bass are very quick and usually feed on small fines such as sardines and minnows

Body Form: Striped bass have a silvery body marked with dark stripes running from the gills to the base of the tail. The maximum weight that has been scientifically recorded is 125 pounds. The common size of this species is about 3.9 feet. Swim Style: Striped Bass swim upright and can move very quickly. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Tiger

Species #9

shark


Galeocerdo cuvier

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Chondrichthyes

Order: Carchariniformes

Family: Carcharhinidae

Geography and Habitat: The tiger shark is often found close to the coast, mainly in tropical and subtropical waters throughout the world. It is found in many tropical and temperate waters, and it is especially common around central Pacific islands. How they feed: Tiger sharks engage in relatively few fast chases after prey. This may be indicative of vigilant prey, in which case it is unsurprising that the sharks would not pursue as stealth is their primary predatory method.

Body Form: 9-13 ft. with a dorsal and posterior fin, as well as fins on the side. The skin of a tiger shark typically ranges from blue to light green with a white or yellow underbelly. Swim Style: Tiger sharks swim upright and can move very quickly. Mouth Position: subterminal


Saltwater/Marine

Species #10

Shortfin mako shark Isurus

oxyrinchus

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Chondrichthyes

Order: Lamniformes

Family: Lamnidae

Geography and Habitat: The shortfin mako inhabits offshore temperate and tropical seas worldwide. How they feed: The shortfin mako feeds mainly upon cephalopods, bony fishes including mackerels, tunas, bonitos, and swordfish, but it may also eat other sharks, porpoises, sea turtles, and seabirds. They hunt by lunging vertically up and tearing off chunks of their preys' flanks and fins. Makos swim below their prey, so they can see what is above and have a high probability of reaching prey before it notices.

Body Form: The Shortfin Mako is cylindrical in shape, with a vertically-elongated tail that assists its highly hydrodynamic lifestyle. This species' color is brilliant metallic blue dorsally and white ventrally, although coloration varies as the shark ages and increases in size.


Swim Style: Shortfin makos swim upright and can take off at fast speeds. However, they are incapable of sitting still in the water, so they often have to circle their prey. Mouth Position: subterminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #11

Swordfish Xiphia

s gladius

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Chondrichthyes

Order: Perciformes

Family: Xiphiidae

Geography and Habitat: These fish are found widely in tropical and temperate parts of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, and can typically be found from near the surface to a depth of 550 m (1,800 ft). How they feed: Adults feed on a wide range of pelagic fish, such as mackerel, barracudinas, silver hake, rockfish, herring, and lanternfishes, but they also take demersal fish, squid, and crustaceans. In the northwestern Atlantic, a survey based on the stomach content of 168 individuals found 82% had eaten squid and 53% had eaten fish, including gadids, scombrids, butterfish, bluefish, and sand lance. Large prey are typically slashed with the sword, while small are swallowed whole.


Body Form: This species has a large dorsal fin and a large sword-like mouth in which they use to slash at its prey to injure the prey animal. Swim Style: Swordfish swim upright and can move very quickly. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #13

Yellow clown goby Gobiodon okinawae

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Clown gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed:


The Clown goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The clown goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Monkey goby Neogobius fluviatilis

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Species #14


Geography and Habitat: The monkey goby can be found in the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. It is an invasive species in Europe. How they feed: Monkey goby feed on molluscs and shrimp.

Body Form: The monkey goby has cycloid scales and can grow up to 7-10 centimeters. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #15


Candy striped goby Awaous strigatus

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Candy striped gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The candy striped goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The candy striped goby can grow to be 4 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style:


Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #16

Yellow rose goby Stonogobiops nematodes

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Yellow rose gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The yellow rose goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.


Body Form: The yellow rose goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #17

Diamond watchman goby Valenciennea puellaris

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Diamond gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed:


The diamond goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The diamond goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Panda clown goby Paragobius lacunicolus

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Species #18


Geography and Habitat: Panda clown gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The panda clown goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The panda clown goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #19

Flaming prawn goby Discordipinna griessingeri


Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Flaming prawn gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The flaming prawn goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The flaming prawn goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Species #20

Purple firefish goby Nemateleotris decora

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Purple firefish gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The purple firefish goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form:


The purple firefish goby can grow to be 2.5-3.5 inches in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #21

Suntail goby Amblyeleotris aurora Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Suntail gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The suntail goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.


Body Form: The suntail goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Species #22

Bumblebee Goby Brachygobius doriae Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Bumblebee gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. It does not tolerate intrusion in its territory. How they feed: The bumblebee goby feeds on small fish and tubifex worms, bloodworms, and brine shrimp often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The bumblebee goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style:


Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Black

Species #23

goby Amblyeleotris aurora Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Black gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The black goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form:


The black goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, nonaggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #21

Suntail goby Amblyeleotris aurora Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Suntail gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The suntail goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.


Body Form: The suntail goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Black-

Species #24

ray goby Stonogobiops nematodes Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Black-ray gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The black-ray goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The black-ray goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style:


Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Yasha

Species #25

white ray shrimp goby Stonogobiops yasha Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Yasha gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The yasha goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.


Body Form: The yasha goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Species #26

Neon

cleaner goby

E.

oceanops Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Neon gobies live in the reefs of the western Atlantic Ocean at depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The neon goby feeds on ectoparasites, They consume algae and other plants as a secondary food source. They dart quickly to catch prey.

Body Form: The neon goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long anal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators.


Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Species #27

Sharknose goby Gobiosoma evelynae Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Sharknose gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The sharknose goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form:


The sharknose goby can grow to be 1.5 inches in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Tiger

Species #28

watchman goby Pseudogobiopsis tigrellus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: TIger gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The tiger goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.


Body Form: The tiger goby can grow to be 2.3 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

White

Species #29

tiger goby Priolepis nocturna Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Tiger gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed:


The tiger goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The tiger goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Steinitz’s goby Gammogobius steinitzi Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Species #30


Geography and Habitat: Steinitz’s gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The steinitz’s goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The steinitz’s goby can grow to be 11 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #31

Transparent goby Aphia

minuta


Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Transparent gobies live in the reefs of the western Atlantgic Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The transparent goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The transparent goby can grow to be 7.9 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their nonaggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Species #32

Engineer goby Pholidichthys leucotaenia Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Engineer gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The engineer goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The engineer goby can grow to be 18 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp.


Swim Style: Its snake-like form allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #33

Mandarin goby Synchiropus splendidus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Mandarin gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The mandarin goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.


Body Form: The mandarin goby can grow to be 1.5-2 inches in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its fins allow it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Species #34

Diamond goby Valenciennea puellaris Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Diamond gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The diamond goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.


Body Form: The diamond goby can grow to be 6 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Saltwater/Marine

Violet

Species #35

goby Gobioides broussonnetii Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat:


Violet gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The violet goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The violet goby can grow to be 38 centimeters in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: superior

Saltwater/Marine

Blue

Species #36

Dragon goby Gobioides broussonnetii Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes


Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Blue dragon gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The blue dragon goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The blue dragon goby can grow to be 1.5 inches in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: superior


Saltwater/Marine

Species #37

Green coral goby Gobiodon histrio Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Green coral gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The green coral goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The green coral goby can grow to be 1.4 inches in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp.


Swim Style: Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Species #38

Flashing tile goby Hoplolatilus chlupatyi Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Flashing tile gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The flashing tile goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The flashing tile goby can grow to be .25 inches in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style:


Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

Circus

Species #39

goby Priolepis nocturna Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: Circus gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The circus goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The circus goby can grow to be 1.5 inches in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style:


Its fins allow it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal


Saltwater/Marine

White

Species #40

sleeper goby Valenciennea sexguttata Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Perciformes

Family: Gobiidae

Geography and Habitat: White sleeper gobies live in the reefs of the western Indian Ocean a depths from 16 to 130 feet. However, they can be found all over the world in tropical waters. They often live inside the bodies or burrows of invertebrates. How they feed: The white sleeper goby feeds on small fish and plankton, often by hiding in burrows until their prey swims by and they can dart out to catch it. They also feed on coral by using their molars to crush the coral and extract beneficial calcium.

Body Form: The white sleeper goby can grow to be 1.5 inches in length. It has a long body and is a close relative of the shrimp. Swim Style:


Its long dorsal fin allows it to move quickly upright through the ocean current. However, because of their bright colors and non-aggressiveness, gobies are important and easy prey for predators. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #41

Lake sturgeon Valenciennea sexguttata Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed: The lake sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form:


They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. . Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #42

Shortnose sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed: The shortnose sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae and other small organisms.


Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #43

Green sturgeon Acipenser medirostris Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed:


The green sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. . Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal


Freshwater

White

Species #4

sturgeon 4Acipenser transmontanus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: The white sturgeon lives on the bottom of slow-moving rivers, bays, and estuarine areas, including the brackish water at the mouths of large rivers. Other sturgeon will spend most of its time in a marine environment, only coming into rivers to spawn. They are well-adapted to finding food drifting by with their excellent sense of smell and taste. When there is an insufficient food supply, sturgeon have been known to move into shallow water

How they feed: The white sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes.


. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Dwarf

Species #45

sturgeon Pseudoscaphirhynchus hermanni Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: The dwarf sturgeon can be found in areas of Asia, Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Amu Darya river, and the Syr Darya river. How they feed: The dwarf sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.


Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. . Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #46

Kaluga sturgeon Huso

dauricus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed: The kaluga sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.


Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #47

Beluga sturgeon Valenciennea sexguttata Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland.


How they feed: The beluga sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. . Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Starry

Species #48

sturgeon (endangered) Acipenser stellatus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae


Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed: The starry sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. . Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #49

Alabama sturgeon Scaphirhynchus suttkusi


Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed: The alabama sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. . Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal


Freshwater

Amur

Species #50

(Japanese) sturgeon Acipenser schrenckii Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed: The amur sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth


and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #51

Bastard sturgeon Acipenser nudiventris Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: Its range is now primarily limited to the Ural River (in Russia and Kazakhstan), with a possible relict populations in the Rioni River in Georgia and the Safid Rud in Iran How they feed: The bastard sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form:


They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Syr

Species #52

Darya sturgeon (critically endangered) Pseudoscaphirhynchus fedtschenkoi Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: It is found in Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan and is currently critically endangered. How they feed: The Syr Darya sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.


Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Amu

Species #53

Darya sturgeon Pseudoscaphirhynchus kaufmanni

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: It is found in Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. How they feed: The Amu Darya sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.


Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water.

Freshwater

Species #54

Sakhalin sturgeon Acipenser mikadoi Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: The Sakhalin sturgeon is commonly found in the areas of Northwest Pacific, Bering Sea, Tumnin or Datta river, northern Japan, and Korea. This species currently spawns persistently in the Tumnin River


How they feed: The Sakhalin sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water.

Freshwater

Species #55

Russian sturgeon Acipenser gueldenstaedtii Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae


Geography and Habitat: It is found in Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Georgia, Iran, Kazakhstan, Romania, Russia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, and Ukraine. How they feed: The russian sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #56

Dabry’s sturgeon (critically endangered) Acipenser dabryanus


Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: The fish lives in slow-moving river waters over substrates of sand and mud. How they feed: The Dabry’s sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms (including leeches), and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal


Freshwater

Pallid

Species #57

sturgeon (endangered) Scaphirhynchus albus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed: The Pallid sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae and other small organisms.

Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth


and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #58

Wisconsin River sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Acipenseriformes

Family: Acipenseridae

Geography and Habitat: This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. How they feed: The Wisconsin River sturgeon has taste buds on and around its barbels near its rubbery, prehensile lips. It extends its lips to vacuum up soft live food which it swallows whole due to its lack of teeth. Its diet consists of insect larvae and other small organisms.


Body Form: They are primarily cartilaginous, lack vertebral centra, and are partially covered with bony plates called scutes rather than scales. They also have four barbels—tactile organs that precede their toothless mouth and are dragged along often murky river bottoms. Sturgeon are distinctly and immediately recognizable for their elongated bodies, flattened rostra, distinctive scutes and barbels, and elongated upper tail lobes. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Silver

Species #59

carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed:


They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: subterminal

Freshwater

Species #60

Grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae


Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #61

Bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis


Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal


Freshwater

Species #62

Crucian carp Carassius cara Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style:


These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #63

Catla carp Cyprinus catla Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.


Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #64

Mrigal carp Cirrhinus cirrhosus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed:


They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #65

Black carp Mylopharyngodon piceus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae


Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #66

Mud carp Cirrhinus molitorella


Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal


Freshwater

Species #67

Hora white carp Cirrhinus macrops Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style:


These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #68

Mirror carp Cyprinus carpio carpio Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.

Body Form:


Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #69

Common carp Cyprinus carpio Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Cypriniformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: This species is a widespread freshwater fish of eutrophic waters in lakes and large rivers in Europe and Asia. It can really be found in any part of the world; it is used as a food source and it is also an ornamental fish. Although tolerant of most conditions, common carp prefer large bodies of slow or standing water and soft, vegetative sediments. How they feed: They are omnivorous. They can eat an herbivorous diet of water plants, but prefer to scavenge the bottom for insects, crustaceans (including zooplankton), crawfish, and benthic worms.


Body Form: Carp are typically slimmer than domesticated forms, with body length about four times body height, red flesh, and a forward-protruding mouth. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #70

Channel catfish Cyprinus carpio Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea.


How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #70

Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae


Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #71


Yellow catfish Ameiurus natalis Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal


Freshwater

Species #72

Mekong catfish Pangasianodon gigas Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style:


These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #73

Hardhead catfish Ariopsis felis Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.


Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #74

Mud catfish Ameiurus nebulosus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.


Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #75

Flathead catfish Pylodictis olivaris Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea.


How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #76

Wels catfish Silurus glanis Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae


Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: terminal

Freshwater

Species #77


Redtail catfish Phractocephalus hemioliopterus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water.


Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #78

Goonch catfish Bagarius yarrelli Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding.


Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #79

Paraiba catfish B. filamentosum Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.


Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #80

Brown Bullhead catfish Ameiurus nebulosus Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes

Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America,


Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Freshwater

Species #81

Black Bullhead catfish Ameiurus melas Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Actinopterygii

Order: Siluriformes


Family: Cyprinidae

Geography and Habitat: Catfish live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, North America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea. How they feed: This species is a bottom dweller, often feeding on scraps. They are nocturnal, so they hunt at night.

Body Form: Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head. Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding. Swim Style: These fish swim upright and can move very quickly, using their posterior fins to propel themselves through the water. Mouth Position: sub terminal

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #82


Elelphant ear sponge Agelas clathrodes Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.

Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style:


They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #83

Stove pipe sponge Aplysina archeri Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.


Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #84

Branching vase sponge Callyspongia vaginalis Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.


Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #85

Brown tube sponge Agelas conifera Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base.


Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.

Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #86

Bath sponge Spongia officinalis Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae


Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.

Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #87

Red boring sponge Cliona celata Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera


Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.

Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body


Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #88

Barrel sponge Xestospongia muta Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.

Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered


with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #89

Row pore rope sponge Aplysina cauliformis

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.


Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #90

Strawberry vase sponge Mycale laxissima

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base.


Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.

Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #91

Asure vase sponge Callyspongia plicifera Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera

Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae


Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.

Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Saltwater Invertebrates

Species #92

Sea tulip sponge Pyura spinifera Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Porifera


Class:Demospongiae

Order: Agilasida

Family: Agilasidae

Geography and Habitat: Sponges are worldwide in their distribution, from the Polar Regions to the tropics. Most live in quiet, clear waters, because sediment stirred up by waves or currents would block their pores, making it difficult for them to feed and breathe. The greatest numbers of sponges are usually found on firm surfaces such as rocks, but some sponges can attach themselves to soft sediment by means of a root-like base. Sponges are more abundant but less diverse in temperate waters than in tropical waters, possibly because organisms that prey on sponges are more abundant in tropical waters. How they feed:

Sponges absorb their food by their little holes in the sponge. Because most adult sponges can't travel in search of food they get their food by a process called filter feeding.

Body Form: A sponge's body is hollow and is held in shape by the mesohyl, a jelly-like substance made mainly of collagen and reinforced by a dense network of fibers also made of collagen. The inner surface is covered with choanocytes, cells with cylindrical or conical collars surrounding one flagellum per choanocyte. The wave-like motion of the whip-like flagella drives water through the sponge's body. Swim Style: They float in the water but they don’t necessarily swim. Mouth Position: pores all over their body

Fish ID Project  

Katy Fisher

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