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LET ALL WHO ARE HUNGRY COME AND E AT: A Haggadah Dedicated to Awareness and Activism around Childhood Hunger and Nutrition

2015 5775 â—Š


‫ — ֵס ֶדר‬Seder — Order KADESH - The First Cup

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URCHATZ – Hand Washing Ritual

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KARPAS - Green Vegetable

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YACHATZ - Breaking the Middle Matzah

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TAKE ACTION NOW: Help End Childhood Hunger

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MAGGID - Telling the Story

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ROCHTZAH - Hand Washing Ritual Before the Meal

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MOTZI MATZAH - Eating the Unleavened Bread

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MAROR - Bitter Herbs

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KOREICH - Hillel Sandwich

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SHULCHAN OREICH - Festival Meal

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TZAFUN - Finding the Afikomen

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BARECH - Invitation to Gratitude

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HALLEL: Songs of Praise

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NIRTZAH - Conclusion

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ADDENDUM: Educate Yourself & Get Involved

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What is a Hunger Seder? (LEADER) Each year, Jews across the world join with family, friends, neighbors, and strangers to celebrate the holiday of Passover. But why? What is behind this tradition? Seder means “order.” The ordered rituals and symbols of the Passover seder help us to tell the story of the Jewish people’s liberation from slavery in Egypt. But for today’s seder we choose to recognize that while the Jewish people may be free, not everyone has cause for celebration. Many people, even in a free society such as ours, are bound by the hardships and challenges of their circumstances. We come together today with them in mind, determined to realize our vision of a day when we will all be truly free from the oppression of hunger. (LEADER) Let us honor this moment by joining together in song:

Song: Hinei Mah Tov

‫ּומ ה נָ ִע ים‬ ַ ‫ִה נֵ ה ַמ ה ּטֹוב‬ . ‫ֶש ֶב ת ַא ִח ים גַ ם יָ ַח ד‬ Hineh mah tov u’ma-na’im shevet achim gam yachad How good it is for brothers and sisters to be together.

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Four Cups for Four Promises During the traditional seder, we join together and drink 4 cups of wine: a cup for each of the promises of freedom God made to the Israelites as God led us out of bondage. Today we join together and make four new promises – promises not about breaking the shackles of Egyptian slavery, but about breaking the bonds of hunger. We do so standing together and calling for a better tomorrow, one in which we are all blessed to have bountiful and nutritious food for our families, our neighbors, our friends, and for all Americans. (ALL READ IN UNISON)

1. We will work to ensure that everyone has access to enough nutritious food. 2. We will learn why so many children in this country struggle with hunger. 3. We will urge our policymakers to make it a priority to end childhood hunger. 4. We will create a world where all Americans and all people are free from hunger.

KADESH - The First Cup

As we prepare to drink our first cup of wine and make our first promise, we acknowledge that not everyone is able to feed their bodies with affordable nutritious food. Far too many of our neighbors and friends, and especially children in our communities, simply do not have adequate resources to do that which we often take for granted: eat in a way that actually provides nourishment and sustenance. Our first cup of wine is our first promise:

We will work to ensure that everyone has access to enough nutritious food. (LEADER) We lift our glasses and read the blessings together (drink wine after the blessings):

. ‫ּבֹור א ְפ ִר י ַה גָ ֶפ ן‬ ֵ ‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יי ֱא‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu, Melech ha’olam, borei p’ri hagafen Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.

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(LEADER) We now say the She’hecheyanu prayer, to give thanks for having an opportunity today to reflect on the problem of childhood hunger and to commit to action.

‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶמ ֶל ְך ַה‬ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יְ יָ ֱא‬ ‬. ‫יע נּו ַל זְ ַמ ן ַה זֶ ה‬ ָ ִ‫ֶש ֶה ֱח יָ נּו וְ ִק יְ ָמ נּו ‫וְ ִה ג‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu, Melech ha’olam, she’hecheyanu ve’kiyemanu ve’higianu la’zman ha’zeh Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who has granted us life, sustained us, and enabled us to reach this season.

URCHATZ – Hand Washing Ritual

The washing of hands is a ritual of purification. We symbolically “wash away” apathy or indifference, and instead prepare ourselves to reignite our passion for justice and our commitment to ending hunger. Later, we wash our hands again and say a blessing in preparation for the festive meal. The leader pours water (from a “washing cup” into a bowl) over each hand and then repeats the procedure, symbolically washing the hands for all those at the seder table. No blessing is recited at this time.

THE PARABLE OF THE STARFISH An old man was walking along a beach when he happened upon a young girl picking up starfish, one by one, and throwing them gently into the water. He asked the girl, “Why are you throwing these starfish into the ocean?” She replied, “Because the sun is up and the tide is going out. If I don’t throw them back, they will die on the beach.” The old man looked at the girl and remarked, “But there are miles and miles of beach and many starfish along each mile. You can’t possibly make a difference.” The young girl listened politely and smiled. Then she bent down, picked up another starfish, threw it back in the ocean, and turned to the old man, saying, “It made a difference for that one.”

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KARPAS - Green Vegetable (LEADER) Karpas is from the Greek word Karpos, which means “fruit of the soil.” When spring comes we note with pleasure the bounty of vegetables and fruits in the market. Yet in communities and neighborhoods across the country, instead of a seasonal bounty there exists persistent scarcity. This year, as we dip our Karpas into salt water, consider the bitterness of the fact that young people in the spring of their lives are severely limited in the possibilities before them when they lack access to the nutritious food that they need to thrive. Let us remember that we have work to do to ensure that affordable, good quality, nutritious food reaches all vulnerable chidren in this country. More than 16 million children live in households in the U.S. that lack the means to get enough nutritious food on a regular basis. This unacceptable situation of children going without adequate nutrition takes a heavy toll on their cognitive and physical development, academic achievement and health and well-being. The opportunity cost of millions of children unable to reach their full potential defies imagination. And there is a staggering economic impact to our country if we ignore the problem of hunger. Fortunately, there are effective federal child nutrition programs that help us ensure that low-income children have access to nutritious foods. The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act, which is due to expire on September 30, 2015, authorizes these federal programs. We have an important opportunity to improve and strengthen these programs in the reauthorization process and better the lives of the millions of children helped by them. (LEADER) We dip our green vegetable into salt water, then together recite the blessing:

. ‫ּבֹור א ְפ ִר י ָה ֲא ָד ָמ ה‬ ֵ ,‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יי ֱא‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu, Melech ha’olam, borei p’ri ha’adama Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, creator of the fruits of the earth. May the blessings of Your bountiful harvests be enjoyed by all of humankind.

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YACHATZ - Breaking the Middle Matzah

LEADER breaks matzah and holds up the broken piece. The larger piece of the broken matzah is wrapped in a napkin and hidden as the afikomen; the smaller is returned to the matzah cover. (LEADER) This broken matzah reminds us that our world is broken. We recall those who are poor, whose uncertainty about their future compels them to put aside the “broken half” for later use. We are shaken out of our complacency as we recall God’s words: “Remember that you were slaves in the land of Egypt.” Through service to others, we strengthen our community. But direct service can only alleviate some of the pain of hunger. Are these efforts enough? How can we heal the brokenness in our world?

THE PARABLE OF BABIES IN THE RIVER One day, a group of friends gathered for a picnic at a river near their village. As they shared food and conversation, one of them noticed a baby in the river, struggling and crying as she floated downstream. Quickly, they rushed to save her from drowning. But no sooner had they done so, more babies came floating down the river. And even more after that! The friends quickly decided they needed to coordinate more villagers to assist in their rescue activities. They organized volunteers to take turns watching over the water and pulling babies from the water. Volunteers recruited their friends to help, and before long the entire village was helping to rescue the babies from the river. In the middle of the ongoing rescue operations, one villager jumped out of the river and began running upstream. “Where are you going?” shouted the other rescuers. “We need you here to help us save these babies!” As she ran she replied, “I’m going upstream to stop whoever is throwing them in!”

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What must we do to create long-term, enduring changes required to ensure that our nation’s families need not worry about providing their children with the sustenance they need? What actions can we take now that will fulfill our promise to ensure that everyone has access to enough nutritious food? (LEADER) In previous seders like this one, we came together to learn about the prevalence of hunger in the U.S. and to urge Congress to take action on behalf of those who struggle with food insecurity. Our actions can make a tremendous difference in protecting the vital nutrition programs that prevent families from falling through the cracks. When we participate in Hunger Seders, write letters, or talk to our policymakers; when we make our voices heard in the public square, call attention to our moral values in newspapers or demonstrate our priorities at the ballot box, we become more and more engaged in the ongoing struggle to end hunger in our communities.

TAKE ACTION NOW: Help End Childhood Hunger (LEADER): This year, we raise our voices and speak out on behalf of the 16 million children in America who face food insecurity. Together, we call on Congress to reauthorize the Child Nutrition Act and make critical investments in child nutrition programs so that no child needlessly goes hungry. Please take a moment now to fill out the advocacy postcard. These postcards, along with the postcards from other communities across the country, will be hand-delivered en-masse to Capitol Hill.

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Seder Plate Symbols (LEADER holds up each symbol as its name is read. If time allows, Leader asks seder guests to share various interpretations for the meaning of each symbol.) The symbols of Passover are represented on our table and our seder plate. On our seder plate, we have a green vegetable (karpas), bitter herbs (maror), a roasted shank bone (zeroah), a roasted egg (beitzah) and a sweet apple/nut mix (charoset). On our table, we also find the unleavened bread (matzah), Miriam’s Cup and the Cup of Elijah. As we retell the story of the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt, we will explore these symbols and their messages of hope and promise that we too, in this generation, can move from oppression to justice, toward a day when no one suffers the indignity and pain of hunger.

MAGGID - Telling the Story (LEADER) The story of the Jewish people’s journey from slavery to liberation is the heart of the seder.

‫ָה א ַל ְח ָמ א ַע נְ יָ א‬ Ha Lachma Anya (ALL)

This is the bread of poverty which our forefathers ate in the land of Egypt. Let all those who are hungry come and eat with us. Let all those who are in need come and share our meal. This year we are here. Next year, may we all be in the land of Israel. This year we are still slaves. Next year may we all be free.

(LEADER) We were slaves in Egypt and God brought us out from there with a strong hand and an outstretched arm. If God had not brought us out from Egypt, then we, our children, and our children’s children might still have been slaves in Egypt. Though many of us are blessed to enjoy the freedom we gained so long ago, far too many people continue to be enslaved by their circumstances. As we gather for this Hunger Seder, nearly 49 million Americans including more than 16 million children - face uncertainty about when and where they will have their next meal. But if we extend our strong hands and stretch out our arms, we can free them from the bondage of hunger.

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Each Passover, we say, “Let all who are hungry come and eat.” Although we cannot formally invite each hungry person to our table, we can make a difference. Let us give modern meaning to these ancient words and do everything we can to ensure that each and every one of us has access to the nutritious food we need to lead a healthy life. Passover not only reminds us of our journey from slavery to freedom, it also reminds us of how important leadership is in realizing such a journey. Moses, who led our people out of Egypt and to the borders of the Promised Land, is often held up as not just an exemplary leader but the exemplary leader. What makes Moses such an exemplary leader? He was a visionary — he saw the suffering of the past and present and also a vision of the future that was hopeful and promising. But he did not just have vision — he also realized that vision, leading his people and crafting changes to become a community grounded in the laws he brought down from Mt. Sinai. Our need for strong and visionary leadership remains critical to confront the pressing challenges facing our nation. We must raise our voices and call upon our leaders to enact just and responsible policies now — policies that will strengthen us as a community; policies grounded in the very highest principles we hold dear. Only then will we be able to create a better future for our nation.

The Four Questions (LEADER) The Four Questions we ask at our Hunger Seder challenge us to consider what is different about this night. Only when we ask the right questions can we understand the true causes of hunger and hope to do something about this unacceptable problem in our midst.

(ALL) Why is this year different from all other years? The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act authorizes all of the federal school meal and child nutrition programs, which ensure that children from low-income families have access to healthy and nutritious foods. The current law, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, is due to expire in September of this year. Reauthorization provides an important and timely opportunity to build on the strengths of the current law and to improve and strengthen the child nutrition and school meal programs so that they better meet the needs of our nation’s children. The child nutrition programs that need to be reauthorized this year include the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, Child and Adult Care Food Program, Summer Food Service Program, Afterschool Snack and Meal Program, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), WIC Farmers Market Nutrition Program, Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program, and the Special Milk Program.

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(ALL) Why a Hunger Seder focused on children? 1 in 5 children in America struggles with hunger, with approximately 16 million children living in poverty. The federal child nutrition programs touch millions of children every day, providing nutritious food that results in improved educational achievement, cognitive and physical development, and overall health. Almost 21 million children receive free or reduced-price lunches. However, just half of those children are also receiving a free or reduced-price breakfast and only about one in seven are receiving a meal during the summer months. Reauthorizing and improving the federal child nutrition programs is a moral imperative and common sense policy to ensure that America’s children consistently have enough nutritious food to eat.

(ALL) What are the impacts of childhood hunger? Put simply, hunger denies children the ability to reach their full potential in life. Without sufficient food and proper nutrition, kids are at a much greater risk of developmental problems, chronic health conditions, poor academic performance, and reduced economic prospects and professional achievement later in life. These personal costs are magnified at the national level. According to a recent report by the Center for American Progress and Brandeis University, “hunger costs our nation at least $167.5 billion due to the combination of lost productivity per year, more expensive public education because of the rising costs of poor education outcomes, avoidable heath care costs, and the costs of charity to keep families fed.”

(ALL) How could so many children still suffer from hunger when we live in a society of tremendous wealth and abundance? Childhood hunger is a solvable problem. It begins with mustering the political will to address this crisis. Our leaders must commit to robust investments that support and enhance federal nutrition programs that provide quality, nutritious foods and improve the overall well-being of millions of American children. For the upcoming Child Nutrition Reauthorization, Congress must: •

Invest in child nutrition programs and ensure that nutrition safety-net programs that protect low-income children and families are safeguarded

Improve access and participation by supporting proposals that strengthen the programs and eliminate barriers to participation

Support and protect nutrition programs and initiatives that promote healthy eating among infants, children, and pregnant and postpartum women

Streamline program operations and maximize use of technology to make it easier for providers to offer nutrition programs and for families to participate in them

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At a community level, each of us must also be part of the solution. We should help raise awareness of and promote underutilized programs, such as the Summer Food Service Program. We can help connect families in need with a local feeding program and encourage schools, synagogues, churches, mosques, or other organizations in our community to host a summer meals site and serve summer meals to hungry children. We were slaves, but now we are free. And with our freedom comes the responsibility to work for justice and freedom for all. (LEADER) Let us honor this moment by joining together in song:

Song: Avadim Hayinu

‫ֲע ָב ִד ים ָה יִ ינּו‬ . ‫חֹור ין‬ ִ ‫ַע ָת ה ְב נֵ י‬ Avadim hayinu Ata b’nai chorin We were slaves – now we are free.

Four Children, Four Faces of Childhood Hunger (LEADER) At Passover, we talk about the Four Children, each of whom has a different reaction to hearing the Passover story. During today’s seder, we read about four children, each of whom has a different experience with hunger and with a federal nutrition program

(ALL) Child 1: The child who receives free lunch at school. “I am enrolled in the School Lunch Program. Last year I wasn’t enrolled because my parents didn’t know that we qualified for the program. Sometimes I didn’t have anything to eat, and my stomach grumbled all afternoon. I got headaches in my afternoon classes and sometimes got in trouble with the teacher for falling asleep or arguing with other kids during class. When my family qualified for SNAP we were told that my brother and I also qualified for free school lunches. Now I get a hot, healthy lunch every day from the school cafeteria. I don’t fall asleep in math class anymore and I don’t get into conflicts with other kids.”

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The National School Lunch Program makes it possible for low-income school children in the United States to receive a nutritious lunch each and every school day for free, for reduced prices, or for a low cost. All schools may participate and all children attending those schools may participate in the program. Properly nourished children more actively participate in the education experience, which benefits them, their fellow students, and the entire school community.

(ALL) Child 2: The child who receives free breakfast at school. “I am in 5th grade and am doing okay in school. My favorite subject is science and I play in the school band. I am enrolled in the School Breakfast and the School Lunch Program. I take the bus to school every day, but it often doesn’t arrive early enough for me to get breakfast in the cafeteria before the school bell rings and I need to be in my classroom. When I miss breakfast, I am hungry until lunch. It’s hard to concentrate in class and I can’t focus on what my teacher is telling me. I get frustrated and act out.” Many children do not have the opportunity to eat a nutritious breakfast in the morning due to tight household budgets and parent work schedules. Just half of the children who receive free or reduced-price school lunch also receive free or reduced price school breakfast. Transportation challenges and stigma are the largest barriers for kids to get school breakfast. Many eligible students are not enrolled in or do not participate in the School Breakfast Program because of the shame associated with being poor and eating breakfast at school. When schools make breakfast a part of the school day, by serving it to kids after the bell rings in the classroom or as a grab-and-go program, students have the healthy food they need to thrive. Research shows that kids who eat breakfast are more likely to succeed in school.

(ALL) Child 3: The child who should be able to participate in a summer feeding program. “I’m 7 years old. I get free lunch and breakfast at school. I like Tuna Melt Day the best, but the other food is okay, too. Most of the other kids in my class are happy on the last day of school because they like the summer. But because I don’t go to school in the summer, I am worried about how I’m going to get these meals. I live pretty far away from my school and any other places where summer meals are served. My parents are working during the day, so I have no way to get to these sites to get a meal.”

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The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) and the Summer Food Service Program offer meals and snacks, combined with enriching recreational and educational out-of-school-time activities to children after school and in the summer. However, current eligibility guidelines, and requirements leave many lowincome kids without access to these critical meals, especially in rural and suburban areas. The summer meals program is currently only serving one in seven children who needs the meals. By providing more flexibility around where children access these healthy meals, children like this one would not go hungry when school is not in session. Reauthorization should include strategies and policies to ensure programs like the summer meals program are operating efficiently and effectively to reach low-income children, no matter where they live.

(ALL) Child 4: The mother and child who participate in WIC. ”Last year when I found out that I was pregnant I was shocked. We were barely making ends meet and I was not sure how my husband and I would be able to support a child. Luckily, my doctor told me about the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and I enrolled immediately. They provided me with prenatal vitamins, breastfeeding and nutrition counseling, access to healthcare, and coupons that I use to get nutritious foods and fresh fruits and vegetables from the local farmers market. Now that I’ve had my beautiful baby, I still receive those coupons and get the foods I need to ensure that we both eat well.” WIC is a preventative program providing low-income pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children with nutritious foods, nutrition education, and improved access to health care in order to prevent nutritionrelated health problems in pregnancy, infancy, and early childhood. Today, WIC serves nearly 9 million women, infants, and children. 1 in every 2 babies born in the United States benefits from the WIC program. Studies conducted by the USDA demonstrate that WIC is one of the nation’s most successful and costeffective nutrition intervention programs. Because WIC is not an entitlement program (in an entitlement program, any person who qualifies for the program can receive the benefits), it is extremely important that enough funding be allocated for the program during the appropriations process every single year. Otherwise, some eligible people will be left out!

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The Ten Plagues (LEADER) On Passover, we read about the 10 plagues God unleashed on the Egyptians. The plagues we see today, however, are not punishments from God, but ones of our own doing – the awful, unintended results of our own actions and creations. As we read each of these plagues aloud, we dip a finger into the wine and touch a drop onto our plate. This reminds us that, even as we celebrate freedom, our freedom is not complete when others still suffer. (Dip your finger in your glass and place a drop of wine on the plate for each plague.)

(ALL READ TOGETHER IN UNISON)

1. A single mother who gives the last bits of food to her toddler while she goes hungry 2. A brother and sister in a rural comunity who live too far away to participate in the summer feeding program and miss meals during the summer months 3. A military family that struggles to make ends meet on the salary of a low ranking enlisted soldier and resorts to anonymously getting a monthly food box at the local pantry to feed their children 4. A middle school student who doesn’t take the free school breakfast because he is ashamed about being poor 5. A family that does not live close enough to a preschool program to ensure their young daughter receives adequate meals and snacks 6. A recently unemployed mom who is worried about getting a new job and is too embarassed to apply for SNAP 7. A father who does not apply for assistance because he cannot understand the application 8. An American Indian family living on a reservation that faces many barriers to healthy eating, including severe poverty and unemployment, limited options for fresh produce, and exceptionally high food prices

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9. A young family that lives in an urban neighborhood where there is no full-service grocery store, only fast food and convenience stores 10. APATHY, the greatest plague of all – the failure to make ending childhood hunger a national priority

Dayenu (LEADER) In the traditional Passover seder, we pause to reflect on what we have in our lives for which we are grateful and thank God for the miracles God performed. Let’s now recite aloud the blessings we enjoy. After each blessing, we take a moment to say together “Dayenu - it would have been enough.”

1. We are grateful that so many among us do not suffer from the oppression and hardship of daily hunger.

Dayenu

2. We are grateful to live in a democracy and have the ability to influence our government’s priorities.

Dayenu

3. We are grateful for the opportunity to direct national attention to the crisis of childhood hunger.

Dayenu

4. We are grateful to those who use their hands to stock a food bank, their feet to march to Capitol Hill, and their voices to demand justice.

Dayenu

5. We are grateful we made the time to be present for this Hunger Seder to educate ourselves and be inspired to act.

Dayenu

6. We are grateful for each other – alone we are limited, but together we are a powerful voice for change.

Dayenu

Song: Dayenu

‫ַד יֵ נּו‬

Day Day-enu, Day Day-enu, Day Day-enu Dayenu, Dayenu (x2)

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The Symbols of Our Seder Rabbi Gamliel taught that when we tell the story of the Exodus, we must also explain the meaning of the most important symbols: zeroah, matzah, and maror. (Leader holds up each symbol as the designated portion is read.) Zeroah is a roasted shank bone, which reminds us that God told the Israelites to put lamb’s blood on our doors to escape the 10th plague, the slaying of the first born. We eat matzah because there was not enough time for the Israelites to allow their dough to rise before they fled Egypt from slavery into freedom. Maror are bitter herbs, reminding us how the Egyptians embittered the lives of the Israelites. At this Hunger Seder today, we recognize these traditional symbols as reminders of our obligation to work for the day when all people are free from the injustice and oppression of hunger.

‫ְב ָכ ל ּדֹור וָ דֹור ַח יָ ב ָא ָד ם ִל ְר אֹות‬ . ‫ֶא ת ַע ְצ מֹו ְכ ִא לּו הּוא יָ ָצ א ִמ ִמ ְצ ַר יִ ם‬ B’chol dor v’dor chayav adam lirot et atzmo k’ilu hu yatzah mi’Mitzrayim In every generation, we are obligated to view ourselves as if we were the ones who went out from Egypt, as it is said: And on that day tell your son, saying “For this purpose Adonai labored on my behalf, by taking me out of Egypt.” It was not our ancestors alone who were delivered by the Holy Blessed One – we were also delivered with them, as it is said: And God took us out from there in order to bring us – to give us – the land that God pledged to our ancestors. We were there, and yet we are also here, part of the unfolding story of pursing justice in our own time. We retell and remember what was and at the same time we continue to shape what will be.

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HALLEL: Songs of Praise (Full texts of Psalms 113 or 114 may be inserted here) “Hallel is about praising God, not about self-satisfaction. The latter makes us complacent and lethargic, but the former can only expand our dedication to the principles that God’s goodness represents in our lives. Our praise of God can motivate us to do God’s work in the world – the work of liberation, love, and justice.” Rabbi Sheila Peltz Weinberg (taken from “A Night of Questions: A Passover Haggadah”, The Reconstructionist Press, 2000) (LEADER) Let us honor this moment by joining together in song:

Song: Hallelu

‫ַה ְל לּויָ ה‬ Hallelu, Hallelu, Hallelu, (repeat 3x) Hallelu-ya, Hallelu-ya, Hallelu, Hallelu-ya (repeat 2x) Let us praise, Let us praise God.

KOS SHEINI - The Second Cup The Second Cup represents our promise:

We will learn why so many children in this country struggle with hunger. The more we know about the reasons that children and families are food insecure, the better able we will be to create solutions that will free them from this bondage. (LEADER) We lift our glasses and read the blessing together (drink wine after the blessing):

. ‫ּבֹור א ְפ ִר י ַה גָ ֶפ ן‬ ֵ ‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יי ֱא‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu Melech ha’olam, borei p’ri hagafen Blessed are You Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.

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ROCHTZAH - Hand Washing Ritual Before the Meal

Once again we wash our hands, this time in anticipation of the festive meal. May this ritual act of hand washing, followed by a blessing, lead to other sacred acts of preparation and protest, advocacy and activism, so that all may find they have the nutritious food they need. (Either have volunteers walk around to each table with a pitcher of water and a basin or invite seder guests to wash their hands in some other way.) LEADER: We join together in the blessing:

, ‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יְ ַָי ֱא‬ . ‫יל ת יָ ָד יִ ם‬ ַ ‫ֹותיו וְ ִצ וָ נּו ַע ל נְ ִט‬ ַָ ‫ֲא ֶש ר ִק ְד ָש נּו ְב ִמ ְצ‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu Melech ha’olam, asher kideshanu be’mitzvotav ve’tzivanu al n’tilat yadayim Blessed are You Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who has made us holy with God’s commandments and commanded us to wash our hands.

MOTZI MATZAH - Eating the Unleavened Bread

We thank God for providing us wheat to make bread. In doing so, God gives us the tools we need to sustain ourselves and our communities. We have the tools to create a hunger-free world. It is our responsibility to use them to create a stronger society. LEADER: We join together in the blessing over the matzah (lift up a piece of matzah and eat after the blessing):

, ‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶ ֽמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֽ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יְ יָ ֱא‬ . ‫ּמֹוצ יא ֶל ֶח ם ִמ ן ָה ָא ֶר ץ‬ ִ ‫ַה‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu Melech ha’olam, hamotzi lechem min ha’aretz Blessed are You Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who brings forth bread from the earth.

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(In some communities, the prayer below is omitted if the Hunger Seder is not held during Passover)

, ‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶ ֽמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֽ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יְ יָ ֱא‬ . ‫יל ת ַמ ָצ ה‬ ַ ‫ֹותיו וְ ִצ ָ ֽו נּו ַע ל ֲא ִכ‬ ַָ ‫ֲא ֶש ר ִק ְד ָ ֽש נּו ְב ִמ ְצ‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu Melech ha’olam, asher kideshanu be’mitzvotav ve’tzivanu al achilat matzah Blessed are You,Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who has made us holy with God’s commandments and commanded us to eat matzah.

MAROR - Bitter Herbs LEADER: Another important Passover symbol is maror (‫)מרור‬, bitter herbs. Bitter herbs serve as a reminder of how the Egyptians embittered the lives of our fathers and mothers. When we eat these bitter herbs, we partake in the bitterness of servitude and oppression. (ALL) It is our obligation, as people and as members of this community, to do what we can to lighten the load of those less fortunate and to show compassion for all those who continue to face oppression. (LEADER) We join together in the blessing over the maror (lift up maror and eat after the blessing):

(In some communities, the prayer below is omitted if the Hunger Seder is not held during Passover)

, ‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶ ֽמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֽ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יְ ַָי ֱא‬ . ‫יל ת ָמ רֹור‬ ַ ‫ֹותיו וְ ִצ ָ ֽו נּו ַע ל ֲא ִכ‬ ָ ‫ֲא ֶש ר ִק ְד ָ ֽש נּו ְב ִמ ְצ‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu Melech ha’olam, asher kideshanu be’mitzvotav ve’tzivanu al achilat maror Blessed are You Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who has made us holy with God’s commandments and commanded us to eat bitter herbs.

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KOREICH - Hillel Sandwich LEADER: To carry out the instruction “They shall eat it with unleavened bread and bitter herbs” (Numbers 9:11), the great sage Hillel would combine matzah and maror on Passover and eat them together. We eat a sandwich of matzah, maror, and charoset to remember both the bitterness and injustice of hunger and the redemptive sweetness that comes with working together to bring about real social change. (The bottom matzah on the seder plate is broken and distributed. Each person takes two pieces of matzah and creates a sandwich with the charoset and maror.)

SHULCHAN OREICH - Festival Meal

If the event includes a festival meal, it should be served at this time. We encourage you to use the time while particpants are eating to engage in discussion about hunger and/or conduct an advocacy activity.

TZAFUN - Finding the Afikomen

Afikomen comes from the Greek word for dessert and is the last item eaten during the seder. Traditionally, the Afikomen is hidden toward the beginning of the seder to keep children’s attention. When the meal is over, the seder’s younger participants search the house for the Afikomen. This year, let us consider the search for the Afikomen as a symbol for the ongoing search for answers as to why so many children are not able to eat healthy nutritious meals every day. (Look for the Afikomen if it has been hidden earlier in the seder.)

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BARECH - Invitation to Gratitude (LEADER) After we’ve eaten, we bless God for the good land that God has given us. We bless You, Adonai, for the land and for the food it yields. It is our responsibility to make sure that it is distributed so that every person gets the nutrition he or she needs to thrive.

. ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יְ ַָי ַה זָ ן ֶא ת ַה כֹל‬ Baruch ata Adonai, hazan et hakol Blessed are You Adonai, who provides food for all.

KOS SH’LISHI - The Third Cup We drink the Third Cup to remember our promise:

We will urge our policymakers to make it a priority to end childhood hunger.

. ‫ּבֹור א ְפ ִר י ַה גָ ֶפ ן‬ ֵ ‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יי ֱא‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu Melech ha’olam, borei p’ri hagafen Blessed are You Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.

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(LEADER) We lift our glasses and read the blessing together (drink wine after the blessing):

KOS ELIYAHU - The Cup for Elijah (Pass around Elijah’s cup and have all participants fill the cup with some wine from their own cups.) Elijah’s cup sits on our table as a symbol of hope and the coming of the Messiah. It is a Passover tradition for each person to spill a little wine from his/her glass into Elijah’s cup, which has been empty for the entire seder. This kind of collaborative effort is how we will build strong communities for the vulnerable children among us, and for us all. (LEADER) Let us all rise and face the open door as we join together in song:

Song: Eliyahu Ha’navi

,‫ ֵא ִל יָ הּו ַה ִת ְש ִב י‬,‫ֵא ִל יָ הּו ַה נָ ִב יא‬ ‫ֵא ִל יָ הּו ַה גִ ְל ָע ִד י‬ , ‫ִב ְמ ֵה ָר ה ְב יָ ֵמ ינּו יָ בֹוא ֵא ֵל ינּו‬ . ‫ִע ם ָמ ִש ַיח ֶב ן ָד וִ ד‬ Eliyahu hanavi. Eliyahu hatishbi. Eliyahu hagil’adi. Bim’hera be’yamaynu yavoh eleinu, im mashiach ben David. May the Prophet Elijah come quickly in our day and bring the time of the Messiah.

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KOS MIRIAM – Miriam’s Cup (LEADER lifts Miriam’s cup) Elijah’s cup is one of a future promise. And yet there is still a long way to go until the day when all who are hungry will be able to come and eat. Jewish tradition teaches that Miriam the prophet is always with us, and her presence calls us to work for – not wait for – that day. Just as Miriam’s well sustained the Israelites in the wilderness, so too we pray that we be nourished and sustained on our journey toward justice and an end to hunger. (Leader takes a sip of water from Miriam’s cup).

HALLEL: Songs of Praise

(Psalms 115-118 may be inserted here. Traditional Passover songs may also be sung at this time.)

(ALL READ RESPONSIVELY) Today we give thanks for the Passover story And its enduring message of freedom and justice. Today we give thanks for our individual blessings And our commitment to increase blessing and nutrition for all. Today we give thanks for the opportunity to gather And lift our voices to speak out on behalf of hungry children. Today we give thanks and act So that no one goes hungry tomorrow.

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KOS R’VI-I - The Fourth Cup We drink the Fourth Cup to remember our promise:

We will create a world where all Americans, and all people, are free from hunger. We pray that, at this time next year, our fellow men, women, and children will be blessed with abundance and free from the yoke of hunger and poverty. (LEADER) We lift our glasses and read the blessing together (drink wine after the blessing):

. ‫ּבֹור א ְפ ִר י ַה גָ ֶפ ן‬ ֵ ‫עֹול ם‬ ָ ‫ֹלה ינּו ֶמ ֶל ְך ָה‬ ֵ ‫ָב רּוְך ַא ָת ה יי ֱא‬ Baruch ata Adonai Elohenu, Melech ha’olam, borei p’ri hagafen Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the universe, who creates the fruit of the vine.

NIRTZAH - Conclusion (LEADER) Our seder is now coming to a close. We celebrated our successes, learned about the hunger that still plagues children in our communities, and affirmed our commitment to work together to create a hunger-free world.

(ALL READ TOGETHER IN UNISON) This year we are here; next year in Jerusalem. This year we are pained by hunger; next year may all who are hungry come and eat.

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3 WAYS YOU C AN HELP HUNGRY CHILDREN IN YOUR COMMUNIT Y TODAY

Advocate in support of critical investments and improvements in the Child Nutrition Reauthorization.

Write, email, call or visit your Members of Congress and ask them to: •

invest in child nutrition programs and strengthen nutrition safety net programs that protect low-income children and families (without jeopardizing funding for other vital programs that support these vulnerable constituencies)

improve access and participation by supporting proposals that eliminate barriers to participation, including streamlining program operations and maximizing the use of technology to make it easier for providers to offer nutrition programs and for families to participate

support and protect nutrition programs and initiatives that promote healthy eating among infants, children and pregnant and postpartum women

Be a Summer Meals Champion Summer can be a very difficult time for children from low-income families. The federal Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) was created to ensure that these children receive nutritional support during the summer months. You can help connect families in need with a local summer feeding program site, or encourage a school, synagogue or organization in your community to be a SFSP site and serve free summer meals to hungry children.

Promote Community Eligibility

2015 5775

The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) allows school districts to offer meals at no charge to all students in high-poverty schools. After a successful pilot in 11 states over three years, CEP is now available to school districts nationwide for the 2014-2015 school year. Despite significant implementation, reaching more than 6.4 million children in nearly 14,000 schools, many eligible schools have not yet opted in. You can help all low-income children get meals at school by encouraging your local school district to participate in this program.

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ADDENDUM: Educate Yourself & Get Involved

The following organizations and online resources can help you learn more about the issue of childhood hunger as well as get involved in the work to end it.

MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger

mazon.org

The Jewish Council for Public Affairs (JCPA)

jewishpublicaffairs.org

Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign

nokidhungry.org

Food Research Action Center

frac.org/pdf/cnr_primer.pdf

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

cbpp.org/files/2-20-15fa.pdf

U.S. Department of Agriculture - Child Nutrition Programs

fns.usda.gov/school-meals/childnutrition-programs

National WIC Association

nwica.org

National Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Association

cacfp.org

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MAZON: A JEWISH RESPONSE TO HUNGER MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger is a national nonprofit organization working to end hunger among people of all faiths and backgrounds in the United States and Israel. Founded in 1985, MAZON was the first national organization to rally the American Jewish community around the issue of hunger, and remains the only national Jewish organization dedicated exclusively to that same cause. MAZON believes we can end hunger in America and Israel by acting to ensure that hungry people have access to the nutritious food they need today and by working to develop and advance long-term solutions so that no one goes hungry tomorrow.

THE JEWISH COUNCIL FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS The mission of the Jewish Council for Public Affairs (JCPA) is to serve as the representative voice of the organized American Jewish community in addressing the principal mandate of the Jewish community relations field, expressed in three interrelated goals: 1.

To safeguard the rights of Jews here and around the world;

2.

To dedicate ourselves to the safety and security of the state of Israel;

3.

To protect, preserve and promote a just American society, one that is democratic and pluralistic, one that furthers harmonious interreligious, interethnic, interracial and other intergroup relations.

The JCPA’s Confronting Poverty campaign – of which the Hunger Seder mobilization is a key program – engages the Jewish community in meaningful anti-poverty advocacy, outreach, and activism against a backdrop of profound and increasing need. The Confronting Poverty campaign has been successful in raising poverty as a priority on the Jewish communal agenda by mobilizing activists and community organizations to combat poverty in a coordinated, sustained, and effective way.


Hunger Seder 2015 Haggadah