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Vigilant eyes billing residents for ambulances

H O L I D AY J O Y

Fire dept. contemplating change after request of village officials BY J OE N I K I C The Great Neck Vigilant Fire Company is considering billing for ambulance services after village oďŹƒcials requested it look at doing so. David Weiss, chairman of the ďŹ re company’s Board of Trustees, said in October members of the ďŹ re company voted to authorize the board to look at potentially billing residents’ insurance for ambulance services. “I understand the complexities of the budgets and ďŹ nancial strain on the villages,â€? Weiss said. “I don’t think it’s unreasonable with the way insurance companies work now. It’s not an unreasonable request for villages to seek some sort of help in their budget process.â€? He added that the ďŹ re company exists to “service the community,â€? and if village oďŹƒcials ask them to consider looking at something they feel is necessary, they

are willing to help. Currently, villages north of the Long Island Rail Road’s Great Neck station contract with the ďŹ re company for both ďŹ re and ambulance services. Weiss said state law prevents ďŹ re department’s from billing for ďŹ re services, but the ďŹ re company could bill for ambulance services if it is split from the ďŹ re services they oer. He added that it would take a “huge processâ€? to create another company, which could take up to a year. Great Neck Plaza Mayor Jean Celender said village oďŹƒcials have discussed with the ďŹ re company the possibility of billing for ambulance services, which would “allow residents with health insurance to have the cost of ambulance services billed to their insurance companies.â€? “This is revenue currently generated to insurance companies Continued on Page 47

PHOTO COURTESY OF ZIMMERMAN/EDELSON

Metropolitan Commercial Bank Vice President and Relationship Manager Ralph Ventura participates in an educational activity with a Quality Services for the Autism Community Preschool and Early Childhood Center student. See story on page 43.

DOT report seeks sex abuse solutions at marine academy emy must address a history of sexual harassment and assault An independent auditor’s at the institution by developing report commissioned by the a comprehensive plan, change U.S. Department of Transpor- a culture of fear and form politation found that the United cies to improve sexual assault States Merchant Marine Acad- reporting.

BY J OE N I K I C

The Logistics Management Institute report, which was released last Friday, states that a culture of “fear of reprisal and retaliation is a huge driver that causes midshipmen not to reContinued on Page 48

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The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

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Kings Point seeks to create passive park

School board urges bond issue approval

Village would need to purchase property along East Shore Road

Residents to decide on Feb. 14 BY J OE N I K I C

Kings Point Village Hall BY J OE N I K I C Village of Kings Point trustees adopted a resolution last Thursday authorizing the village to acquire property along East Shore Road for the creation of a passive park. Kings Point Village Attorney Stephen Limmer said after holding a public hearing at last Thursday’s Board of Trustees meeting, the board unanimously approved the authorization to purchase the waterfront land on Manhasset Bay for a six-acre park. “The property would be turned into a passive park that would beautify one of the main gateways to the village, providing residents with beautiful vistas as they enter and exit the village,” Kings Point Mayor Michael Kalnick said. “The new open space will allow residents to enjoy activities such as bird watching, nature study and photography.” The park would be created by purchasing vacant properties by eminent domain, under which a government entity can

seize private property with compensation for public use. The creation of the passive park would allow the village to continue using a 1.1-acre parcel of land in Kings Point Park for Department of Public Works facilities. Former state Sen. Jack Martins and former Assemblywoman Michelle Schimel introduced legislation in June to authorize the village to use the park for its DPW facilities. Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the bill in July. To use the area for non-park functions, the village must also designate another area of the village as parkland, the bill states. The legislation allowed the village to avoid the demolition of the public works facility as required under a 2014 state Court of Appeals ruling that found the village had violated state law in building it there in 1946. The state Court of Appeals unanimously affirmed a state Supreme Court’s 2011 ruling that the Village of Kings Point’s plan to raze 5.45 acres of Kings Point Park for a Department of Public Works building violated state law, and ordered the re-

moval of a village salt shed on the property. Great Neck residents Daniel Capruso, Alan Berkower, Elizabeth Allen and Julian Kane filed the lawsuit in 2009 to block Kings Point’s plan to construct a new public works building on the parkland. Capruso, who was at the public hearing for the proposed passive park, said resident landowners told the board they did not want their land taken from them and “did not understand why their properties had to be taken from them and made into a park.” “At the meeting, the mayor and [Board of Trustees] were not forthcoming about the fact that their seizure of property by eminent domain is part of a larger plan to alienate and destroy part of Kings Point Park, although their attorney ultimately admitted that was a fact,” he said. Kalnick said that the board considered all resident concerns “when rendering a decision.” Capruso called the move an “abuse of the power of eminent Continued on Page 47

Members of the Great Neck Board of Education on Monday urged voters in the district to approve a proposed $85.9 million bond issue that aims to address infrastructure needs and provide educational enhancements to its public schools. At Monday’s Board of Education meeting, officials outlined where $51.7 million would be spent toward the district’s capital needs and how another $43.71 million would be spent on educational and school building improvements. Trustee Donald Ashkenase, who is serving his 12th term on the board, said the proposed bond issue is “one of the most important undertakings” the board has considered during his 35-year tenure. “When you think about the age of our school buildings, the youngest school building being 50 years old or older, if we don’t make that $51 million investment in the infrastructure of those buildings, where are we going to be in the next five or 10 years? It’s essential for the preservation of the public schools in

Great Neck to make that investment,” Ashkenase said. “This investment reassures the community and all of us as taxpayers that for the next 15 or 20 years, we have made the investment in the public schools that are necessary to preserve the quality of education that we have been able to provide in Great Neck,” he added. “In my mind, it’s so important for the community to approve this bond issue on Feb. 14.” Board President Barbara Berkowitz echoed Ashkenase’s statement, saying that if the “structural projects” were not completed in a “timely fashion” the district’s buildings can be severely damaged. “These need to be taken care of in a timely fashion because otherwise your buildings will deteriorate, create dangerous working conditions and school conditions as well,” Berkowitz said. Superintendent of Schools Teresa Prendergast said that the educational enhancements included in the proposed bond are just as significant for the district as the capital projects. Continued on Page 48

The Great Neck Board of Education

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The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

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Car crash claims 3 lives in Albertson Stolen auto plunges into icy pond on Sunday as driver attempts to elude state trooper BY N O A H M A N S K A R Three people were killed Sunday night after the stolen car they were driving crashed into a frozen Albertson pond. They were fleeing a state trooper and crashed through a chain link fence into a sump pond near the intersection of I.U. Willets Road and Searingtown Road around 6 p.m., New York State Police said in a news release. State police identified the victims as 29-year-old Joan A. Sanjuan of Central Islip, 46-yearold Adolph Ford of Roosevelt and 51-year-old Donald Farr of Westbury. The 2010 Honda was reported stolen in the Village of Hempstead on Jan. 6, state police said. The state trooper started following the car after his license plate reader flagged it on the Northern State Parkway before it exited at Shelter Rock Road, police said. The trooper did not have his patrol car’s lights on and called for backup before trying to pull over the car, state police Maj. David Candelaria told reporters, according to Newsday.

PHOTO BY NOAH MANSKAR

A stolen 2010 Honda crashed into this sump pond at the corner of Searingtown and I.U. Willets roads in Albertson on Sunday. The car’s three occupants later died. “I think he spotted me,” the trooper told dispatchers over his radio as he followed the car eastbound on I.U. Willets Road, according to police. The car accelerated and illegally passed several cars before

trying to turn left on Searington Road, then losing control and overturning into the 10-foot-deep sump pond, police said. The car was fully submerged in the iced-over pond when Albertson firefighters arrived, said

Albertson Fire Department Chief Joel Melamed, who was at the scene. One of the occupants was pulled from the car as Albertson firefighters and officers from the Nassau County Police Depart-

ment’s Emergency Services Unit used a winch to get it out of the water, Melamed said. Rescue divers from the Oyster Bay and Freeport fire departments were also among the 50 emergency workers who responded, Melamed said. Workers pulled a second occupant out of the car after removing it from the water, but had to use jaws of life to remove the third, Melamed said. All three were later pronounced dead at a hospital, police said. One police officer was hospitalized for hypothermia and one diver was hospitalized for hypertension after getting out of the water, Melamed said. The state police are continuing to investigate the crash, but Candelaria told Newsday the vehicle’s speed and faulty tires were likely contributors. Police have not said how fast either car was going. “The vehicle was attempting to make a left-hand turn at a high rate of speed,” Candelaria told Newsday. “... It wasn’t 100 mph or anything like that, but that neighContinued on Page 47


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The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

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Melbourne Road parking changes approved BY J OE N I K I C Village of Russell Gardens trustees approved traffic and parking changes on Melbourne Road last Thursday that include increasing on-street parking time limits from two hours to four hours and installation of a stop sign aimed at preventing speeding. Russell Gardens Mayor Steve Kirschner said at Thursday’s Board of Trustees meeting that the move to increase parking time limits on Melbourne Road was to “conform with the rest of the village,” since the other streets in the village with restricted parking hours have a four-hour time limit. But overnight parking is still not permitted between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Melbourne Road. Kirschner said the board proposed placing a stop sign on Melbourne Road after a resident told him it was difficult to back out of his driveway because of speeding cars. The location is a point where

Russell Gardens Mayor Steve Kirschner Melbourne Road curves, he said, and he felt the stop sign would improve safety. The stop sign will be placed 613 feet west of South Middle Neck Road. The board also proposed a parking change to Darley Road, which calls for increased parking restrictions in front of one home.

Instead of the village’s onstreet parking restriction ending at 8 a.m., the proposal calls for the restricted time to increase to 10:30 a.m. in front of 1 Darley Road. Kirschner said the homeowner at 1 Darley Road made the request after experiencing

an inability to exit his driveway “succinctly” and the board was attempting “to accommodate him with the least amount of impact on the village.” But residents at the meeting voiced displeasure about the proposed change. Mitch Pitnick, a resident of the apartment building at 160 South Middle Neck Road, said the board did not present a “sufficient rationale for making the changes.” “Many of us who live in the apartments knew or should have known that, when we rented the apartments, parking was limited in the area, but I do believe that it’s not a justification for the village to further restrict parking during daytime hours in front of one particular house,” Pitnick said. “In fact, I think the village should be doing the opposite and trying to find places where we can park and not creating additional restrictions when they’re not necessary.” He said the proposed change would have more of a negative impact on other residents than

it would benefit the one homeowner. Another resident, who said she also lived at the apartment building at 160 South Middle Neck Road, said if approved, the Darley Road proposal would set a “dangerous precedent.” “Our concern is now if we make this exception for 1 Darley, then 3 Darley is going to complain and have the same exception,” she said. “It’s going to go down the line.” Kirschner said any change the village makes to its code can be changed back if it is found that the law did not accomplish what it was intended to. The proposal was adjourned to the next board meeting as there was an error in the proposed law that was distributed to the public identifying where on Darley Road the parking restriction would begin. Kirschner said he would find the correct “dimensions” for the proposed change and the board would present it again at the next meeting on Feb. 2.

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Seven G.N. students make science semis BY J OE N I K I C Seven Great Neck high school students were named semifinalists in the Regeneron Science Talent Search last Wednesday, an increase from the three students from the peninsula who earned the honor last year. Six students from Great Neck South High School and one from Great Neck North High School are among 300 from across the country who qualified as “scholars” in the competition, which was formerly sponsored by Intel. Great Neck Superintendent of Schools Teresa Prendergast said given the number of students that applied for the competition, the success Great Neck students have found so far in the competition is “absolutely amazing.” “Keep in mind that is perhaps one of the most prestigious competitions in this country,” Prendergast said. “We are so incredibly proud of our students and look forward to their continued success as they compete in Washington, D.C., in March.” The Regeneron Science Talent Search semifinalists include

Great Neck South High School Patrick Gao of Great Neck North High School and Jaysen Zhang, Lynn Hlaing, Matthew Ko, Olivia Lundelius, Rubin Smith and Yujia Su of Great Neck South High School. In the fall, Zhang also made the semifinals of the 2016 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology, another major contest for high-caliber science research students. Westchester County-based Regeneron, a medical science

and technology company, this year took over sponsorship of the contest recognizing top science research projects from high-schoolers around the country. The seven Great Neck students were picked as semifinalists from among 1,749 applicants based on their promise as scientists, academic performance and recommendations from teachers and professional scientists, according to a news

release from the Society for Science & the Public, which cosponsors the competition. The 300 semifinalists each get a $2,000 award. Forty finalists to be named Jan. 24 will compete for $1.8 million in awards in Washington in March, with winners named at a March 14 gala. The top winner will get $250,000. This year’s honored research projects focus on topics in astronomy, biology, medicine,

physics and social sciences. Gao’s project was titled “Development of an Automated Feedback Loop for the Geometric Stabilization of Taylor Cones in Low Flow-Rate Magnetoelectrosprays.” Hlaing’s project was titled “Modulating LRRK2 Kinase Domain Through an FDA Approved Compound,” Zhang’s project was titled “A Cell Culture Model of Glutamine Addiction in Cancer via the c-Myc–Sirt5– Glutaminase Axis” and Ko’s project was “Extraction of the Specific Shear Viscosity of the Quark-Gluon Plasma from Measurements of Flow Harmonics in Au + Au Collisions at 200 GeV.” “Sorting Microfossil Concentrate Under Ultraviolet and Daylight Conditions Using a Support Vector Machine” is the title of Lundelius’ project, Smith’s project was titled “Modeling Topography and Mammal Species Diversity Within the Western U.S. Basin and Range from 36Ma” and Su’s project was titled “Groundwater Contaminant EDC: A Potential Hazard on Human Nervous System.” Efforts to reach the students were unavailing.

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

ATTENTION STUDENTS & PARENTS

Town group floats more ethics reforms BY J OE N I K I C

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Town of North Hempstead officials are seeking to strengthen its ethics code and create rules for situations when family members are employed by the town. Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth said the town’s ethics working group, which was formed last year to “come up with ways to improve” the town’s ethics procedures, met over the past few months and recommended changes to the town’s ethics code. “These resolutions will include numerous amendments to our current code of ethics, as well as establish rules for situations where members of the same family are employed by the town,” Bosworth said. “These significant changes are necessary in order to maintain our transparency and to keep our progress moving forward.” The town board voted to set public hearings on the proposed ethics code and “anti-nepotism” code amendments for its Feb. 28 meeting. Bosworth said that the laws are still being drafted but would be distributed to board members “well in advance” of the

public hearings. A town synopsis of the first public hearing states that the law “would amend various provisions of the town’s Code of Ethics including, amongst other things, conflicts of interest, interests in contracts, gifts, disclosure, recusal, use of town resources, private employment and the composition of the Board of Ethics.” The town’s synopsis of the second public hearing states the law “would establish regulations addressing the employment, supervision, transfer or recommendation of relatives of town officers or employees.” The town began taking steps last April to address corruption and conflicts of interest after the former town Democratic chairman, Gerard Terry, was found to have $1.4 million in tax debts and a former employee, Helen McCann, was arrested for allegedly stealing $98,000 from the Solid Waste Management Authority. The town board approved a package of revisions to its ethics code in March, requiring contractors and more officials to file financial disclosures and adding family members who work for the town to the list of information that must be disclosed.

Any student currently enrolled in a recognized journalism program is eligible to compete for an internship with a $2,500 stipend provided by the New York Press Association. Applicants must attend college during the 2017-2018 academic year. Hurry! The application deadline is March 1, 2017. North Hempstead Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth.

To apply, please send a resume and cover letter to Assistant Managing Editor Noah Manskar at nmanskar@theislandnow.com.

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

County probation cost victims $226K: audit

Catholic Schools Week Open Houses, Jan. 29-Feb. 4

BY N O A H M A N S K A R Mismanagement in Nassau County’s Probation Department led crime victims to lose out on $266,000 over three years, according to an audit by county Comptroller George Maragos. The department failed to follow up on 1,102 checks worth that much left uncashed as of Dec. 31, 2014, from its Restitution Bank Account, which collects about $2.6 million in criminal restitutions annually, according to the audit released last Thursday. “The Probation Department appears to be failing crime victims and our system of justice by not effectively accounting for, safeguarding and distributing restitution funds,” Maragos, a Democrat who is running for county executive, said in a statement. The Probation Department collects fines, court-ordered restitutions and reparations, probation fees and surcharges and makes payments to crime victims from its restitution account. Maragos’ audit, covering 2013 through 2015, found the restitution account was “not adequately managed or reconciled.” The department is supposed to spend up to a year searching for victims whose checks have not cleared to ensure they get their money, but auditors found it had not sent letters trying to locate unpaid victims since December 2011. In addition to leaving the checks unaddressed, the department failed to reconcile its bank balances for at least 19 months, left more than $100,000 in bank entries unadjusted for two years and had not released payments from restitution trust funds since 2011, the audit says. The department also lacked controls to prevent money from being stolen and used restitution money as probation fees, which violates state regulations, the audit says. “Probation should take the audit as a wakeup call and expeditiously implement all recommendations in order to serve its mission,” Maragos said in a statement. The audit covered the last three years under Probation Director John Fowle, who retired in January 2016, according to his LinkedIn profile. In a written response to the audit, acting Probation Director John Plackis disputed several of the audit’s findings, but said the department has implemented several of the comptroller’s recommendations to strengthen its financial controls. Department records indicate there

Comptroller George Maragos have been 751 checks worth $150,766 left uncashed since Dec. 31, 2014, not the 1,102 the audit reported, Plackis wrote. Auditors noted they counted all checks leading up to that date, while the department counted those uncashed after it. The department now sends form letters to crime victims telling them to contact the department if they cash the check or if it never arrives, Plackis wrote. “Although it is not mandated, we will attempt to use DMV [Department of Motor Vehicles] records as a means to try and locate beneficiaries’ current addresses and then ascertain their reasons why checks were not cashed,” Plackis wrote. Plackis rejected the audit’s findings that the department does not segregate duties well enough and that it improperly uses restitution money as probation fees. No theft was found in the probation account system, he wrote. The department now uses a case management program called Caseload Explorer that allows for better oversight and more accurate tracking of payments, Packis’ response says. “The department has segregation of duties of the supervisor to avoid any conflicts,” Plackis wrote. “There are internal controls.” Maragos, a former Republican, regularly audits county agencies, but in recent months has been more vocally critical of County Executive Edward Mangano’s administration as he begins his county executive campaign. Mangano, a Republican who has pleaded not guilty to federal corruption charges, has not said whether he will run for a third term.

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

Ex deputy commisioner sentenced Edward Korona Jr. gets 1-year conditional discharge for lying on county job applications BY J OE N I K I C The former deputy commissioner of Nassau County’s Office of Emergency Management was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge for making false statements while applying for various county jobs. State Supreme Court Justice Robert McDonald sentenced Edward Korona Jr., 54, of Hicksville, on Monday to the one-year conditional discharge after he pleaded guilty in November. Korona was facing up to four years in prison on charges of perjury, offering a false instrument for filing and making an apparently false sworn statement, according to Nassau District Attorney Madeline Singas’ office. According to Newsday, his guilty plea ended his felony trial, with a public corruption unit prosecutor stating that he had met with her office and provided law enforcement officials with “fruitful” information. “Mr. Korona is relieved that this matter has been resolved and is looking forward to moving on with his life,” Korona’s attorney, Joseph Lobosco, told Newsday. Singas said in December that it was discovered that he had a prior

criminal conviction during her office’s investigation of county contracts and the contracting process, though he was not accused of any crimes related to contracts. In February 1982, Newsday reported, Korona was convicted of seconddegree burglary and sentenced to 1 2/3 to five years in prison. According to the DA’s office, the investigation revealed that he made false statements on four applications to the Nassau County Civil Service Commission in December 2007, February 2010, April 2010 and June 2013 while applying for various civil service positions. Korona, who was arrested on Oct. 15, checked off “No” to the question “Except for the above traffic offenses, have you ever been convicted of any violation, misdemeanor, or felony?” on the four applications. As long as he does not commit any crimes over the next year, he will avoid jail time. Reach reporter Joe Nikic by e-mail at jnikic@theislandnow.com, by phone at 516.307.1045 x203. Also follow us on Twitter @joenikic and Facebook at facebook.com/theislandnow.

Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas.

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3rd track comment period extended BY N O A H MANSKAR The Long Island Rail Road has extended the deadline for public comments on its proposed third track project to Feb. 15 from Jan. 31, the railroad announced Wednesday. The move gives local oďŹƒcials and residents two more weeks to submit formal feedback on the lengthy draft environmental study of the $2 billion plan released in late November, and followed requests to extend the deadline from New Hyde Park Mayor Robert Lofaro and Hempstead Town Supervisor Anthony Santino. In a project update email, planners of the project Gov. Andrew Cuomo proposed last year noted — as they have previously — that the two-month comment period was already longer than that for larger projects such as the Second Avenue subway and the new Tappan Zee bridge. “Today’s deadline extension is another example of the governor’s and project team’s strong commitment to community out-

PHOTO BY ADAM LIDGETT

A Long Island Rail Road train pulls into the Great Neck station. reach and input,� the email says. The public can submit comments through the project’s website, AModernLI.com, by emailing info@amodernli.com, writing a letter to the MTA or attending one of six public hearings scheduled for Jan. 17, 18 and 19. Project planners will review the comments and incorporate

them into a ďŹ nal environmental impact statement later this year. The LIRR wants to add a third track to a key 9.8-mile stretch of its Main Line between Floral Park and Hicksville, expected to take three to four years. The LIRR did not extend its deadline for comments on the outline of the environmental study released last spring after

Lauded detective dies at Manhasset hospital BY M A X Z A H N Detective Steven McDonald, a New York City police oďŹƒcer who inspired many with the forgiveness he showed a teenage gunman who rendered him quadriplegic, died on Tuesday at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset. He was 59. McDonald, of Malverne, reportedly suered a heart attack on Friday. On duty in Central Park in July 1986, McDonald was shot by Shavod Jones, a 15-year-old who left McDonald paralyzed from the neck down. Though he lacked the ability to walk or talk, McDonald remained an active duty police oďŹƒcer after the attack. Eventually, he regained speech and become a public speaker known for his message of forgiveness.

“No one could have predicted that Steven would touch so many people, in New York and around the world,â€? NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill said in a statement. “Like so many cops, Steven joined the NYPD to make a dierence in people’s lives. And he accomplished that every day. He is a model for each of us as we go about our daily lives.â€? Nassau District Attorney Madeline Singas said McDonald “became a voice for peace and served as an inspiration for countless people. Detective McDonald was a true American hero and we should all aspire to live a life of service like him.â€? McDonald is survived by his wife, Patti Ann, and his son, Conor. A public wake was set to take place on Wednesday and Thursday at the St. Agnes Parish Center, adjacent to St. Agnes Cathedral in Rockville Centre.

similar requests from local oďŹƒcials and project opponents, but did hold additional public hearings on that document. More than 1,200 people attended those meetings and more than 750 submitted comments at those hearings, project oďŹƒcials said in August. The environmental study says the project would have a minimal environmental impact and improve train service, traďŹƒc and noise along the corridor. But many local residents have remained concerned about construction aecting traďŹƒc and their quality of life and questioned the need for a project they see as disruptive. Larry Montreuil, the Village of New Hyde Park’s deputy mayor, praised the two-week extension, but said the six weeks village oďŹƒcials asked for “would have been much more helpful.â€? “We thought the magnitude with which this project may impact New Hyde Park deserves a very careful study so that we can appreciate the impacts and hope to mitigate them,â€? Montreuil said.

Bernard Ryba, mayor of the Village of Old Brookville and president of the Nassau County Village OďŹƒcials Association, praised the extension, saying it makes sense because small villages do not have the resources of larger municipalities that have hosted projects of this scale. “These communities that have these concerns about having enough time, they’re not the size, obviously, of New York City,â€? Ryba said. “When New York City knew [other projects were] coming, they had attorneys at their beck and call.â€? New Hyde Park, Floral Park and Garden City have together retained Beveridge & Diamond, a Manhattan environmental law ďŹ rm, and Vertex, an engineering ďŹ rm, to review the LIRR’s environmental statement. Dave Kapell, executive director of the pro-third track Right Track for Long Island Coalition, called the extended deadline “an additional eort to make this project as inclusive as possible, resulting in increased support and momentum for the project.â€?

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10 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

OUR TOWN

Stopping by a snowy woods in Nassau Last weekend was the first big snow storm of the season. Children will greet the arrival of winter’s first snow with glee. I was the same when I was a kid. At the first sign of big snow my brother and I would bundle up, grab our American Flyers sleighs and head for the nearest hill. Oh dear me how things change in adulthood. When the snow started falling on Saturday my reaction was a mixture of annoyance laced with dread. Indeed I’d have to shovel out myself or face the challenge of negotiating with the gang of four. The gang of four is the group of neighborhood teens who are not in the least bit afraid to charge me $150 for what to me looks like a $40 job of shoveling. But if I choose to face the challenge myself I do risk the terrifying possibility of a heart attack. Well this time I shoveled myself and as I finished the job night time had arrived and I thought to myself of the wonderful poem by Robert Frost entitled “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening.” Here was an example of a guy who liked snow quite a bit. Here is how it started:

“Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow.” Lovely start. So I thought to myself on Sunday I would drive out to the Muttontown Preserve and take a walk through the woods. Well as it turns out finding the preserve wasn’t all that easy. I following the instructions from my GPS, turned into the road it told me and was greeted by two signs that shouted “Private Property. This is not access to Muttontown Preserve!” However I remained undaunted, having just read the Frost poem which did say “He will not see me stopping here.” I slowly crept down the private road past mega estates and Bentley’s park on the side. Soon enough I began having fears that the cops or some private security guard would be arriving at any moment so I turned around and got back on the main drag. I kept riding north and passing ever more expensive estates, got to 25A and headed east. Within a mile or so I noticed a small sign that says Chelsea

DR. TOM FERRARO Our Town Preserve, Property of Nassau County. I assume this is the place I am looking for and head deep into the woods along a pretty little road which has just been plowed clear. The second stanza of the Frost poem reads: “My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year.” Given the fact that I am in a car rather than on a horse it is difficult for me to relate to these lines. And further it is morning time and not night so again hard to relate. I pass by a woman

There are many nature trails and winter time sanctuaries in Nassau County.

who is strolling along the road and finally get to a parking lot with some very old and nice looking homes and stables. I now feel certain that this is not the Muttontown Preserve but my patience has worn thin so I decide to make the best of it and walk around the grounds and through the woods making believe it’s the Muttontown Preserve. The place has a quiet beautiful elegance to it with stable houses and a central mansion and it’s all covered with white freshly fallen snow. As I begin my walk I notice the lady and ask her if this is the Muttontown Preserve. She tells me that the real preserve is down the road about half mile. I feel I need to explain my reason for being here and say I am writing a story about nature trails in Nassau County. She explains that this place is always very quiet and hidden away and please don’t do any writing about it. I quickly say that she ought not to worry too much because no one reads anymore anyway. Most like watching television. I walk around the grounds and listen to the silence like in the third stanza of the Frost poem. “He gives his harness bells a

shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sound’s the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake.” But in my case I hear the sound of a jet plane high overhead. No question I live in a different place and time for Robert Frost. He wrote the poem in 1922 and he lived in Shaftsbury Vermont. Not jets flying overhead, just the sound of ‘easy wind.’ I am mesmerized by the beauty of this place. I spend about 2 to 3 minutes strolling about, snap a picture and then wonder if I should stay longer in order to try to enjoy the place more. But I quickly realize I’m under deadline and must have this written by 5 p.m. today. However I don’t feel too bad about my rushing. I recall the last line of the Frost poem and think maybe he and I are alike in some way. The last stanza goes like this: “The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.”


The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Nominations for roll of honor North Hempstead Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth and Town Clerk Wayne Wink are calling for nominations for the 2017 May W. Newburger Women’s Roll of Honor now until Tuesday, Feb. 21. Anyone interested in submitting a name for consideration can call North Hempstead’s 311 Call Center or log-on to the Town’s website ( h t t p : / / w w w. n o r t h h e m p steadny.gov/roll-of-honor) and download the application form. The 24th Annual Women’s Roll of Honor Breakfast will be held on Wednesday, March

29 at the Clubhouse at Harbor Links in Port Washington from 8 a.m. until 10 a.m. “The women who volunteer their time and talents to enrich their communities make our Town an extraordinary place to live,” said Supervisor Bosworth. “By placing the concerns of others first, they set an excellent example for all of us to follow. The Women’s Roll of Honor is a wonderful way to say thank you and give them the recognition they deserve.” Event chairperson Wayne Wink said, “The women that are honored at this event are

what make up the fabric of the North Hempstead community. Each year, I am proud to honor the women throughout the Town who work to enrich the lives of others and they deserve to be recognized for their efforts.” Since 1994, North Hempstead has held the Women’s Roll of Honor breakfast to honor women who reside in the Town who have made a contribution to their community, or have accomplished a significant achievement through public or private efforts in a volunteer capacity.

THE ADELPHI UNIVERSITY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER PRESENTS

TWINKLE TAMES A DRAGON, THE MUSICAL SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 • 2:00 P.M. TICKETS: $20

From Katharine Holabird, the author of the classic Angelina Ballerina book series, comes a brand-new show for all those who love fairies, friendship, dragons and fun. While her friends get cute little pets, a naughty pet dragon named Scruffy is not what Twinkle had in mind! Can Twinkle tame her dragon in time for Fairy Pet Day?

THE HABANA BOYS THE HILLBENDERS: THE WHO’S TOMMY– A BLUEGRASS OPRY

Boy Scouts donate to town The Town of North Hempstead recently accepted generous gifts to benefit the Town’s Parks from two local Boy Scouts. Yianni Binnaris from Plandome Boy Scout Troop 71 and Kevin Dans from Port Washington Boy Scout Troop 7 each donated items that will enhance the park-going experience for residents. Yianni recently completed a bat box construction project at Clark Botanic Garden in Albertson as a part of his requirement for his Eagle Scout award. He constructed multiple bat boxes for the Garden and other locations as an environmentally friendly way to control the mosquito population.

He donated the remainder of the funds that he raised in order to complete his project, $2303, to Clark Botanic Garden with to support wildlife in the garden. The funds will go to projects such as the renovation of a butterfly garden and the creation of a pollinator garden. Kevin’s work towards his Eagle Scout project included clean-up along the Hempstead Harbor Trail in Port Washington and the construction and installation of a new picnic bench for the trail. The funds left over from his project will be used specifically for the beautification and maintenance of the Hempstead Harbor Trail.

Bos to give state of town North Hempstead Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth, who is currently serving her second term in office, will deliver her 4th State of the Town address, part of a luncheon program hosted by the League of Women Voters of Port WashingtonManhasset. The Supervisor will speak about her goals for 2017 and will share her vision for the future. Supervisor Bosworth will also open the floor

to questions from residents. WHEN: Friday, January 27, 2017 Speech begins promptly at 1:15 p.m. WHERE: Clubhouse at Harbor Links Golf Course 1 Fairway Drive, Port Washington Other local elected officials and dignitaries will be in attendance.

SUNDAY, MARCH 12 • 3:00 P.M. TICKETS: $40/$35 Direct from Havana (on their debut North American tour), the Habana Boys is a group of four classically trained tenors and their band, who will feature music from opera to Broadway, Motown to pop hits—and, of course, Latin hits from their home in Cuba.

FRIDAY, MARCH 24 • 8:00 P.M. TICKETS: $40/$35 With a perfect mix of virtuoso musicianship and rock-star vocals, the Hillbenders bring Pete Townshend’s original vision to life with banjo, dobro, mandolin, bass and guitar bringing the same energy and vision to Tommy as The Who did with a full rock band and orchestra.

CRYSTAL GAYLE

BILLY PORTER: BROADWAY & SOUL FRIDAY, APRIL 21 • 7:30 P.M. TICKETS: $45/$40 Ebullient triple threat and Tony and Drama Desk Award winner for Kinky Boots Billy Porter is a New York City theater success story. Here, the versatile star appears where his talents shine brightest—center stage, performing a heartfelt selection of songs, including his own, drawing on a wide spectrum of styles and emotions.

SUNDAY, MAY 13 • 8:00 P.M. TICKETS: $50/$45 With a program that will include country, folk, pop, rock, Broadway and gospel, we are honored to close our season with Grammy award-winning legend, Crystal Gayle, in her first Long Island concert appearance in over 10 years.

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of Johnny Ciminna offers custom sculpted cakes — such as this one in the shape a coffee mug — and more than 20 varieties of pastries at Sweet Passion Desserts, his new bakery in New Hyde Park. See story on page 3.

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The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

GN

13

Plaza nears parking garage code changes BY J OE N I K I C Village of Great Neck Plaza officials have taken steps toward amending its village code to include provisions and regulations for automated parking garages. At last Wednesday’s Board of Trustees meeting, the board discussed what requirements should be included in the law regarding the construction and use of such garages. “It’s a new thing for this village. It’s a new thing for Nassau County,” Great Neck Plaza Mayor Jean Celender said. “And so we need to amend our village code to provide provisions for it.” Automated garages use computers, cameras and sensors to mechanically move a car and park it in an empty spot. There are currently no provisions in the village code regarding automated parking garages. The developer of a proposed 61unit apartment complex at 15 Bond St., Effie Namdar, is looking to construct an underground automated parking garage for residents of the building, which Celender said is one of the reasons the village is looking to amend its code. She said underground automated parking garages can present a more viable option for developers given the “price of land” and the village’s parking spot requirements for residential buildings. Celender said village officials would do more research into allowing these types of parking systems to make sure the village was “doing it right by the village and our residents and we consider all effects of this.” Village Attorney Richard Gabriele said the village should consider limiting the construction and use of automated parking garages to residential buildings, at least for the early stages of the law’s existence. “One reason for that being that in commercial retail uses you’re going to have a lot more people that are unfamiliar with using it and customers, clients come in, whereas in a residential building, generally it’s going to be used by the residents of the building,”

Great Neck Plaza Mayor Jean Celender Gabriele said. “There will be a lot less problems to deal with at least as we initially try to come up with the best system we have for regular buildings.” Wherever the automated garages operate, he said, the village should also consider setting a time period where there is a required on-site garage attendant to help residents learn how to use the system. Gabriele also said the village

should look at how people who don’t live in the residential buildings, such as guests visiting friends or family, would know how to use the automated parking system. Trustee Gerald Schneiderman suggested that if the village decides to require an on-site garage attendant for a limited period of time, that attendant could also teach the superintendent of the building how to work the system.

The superintendent, Schneiderman said, can then assist new tenants who are not familiar with how it operates. The board voted to delay a decision on the code amendment to seek more information on automated parking garages. The next board meeting is on Jan. 18.


14 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

Opinion OUR VIEWS

Editorial Cartoon

Time to resign Mr. Mangano, II Oyster Bay Town Supervisor John Venditto was arrested with Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano and Mangano’s wife on federal corruption charges on the same day in October. Venditto and Mangano were both charged with trading government contracts and official favors for free vacations and in the case of Linda Mangano, a no-show job as a food taster, with a businessman widely identified to be Harendra Singh. Both Republicans leaders declared their innocence and intent to fight the 13-count indictment U.S. Attorney Robert Capers unsealed in federal court. Last week, Venditto announced his resignation. “I have decided to leave my position as the Oyster Bay town supervisor,” Venditto said in statement. “I now feel that it is in the best interests of the town and its residents for me to do so, especially since it will be difficult, if not impossible, for me to function as the town supervisor going forward as I focus on clearing my name.” Mangano, on the other hand, says that at least for now he has no intention of leaving. “There’s really, honestly, nothing that is not occurring that occurred before,” Mangano said in a recent interview with Newsday. “We’re not having any issues in terms of governing, communication, policy or positions.” He cited his work on the protracted 2017 budget negotiations, the Nassau Coliseum redevelopment, and studying the feasibility of a cheaper way

to keep effluent out of nitrogenchoked bays, according to Newsday. It’s possible that Mangano is better at time management than Venditto. Or that the demands of being county executive are less than those of the supervisor of the Town of Oyster Bay. Or that Mangano believes the charges filed by federal prosecutors have less weight than Venditto does. But we doubt it. So, as we have said before, it is time for Mangano to step down. Certainly, the case against Mangano recently took an ominous turn when a federal trial for Singh was delayed indefinitely. Singh has been negotiating a plea deal to be a key witness in the case against Mangano, his wife and Venditto, according to a report in Newsday, citing unidentified sources. He has been charged with bribery, income tax evasion and obstruction of justice on Long Island. He has also been negotiating a similar deal with federal prosecutors in Manhattan, who are investigating the possible granting of favors by city officials to campaign fundraisers such as Singh. Mangano has faced a growing chorus of officials calling for him to step down. State Sen. Jack Martins joined other Republicans in calling on Mangano to resign following his arrest — at a time Martins was running for Congress against former Nassau County Executive Tom Suozzi. “It is imperative that government continue undistracted by

anything that may be out there,” Martins said. “And so, we’re asking county executive to resign, step aside, and to allow county business to continue undistracted.” Martins, who lost his bid for Congress, is now mentioned along with Hempstead Town Receiver Donald Clavin and Hempstead Town Board member Bruce Blakeman as possible candidates for county executive in the fall. Martins was joined at the time by Republican state Sens.

Kemp Hannon and Carl Marcellino as well as then Senate candidates Elaine Phillips and Chris McGrath — in calling for Mangano’s and Venditto’s resignations. Incredibly, Mangano has not only said he did not intend to resign, but he has not ruled out running for re-election. Nassau County Comptroller George Maragos, who switched parties to run for county executive as a Democrat, called for Mangano’s resignation this week.

He has joined Nassau County Legislator Laura Curran of Baldwin and state Assemblyman Charles Lavine of Glen Cove among the Democrats seeking to clean the corruption for which they hold Mangano responsible. Rarely has there been this much unity among Democrats and Republicans. Self interest, no doubt, plays a role. But in this case, they have it right. Ed Mangano should do the right thing and step down. Now.

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

15

KREMER’S CORNER

The burdens facing President Trump

O

n Jan. 5, 1966 I walked into a tiny Albany office in the state capitol, ready to take on the responsibility of being an elected member of the state Assembly. Having had six years of experience in local government I felt that I could take on the responsibility of representing the 175,000 people who lived on the South Shore of Long Island, but I had my share of uneasiness. I knew that state legislators made laws as I had seen many of them during my local service. But there was no handbook or one-month preparatory class for newly elected officials. Shortly after my arrival in Albany I was summoned to the Assembly chamber to take part in the seat selection process. I didn’t expect to be seated in the first few rows of the chamber as they were reserved for the more senior members. And as luck would have it, I was assigned a seat in the last row. I confess that during those early days, I was in awe seeing

state government, not as an outside observer, but as a member of a body that had the power to change people’s lives, hopefully for the better. During that period of time Albany had its celebrities such as Gov. Nelson Rockefeller, surrounded by advisors such as Henry Kissinger. These are a few observations illustrating the experience of a political neophyte. I am contrasting this short history of my earliest days in politics, with the Presidentelect Donald J. Trump and what thoughts may or may not be going through his mind. Mr. Trump is the son of a wealthy father. He always had the best of everything from military school to the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. I was a first-generation office holder whose father toiled as a milkman and a grocery store owner. Trump has had a charmed existence never wanting for anything and always able to get out of his business headaches either through bankruptcy or the

JERRY KREMER Kremer’s Corner use of other peoples’ money. But no matter who you are in life, becoming an elected official, especially President of the United States and the voice of 300 million people, has to be a mind blowing experience. Over the years we have known Donald Trump to be brash businessman, a great marketer and the creator of a successful brand. But I am hopeful that on the first day that he walks into the fabled Oval Office, he takes a

very deep breath and is in awe of what it’s like to be this country’s leader. Running a real estate empire, building golf courses and condominiums, is not considered basic training to be a president. In the private sector you can snap your fingers and everyone stands at attention. You can hire and fire with no real consequences as the world is not watching you. The two-plus months leading up to the inauguration have been a circus sideshow. Tweets on a cell phone attract attention and get some people nervous and upset. But when you speak from the nation’s capital, words have a lot more meaning and the wrong words can lead to a national crisis. You can brush aside the controversy of hacking by Russian President Putin, but once in office you can’t ignore a Russian invasion of a NATO ally. Mr. Putin is not Mr. Rogers, and sooner or later he will turn your neighborhood upside

down. As a state legislator the only people who follow you around are your loyal staffers. As President of the United States, you are followed by a soldier a suitcase that can start a nuclear war, with more consequences than a silly tweet. The voters who supported Donald Trump may have chosen him because they viewed him as a person who didn’t believe in being politically correct. But once you sit in the seat of power you have to be a lot more politically correct and a lot more measured in your words. In the weeks and months ahead, the caring people of this country are hoping that the new president takes on the job with the seriousness that it deserves. That he conducts himself in a manner to be worthy of sitting in the Oval office. And that someday some youngster says that a President Trump inspired him or her to seek high office. That’s the burden a new president must bear and we all pray he will do it well for our sake.

A LOOK ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

A different kind of ‘to-do’ list

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emind me why we’re tossing out perfectly good pots?” I ask my son. “Do I have to?” “Yes, mom, you do.” His voice was stern. When my boys are home for the holidays, I try to do things with them that they’ll enjoy. We work on our lists all semester. But this boy’s list started with making me declutter — and went downhill from there! I did not bargain for this. “So why are we doing this?” I asked. “Because they’re worn out; you never use them; and they clutter up so much of the kitchen table that there’s no room for us all to have breakfast together!” I summoned up the energy for one last try. “But one of these is the good latke-frying pan, and I can never remember which!” “It’s this one, mom. See? The one with the sticky-note saying ‘Keep this—good Latke pan’? Now, can we recycle all of the others?” “If it makes you happy,” I say. But in truth, I’m done with decluttering; I must distract him

somehow. Aha, I’ve just remembered! “Sweetheart — let’s get back to your list. Wasn’t there some TV thing you wanted to watch?” “The football game? You’ll really watch it with me?” “I said I would, didn’t I? Too bad there aren’t any on….” “Actually, you’re in luck! There’s one right now.” And he snatched up the TV remote and found us a game. And before you could say, “Concussion protocol,” I was watching a herd of men in hot pursuit of another man, from another herd — like lions after a stag — cutting him out and bringing him down. “This is so violent!” I mutter. “What else can we do? Where’s that list?” “How about watching a show?” “Okay. What are my choices?” “There’s ‘The Walking Dead’.” “With all the zombies? Who get shot in the head?” “Or stabbed. Or speared. Or….”

JUDY EPSTEIN A Look on the Lighter Side “Anything else?” “How about ‘Daredevil’? “He’s the one who gets beaten up, every episode?” “Well, he beats other people up, too.” “Lovely. Anything less violent?” “Remember, this is still a teenage boy you’re dealing with,” my husband butts in. “Well,” says the boy, “There’s the series ‘Tyrant’. It’s about the Middle East, so of course there’s some violence, but it’s mostly political.”

“Okay, let’s try it.” “Tyrant,” from the creators of “Homeland,” is the story of a ruling family in a fictional place that might as well be Syria. When we watch, I am torn between admiring the beautiful mosaics and interiors, and flinching from the backstabbings — both literal and figurative — of characters I have come to care about. “I can’t watch this!” I soon say. “But mom, you promised!” “I promised I would try. But it’s so painful! Can’t we just watch a nice, clean murder for once?” “What’s a ‘nice, clean murder’?” “Well, for one thing, I mean a murder that gets solved before the end of the show; but also, one with a victim you never meet — or if you do, they’re horrible people and you’re happy to see them go!” “Mom, that sounds worse than anything I’ve asked you to watch!” “Well, I can’t help it — that’s what I want. That’s what’s on my list. Now, give me that remote!”

And before he can object, I snatch the TV remote, pushing the buttons to change to something else. But nothing happens. I push the buttons harder. Still nothing. “Why isn’t this working?” “Because it’s broken. Are you looking for this?” My boy grins as he holds up a twin of the remote in my hand. “Or this one, perhaps?” And he holds up a third! “I have to ask you, Mom — why do you keep all the broken remotes, right next to the good one?” “I don’t know.” “In fact,” he continues, “maybe we should…” “Oh, no!” I know where this is going. “… just get rid of them?” So here we are, back at the recycling bin. He makes me throw the two old remotes away! “There. Was that so hard to do?” he asks me. “Yes it was!” I answer. But at least it’s done one good thing — it’s making me just a little bit less sad about putting him on the plane tomorrow, back to school!


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ORUETAODFE R L ESF W T RFII TE E LD

Women’s voices in history, part II

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fter my previous column was published, one of North Shore Long Island’s most acclaimed feminists asked me a question. “Do you realize,” she said, “that all the American voices you cited were males?” Frankly, I had not been attentive to that. I did not consider the critical comment as a “political correctness” assault. As a person who taught the first women’s history class at Hofstra in the 1960s, I was now reminded that my half century focus on “Her-story” still had a ways to go. Clearly, like many males (notwithstanding my ongoing efforts for gender equity and inclusion), I slipped into being the product of my long male socialization (not alert enough to

recognize how deeply language and identity should matter in our pluralistic society). Ironically, I know — and respect — many outstanding female voices. Although I have taught them for decades, my last column slipped to the exclusivity of “His-tory.” So, let’s begin a bit of remedial commentary here. Anne Bradstreet, the first published female poet in America (in the 1600s) had much to say about growing up — and living — female. You can check her views and also note that the introduction to her book of poetry was by a man. He explained that lest anyone conclude that Mistress Bradstreet had neglected her husband and children to do her writing, he wanted it known

MICHAEL D’INNOCENZO Out of Left Field that she had snatched the extra time from her sleep! Most of Abigail Adams’ letters was not opened to the public until the 1950s. For years, I taught about her based on primary source research conducted in an honor’s project by Patti Alleva, one of

my all-time star students. So far as I know, Patti might have been the first scholar to pluck from Abigail’s letters to husband John, the comment: “My pen is freer than my tongue, so I am able to write things to you that I would not say.” That was a view of the code of female modesty and subordination. Because Abigail did so much writing (John was away for years as a diplomat in Europe), she became bolder and bolder as a social commentator. She was among the early critics of maintaining a system of slavery while the Americans said they were contending for liberty from the British. Everyone who has studied Abigail during the past half century knows her famous “Remember the Ladies” letter to

John, warning him that women should be included in the new laws and constitutions, and, if they were not: “We are determined to foment a rebellion of our own, and will not hold ourselves bound by laws in which we have no voice or representation.” Indeed, that is precisely what Elizabeth Cady Stanton did at the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848. Not only did she use the model employed by the Revolutionaries of calling a “convention” (an assemblage of citizens), but she took the dramatic step of paraphrasing Jefferson’s “Declaration” as the focal point of the meeting. Because Jefferson had listed 16 grievances against King George III, Stanton used the Continued on Page 18

PULSE OF THE PENINSULA

Urge LIPA to OK windpower pact

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n Jan. 25, activists who have been fighting for decades for clean, renewable energy in order to end our society’s dangerous addiction to fossil fuels, are hoping they will finally be able to pop the champagne corks when the Long Island Power Authority Board approves a power purchase agreement for off-shore wind power for the East End. Indeed, just a week after the Block Island Wind Farm began producing power, New York labor unions, civic and environmental organizations and elected officials hosted a rally outside of Long Island Power Authority praising LIPA for expressing support of offshore wind power and its anticipated vote on Jan. 25 to move forward on the nation’s largest offshore wind project. Over 100 gathered in front of LIPA, in the largest show of Long Island’s support for offshore wind to date. Located off the east end of Long Island, Deepwater Wind’s 90-megawatt, 15-turbine project will produce enough energy to power about 50,000 Long Island homes by 2022. This pivotal decision, opening a new era for Long Island’s energy economy, would eliminate the need for LIPA to build a new coal-fired plant to meet the region’s energy needs. Keep in

mind that Long Island officials keep saying the impediment to businesses coming here are the high energy costs. Now the activists are calling on LIPA to move forward on the Island-Wide renewable energy Request for Proposal in early 2017 which could include another 210 MW of offshore wind off of Long Island’s south fork. (Europe already generates 12,100 megawatts of off-shore wind energy). Meanwhile, in the waning days of the Obama Administration (and not a moment too soon), the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, awarded Statoil Wind US LLC, a private company from Norway that specializes in oil and gas, the lease to develop an off-shore wind farm on 80,000 acres some 12 miles off of Long Island’s south shore. Statoil’s $40 million bid beat out NYSERDA, the New York State energy research development agency, which had wanted to win so it could be the lead agency and expedite development of offshore windpower for New York. Now that it will be the domain of a private company, New York customers- like LIPA and Con Ed — will likely have to compete with New Jersey and others. LIPA needs to lock in supply and do so before the Trumpsters try to overturn the lease altogether.

KAREN RUBIN Pulse of the Peninsula Recall this is the same area where a private company wanted to site a Liquified Natural Gas facility, which would have shut down any wind farm. The incoming Trump Administration’s determination to reverse course on a transition to clean, renewable energy, and return us to dependency on fossil fuels — no matter the impact on climate, the environment and ecology, no matter how it basically indentures residents and businesses to ever higher prices for energy, no matter how it endangers national security - means it will be up to the states to continue progress. Gov. Cuomo has set a goal of producing 50 percent of New York’s electricity from renewable sources by 2030 and 80 percent

by 2050. Developing offshore wind power — and a wholly new industry for Long Island — is essential for achieving that goal, along with solar, geothermal and hydro power sources (East Hampton has passed legislation that it would get 100 percent of its electricity from clean, renewable sources.) Gov. Cuomo made major news during his State of the State message at SUNY Farmingdale on Long Island, announced that New York is committed to building 2,400 megawatts (MW) of offshore wind power by 2030 – enough to power 1.25 million homes. The governor also pledged his support for New York’s first, and the nation’s largest, offshore wind project off the east end of Long Island. Offshore wind power is especially important in light of Cuomo’s pronouncement in his State of the State address that the Indian Point nuclear plant, which theoretically generates 2000 megawatts of energy, will be shut down by 2021. The Atlantic waters off Long Island has some of the best conditions for off-shore windpower production in North America, if not the world. Dubbed the “Saudi Arabia of offshore wind” we could be the epicenter for a new American energy industry,

already $20 billion globally. Scientists and engineers at SUNY Stony Brook are developing new battery storage systems and monitoring controls. Wind turbines need to be manufactured, installed, monitored and maintained, producing thousands of everlasting jobs along with the wind power. And unlike fossil fuels, where the prices are unpredictable except they almost always go up (oil and gas, after all, are finite resources, costly to develop, process and deliver), wind power is a predictable, stable price that is on a trajectory to come down, not up. “It’s been a marathon of work and effort to bring wind power to Long Island, but we are at the last mile and moving closer to the finish line,” Adrienne Esposito, executive director of Citizens Campaign for the Environment said at the Dec. 20 rally. “Long Islanders are ready for offshore wind. We have assessed the science, the economics and the societal benefits and we concluded that wind works as an important mainstream energy source. We can longer be fossil fools and deny the consequences of climate change.” Come out to the LIPA board meeting on Jan. 25 to show your support. If they build it, we will come.


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ALL THINGS POLITICAL

Run your financial life efficiently

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’ve said it before; I’ll say it again. Long Islanders are suffering financially, and we’re not alone. In America, 38 percent of households carry credit card debt with an average outstanding balance of $16,000. This kind of debt is usually worse right after the holidays. It’s time for Long Islanders to get their financial houses in order. I’ve always had a passion for business and investing; and, as my wife Renée likes to say, I’m “fluent in the language of money.” I’m always working at lowering our monthly nut, and you can too! Here are some suggestions to run your financial life more efficiently. Credit Card Debt As previously stated, 38 percent of American households owe $16,000 in credit card debt. The average interest rate charged, about 14.95 percent, makes credit cards one of the worst choices as a source of debt. On Long Island, credit unions usually have the most competitive credit card rates.

line access. When I told the customer service rep this seemed way too high and asked if Verizon could do better, it was cut in half to $20 per month. My family cell phone bill is now $140 per month cheaper.

For example Suffolk Federal Credit Union has a 0.00 percent 6-month introductory rate on both purchases and free balance transfers. After the introductory period ends, the rate can be as low as 7.74 percent. It’s worth the time and effort to make the balance transfer and change credit cards! Mortgage Payments Most conventional mortgages are for 30 years and pay off interest and principal with a monthly payment. If you pay your mortgage every two weeks instead, you will make 26 annual payments, or one extra monthly payment a year. This will shave off roughly five years of mortgage payment. Make sure your lender deducts the payments immediately as some wait until month’s end to give you credit. There may be some fees the servicer of your mortgage will try and tack on. Don’t ever accept the statement, “This is standard and customary.” Everything is negotiable! Don’t be afraid to ask to have fees waived.

ADAM HABER All Things Political Cell Phone Fierce competition among cell phone service providers creates opportunity for the consumer. Don’t be concerned about switching services if savings are to be had. Quality of service is relatively consistent among providers throughout Long Island. I recently called Verizon and found out they roll over unused gigabytes of data so I lowered my plan from 40GB a month to 18GB for a savings of $60 per month. I also noticed I was paying $40 per month for smartphone

Cable TV and Internet Just like cellphone service, there is fierce competition for cable TV and internet connections. Dish Network, Verizon/Fios and Cablevision/Optimum all want your business. If you don’t call your provider every six months to check on the latest deal you are actually losing out. Although I am currently already on a “promotional rate,” a quick call to my cable and internet service provider saved an extra $20 per month. Banking Heavy competition for your business means you should have free checking and overdraft protection. Consumers shouldn’t have to pay a monthly maintenance fee or for many bank services such as wires, overdraft protection or an insufficient funds fee.

When these fees hit up, if they aren’t already free, complain! If you are a good customer these annoying fees are usually waived. Long Island has several credit unions such as NEFCU, Bethpage or Nassau Educators Federal Credit Union, which are competitive and worth a look. Other Bills Other negotiable household bills that need to be shopped around at least once a year are home heating oil providers, auto and homeowners insurance. For example I just switched from Geico to Liberty Mutual for auto insurance and saved $2,500 per year. The gecko on the commercials may be cute but Geico didn’t provide a competitive quote when my son was recently added to our auto policy. My father gave me great advice many years ago: “You don’t get poor from asking.” Now stop wasting your precious, hard earned dollars and go out there and negotiate!

READERS WRITE

Village at fault in Baxter House deterioration

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ecently, the Port Washington Times ran a letter from a resident of the Village of Baxter Estates who has ascribed a “lynch mob” mentality to individuals in Port Washington who are concerned about the condition of the Baxter House and want to see the village require the owner to maintain her historically designated property as required by the law. While the writer felt compelled to provide “background” in order to inform people that the owner “is not the villain,” in our opinion he failed to provide the complete picture and frankly missed the point. Must there be a villain? Certainly, the good lawabiding residents of Baxter Estates and Port Washington who want to live in a community in which the rule of law applies aren’t villains. The property was landmarked in 2005 by the Village

of Baxter Estates under authority contained in the village code and under New York State Law. The owner, who fought the designation at the Village level, never availed herself of the opportunity to challenge that determination in State Supreme Court as was her absolute right. Rather, she accepted the designation and moved into the home for a period of time. At one point, however, according to village records, she illegally converted the one family house into a multiple occupancy and illegally rented the house. At some point, the original front door and leaded glass windows were removed without seeking permission from the Historic Preservation Committee. For the past several years, she has not maintained the home and indeed has allowed the roof to go unpatched in spots, resulting in a village-

hired independent inspector to note that birds were nesting in the house. Rather than maintain the house as one might expect of any owner, she has allowed it to run down to the point that she has claimed it cannot be saved and must be demolished so that she can build another house — presumably a larger one — or subdivide the property and place two houses there, a subdivision that she has applied for twice in the last eight years only to withdraw both applications. It is indeed unfortunate that many unkind comments have been directed toward the current owner of the Baxter House. We believe these comments reflect how strongly the Port Washington community feels about the potential loss of the historic Baxter House. Anyone driving down Shore Road can see that the house has not been maintained and al-

lowed to fester in decay. Whose responsibility is that if not the owner’s? The leaded windows and original front door have been replaced, in violation of VBE’s preservation laws. Not only is the house unsightly with the black and blue tarps, but those deteriorated tarps are ending up on neighbor’s lawns, as well as in the Baxter Pond and Manhasset Bay. The owner can renovate the interior as she likes — although she is not permitted to subdivide and rent out the house to multiple individuals, as she has done. While the law allows her to erase the historic beauty of the interior, it is worth noting that recent photographs of the interior reveal beautiful detail that cannot be recreated and which anyone would be glad to live in. The exterior of the house belongs to our history and has

been allowed to decay. Why? Who knows, but some speculate that the owner wants to tear down the house and build a McMansion she can sell. Does any of this make the owner a villain? No, but it does paint a slightly different picture than the one painted by some. We are not looking for, as the writer put it, a “pound of flesh,” what we are looking for is an equal application of the law by the village. Every resident is responsible and accountable for the upkeep of our homes, it seems that only one resident of the Village has not been called to account. We do desire that the house be preserved, but we also desire that the owner of the Baxter House live under Village law as the rest of us do. Kathy Coley Port Washington


18 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

READERS WRITE

Obama attacked Israel in UN vote

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fter watching all the pomp and circumstance of the presidential inauguration of Jan. 20, 2009, I remember turning to my husband Steve and saying: “The sole mission of Barack Obama and his henchmen is to destroy Israel.” Sure enough, over eight years he consistently genuflected to our enemies and spit in the face of our most faithful allies, most particularly Israel. Writer Mona Charen has said that Mr. Obama has a “genocidal hostility toward Israel.” Sure enough, he spit on Jews –– and also Christians –– by launching his poison dart on Dec. 23, right in time for Chanukah and Christmas. That dart was Resolution 2334 to condemn Israeli “settlements”–– meaning housing on Israeli land –– and insist on a return to 1967 “Auschwitz borders” that was proposed by the UN’s Security Council members New Zealand (10,000 miles from Israel), Malaysia (where the official religion is Islam), Senegal (which is 90-percent Muslim), and Venezuela (so impoverished that people are now scrounging for toilet paper).

Reversing decades of U.S. policy, the Obama regime refused to veto this anti-Semitic proposal. This sneak attack was hatched and orchestrated directly from the Oval Office and involved Mr. Obama himself, Secretary of State John Kerry, Susan Rice, and other of his Jew-hating acolytes, among them (this is the short list): current U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power (end all U.S. military aid to Israel); all the “court Jews” who sold their souls to the devil in exchange for the seductive allure of access to power; close advisor and Hamas and Hezbollah fan Robert Malley; Dennis Ross (who suggested a plan that translated today would mean listening to the 22 hostile states that surround Israel and saying “majority rules!”); George Soros –– Obama’s “puppet master” –– the Hungarian-born Jewish multibillionaire, who has founded and funded numerous groups that work unstintingly to bring about Israel’s destruction; Hillary Clinton, whose relationships with terrorists date back decades and whose rancid relationship with Israel is well known; Susan Rice, former Am-

Clark does not deserve freedom

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ov. Cuomo’s commuting of Judith Clark’s sentence for second-degree murder and robbery charges in connection with the Brinks armored car robbery in Nannette, N.Y., In 1981 makes Ms. Clark eligible for parole in 2017 and raises some interesting points of view. No matter how the proponents for Miss Clark couch their rhetoric, the fact remains that three decent family men were murdered in the course of doing their jobs, trying to uphold the law, in response to a crime for which Ms. Clark was found guilty. Ms. Elaine Lord, former superintendent of the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for Women, where Ms. Clark has been an inmate for most of her 35 years of incarceration,

stated that she has witnessed Ms. Clark “change into one of the most perceptive, thoughtful, helpful and profound human beings I have ever known either inside or outside of prison”. Assuming for the sake of argument, that Ms. Lord is correct in her assessment, what better for Ms. Clark to make the best use of her quiet attributes and truly repay her debt to society, than to remain in prison and to minister to the inmates who would surely benefit from Ms. Clark’s perceptive insights. Let the day that either Sergeant O’Grady, Officer Brown, or Mr. Paige walk into the correctional facility and ask for the keys to her cell, so that they may set her free, be the day that she leaves prison. Jack Benigno New Hyde Park

bassador to the U.N. and current National Security Advisor, who has advocated ending all U.S. military aid to Israel; Lee Hamilton, former Indiana congressman, who has suggested pressuring Israel to surrender the Golan Heights and leave the West Bank; Zbigniew Brzezinski, Obama advisor and longtime Israel loather, who suggested that the Obama regime tell Israel that the U.S. will attack Israeli jets if they try to attack Iran; John Brennan, former Deputy National Security Advisor for Homeland Security and current head of the CIA, who has suggested that Mr. Obama “reach out” to Hezbollah, and also that “jihad is a holy struggle…”; and the execrable John Kerry, who, after the anti-Israel U.N. vote, spoke directly for his boss on TV, engaging in egregious historical revisionism and fairytale bromides to essentially inflict a two-state solution on Israel, with partners who to this day do not –– and have sworn they never will –– accept a Jewish state in their midst. My favorite line was Mr. Kerry saying that Israel could be Jewish or democratic, but not both. Right, like Iran and Iraq could be either democratic

or Muslim but not both. Former Great Neck resident Rabbi Aryeh Spero writes that after most votes in the UN, “the vote is recorded. Period. But after the vote to declare Jerusalem and Judea and Samaria as Arab/Islamic land, the [U.N. members] celebrated by giving themselves a standing ovation. They clapped…in declaring the Jewish tie to the Old City of Jerusalem as illegitimate and Israel’s attachment to the Temple Mount and Judea and Samaria as illegal…It was an act of anti-Semitism.” Writer Caroline Glick writes of Mr. Obama’s four-pronged attack on the people and the state he loathes beyond loathing. First was the UN Resolution 2334. Second was Sec. Kerry’s hate-filled speech. And on Jan. 15, “stage 3 will commence in Paris” when foreign ministers of some 50 [to 70] states are expected to adopt Kerry’s anti-Israel [so-called] principles. “The next day,” says Glick, “it will be Obama’s turn…he can be expected to use the occasion of Martin Luther King Jr. Day to present the Palestin-

ian war to annihilate Israel as a natural progression from the American Civil Rights movement that King led 50 years ago. “Finally, sometime between Jan. 17 and 19, Obama intends for the Security Council to reconvene and…recognize `Palestine’ and grant it full membership in the UN.” Happily, on Jan. 20, President-elect Donald J. Trump, who shares the affection and respect of all sane people for Israel, as do all of his appointees, will be inaugurated. My personal wish is that he immediately stop any U.S. funds from going to that nest of America-and-Israel haters and that he ultimately kick the putrid U.N. out of the United States altogether. Personally, I believe that the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob had a hand in booting out the anti-Semites from the current White House, preventing the loathsome heiress apparent from continuing their destructive policies, and bringing our country a true American patriot in their stead. Hallelujah! Joan Swirsky Great Neck

Women’s voices in U.S. history, part II Continued from Page 16 same number against the oppressive male sex (a document that, sadly, is still relevant 169 years later). She began by modifying Jefferson’s opening lines: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men AND WOMEN are created equal. The history of man toward woman is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world.” This discussion is an extremely modest beginning; I will use future column space for so many other significant women’s voices: Anthony, Chopin, Paul, Roosevelt, Friedan, Steinem, and others who represent the qualities of Helen Fisher’s “The First Sex.”

Two aspects of women’s voices are timely right now. One of those voices has been frequently presented in the Blank newspapers. Not only is Diana PoulosLutz an elegant and articulate voice, but in her “Readers Write” submissions, she regularly presents analytically probing and incisive commentaries of high quality. One could expect to find her essays in the top publications in our nation. She writes from a gender perspective, but her views resonate for all who seek just and inclusive societies, here in the U.S. and around the world. I don’t know if Diana Poulos-Lutz will be among the approximately 200,000 women who have committed to a demonstration in Washington on

January 21, the day after the inauguration of the 45th President of the U.S. Women don’t need to go to Washington. They will also be mobilizing in towns and cities across the U.S. to remind the new President that, for everyone, there needs to be an agenda of fairness, equity and inclusion for women. Author Peggy Orenstein has emphasized that the coarse views and hostile policies of the new President might “unwittingly inspire a new bipartisan feminism.” Women’s Voices going forward from Jan. 21 can help to do for our nation and the world what Eleanor Roosevelt did in fostering the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.


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READERS WRITE

NICE provides improved bus service

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et us all celebrate the fifth anniversary of NICE bus which occurred this past Jan. 1, 2017. Thousands of Nassau County residents ride Nassau Inter County Express Bus to jobs, schools and other destinations in Queens. Many transfer to the New York City Transit subway at Flushing, Jamaica or Far Rockaway stations. Thousands of Queens residents travel via NICE bus to jobs, schools and other destinations in Nassau County. The viability of NICE benefits everyone. To understand the origins of how we got here, you must go back in time to the early 1970s. Prior to NICE, bus service in Nassau County was operated under Long Island Bus and Metropolitan Suburban Bus Authority. In 1973, Nassau County purchased equipment, routes and some facilities from numerous private bus operators most of whom were experiencing serious financial difficulties. These private bus operators included Bee Line, Rockville Center Bus Corporation, Utility Lines, Stage Coach Lines, Schenck Transportation, Inc., Nassau Bus Line, Hempstead Bus Corporation, Jerusalem Avenue Bus Lines, Universal Auto Bus, Roosevelt Bus Lines, Stage Coach Lines, Hendrickson Bus Corporation and others. Their respective fare box income was becoming insufficient to cover current day to day operating expenses. They also lacked the funding to

purchase new replacement buses, along with upgrading out of date maintenance and operating bus garages. Nassau County followed up that same year by entering into a lease and operating agreement with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to continue providing local bus service. This resulted in creation of the Metropolitan Suburban Bus Authority. Years later, the Metropolitan Suburban Bus Authority was followed by Long Island Bus and on January 1, 2012 Nassau Inter County Express (NICE). Many of the same routes operated by MSBA, LI Bus and NICE today can be traced back to the various private bus operators. It is a four-way dance between fares paid by riders (know as farebox revenues) along with funding provided by Nassau County, New York State and the Federal government in financing public bus transportation operated by NICE. They operate a fleet of 308 buses out of the Rockville Center and Mitchell Field bus garages. NICE also operates a fleet of almost 122 Able Ride paratransit vehicles out of the Stewart Avenue facility. All three facilities were constructed by federal capital grants with local matching funds provided by Nassau County and the state Department of Transportation. It was the same funding sources for both construction of the Hempstead Multi-Modal Bus Terminal and Mineola Intermodal Bus Terminal/

Commuter Parking Garage. All five of these initial investments combined cost almost $100 million. In today’s dollars, it would be far higher. NICE attempts to schedule bus replacements on a 500,000-mile or 12-year cycle, which ever comes first, is based upon U.S. Department of Transportation guidelines. Since 1973, buses operated by NICE under contract to Nassau County are now on the fourth replacement cycle. Most buses operated by NICE are under 12 years old. This was not the case decades earlier when the average age of the fleet was closer to 12 years. Over time, there have been other capital investments, including compressed natural gas fueling stations, facility modifications to accommodate CNG buses inside garages, new fare collection equipment, automatic vehicle locator equipment, real time communications systems to notify riders for anticipated arrival of the next bus, shelters, bus stop signs and other support equipment necessary to run the system. Just like a homeowner, what is new today requires constant maintenance, periodic upgrades and eventual replacement years later. Capital physical assets of any bus system (including revenue vehicles along with bus facility components such as HVAC, bus washers, paint booths, engine shops, bays, pits, lifts, doors, fueling stations, lighting, security systems and many others) eventually reach the end of

their useful life based upon straight line depreciation and/or manufactures warranty. Significant changes in technology may also require replacement of outdated equipment. Farebox recovery rate analysis is critical in determining the frequency and continuation of service on a route by route basis. Fifty percent is a good transit industry standard. Some routes are higher and others lower. There are bound to be routes with a handful of riders and a very low farebox recovery rate. In these cases, difficult decisions have to be made by management for preservation of the overall system benefiting the other 98 percent of daily riders. It is easy over time to add service providing the financial support is available. The riding public has a difficult time understanding why their route is subject to reduction in the frequency or elimination of all service because it has become a significant financial drain on the transit system. The costs of labor for drivers including salary, fringe and benefits along with fueling, washing, cleaning and maintenance of equipment are major factors in determining the price of service. You also have to add depreciation over time for the life of the bus. The average cost of providing service on any bus route averages $150 dollars or more per hour. It has been 44 years, since Nassau County took control of all bus routes from private operators. Over that time period, Nassau

County, New York State and the Federal governments have combined invested over $700 million in capital improvements. Operating subsidy dollars easily top over $1 billion. NICE services continue to be one of the best bargains around. Since the 1950s, the average cost of riding a bus in Nassau County has gone up at a lower rate than either the consumer price index or inflation. The Metro Card introduced in 1996 affords a free transfer between NICE bus and the NYC Transit bus or subway. Prior to this, riders had to pay two full fares. Purchasing either a weekly or monthly pass further reduces the cost per ride. Many employers offer transit checks, which pay even more of the costs. In the end, it all comes down to the availability of increased funding for additional transportation service to serve residents. Operating subsidies are required to increase the level of service and reduce the amount of time one waits for a bus on existing routes. Same for adding more off-peak, evening and weekend service. This also holds true for those routes currently under discussion for elimination when there are insufficient revenues to maintain existing service. TANSTAFL - There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch or in this case bus ride. Larry Penner Great Neck

Ignoring pledge not wrong Give N. Shore, staff more credit I

have been hearing much about those not adhering to proper protocol when the pledge to our flag is recited. I don’t see it as disrespect to the flag of our country but as a protest to the many improper and corrupt things that happen every day here in the USA. Burning the flag is in the extreme but it does reflect how deeply some feel about injustices. One such injustice will probably be the soon to come destruction of The Affordable Care Act: More tax cuts for the rich and big trouble for the deprived. They, and we know who they are just laugh about the dire straits of their fellow human beings. As, What are you going to do about it? As is said, one has the right to remain silent in certain instances but one also has the right not to remain silent which amounts to acceptance. One has a duty to speak the truth. In the pledge to our flag, skip to the part where ‘Under God’ has been inserted. Our Constitution begins with Our Creator. Our Creator is our only legitimate God ,which is or should be understood. Too many have their small limited perception of the real reality. There are a multitude of ‘undergods’ around: the reason for separation of church and state. We are primarily considered to be a democracy.

There have been reasons in the past for aspects of being a republic to exist: Re (the) public. Fun was being made of the millenials who so strongly supported Bernie Sanders. Never before has this age group and many others who are older been so well educated and informed. This has eliminated much of the need for republic aspects as in the past. Bernie Sanders actually won the Democratic primary. We know the ones who have nothing doing with that and Bernie was defrauded. Skip to the last line of the pledge to our flag: Justice for All. One can hear them saying “What is this with Justice for All?” One can sense their expletives: Foofaw! Gwoosch! Snort! Scrumph! Justice for All? Is he kidding? Are these individuals part of the human race? The thought came to me that perhaps aliens don’t have navels. Maybe they should have their bellies examined. At any rate, for decades now Bernard Sanders and James Carter among many others stand out as shining examples of how those in government should be. Charles Samek Mineola

L

et me start off with the fact that I had surgery at North Shore Hospital in Manhasset which is a member hospital of Northwell Health. This occurred on Jan. 3 and is my fourth surgery in about 18 months. My first was due to an aggressive prostrate cancer and was recommended by my primary physician Dr. Doris Berland and was operated on by my urologist Dr. Barry Goldberg of Advanced Urology in Manhasset. Due to expert care and his medical staff I’m in remission. He did another procedure to correct another problem. My next two procedures

were administered by Dr. Angelo Procaccino of Northwell Health of Great Neck for hernias. I found the nurses in the hospital kind, caring and concerned with what I was going through. I also found this true in the operating room with the doctors, nurses and medical personal who made me feel at ease and safe. I think not enough of us give credit to all those in the medical field for what they all do caring and trying to save lives. In closing let me say this, kudos, for all you did for me. Frederick Bedell, Jr. Mineola


20 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

READERS WRITE

Populism a response to economic stress

J

ohn O’Kelly makes some valid and highly important points in his rebuttal (issue of Dec. 30) to the letters from other readers critical of his initial contribution. It is incontrovertibly clear that his views are given Constitutional protection by the First Amendment, and that the Port Washington Times enjoys a similar right to publish those views — provided, of course, that the language is not obscene, scatological, or otherwise degrading. As O’Kelly suggested, demands for censorship of unpopular or even blatantly incorrect opinions, as well as a proposal to boycott a newspaper because it published such opinions, violate the Constitutional principles of free speech and freedom of the press and are inherently un-American. He is also on solid ground by stating that ad hominem remarks are both uncalled for and, more importantly, ineffective in the development of points in a debate. However, O’Kelly displays and even reinforces the biases that evoked the protests by other readers. He asserts his opinion as though it were fact that those who differ with him about the role of the U.S. are actually “fronts” for some insidious but unnamed forces bent on undermining their — and

our — country. He then adds that “the role of the media and of George Soros in assisting Clinton and opposing Trump is well documented,” as though they — and all other individuals — as well as the news media should not have every bit as much right to support the candidates of their choice as vigorously as he and his fellow conservatives do. That right of all citizens, regardless of race, color, creed, or country of origin, is the very essence of democracy; to suggest otherwise is a profound violation of American principles. O’Kelly is, in my opinion, also correct that war is bad for the country. Indeed, I consider it bad for the victors in wars as well as for the losers; even though the U.S. was fortunate to be sheltered by two great oceans from the devastation suffered by countries that were ravaged during the two world wars, too many American families lost fathers and sons, mothers and daughters, sisters and brothers, who died or were grievously wounded in the hostilities. Furthermore, O’Kelly seems to overlook in his assessment of the harm inflicted by war that Soros, who survived World War II and the Holocaust as a child in Hungary, has probably had more direct, personal experience with war and its consequences than O’Kelly and, thus,

has an understandable motivation to do his best to avoid or at least mitigate the conflicts that all too often lead to war. In his defense of “populism,” O’Kelly may have forgotten, overlooked, or chosen to ignore some lessons of history. In Germany in the 1930s, Adolph Hitler cultivated and intensified the populism that arose from the defeat in World War I and the subsequent economic misery compounded by the victors’ insistence on reparations; the very title of the national anthem, “Deutschland Ueber Alles” (Germany above all others) expresses that sentiment admirably. We all know how that turned out. In Italy, the Fascist government of Mussolini, as well as the more recent, albeit less painful, leadership under Silvio Berlusconi proved to be disheartening experiences with “populism.” In the U.S., it is virtually unanimously agreed upon by economists of just about every theoretical stripe that the Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930 — a classic example of economic populism — was a significant contributing factor to the intensification of the Great Depression that battered our country, as well as nearly all of the rest of the world. And, finally, because O’Kelly’s name indicates his Irish heritage, it’s pertinent to point out that, in much of the 19th century in the U.S., a potent expression

of populism was the anti-Irish hysteria on the part of the more populous residents of English and Scottish ancestry who decried the allegiance of Catholics to the Pope and considered them a threat to the new nation’s social and cultural stability. In sum, populism is not, contrary to O’Kelly’s conviction, a “natural” state. It is, instead, a sporadic occurrence in history that reflects what is hoped by many Americans to be a temporary response to periods of economic (and perhaps social) stress that is relieved when leadership — of whatever party and, in the context of democracy, of whatever political philosophy-- is able to restore in the nation a sense of common purpose. And an essential role in that process must be played by the news media, the role of which is to report fully and accurately — with due respect to the opinions of those reporters and their employers — on the conduct of government and the foibles of its elected leaders so that, in a true democracy, a well-informed informed public is able to reach reasonable conclusions about the political philosophies of the contending parties and the merits of the various candidates for office who run under their banners. Robert Adler Port Washington

U.S. hypocritical on Israeli settlements

A

fter years of enduring Karen Rubin’s myopic columns unconditionally supporting anything related to Obama/Clinton/Democrats, whether it be her lame defense of Obamacare, Hillary’s emails and private server, or the Clinton Foundation, I finally couldn’t take it anymore with her Dec. 30 piece “Why Obama Administration abstained.” If Rubin had any journalistic acumen, she would realize that, at best, Obama’s abstention was a personal vendetta of a lame duck president against the Netanyahu government of our democratic ally Israel, and Obama’s attempt to damage our country by sabotaging the foreign policy agenda of our incoming administration. Even worse, the abstention sets back the peace process and endangers Israeli and American lives. Fittingly, Obama, who abstained from his red line in Syria, leading to hundreds of thousands of deaths, and abstained from action in Iraq, leading to the rise of ISIS, has once again defined his foreign policy with an abstention. It’s unprecedented that an American lame duck president makes substantial foreign policy decisions within the last month in office that run counter not only to the incoming president’s planned policies, but to the opinion of the overwhelming majority of our democratically elected Senate and Congress, including a substantial number of Democrats.

It perplexes me that in the same column Rubin makes some rational observations, including the fact that Israel’s dismantling of settlements and complete withdrawal from Gaza has led to an unrelenting terrorist barrage of rockets from Gaza, she then bizarrely concludes that Israel should follow the same withdrawal policy with regards to the West Bank and East Jerusalem. Rubin prefaces her favor of UN Resolution 2442 with, “The way I understand the resolution.” Well, here is some text of the resolution to help clarify her understanding: 1. “Reaffirms that the establishment by Israel of settlements in the Palestinian territory occupied since 1967, including East Jerusalem, has no legal validity and constitutes a flagrant violation under international law and a major obstacle to the achievement of the two-State solution and a just, lasting and comprehensive peace; 2. Reiterates its demand that Israel immediately and completely cease all settlement activities in the occupied Palestinian territory, including East Jerusalem, and that it fully respect all of its legal obligations in this regard;” A rudimentary “understanding” of the resolution would make it clear that even the Western Wall and the Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem are considered illegal settlements. Does Rubin therefore believe, as the UN does, that the renovation of the Western Wall

plaza area, reconstruction of synagogues in the Jewish Quarter previously destroyed by Jordan in 1948-1967, or addition of a bedroom to a Jewish Quarter home, are illegal settlement activities? Does she agree with UNESCO, that the Western Wall isn’t even a Jewish site? If not, she should understand why for decades the United States has vetoed such UN resolutions and why Obama (and his cheerleader Karen Rubin) should have objected as well. But Obama, Kerry, and Rubin, from the comforts of their homes, are content to dictate the terms of their vision of a peace agreement to Israel with regards to settlements. The word settlement is even a misnomer, as the land at issue dates to being Jewish for 4000 years. Had the state of Israel not been attacked by Egypt, Jordan, and Syria in 1967, it would have remained within the 1948 borders. But it was attacked, and in a defensive move, reclaimed these territories. Yet, despite Israel’s historical connection to this land, and despite Palestinian intransigence, it is still willing to negotiate land for peace. Speaking of actual settlements and occupation, perhaps Rubin should ponder the fact that her home, as well as the White House, are genuine settlements on land originally belonging to the Native Ameri-

cans. And this is very recent history, stretching only over the last few hundred years. However, through guns and germs, “America” has been quite successful in eradicating the Native Americans, and marginalizing the remaining handful to substandard living on reservations, where, out of sight and out of mind, they are occasionally thrown a bone of a casino. Perhaps we should return to the pre1492 border, when it was all Native American. Or the pre-1607 border, before there were North American European settlements. Or the pre-1803 border, before the Louisiana Purchase gained land from France that was unjustly taken from the Native Americans. Or the pre-1845 border, and return Texas, California, Arizona, and Nevada to Mexico. And what is America doing way out in the middle of the Pacific on land taken from the native Hawaiians? Perhaps the UN, Obama, and Rubin should consider these occupying settlements (never mind Tibet, Kurdistan, Kashmir, Northern Ireland, Crimea, Australia, New Zealand, and others) before lecturing Israel about their native land. Ron Weber Great Neck Letters Continued on Page 22


The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

GN

21

COMMUNITY NEWS

County Kwanzaa Police to swear in new recruits celebration held Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano, along with the Nassau County Office of Minority Affairs, hosted the 50th Anniversary celebration of Kwanzaa on Thursday, Dec. 29 at the Roosevelt Field Mall in Garden City. The celebration featured the Ngoma (Drum) Procession of Distinguished Elders and celebrated Day 4 of Kwanzaa: Ujamaa (oo-jah-MAH-ah) Cooperative Economics. County Executive Mangano presented citations to eight hard working and dedicated members of the African American community in Nassau County. “Thanks to everyone for gathering here today for a wonderful ceremony as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Kwanzaa,” said County Executive Mangano. “The weeklong celebration of Kwanzaa is a festive, educational and inspirational holiday that is a great way to experience a dynamic African American celebration of life and

Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano was joined by Acting Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter and Department Chaplain Reverend Joseph D’Angelo, to swear in 181 new recruits who have successfully completed their training to join the Nassau County Police Department, Sheriff Department and Village Police Departments. “I thank each and every recruit for choosing to join these invaluable forces and for your commitment to a career in both law enforcement and public service,” said County Executive Mangano. “Law enforcement is a very difficult and often dangerous profession. It demands the utmost

professionalism, vigilance and a distinct skill set. Each of you and your families should be extremely proud of your accomplishments.” The 181 recruits completed 7 months of intense law enforcement training at the Nassau County Police Academy. 15 have prior military experience and 25 have prior law enforcement experience. 154 of the total recruits are joining the Nassau County Police Department. The remaining 27 recruits will be joining either the Nassau County Sheriff ’s Department or a Village’s Police Department.

Zuckerman attends drive heritage which can be enjoyed by people of all ages, races and ethnic backgrounds.” Kwanzaa has emerged as a secular festival observed by many African Americans from Dec. 26 to Jan. 1 as a celebration of African cultural heritage and traditional values. It honors the seven Africanbased principles of Kwanzaa, called Nguzo Saba in Swahili. It celebrates Family, Community and Culture and reflects the principles of UNITY.

Town of North Hempstead Town Council Member Peter Zuckerman attended a warm winter clothing drive on Sunday, December 18 at the Town of North Hempstead’s Laurel Homes Community Center in Roslyn Heights. The coat drive was part of TIkkun Alliance of the North Shore (TANS) “Neighbors Helping Neighbors” Community Outreach Program. It was hosted by Temple Beth Sholom, Temple Sinai, EJOY Community Resource Center, the Friendship Baptist Church and the North Hempstead Housing Authority.

Following the coat drive, the EJOY Community Resource Center and Friendship Baptist Church held its Annual Toy Drive. It was truly a collaborative community effort. Over 65 families attended the event. Organized by the Sid Jacobson JCC, the Tikkun Alliance of the North Shore (TANS) is a collaborative community effort formed to address issues affecting the world today. The coat distribution was handled by dedicated community volunteers from Temple Sinai and Temple Beth Sholom.

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22 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

READERS WRITE

Opponents of home display lack holiday spirit

I

think it is a shame and very sad that one or two grinches can ruin the holiday spirit for so many people. I just read the article about the Flower Hill family whose house is decorated every year for the holidays. I seems that the homeowners have been harassed to the poi nt of not decorating the house anymore.

My family and I have been passing by that house for years. It is a testament to the holidays and the spirit of the season. The fact that these people allocate so much time and energy to assemble this display should be appreciated. It beautifies the block and peoples spirits. It can be seen from St Francis hospital and helps lifts patient’s spirits in,

what is usually, a dark time for most of them. The fact they are also raising money for a charity that works with kids makes i t even more important. For those neighbors that are bothered by the traffic, it is only one month a year. I understand it can be annoying having a lot of cars on your block. Having a

curfew for the lights is only right. If the homeowners abide by the curfew, then they should be allowed to keep the decorations without being harassed. They also have the right to practice their holidays as they see fit. The traffic is a temporary inconvenience, not harmful. In this very uncertain and hateful time in our country’s his-

tory, a bright, cheerful and happy display is just what we need. What the neighbors and the town are doing is shameful and disgusting. Maybe you should embrace the holiday spirit instead of trying to stamp it out. Terri Hovanec Port Washington

No excuse for defending anti-Semitism

R

e: “Ills of globalism, Dem. Policies are real” and “Globalism a threat to Western Civilization” (Port Washington Times, Jan.

6): Jeffrey S. Wiesenfeld, “as Jew, by the way,” finds John O’Kelly’s “idea that only personalities with Jewish surnames

were worthy of mention” in his virulently anti-Semitic Dec. 16 letter “disturbing.” Dr. Wayne Roth, “a proChristian Jew,” doesn’t even

LETTERS POLICY Letters should be typed or neatly handwritten, and those longer than 300 words may be edited for brevity and clarity. All letters must include the writer’s name and phone number for verification. Anonymously sent letters will not be printed. Letters must be received by Monday noon to appear in the next week’s paper. All letters become the property of Blank Slate Media LLC and may be republished in any format. Letters can be e-mailed to news@theislandnow.com or mailed to Blank Slate Media, 105 Hillside Ave., Williston Park, NY 11596.

bother to address the issues raised “in the many letters of the past two weeks criticizing” Mr. O’Kelly’s anti-Semitic slanders. Yet Messrs. Wiesenfeld and Roth are more than willing to give Mr. O’Kelly a pass on his anti-Semitic views because they agree with Mr. O’Kelly’s political views. Messrs. Wiesenfeld, Roth and O’Kelly are entitled to hold whatever political beliefs (however extreme and misguided they may be) which they find

appropriate, but anti-Semitism should never get a pass. The anti-Semite who defends himself by noting the “some of my best friends are Jewish” is still an anti-Semite. And, when Mr. Wiesenfeld states that “I stand with John O’Kelly” and Dr. Roth dismisses Mr. O’Kelly’s comments about “Jewish bankers,” it’s the same as saying: “Some of my best friends are anti-Semites.” Jay Feldman Port Washington


BLANK SLATE MEDIA January 13, 2017

Eating, laughing for a good cause

S

id Jacobson Jewish Community Center’s “Eat. Bid. Laugh!! An Auction & Epicurean Event,” the premier fundraising event on Long Island, will be held on Thursday, March 30, at 6:00 p.m. at the Fresh Meadow Country Club in Lake Success. The event will feature an exciting live performance by Emmy-nominated actor and comedian Billy Gardell. The annual event connects thousands of donors, sponsors, volunteers and participants who enthusiastically collaborate to provide Sid Jacobson JCC with funding for vital social service programs throughout Long Island. Last year’s event raised nearly $1.2 million, all of which helped enhance the lives of those who rely on the JCC’s quality services. A highlight of the event was the raising of a record-breaking more than $200,000 in scholarships for Camp Kehilla, the JCC’s pioneer camp that has served those with special needs for more than 20 years. This year’s event will feature a live performance by Gardell, exciting silent auction prizes, gourmet cuisine, cocktails and dessert from more than 30 of Long Island’s finest restaurants. Gardell, an Emmy-nominated actor and comedian who starred on the hit

CBS television series “Mike & Molly,” has a slate of several comedy specials airing on Comedy Central and Showtime. Gardell currently stars on the CMT series “Million Dollar Quartet.” Tickets will go on sale Thursday, Jan. 19 at 10:30 a.m. To purchase tickets or for more information on the event, please visit www.sjjcc.org/auction or contact Assistant Director of Development Bridgette Adair at 516-484-1545, ext. 141 or auction@sjjcc.org. Sid Jacobson Jewish Community Center, in East Hills, and its surrounding campus, the Bernice Jacobson Day School and Camp, in Old Westbury, provide a full range of cutting-edge recreational, health, fitness, educational, cultural arts and social services programs. Sid Jacobson JCC promotes Jewish identity and provides a comprehensive program based on Jewish values, traditions, heritage and culture and is committed to enriching the lives of all individuals and families in its community. For more information, contact the JCC at 300 Forest Drive, East Hills, NY, 516-484-1545 or visit www.sjjcc.org. Sid Jacobson JCC is a beneficiary agency of the UJA Federation of New York.


24 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

Gold Coast International Film Festival

WINTER FILM SERIES

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 7:30 PM

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The top seven events

1

Winter Walk at the Muttontown Preserve

Sunday, Jan. 15 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. The Muttontown Preserve will present a “Brisk Winter Walks” tour. Comprising 550 acres of fields, woodlands, ponds and estate grounds, the Muttontown Preserve is one of the most beautiful settings on Long Island. The preserve includes miles of marked nature trails with local wildflowers, trees, birds and animals, as well as structures, including the renovated Chelsea Mansion. The walk is $5 and begins at the Bill Paterson Nature Center on the preserve. Pre-registration is required. Where: The Muttontown Preserve Muttontown Lane, south of 25A, East Norwich Info: (516) 571-8500 • nassaucountyny.gov/parks

Academy-Award nominated Iranian director Asghar Farhadi’s latest film is a simmering drama steeped in intellect and nuance that premiered at Cannes in 2016, taking home the awards for Best Actor and Best Screenplay. The film follows young couple Emad (Shahab Hosseini) and Rana (Taraneh Alidoosti), who are forced to find a new apartment in Tehran. While fate seems to finally smile on them, in the form of a recently vacant apartment owned by their acting buddy, an incident linked to the previous tenant of their new home dramatically changes the couple’s life. Visit goldcoastfilmfestival.org or call 516-829-2570 for tickets. Tickets $20/$18 for seniors.

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The Guthrie Brothers Present “Scarborough Fair”: A Simon & Garfunkle Experience

Thursday, Jan. 19 at 8:30 p.m., with a 7:30 p.m. open mic The Guthrie Brothers will perform the songs of Simon & Garfunkle, along with a few of their own, during the monthly Hard Luck Cafe series. With their tight vocal harmonies and acoustic guitars, brothers Jeb and Jock Guthrie emulate the signature sound of the iconic folk-rock duo. Stories and trivia will be interspersed with songs during the concert. Tickets are $15. Where: Cinema Arts Center 423 Park Avenue, Huntington Info: (631) 425-2925 • fmsh.org

3

The Huntington Arts Council: Opening Reception of “The Masters Show”

Friday, Jan. 13 from 6 to 8 p.m.

28 Chestnut Street, Greenvale, NY 11548 | 516-484-7431

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Whether photography, still life, abstract or portraits, “The Masters Show” features a variety of pieces from artists who participated in the juried shows of 2016. This exhibit is a wonderful compilation of some of the Best in Show and Honorable Mention artist recipients from last year and will be on display through Jan. 28. This is a free event. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome! Where: Main Street Gallery 213 Main Street, Huntington Info: (631) 271-8423 x15 • huntingtonarts.org


News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

25

for the coming week

4

Ansel Adams: Sight and Feeling

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For Superior Freshness & Flavor

Ongoing through March 5 Ansel Adams’ ability to create photographs with a remarkable range and subtlety of tones is legendary. Yet for all his technical mastery, Adams recognized that what made a compelling photograph was far more elusive. This exhibition of Adams’ photographs, from the collection of the Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts, suggests how his intuitive and emotional response to the landscape resulted in powerful and enduring photographs. Where: Nassau County Museum of Art, One Museum Drive, Roslyn Harbor Info: (516) 484-9337 • nassaumuseum.org

5

Landmark on Main Street Presents... and Social Justice for All: A Conversations from Main Street Event Co-Presented with Long Island Together

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Landmark on Main Street invites you to a celebration of community activism... and Social Justice for All is a multi-cultural event with entertainment, food, informationsharing and conversation where people can come together to connect with diverse communities. The event will feature song, dance and theatre performances. Food from various ethnic communities will be sponsored by local businesses. Free admission. No tickets required. Where: Landmark on Main Street, 232 Main Street, Port Washington Info: (516)767-1384 • landmarkonmainstreet.org

6

The Dolphin Book Club Discussion: The Little Red Chairs: A Novel by Edna O’Brien

Wednesday, Jan. 18 at 7 p.m. “One of Edna O’Brien’s best and most ambitious novels yet. The Little Red Chairs is personal and political; charming and grotesque; a novel of manners and a novel of monsters.” -- National Public Radio. No registration necessary, but Dolphin Bookshop requests that you purchase the book from the store and offers a 10% discount. Where: Dolphin Bookshop, 299 Main Street, Port Washington Info: (516) 767-2650 • thedolphinbookshop.com

7

Film: Lost in Paris Wednesday, Jan. 25 at 7:30 p.m.

The filmmaking duo of Fiona Gordon and Dominique Abel (The Fairy) return with a whimsical adventure about a small town librarian who heads to Paris to help her elderly aunt (Oscar nominee Emmanuelle Riva), but after a slew of wild catastrophes finds herself relying on a seductive but annoying bum who refuses to leave her alone. Where: Bow Tie Squire, 115 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck Info: (516) 829-2570 • goldcoastarts.org

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26 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

LEO’S

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Thursday is Mexican Night at Leo’s Margaritas Mohitos Fish Tacos Fajitas Tacos

Order Our famous wings, chili, chicken tenders, etc. EARLY for the Big Game February 4th!! Now Serving Breakfast Daily

Sunday, Jan. 15 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Give back to the community and volunteer along with your neighbors as you sort and organize donated books and assemble summer reading book bags to help underprivileged children. There will also be opportunities for families with young children, including story time, arts and crafts, a film screening and music. Dream! Read! MLK! Literacy Projects is part of UJA-Federation’s new Time for Good volunteer platform encouraging New Yorkers to give back to the community. Registration is required.

Where: Sid Jacobson JCC 300 Forest Drive, East Hills Info: 516-484-1545 or www.sjcc.org

K

ids in the Kitchen

Friday, Jan. 13, 20 and 27 from 11:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Join the group and mix things up in the kitchen to stir an interest in kitchen creativity and healthy eating. Each week, you’ll be making an easy and yummy, kid-friendly snack. Helping in the kitchen is a great learning tool as children practice measuring ingredients, following directions and building their vocabulary. Ages 3-5. Material fee: $5 with museum admission ($4 LICM members).

8:00-11:30AM

Where: Long Island Children’s Museum, 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City Info: 516-224-5800 or www.licm.org

Friday Only 25% Off Entire

Saturday Only 25% Off Entire

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 1/19/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 1/19/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Sunday Only 30% Off Entire Dinner Check Cash Only • Alcohol not included • Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 1/19/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined 9/any other offer

Monday Only 30% Off Entire

Tuesday Only 30% Off Entire

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 1/19/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 1/19/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Wednesday Only 25% Off Entire

Thursday Only 25% Off Entire

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 1/19/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 1/19/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

190 Seventh St., Garden City 742-0574 • www.leosgardencity.com

D

ream Big Workshop: MLK, Jr. Day Monday, Jan. 16 at 1 p.m. On this special day, explore the fascinating diversity of whaling crews. Design and sew a pillow for your own dreams. Ages 7 and up. Admission plus $5 craft fee. Member child $5.

Where: The Whaling Museum 279 Main Street, Cold Spring Harbor / Info: 631-367-3418 cshwhalingmuseum.org

M

usic & More at the Dolphin Bookshop

Friday, Jan. 20 at 11 a.m. Marilyn and her guitar will make music and more for children. Kids will listen to stories and poetry as well as participate in songs, creative dramatics puppetry, explore musical instruments, movement and more.

Where: The Dolphin Bookshop, 299 Main Street, Port Washington Info: 516-767-2650 www.thedolphinbookshop.com

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

27

THE CULINARY ARCHITECT

Turning lamb stew into party dish January and February are the perfect months for entertaining at home. All of my friends jump at an invitation this time of year, as other social obligations have come to a complete halt. As you know, when I entertain I like to make the “affair” delicious and as easy as possible so that I may enjoy my time with my guests to the fullest. Lamb stew is the perfect winter entree…it is easy to prepare ahead of time; in fact, it even tastes better if made a day before. The lamb stew, one pot wonder, lends itself to being served family style and it is delectable. Round out the meal with slow cooker “Bulghar Wheat and a salad and your entree is filling. End your meal with homemade pear sauce and store-bought chocolates and you have a party. Before your guests arrive, light a warm, welcoming fire, set out wine and wine glasses and you are bound to have a warming winter party that soothes the soul. MENU Serves 6 to 8 Lamb Stew Bulghar Wheat Salad* Pear Sauce and store-

bought chocolates and tangerines* *Recipe Not Given Lamb Stew 1 tblsps. olive oil 4 slices of bacon, sliced into 1” pieces 3 lbs. lamb shoulder cubed (I like to use lamb with marrow bones, available at A & F Market in Manhasset) Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons Wondra 2 cloves garlic, minced (I use a garlic press) 2 cups homemade beef stock or store-bought 1 cup full-bodied red wine 1 cup crushed canned tomatoes 2 tsp. minced fresh thyme leaves 1 lb. carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch thick slices, diagonally 3 small Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into chunks 1 lb. fresh cipolline or pearl onions, peeled 6 small turnips, whole or halved, depending on size (1 lb.) 2 tblsps. unsalted butter,

ALEXANDRA TROY The Culinary Architect at room temperature 1 (10 oz.) package frozen green peas, defrosted 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Heat the olive oil in a medium, ovenproof pot over medium heat. Add the bacon and cook for 5 minutes until browned. Transfer the bacon to a large plate, leaving the fat in the pan. Dry the lamb with paper towels and toss it in a bowl, with 1 tablespoon salt and 1 teaspoon pepper, and then with the 1/4 cup of Wondra. Raise the heat to medium high and cook half the lamb in the bacon fat for 5 minutes, turning

occasionally until browned. (Do not over crowd the meat as it will steam, rather than sear) Add the lamb to the plate with the bacon and brown the second batch, once cooked add it to the plate. Add the garlic to the pot and sautee for one minute. Pour the lamb and bacon, along with any juices back into the pot. Add the beef stock, wine, tomatoes (including the juice), thyme, 2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon pepper and bring to a boil, scraping up the brown bits in the pot. Simmer for 5 minutes, cover and place in the oven for 30 minutes. Add the carrots, potatoes, onions and turnips. Cover and return to the oven for 1 hour, until all the vegetables are tender. Rferigerate overnight. The next day, remove any fat that has accumulated on top. Heat the lamb covered on the stove on low. Mash the 2 tablespoons of Wondra with the butter in a small bowl, add a 1/4 cup of the Lamb Sauce and combine. Stir the mixture into the stew and simmer on top of the stove for 10 minutes. Off the heat, stir in the defrosted peas and parsley, season to taste and serve family style.

Bulghar Wheat Pilaf 2 cups Red Bulghar Wheat 6 cups Homemade or store-bought Chicken Stock 3 hours before serving, place Bulghar wheat and stock in a slow cooker. Cook on High. Just before serving, fluff Bulghar Wheat with a fork and serve along side Lamb Stew. Pear Sauce 7 Pears 1/4 cup apple juice or water 2 cinnamon sticks 1/8 cup sugar optional Using an Apple slicer, core and divide the pears into wedges Remove any seeds. Place wedges in a pot with liquid and sugar, if using. Cook on medium heat and mash every now and then. Serve warm or chilled. Alexandra Troy is owner of Culinary Architect Catering, a 32 year-old Greenvale-based company, specializing in private, corporate and promotional parties. She lives in Manhasset with her husband and son.


28 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

Rick Eberle to launch Planting Fields to hold music show on radio gardens fest on Jan. 15. With the new year just beginning, music and entertainment industry leader Rick Eberle will be launching his brand new “Rising Stars Radio” show on WHPC 90.3 FM, the station of Nassau Community College, every Monday at 10 p.m., with a replay Tuesdays at 5 a.m. The show is set to premiere new music along with interviews from some of Long Island and the greater New York area’s top music acts in varying genres from rock to reggae, blues, R&B, hip-hop and more. Eberle is an accomplished publicist,

talent agent, artist manager, musician, songwriter, singer, guitarist and TV and radio personality. His band Iridesense (1993 to present, which also includes Tara Eberle-Drouin on vocals and bass, Rich Drouin on drums and Rob Viccari on guitar), of which he is a founding member and co-lead singer, songwriter and rhythm guitaristm, has toured the U.S. opening for major acts such as Gin Blossoms, Spin Doctors and Sugar Ray and placed songs on the Nickelodeon Network shows “Drake & Josh,” “Zoey 101” and “iCarly.” The band has several independent label releases, including “Cool Dream Tomorrow” (1997), “Iridesense” (2001), “A Trip Called Life” (2007), “Secret Constellation” (2011) and “Thought Parade” (2015). Eberle’s music business career began in New Media where he spent time working on online initiatives for Pink, Usher, Outkast, Dido and others at Arista Records in New York City from 1999 to 2002. Eberle left Manhattan to begin work in venue management, booking and promotions for The Downtown Concert Venue from 2002 to 2005 with artists such as Jewel, Fall Out Boy, Maroon 5 and Gavin Degraw, and handled public relations and assisted with bookings for The Crazy Donkey Concert Venue from 2005 to 2010 for acts such as Bowling for Soup, LMFAO, Cinderella and Cobra Starship.

The Planting Fields Foundation will hold the Paradise Garden Festival at Planting Fields on Sunday, Jan. 15 in the Winter Garden, known as the Main Green House, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. with events for children and families. Admission is free. The large Winter Garden, originally known as the Hibiscus House, with tropical trees and plants, was built in 1929. It is one of the last surviving examples of a private winter garden in the northeast, typical of the sort that had first been constructed by the British in the 1830s. Private winter gardens were built for the pleasure of wealthy owners to entertain their family and friends. This greenhouse, a feature of the 409acre park, is now owned by the State of New York and is open to visitors 364 days a year. The Main Greenhouse was erected by the prominent firm, Lord and Burnham, and was designed by the Olmsted Brothers. The idea of setting up a Garden of Eden, an earthly paradise that mocks the winter scene outside, is an age old dream which became possible in 19th-century England with the invention of iron and glass buildings heated by coal stoves. For the very wealthy the fashion spread throughout Europe and the U.S. For such a greenhouse, the construction, purchase of plants, upkeep and heating are very expensive. A winter garden, like a big house with an art collection, became one of the recog-

nized signs of high social standing. At Planting Fields the main greenhouse was commissioned by W. R. Coe, who was born in England and came to the U.S. as a teenager. He made his fortune in marine insurance. His wife, Mai Rogers Coe, was the daughter of Henry Huttleston Rogers, one of the founders of Standard Oil. Growing under the palm trees are two a small cocoa trees, from the beans of which chocolate is made. It is difficult to pollinate cocoa flowers in a green house, but in the last year they have been successfully pollinated and there are now cocoa beans at Planting Fields. There are ferns, begonias, orchids and cactuses to be seen. The exotic vanilla vine is another plant which is very difficult to pollinate under glass but is successfully pollinated here in the main greenhouse. Small animals to be seen here are the small eastern gray tree frog, which changes color to adapt to gray or green backgrounds, and Italian wall lizards. The two-story Hibiscus House was one of the last great private winter gardens to be built before the financial crash of 1929. In 1949, Coe sold Planting Fields for $1 to the State of New York, and it is now a state park, partly supported by Planting Fields Foundation Tropical vegetation, banana trees, palms, guava, cocoa and orange trees, orchids, begonias and dozens of other “indoor” plants will be on view.

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REAL & Personal Finanace ESTATE a blank slate media/litmor publications special section • january 13, 2017


30 REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL FINANCE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

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home is the most costly thing many people will ever buy. The process of buying a home can be both exciting and nerve-wracking. One way to make the process of buying a home go more smoothly is to save enough money to put down a substantial down payment. Saving for a down payment on a home is similar to saving for other items, only on a far grander scale. Many financial planners and real estate professionals recommend prospective home buyers put down no less than 20 percent of the total cost of the home they’re buying. Down payments short of 20 percent will

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dequate retirement planning can set men and women up to enjoy their golden years however they see fit. Getting to retirement with enough money takes discipline and commitment and may require some sacrifices along the way. “Retirement planning” is an umbrella term that covers various types of financial products and investments. One of the products prospective investors are likely to hear about when mulling their retirement investment options is an Individual Retirement Account, or IRA. An IRA is a personal retirement savings plan that can provide tax benefits to those who qualify. When speaking with a financial planner or exploring options on their own, prospective investors will hear about traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs and wonder what distinguishes one from the other. The following breakdown can help investors understand those differences with the hopes of finding the best option for them.

require private mortgage insurance, or PMI. The cost of PMI depends on a host of variables, but is generally between 0.3 and 1.5 percent of the original loan amount. While plenty of homeowners pay PMI, buyers who can afford to put down 20 percent can save themselves a considerable amount of money by doing so. Down payments on a home tend to be substantial, but the following are a few strategies prospective home buyers can employ to grow their savings with an eye toward making a down payment on their next home. Decide when you want to buy. The first step to buying a home begins when buyers save their first dollar for a down payment. Deciding when to buy can help buyers develop a saving strategy. If buyers decide they want to buy in five years away, they will have more time to build their savings. If buyers want to buy within a year, they will need to save more each month, and those whose existing savings fall far short of the 20 percent threshold may have to accept paying PMI.

Prequalify for a mortgage. Before buyers even look for their new homes, they should first sit down with a mortgage lender to determine how much a mortgage they will qualify for. Prequalifying for a mortgage can make the home buying process a lot easier, and it also can give first-time buyers an idea of how much they can spend. Once lenders prequalify prospective buyers, the buyers can then do the simple math to determine how much they will need to put down. For example, preapproval for a $300,000 loan means buyers will have to put down $60,000 to meet the 20 percent down payment threshold. In that example, buyers can put down less than $60,000, but they will then have to pay PMI. It’s important for buyers to understand that a down payment is not the only costs they will have to come up with when buying a home. Closing costs and other fees will also need to be paid by the buyers. Examine monthly expenses. Once buyers learn how much mortgage they will qualify for, they will then

Avoid risky investments. Some times it’s great to take risks when investing, but risk should be avoided when saving for a down payment on a home. Traditional vehicles like certificates of deposit, or CDs, and savings accounts can ensure the money buyers are saving for their homes is protected and not subject to market fluctuations. Saving enough to make a down payment on a home can be accomplished if buyers stay disciplined with regard to saving and make sound financial decisions.

depending on which type of IRA an investor chooses. There are no income limits attached to traditional IRAs, but account holders’ ability to deduct contributions from their income may be limited if their spouse is eligible to participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan. There are income limits associated with Roth IRAs. Account holders’ adjusted growth income must be below certain limits depending on their tax filing status (i.e., filing single or filing jointly with a spouse).

Contributions Contributions to traditional IRAs are pre-tax, and they may be tax deductible depending on the account holder’s income and other factors. Contributions to Roth IRAs are made with post-tax income and are not eligible for tax deductions.

Taxes on distributions While men and women about to open an IRA likely won’t have to worry about distributions for quite some time, it’s important that prospective account holders know that, according to Prudential, traditional IRA account holders will pay federal taxes on their account’s investment earnings and on pretax contributions when money is withdrawn. Roth IRA account holders will not pay federal taxes on withdrawals, including their investment earnings, if they meet certain eligibility requirements. Prospective investors should know that there are tax penalties for account holders who withdraw money from their traditional or Roth IRAs before they reach age 591⁄2.

see how close they are to buying a home. But prospective buyers of all means can save more each month by examining their monthly expenses and looking for ways to save. Buyers can begin by looking over their recent spending habits and then seeing where they can spend less. Cutting back on luxuries and other unnecessary spending can help buyers get closer to buying their next home.

Exceptions to that rule should be discussed with a tax or accounting professional.

Income requirements In order to open an IRA, whether it’s a traditional or Roth IRA, prospective account holders must have earned income, such as wages, salaries or income from self-employment. Men and women who do not work can still open an IRA, but only if their spouse is employed and the couple jointly files their tax return. There also may be income limits

Distributions and age The Internal Revenue Service notes that traditional IRA account holders must begin taking distributions by April 1 following the year in which they turned 701⁄2 years of age and by December 31 in future years. No minimum distributions are required for Roth IRA account holders. Understanding the various types of IRAs can be difficult. Prospective investors who need help navigating their retirement planning should not hesitate to contact financial planning professionals.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017 • REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL FINANCE

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74-24 263rd St Glen Oaks 81-59 265th St Glen Oaks 260-27 Langston, Glen Oaks 263-21 73rd Ave., Glen Oaks

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31


32 REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL FINANCE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

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he cost of college tuition is a concern for many collegebound students and their families. The cost of a college education continues to rise, but it’s not just tuition and room and board that students and their families must account for. College students may underestimate cost-of-living expenses when planning their school-year budgets. But such expenses can be substantial, catching even the most well-prepared students off guard. Fortunately, there are several ways for college students to save money on living expenses and still make the most of their time on campus. Venture off campus. Towns that rely heavily on colleges or universities to support their

economies typically offer great deals to students willing to venture off campus. Local businesses, including bars, restaurants and entertainment venues like mini golf facilities or bowling alleys, may offer student discounts to entice kids to leave campus. Students can take advantage of these offerings to save on food and entertainment, which tend to be among the more pricey cost-of-living expenses college students contend with. Buy secondhand furnishings. College students living in their own apartments or dorm rooms may not have the financial resources to purchase new furniture. Rather than purchasing brand new items they are likely to discard after moving out or graduating, college students can purchase secondhand items from local thrift stores or used furniture retailers that offer sturdy furnishings at low prices. Become a resident advisor. Resident advisors, often referred to as “R.A.’s,” typically receive free or reduced room and board in exchange for living in the dorms and monitoring the floors they live on. Competition to be an R.A. can be competitive, but students who

become R.A.’s can save thousands of dollars on room and board costs over the course of their time at school. Make your own meals. Meal plans may be ideal for college students during their freshmen years, when students may still be adjusting to campus life. But older college students can skip the meal plan in favor of preparing their own meals. Doing so can save students substantial amounts of money, and some students may even prefer the variety available at the local grocery store over the more limited offerings available at dining halls or other campus eateries. Move off campus. Some schools do not permit freshmen and sophomores to live off-campus, but older students may find that private housing is more affordable than oncampus apartments or dormitories. Students eligible to live in off-campus housing can contact local real estate agents to get a feel for the off-campus housing market before making a final decision. Cost-of-living expenses at colleges and universities can be considerable, but savvy students can find various ways to save money.

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017 • REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL FINANCE

33

TOP 10 REASONS TO USE REGINA GORSLINE TO SELL YOUR HOME 10. Regina knows the real estate market in your area She has access to data about recent sales in your neighborhood, and can help you price your home accordingly. 9. Regina has access to the Multiple Listing Service (MLS). The MLS is a database of current homes for sale. By hiring a broker, information about your home will be instantly available to agents all across your area 8. Selling your home by yourself does not connect you to other sales professionals If you try to sell your home by yourself, you might not be listed in the MLS and buyers’ agents won’t bring your home to their clients’ attention.

3. Regina will do a special showing of your home and limit it to other agents. Those agents will see your house with a professional eye with their clients in mind. 2. Regina can negotiate with potential buyers and their agents in your place. She will act on your instruction and tell you about offers. Regina is particularly helpful if the potential buyer is extremely demanding. 1. Regina is professionally trained to ensure that the sale of your house proceeds smoothly. When trouble arises, she will let you know when/if you need a lawyer.

7. Regina knows about codes and violations and can suggest improvements As an experienced real estate professional she can help you get your house ready for sale, point out housing-code or zoning violations, and suggest improvements to help your house sell. 6. Regina will help you fill out paperwork you will need before you offer your home. This reduces the stress in the home selling process. 5. Regina has fantastic qualified referrals She can provide referrals of qualified home inspectors and contractors should your home need additional repairs or if it needs to be brought up to code (to comply with your city’s housing rules).

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34 REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL FINANCE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

S

aving money on everyday expenses is a goal for many adults. Certain expenses, such as loan payments, may be more difficult to pare down than others. But there are ways adults can save on everyday expenses without drastically overhauling their daily routines.

Transportation

Brown-bagging lunch instead of buying lunch out each day can save adults hundreds of dollars per year.

Great U parttime jobs for retirees Retirees with w a love of o crafting can turn their th hobby into income.

Transportation is a significant expense for many adults. The Federal Highway Administration notes that the average American family devotes 19 percent of its monthly budget to transportation costs, while Statistics Canada points out that Canadian families spent slightly less than $12,000 on average on transportation in 2014. A 2011 report from the American Public Transportation Association found individuals who ride public transportation can save more than $10,000 annually. That figure is closely tied to fuel costs, but even when fuel costs are low, adults can still save substantial amounts of money by utilizing pubic transportation instead of driving themselves to work every day. Even adults who live in auto dependent exurbs, where families devote 25 percent of their monthly budgets to transportation costs, can save by carpooling to work, which allows commuters to split fuel and toll costs while also reducing wear and tear on their vehicles. That reduced

pon retiring, many newly minted retirees find themselves looking for ways to fill their free time. Hobbies may not take up too much time, and travel can stretch retirees’ budgets. One way that retirees can make great use of their free time and make a little extra money is to find part-time employment. Part-time jobs can help retirees maintain their connections with their communities, whether it’s their professional community or the community in which they live, while also providing a sense of purpose. Retirees interesting in finding parttime work may want to consider the following jobs. Consulting work: Many retirees have long résumés, and that experience is still valuable even after retirement. Consulting firms often hire experienced businesspeople on a project or contract basis, which can be great opportunities for retirees to fill their time and make sizable amounts

wear and tear will add years to a vehicle’s life, saving auto owners money as a result.

Food Food is another daily expense where many adults can likely save some money. A 2013 survey from Visa found that the average person goes out for lunch twice per week, spending $10 each time. That adds up to more than $1,000 annually. By bringing their own lunches to work, working professionals can save hundreds of dollars per year. In addition to the financial benefits of brownbagging lunches, adults can reap nutritional rewards by packing healthy meals for themselves. Men and women who eat out for lunch each day will have to eat whatever the eateries near their offices have to offer, whether those offerings are healthy or not. Individuals also can save more money by bringing their own coffee to work each day rather than relying on coffee shops to

of money without having to commit to long-term employment. Teaching: Retirees can also put their professional experience to work in the classroom. Inquire about teaching opportunities at a nearby university or even the local high school. Such opportunities may only be available on a volunteer basis, but some might pay part-time salaries or small stipends. Either way, many retirees find that working with young people helps them stay young, and passing on lessons learned to younger generations can provide a strong sense of purpose. Seasonal work: Seasonal work is another great way for retirees to fill their time and make a little extra money along the way. Come the holiday season, retirees should have no trouble finding seasonal retail work at their local malls or shopping centers. In warmer months, retirees may find seasonal employment at area beaches, golf courses or parks. Sports teams: Retirees who live in

satisfy their morning java fix.

Entertainment Entertainment is another area where many adults can likely save money. NBC News reported in 2015 that the average cable bill was $99 per month, and that was before 2016 rate increases were announced by a host of providers, including DirecTV, Dish Network and Time Warner Cable. Streaming services such as Netflix ($9.99 per month), Amazon Prime ($99 per year) and Hulu Plus ($7.99 per month) combine to cost a fraction of that figure, and such services continue to increase their offerings. Adults interested in trimming their daily expenses can access all three services for less than $320 per year, or a little more than three months’ worth of cable bills. Reducing everyday expenses is a goal for many adults, and doing so is simpler than men and women may know.

cities with professional sports teams may be able to find work with their favorite franchise. Professional sports franchises often rely on retirees to staff in-game positions like ushers and concessions employees, and some may even hire retirees to greet fans. While the pay might not be great, such positions are ideal for retirees who happen to be big sports fans. Crafts: Retirees with a love of crafting can turn their hobby into income. For example, Etsy.com makes it easy for creative entrepreneurs to post their creations and sell them to buyers all over the globe. Sellers often dictate how quickly they can make and ship products, so retirees need not feel worried about being rushed. Many retirees still work even after calling it a career, and opportunities abound for men and women looking to fill their time and make a little extra money along the way.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017 • REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL FINANCE ADVERTORIAL

Look How Far We Have Come… Transportation and location in 1947, then as now are the keys to the Long Island life-style. 157 Main Street, Port Washington, then was a car showroom. Sleek cars waited for purchase. The dealership eventually rolled on. That space became home to the Port Washington Federal Credit Union (PWFCU). Back in 1968 this Credit Union’s bedrock sprang forth from one primary goal: Serve the financial needs of the Port Washington community. That goal now includes Manhasset, Roslyn, Great Neck plus the employees of the Town of North Hempstead. The financial products and services include Savings and Loans all with the added bonus of beneficial rates. Treating others in a friendly and professional way is an important part of that tradition. Fast-forwarding to 2006, the Credit Union expanded to its current location. Remodeling included a new logo. Growth came via grass roots marketing. This move also integrated more individuals, business and other Non Profit Organizations. As revenue steadily increases more products and services are added. Currently a special high yield CD is in place too. The staff’s commitment and dedication is reflected in long time membership loyalty. The staff knows three generations on a first name basis. For five-decades and outwards by side stepping pitfalls of greed and avarice, the Port Washington Federal Credit Union follows a simple goal: serve the community and it’s people. For more information: visit in person, call 516 883 3537 (or) www.pwfcu.org

157 Main St., Port Washington, NY 11050

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36 REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL FINANCE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

Umbrella insurance offers an excess of liability coverage in the event of lawsuits.

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nsurance policies come in various forms. There is a type of insurance to cover everything from motor vehicles to personal health to apartment dwellings. While the majority of people understand the importance of insuring their homes and cars, many may not explore the benefits of a different type of insurance: umbrella coverage. Unlike other types of insurance that only offer one specific coverage, umbrella insurance is a single policy that covers various aspects of a person’s life. An umbrella policy can fill in the gaps where liability limits come into play with other insurance policies, keeping a person protected regardless of deductibles and other assets. According to the financial resource Money Crashers, umbrella insurance is a type of liability insurance. Its main purpose is to protect policy holders in the event of lawsuits. The umbrella policy will provide additional coverage against bodily injury liability claims and property damage liability claims. These policies also provide broader forms of coverage and can help cover some legal fees, if necessary. Trusted Choice Independent Insurance Agents says umbrella

urchasing a house or property is about more than setting up a home. Although quite a number of people buy real estate to establish their future, long-term abodes, many others recognize the potentially lucrative investment that lies within a real estate purchase. Despite the ups and downs of the economy, real estate has become a common investment vehicle — one that has plenty of potential for making big gains for those who are willing to put in the effort. According to the experts at Entrepreneur, even in a bad economy, real estate investments will insurance is important because it usually fare better than stocks. Real can prevent financial ruin in the case estate also continues to appreciate of an accident. despite the occasional economical The amount of umbrella coverage slow-down. a person may need depends on Like any other endeavor, there is a how much that person is worth. right and a wrong way to go about Prospective policy holders can investing in real estate. Novices may calculate their total assets and then not know where to begin their first take out policies in that amount forays into the real estate market as or more to protect their net worth. investors, even if they already own Depending on the insurance their own homes. Buying a property company, umbrella policies range as an investment is an entirely anywhere from $1 to $10 million. different animal than buying a home to Coverage typically starts in the range establish a residence. However, with the right guidance, anyone can dabble of $150 to $200 for a $1 million policy. What’s more, some insurance in real estate. companies will not issue an umbrella Establish financial goals. Before policy unless the insured already has you even begin looking at properties an automotive or home policy with or put forth the effort of meeting with an agent, you must determine what them — and one that maintains the you expect from the investment. The standard amount of liability in those days of buying real estate and flipping other policies. it for a fast profit may no longer When reviewing umbrella policies, it’s also wise to think ahead to future be here. However, real estate can provide a steady stream of long-term income and how one’s assets may income. Understand what you hope to grow. Adjust policies to account achieve by investing. If it’s to become for inferred earnings or other an overnight millionaire, you may expected assets. be looking at the wrong investment Learn more about umbrella policies vehicle in real estate. that can offer above-and-beyond protection by speaking with a trusted Establish a plan. New investors who do not have a plan in place will insurance agent.

likely spend too much or have more setbacks than others who have planned accordingly. When investing in real estate, it’s more about the bottom line than the property itself. According to Springboard Academy, a real estate academy for investors, look for motivated sellers and stick to a set purchase price. Try to make offers on a variety of properties that work in your financial favor. And know what you want to do with the property (i.e., renovate and sell, remove and rebuild, or rehab and rent) before you buy. Fit the house to the plan, and not vice-versa. Start small. If this is your first time out there, stick with properties that will turn over quickly. Research areas in and around urban centers or close to transportation and shopping. A good starter property is a small house or a condominium that can be refurbished and then rented. Rental properties offer steady sources of income when renters are properly vetted, offers Investopedia, an investment resource. Look at many different properties. Become an expert by learning as much as you can about what is out there. Attend open houses; look for vacant/unattractive properties; scour the classifieds in your local paper; or put the word out there that you’re interested in buying a property. Only look at properties that have motivated sellers, because then you’ll get closest to the price you want to pay. And don’t forget to research the area and the home turnover rate for the specific area where you are looking. Don’t make assumptions that a property will appreciate without doing your homework. Real estate can be a worthy investment opportunity. With research, a plan and the right price, just about anyone can be a real estate investor.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

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Hofstra exhibit on Civil Rights movement Works of Danny Lyon, a photographer best known for capturing some of the most memorable and haunting images of the civil rights movement, will be showcased in an exhibition presented at the Hofstra University Museum. Danny Lyon: Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement will be featured from Jan. 31 to April 13 at the Emily Lowe Gallery, organized by art2art Circulating Exhibitions. An opening reception that is free and open to the public will take place on Thursday, Feb. 9, from 4 to 6 p.m. In the summer of 1962, Lyon, a 20-yearold University of Chicago history student, packed a Nikon Reflex and an old Leica in an army bag and hitch-hiked south. Within a week he was in jail in Albany, Georgia, looking through the bars at another prisoner, Martin Luther King, Jr. Lyon soon became the first staff photographer for the Atlanta-based Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which already had a reputation as one of the most committed and confrontational groups fighting for civil rights. This exhibition at Hofstra highlights the events and individuals that Lyon captured as SNCC’s staff photographer. He was present at some of the most violent and dramatic moments of civil rights history: Black Monday in Danville, Virginia; the aftermath of the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham; the March on Washington in 1963; the violent

winters of 1963 and 1964 in Atlanta; and the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964. But Lyon’s photographs are more than a record of marches, jailings, and protests. They take us inside the Movement-to the meetings, organizing work, and voter registration drives that were the less visible but no less important side of the struggle. Many people have since forgotten the idealistic and truly multiracial character of the movement’s early years. Lyon’s pictures, taken during the early 1960s, chronicle the Southern Civil Rights Movement at the height of its power. Curated by Karen T. Albert, Hofstra University Museum deputy director and chief curator, this exhibition brings together the photographs Lyon took from 1962-1964, defining a new form of photojournalism in which the image maker is deeply and personally embedded in his subject matter. Funding support has been provided by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. The Feb. 9 opening reception will feature guest speaker Dr. Jonathan Lightfoot, director, Center for “Race,” Culture and Social Justice at Hofstra University. There will also be a musical tribute by Gequon Hunter and Jazara Morales, students from the Hofstra Gospel Ensemble, as they perform songs that were, and continue to be, a source of strength and hope in the ongoing effort toward equality and justice for all.


38 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Arts & Entertainment Calendar GOLD COAST ARTS CENTER 113 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck (516) 829-2570 • goldcoastarts.org Jan. 22 to March 12 Lost & Found: The Art of Assembling LANDMARK ON MAIN STREET 232 Main Street, Suite 1 Port Washington (516) 767-1384 ext. 101 www.landmarkonmainstreet.org Saturday, Jan. 13 at 8 p.m. Tom Papa, standup comedian Saturday, Jan. 14 at 2 p.m. The Olate Dogs, America’s Got Talent winning family show Sunday, Jan. 29 at 3 p.m. Berenstain Bears, live musical show PLANTING FIELDS Coe Hall Historic House Museum 1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay (516) 922-9200 • http://www.plantingfields. org FRIDAY, JAN. 20 at 7 p.m. West Side 5 Wednesday, Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. The Master Keys Thursday, March 24 at 7 p.m. Hot Club of Flatbush THE PARAMOUNT 370 New York Ave., Huntington (631) 673-7300 ext. 303 www.paramountny.com Thursday, Jan. 12 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 15 at 6 p.m. Michael Carbonaro Live Friday, Jan. 13 “The Ultimate Beach Party Tribute to Jimmy Buffett, Kenny Chesney and Zac Brown” LONG ISLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City 516-224-5800 • www.licm.org Monday, Jan. 16 at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Dreaming with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Ages 5 and up. Fee $3 with museum admission ($2 for LICM members) Tuesday, Jan. 17 through Friday, Jan. 20 from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Silly Snow People Ages 3 and up. Free with museum admission. Saturday, Jan. 21 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Air-mazing Dynamos Ages 3 and up. Free with museum admission. Saturday, Jan. 21 and Sunday, Jan. 22 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Messy Afternoons Ages 18 months to 4 years. Free with museum admission. HUNTINGTON ARTS COUNCIL 213 Main Street, Huntington February 2-25 The Human Condition exhibit

THE JOHNNY MAC BAND Sunday, Jan. 15 Mousetrap Cafe Amityville ZEBRA- A HAMMERHEADS REUNION Mulcahy’s Pub and Concert Hall 3232 Railroad Avenue, Wantagh Saturday, Jan. 14 NASSAU COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn (516) 484-9338 www.nassaumuseum.org Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 Ansel Adams: Sight and Feeling Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 Light Works: 100 Years of Photos Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 New Photos: Long Island Collects Ongoing Sculpture Park Walking Trails Gardens Events FILM SCREENING Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 Stryker’s America: Photographing the Great Depression FILM SCREENING Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 Cartier-Bresson’s Century For The Family Sundays, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Family Tour at 1 p.m. Art Activities at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 8, 22, 29 Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26 Neiman Marcus Family Sundays at the Museum Sunday, January 15, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Super Family Sunday Merrymaking in a Gold Coast Mansion 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21 Wednesday, Feb. 22 Thursday, Feb. 23 Family Art Making Days February Three-Day Break for Art New Program Tuesdays, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 17, Feb. 14 Sketching in the Galleries Exhibition Lecture Thursdays. 1-2 p.m. January 5, February 2 Brown Bag Lectures: Riva Ettus THE DOLPHIN BOOK SHOP & CAFE 299 Main St., Port Washington (516) 767-2650 • www.thedolphinbookshop.com Wednesday, Jan. 18 at 7 p.m. Book: The Little Red Chairs by Edna O’Brien “One of Edna O’Brien’s best and most ambitious novels yet. The Little


News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

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A&E Calendar cont’d Red Chairs is personal and political; charming and grotesque; a novel of manners and a novel of monsters.” Maureen Corrigan, National Public Radio The ART Guild 200 Port Washington Blvd. Manhasset www.TheArtGuild.org Mondays from Jan. 23 to March 13 Drawing: Get Sharp! with Stephanie

Navon-Jacobson Beginners, 1 to 3 p.m.; Intermediates, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesdays from Jan. 10 to Feb. 14 Oil Painting: Landscape Painting with Paul Bachem Beginners, 1-4 p.m.; Intermediates, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesdays from Jan. 11 to Feb. 15 Watercolor with Paul Eileen Neville Beginners, 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.; Interme-

diates, 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Thursdays, Jan. 12 to Feb. 16 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Oil Painting: The Still Life for all levels with Frances Ianarella For children: Saturdays, Jan. 28 to March 4 Children’s Art Studio (ages 8-12), 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Art Explorations (ages 5-7), 12 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.

Wednesdays, Jan. 25 to March 1 Children’s Art Studio (ages 8-12), 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursdays, Feb. 9 to March 30 Advanced Art Instruction for High School Students (ages 15-18), 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

For the latest news, visit us at www.theislandnow.com

Community Calendar WINTHROP-UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 200 Old Country Road, Suite 250 Mineola, NY 11501 Winthrop-University Hospital’s Department of Neuroscience Offering Free Support Groups Huntington’s Disease – 2nd Monday of the month Winthrop’s Research & Academic Center, 101 Mineola Blvd., Room G-013 Head and Neck Cancer Patient Support Group Offered by Winthrop-University Hospital’s Center for Cancer Care 1300 Franklin Avenue, Suite ML5 Garden City Third Monday of the month, from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. RESIDENTS INVITED TO PROVIDE INPUT FOR FUTURE OF NORTH HEMPSTEAD BEACH PARK Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017 at 7 p.m. Port Washington Library Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017 at 7 p.m. Clinton G. Martin Park Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017 at 7 p.m. North Hempstead “Yes We Can” Community Center THE SAMUEL FIELD Y TWO WEEKDAY PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES Contact Amanda at (718) 423-6111 ext. 242 or e-mail asmith@sfy.org 58-20 Little Neck Parkway. Little Neck On Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

TEMPLE JUDEA OF MANHASSET 333 Searingtown Rd. Manhasset (516) 6218049 temple-judea.com Three Days of Duplicate Bridge The game schedules are: Mondays and Tuesdays at 12 p.m. and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. COPAY 21 North Station Plaza, Great Neck Friday, Jan. 27, 2017 at 10 a.m. Psycho Neurology Of Trauma Friday, Feb. 17 at 10 a.m. Child Abuse Prevention SID JACOBSON JCC 300 Forest Drive East Hills, 11548 www.sjjcc.org/jll. Thursdays from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Meditation Classes To Calm The Spirit COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS FOR EDUCATION Currently looking for community volunteers, with a music background, to assist our music teachers with students for one or two hours a week in the New Hyde Park-Garden City Park School District. (516) 434-2306. SAMUEL FIELD Y WEEKDAY PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES 718 423-6111 ext 242 asmith@sfy.org 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Little Neck site on Dec. 18 Sunday Fun Day Program

HAVE A HAPPY & PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR Chris Pappas Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker Commercial & Residential Expert / Leading Edge Award Winner 2014, 2015 C: 516.659.6508 | chris.pappas@elliman.com www.ckpappas.com Manhasset Office: 154 Plandome Road © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


40 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

COMMUNITY NEWS

Northwell defies stats on baby births With the number of American babies born in 2016 expected to fall to the lowest rate in history and birth rates in New York State again remaining flat, Northwell Health projects a 4 percent increase in newborns in 2016. “Bringing over 40,000 newborns into the world in 2016 alone is both an honor and a privilege, and something that’s taken very seriously by the highly experienced staff at our 11 hospitals that have maternity programs,” said Dr. Michael Nimaroff, interim executive director of obstetrics and gynecology services at Northwell Health. “The goal of everyone associated with these world-class facilities is providing the best clinical care, which is why our outcomes for both mothers and infants are among the best in the nation.” The Katz Women’s Hospital at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park saw the largest spike in births in 2016 to more than 9,400 — the largest maternity program in New York State. Other Northwell Health hospitals with significant increases were Southside Hospital in Bay Shore with an eight percent jump, and Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn with a 7 percent rise. The increase in births goes against the national trend, where in the first quarter of 2016, the birth rate fell to the lowest rate ever recorded in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Northwell hospitals account for about 17 percent of all births in New York State and 1 percent nationwide, far surpassing any New York health system. The number of babies born every year at Northwell hospitals would fill Citi Field in Queens. “Our vision is to provide high-quality care for patients in the communities in which they live and work,” said Nimaroff. “That is why we are investing about $25 million over the next two years at several of our maternity programs to enhance our commitment to woman’s health and family-centered care, including Long Island Jewish Forest Hills, Huntington Hospital, the Katz Women’s Hos-

pital at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset and Southside Hospital.” This year, LIJ Forest Hills will be expanding its maternity unit, including the creation of 10 private rooms. The hospital’s newborn nursery and Level 2 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit will also be renovated to create an entire patient- and family-centered maternity unit with a total of 23 beds. In February, a major renovation project is scheduled to begin at the Katz Women’s Hospital at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, which is adding an operating room, upgrading labor and delivery rooms and expanding the number of triage and post-operative care beds. Huntington Hospital will be converting all of its maternity rooms to private rooms, creating 17 private suites with full baths that can accommodate family members and the newborn. The hospital will also be adding stateof-the-art monitoring equipment and expanding its nurse midwifery program. Southside Hospital is developing plans to expand its labor and delivery and maternity rooms and neonatal intensive care unit to meet the growing demand for mater-

nity services. As part of the introduction of its new name on January 1, 2016, Northwell Health launched a robust rebranding campaign by celebrating the birth of Austin Joseph Sparacio of Franklin Square on New Year’s Day, one of the first of about 40,500 babies delivered at Northwell hospitals over the past 12 months. In 2015, Northwell hospitals delivered about 39,000 babies. The “Happy Birthday” ad was part of Northwell Health’s extensive rebranding campaign in 2016--the most-aggressive marketing push in the 25-year history of the 21-hospital health system. The touching, first-of-its-kind ad debuted on New Year’s Day 2016 and featured emotional footage of Austin and his mother embracing for the first time at LIJ Medical Center in New Hyde Park. Beginning this week, a new advertising campaign will be launched to celebrate the first birthdays of Austin and Northwell Health–and the many milestones both have reached over the past year. The new TV ad will air on stations throughout the New York area, including: WABC, WNBC, WCBS and WNYW. The campaign will also include a digital and social media initiative directing viewers to a new Northwell hub page, giving them the opportunity to learn more about the campaign and explore ways they can kick start their journey towards wellness in the New Year. In addition to LIJ Medical Center in New Hyde Park, Southside Hospital, Maimonides Medical Center, North Shore University Hospital, Huntington Hospital and LIJ Forest Hills, Northwell has maternity programs at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan, Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, Phelps Memorial Hospital Center in Sleepy Hollow, Staten Island University Hospital and Peconic Bay Medical Center in Riverhead.

L.I. Baroque Ensemble opens 47th year In its 47th subscription season, the Long Island Baroque Ensemble’s is presenting: ALBA Consort. “Treasure Laden”— gems of early Mediterranean music on Jan. 28 and 29. Bach — the Live Stream. LIBE’s 47th annual tribute to Johann Sebastian Bach on April 1 and 2. Fortepiano! The instrument of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven on May 20 and 21.

Saturdays: St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, 30 Brooksite Drive, Smithtown, 11787 Sundays: Christ Church, 61 East Main St. Oyster Bay, 11771 Subscription tickets for five programs, each in either venue $125. General Admission: $30, $20 “in your twenties,” $15 students and teens and children are free.

It’s not your standard funeral home…it’s the standard in funeral homes. When it comes to measuring levels of service, there are all the other funeral homes, and then there is ours. Come experience our unmatched commitment to excellence and comfortable surroundings and we think you’ll agree.

2175 Jericho Turnpike • Garden City Park, NY 11040 • (516) 747-4300


News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

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Community Meetings Village of East Hills Board of Trustees Meeting

Herricks School District Board of Education Meeting

Port Washington Public Library Board of Trustees Meeting

Village of Plandome Manor Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, January 18 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 209 Harbor Hill Road, East Hills 516-621-5600

Thursday, January 19 Herricks High School 999B Herricks Road New Hyde Park 516-305-8900

Wednesday, January 18 @ 7:30 p.m. 1 Library Drive Port Washington 516-883-4400

Tuesday, January 17 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall 55 Manhasset Avenue, Manhasset 516-627-3701

Village of Kensington Board of Trustees Meeting

Village of North Hills Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Village of Plandome Manor Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Wednesday, January 18 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 2 Nassau Drive Kensington 516-482-4409

Tuesday, January 17 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 1 Shelter Rock Road North Hills 516-627-3541

LIRR Third Track DEIS Public Hearing

Village of North Hills Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, January 17 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Yes We Can Community Center 141 Garden Street Westbury

Wednesday, January 18 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 1 Shelter Rock Road North Hills 516-627-3541

LIRR Third Track DEIS Public Hearing

Village of Old Westbury Board of Trustees Meeting

Village of East Williston Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Thursday, January 19 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 2 Prospect Street, East Williston 516-746-0782 Village of Floral Park Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, January 17 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 1 Floral Boulevard, Floral Park 516-326-6300 Floral Park Library Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, January 17 @ 7:30 p.m. 17 Caroline Place Floral Park 516-326-6330 Village of Great Neck Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, January 17 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 61 Baker Hill Road, Great Neck 516-482-0019 Village of Great Neck Planning Meeting

Thursday, January 19 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 61 Baker Hill Road, Great Neck 516-482-0019 Village of Great Neck Estates Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Thursday, January 19 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall Atwater Plaza/4 Gateway Drive Great Neck 516-482-8283 Great Neck Public Library Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, January 17 @ 7:30 p.m. Main Branch 159 Bayview Avenue, Great Neck 516-466-8055 Village of Great Neck Plaza Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, January 18 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 2 Gussack Plaza, Great Neck 516-482-4500 Great Neck Water Pollution Control District Board of Commissioners Meeting

Thursday, January 19 @ 8:30 a.m. District Office 236 E Shore Rd, Great Neck (516) 482-0238

Wednesday, January 18 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. David S. Mack Student Center at Hofstra University, Hempstead

Tuesday, January 17 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall 1 Store Hill Road Old Westbury 516-26-0800

Thursday, January 19 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 55 Manhasset Avenue, Manhasset 516-627-3701 Village of Roslyn Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, January 17 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 1200 Old Northern Blvd., Roslyn 516-621-1961 Village of Roslyn Estates Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Wednesday, January 18 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 25 The Tulips, Roslyn Estates 516-621-3541 Meetings are held at the respective Village Halls except where noted. All meetings, dates and times are subject to change.

LIRR Third Track DEIS Public Hearing

Thursday, January 19, 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. The Inn at New Hyde Park 214 Jericho Turnpike New Hyde Park Village of Manorhaven Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Tuesday, January 17 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall 33 Manorhaven Blvd. Port Washington 516-883-7000 Manhasset School District Board of Education Meeting

Thursday, January 19 @ 8:00 p.m. Manhasset Secondary School 200 Memorial Place Manhasset 516-267-7600 Village of Mineola Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, January 18 @ 6:30 p.m. Village Hall 155 Washington Avenue Mineola 516-746-0750 Village of New Hyde Park Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, January 17 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 1420 Jericho Turnpike New Hyde Park 516-354-0022

The Green Vale School Where Every Child is Known ... and Inspired to Excel, to Lead, to Care &    "    8=*>              ? 0          @     >,          "        +             7/A   :   B                        

Green Vale’s tradition is to provide a challenging liberal arts education with an emphasis on character development.             3  C                D   & C               

                          !"#$%&'   ( ) ) *    +   *,   .         & "        /    0 1            )   2 3           43 &           5     Where Every Child is Known and Inspired to Excel, to Lead, to Care. 7   ,89/9*:/,8 9    1$  %$  ;4  <Tuesday, January 24 and Thursday, April 6. All presentations and tours begin at 9:00 am.


42 The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

GN

Great Neck Library Levels Planning Board Meeting Levels is the Great Neck Library’s cultural center for teens. A major function of the Great Neck Library is to pressent programs which meet and further the educational, cultural, and civic nees of the community. Levels has the responsibility in the Library for presenting such programs for the young people (7th grade through college) in the community. For more information about Levels, call 516-466-8055 x217. Levels: Craft for a Cause Tuesdays, Jan. 17 and 24 5:30-6:30 p.m. Show appreciation for our hospitalized veterans, collecting (new) gift items and decorating boxes to assemble into care pack-

ages. This crafts workshop with Gabby will be held at the Main Library, 159 Bayview Avenue.

Library in the small Multipurpose Room at the Main Building, 159 Bayview Avenue.

Board of Trustees Meeting Tuesday, Jan. 17 7:30 p.m. The next regular meetings of the Great Neck Library Board of Trustees will take place in the large Multipurpose Room of the Main Library, 159 Bayview Avenue. All are welcome. Please confirm with the Library at 516-466-8055 that there has been no change in meeting day, time or location.

Wedneday Film Matinee at Main Wednesday, Jan. 18 2 p.m. The next Matinee at Main is a chronicle of an epic march for equal voting rights and shown at the Main Library, 159 Bayview Avenue. Refer to the Library newsletter, film brochure or website for further information on the films scheduled.

Chess Club at Main Wednesdays, Jan. 18 and 25 12:30-4:30 p.m. Enjoy a game of chess at the newly renovated Main

Unlock the Secrets of the ACT and SAT Exams: What Every Student Needs to Know Wednesday, Jan. 18 7-8 p.m. Nick LaPoma, founder and lead tutor of Curvebreak-

ers Test Prep will give a presentation on the differences in the ACT and SAT tests and how to choose the right one for you. In the Community Room of the Main Library, 159 Bayview Avenue. There is a separate registration for teens and parents. Parental attendance is encouraged, not required. Contact Courtney Greenblatt, YA Librarian (516-466-8055 x218) or register online at www. greatnecklibrary.org. Sticks in the Stacks Knitting and Crochet Class at Lakeville Thursday, Jan. 19 3:30-4:45 p.m. Come and learn the basics or just brush up on what you already know at this ongoing knitting and crocheting class. At the

Lakevillle branch, 475 Great Neck Road. All skill levels are welcome. Levels Production of Macbeth Thursday, Feb. 2, Friday, Feb. 3 and Saturday, Feb. 4 at 8 p.m. Tickets are now available free of charge (while they last) for the Levels Spring 2017 theatre production of William Shakespeare’s Macbeth that will take place in the Levels Teen Center on the lower level of the Great Neck Library’s Main Building, 159 Bayview Avenue. Great Neck Library Closing/Cancellation Information Online Library patrons connected to the Internet are asked to check the website: www.cancellations.

com for Library weather related closings/program cancellations. In order to access this service, Library District residents can log on to cancellations.com, type in their zip code or Great Neck Library and obtain information on program cancellations or Library closings. In addition, at no charge, residents can request automatic e-mails from cancellations.com when the Library has posted any information. This is a great way for Library District residents who are connected online to be advised of weather related changes in Library hours or programs.

Great Neck Community Calendar BOOSTS LOCAL RESTAURANTS In order to show community dedication and support, Leonard N. Katz, President of the Rotary Club of Great Neck, has instituted a new dynamic to his club. They have begun to have dinner events at local Great Neck restaurants on a monthly basis. The second Wednesday of each month will be given over to the club patronizing local establishments. As a further welcoming gesture, the club invites town residents and businesspeople to visit these restaurants with them to network and to participate in keeping Great Neck great and a wonderful place to live and work. They say, “come and discover how meaningful it is to give back to the community.” For more information, visit their Facebook page, Rotary Club of Great Neck or their website, www.rotaryclubofgreatneck.org. To join with them and be a dinner participant, just call 516-487-9392 or email them at rotaryclubofgreatneck@aol.com. FREE EXERCISE CLASSES Ongoing Program - FREE Silver

Sneakers Exercise Classes For All Levels: Balance, agility, strengthening, endurance and osteoporosis for eligible seniors. Monday through Saturday. Garden City, Roslyn and Great Neck. Call for more details, including seeing if you are eligible and class times, (516) 745-8050. WOMANSPACE A discussion group devoted to issues concerning women. Weekly meetings are held every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Great Neck Senior Center, at 80 Grace Ave, Great Neck. New members welcome. For more info call Joan Keppler at (516) 487-5844. LIONS CLUB OF GREAT NECK Lions Club of Great Neck meets the first Monday of each month at Pearl East Restaurant, 1190 Northern Blvd., Manhasset at 12 p.m. If you would like to attend a meeting and learn more about our club, please contact fernweiss@aol.com or call (516) 829-5192. The Rotary Club of Great Neck Invites residents and business people to visit its meetings for

social and business networking. In alignment with the club’s motto, “They Profit Most Who Serves Best,” all are welcome to discover how meaningful and satisfying it is to give back to the community while networking through the Rotary Club of Great Neck. On the second Wednesday of each month, dinner events are held to support local Great Neck restaurants, and on all other remaining Wednesdays in the month, the group gathers for breakfast at 8am in the boardroom of TD Bank at 2 Great Neck Rd. For more information, visit their website at www.rotaryclubofgreatneck.org or Facebook page at rotaryclubofgreatneck. To arrange for your visit as a guest or if interested in becoming one of their weekly speakers, please email rotaryclubofgreatneck@aol. com or call 516-487-9392. TUESDAYS WITH REAP Reap, institute for studies, is part of the adult education center, 20 Cumberland Ave., Great Neck. At 9 a.m. Herb Saltzman

will discuss “New Developments In Medicine.” At 10:30 a.m. there is an open Business Meeting. My Opinion will be offered by our President Ron Ullmann. Our guest speaker is Aaron Reisfeld who will discuss, “Bloody Dictators of the 20th Century. We take a lunch break at 11:45 a.m. So please join us and bring your lunch. Current Events roundtable starts at 12:30 pm led by Adele Rothfeld. Coffee, tea and refreshments will be served! VACATIONARTS AT THE GOLD COAST ARTS CENTER The Gold Coast Arts Center continues to bring fun and creative activities to children through the VacationArts program. It’s the perfect choice for no school days. VacationArts allows you to choose your own dates and schedule your Pre-K through 7th Graders for a fun, exciting and active day. Your children will experience sessions in Art, Music, Ceramics, Chess, and Acting, taught by experienced teachers and artists.

Days off from school are filled with creative activities which will keep your child engaged and happy. Construct a sculpture; learn a hip-hop routine; strategize chess moves with a grand master; make a unique edible art project; and more. Activities vary daily. Creative expression is considered one of the building blocks of early development, so why not keep your child engaged. Further VacationArts™ Programs: Winter Recess: Feb. 21, 22, 23, 24 2017 Spring Recess: April 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 18 2017 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. A NUT-FREE Snack and Lunch is Included in Tuition. Kosher Meals Available Upon Request. Transportation Not Provided. ST. ALOYSIUS R.C. CHURCH SOCIABLES Wedneday, Jan. 25 at 1 p.m. At Jonathan’s Restaurant 2499 Jericho Turnpike, Garden City Park. Cost: Price of your meal. Please call John Hyland (516-4823795) for reservations.

Great Neck Social Center Veterans Social Club The Veterans Social Club is first and foremost Social! Every second Friday of the month, Veterans, their spouses, and guests meet to enjoy a program that is entertaining or informative.

World in Depth Lots to talk about for the savvy seniors who have better ideas about how to run the world. Every Thursday at 2:00pm there is a session. No charge, just come and put in your own opinion! Any subject is OK, whether it’s here in the U.S.A or overseas on any continent,

somebody’s got something to say. Often heated, the conversation is kept to the point by one of four moderators: people like Janet De Winter, Martha Cohen, Martin Boomser or another Special Guest. Try it! You’ll like it!

St. Francis Wishes You the Best of Health St. Francis Hospital sends its Outreach Bus to the Center periodically to let you have a free cardiac screening. No appointments necessary.

Lunch and Learn with Janet Just imagine a light picnic lunch as you munch and listen to one of Janet De Winter’s crisp and lively reviews of a fascinating novel. Do call (516)487-0025 to reserve a space for her delightful review. And you do not have to read the book to enjoy Janet’s review.


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COMMUNITY NEWS

Temple to host Bank visits autism organization Torah scribe

Founded in 1967, Temple Isaiah is about to embark on its 50th year in Great Neck. To begin the year-long celebration, internationally renowned Torah scribe (“Sofer”) Neil Yerman will serve as Scholar-in-Residence, conducting programs for the congregation and the community. Yerman’s first program will take place on Sunday, Jan. 22. He will introduce the program with a presentation called “The Living Torah – Time Traveler,” discussing how the physical formatting of the Torah has changed over the centuries and countries of its travels, and how each Torah’s characteristics can help to identify when and where it was written. Following the presentation, participants will have a handson opportunity to experience the sacred ritual of cleaning one of the Temple’s Torahs in preparation for restoration work that Yerman will undertake. A subsequent program in May will offer a hands-on opportunity to restore lettering in the Torah. In his 31-year career, Yerman has written eight original Torahs and restored hundreds of Torah scrolls. He has involved Reform, Conservative and Reconstructionist communities in hands-on educational and development programs based on the Torah.

He is certified by the Memorial Scrolls Trust in England to help preserve Holocaust Scrolls – a matter of great interest to Temple Isaiah as one of the Temple’s Torahs was rescued from the Nazis in Czechoslovskia and is on loan to the congregation for safekeeping from the Memorial Scrolls Trust. The Jubilee Year celebration will continue with other programs that showcase Temple Isaiah’s role in the community. “We’ve always referred to ourselves as the ‘alternative Reform congregation’ in Great Neck,” co-President Bill Rosenberg said, “but that’s a little misleading. In fact, our practices and observances are actually very traditional. If we’re in any way alternative, I think it’s in our relationships and how the community functions. Over our history we’ve had a blind cantor who brought his seeing eye dog onto the bimah, a female rabbi at a time when that was still unusual and, most recently, a Japanese-American rabbi. I don’t think many congregations can say that.” Yerman’s first program will take place on Sunday, Jan. 22 at 2 p.m. There is a suggested donation of $18.00. Temple Isaiah is located at 1 Chelsea Place, off Cutter Mill Road. For more information, call the Temple office at 516487-5373.

The banking team from Metropolitan Commercial Bank’s Great Neck banking center recently spread some holiday joy while volunteering at the Quality Services for the Autism Community Preschool and Early Childhood Center in Douglaston, Queens. Vice President and Market Sales Manager George Lotto, Vice President and Relationship Manager Ralph Ventura and Vice President and Relationship Manager Rocco Zito joined fellow Metropolitan Commercial Bank representatives from the bank’s Manhattan corporate office and banking centers in Brooklyn and Manhattan in a day of service to help enhance the seasonal celebration and educational experience for the school’s pre-school students. The QSAC is a New York City-and Long Island-based nonprofit organization that supports children and adults with autism, providing a range of educational services. Bank representatives spent the day helping teachers by reading children’s books to students, playing soccer and participating in several academic lessons with the children. In addition to volunteering,

the bank donated funds to help support QSAC’s ongoing efforts to advocate for children and adults with autism. “Community involvement is a cornerstone of Metropolitan Commercial Bank’s mission to give back to the communities we serve. Our team is always looking for innovative ways to engage with and develop lasting relationships with community groups,” said Laura Capra, Metropolitan Commercial Bank’s Senior Vice President and Head of Retail Banking. “We were happy to have this opportunity to support QSAC and spend quality time participating with and bringing some holiday cheer to these very special children.” “Our students truly enjoyed

the fun time they had with the folks from Metropolitan Commercial Bank,” said Joe Traegler, Director of QSAC’s Preschool. “These types of experiences bring huge smiles to the faces of our children, and that is priceless. Establishing partnerships, like the one with Metropolitan Commercial Bank, is essential to QSAC’s goal of offering students an educational experience focused on community-oriented, person-centered services.” For more information about Metropolitan Commercial Bank and its banking center in Great Neck Plaza, New York, call 516441-5232, or visit the Bank’s website at: www.MetropolitanBankNY. com.

Teen center to present ‘Macbeth’ Tickets are now available free of charge for the Levels Spring 2017 theatre production, William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Performances will be held Thursday, Friday & Saturday, Feb. 2, 3 and 4 at 8 p.m. in the Levels Teen Center on the lower level of the Great Neck Library’s Main Building at 159 Bayview Avenue in Great Neck. Levels, the Great Neck Library’s cultural center for teenagers established in 1974, presents several fully-staged theatrical productions a year. Macbeth will be the first theatre production to perform in the newly-renovated Levels space, which now features a state-of-the-art LED lighting system. Like all Levels productions, Macbeth is entirely directed, produced and performed by students sev-

enth grade through college-age. Macbeth tells the tale of a beloved Scottish general who led his country to victory in war. But a prophecy from a trio of witches, combined with the manipulative words of his wife and his own self-doubt, transform Macbeth from an even-tempered man into a tyrannical monster who craves power for its own sake. Tickets are free of charge and are intended to guarantee seating, as space is limited. They are available at the Circulation Desk of all Great Neck Library facilities while they last. For more information, contact Levels at 516466-8055 ext. 216 or email levels@greatnecklibrary.org.

G.N. Library offering English classes English Conversation Classes for beginners and second level will now be held on a weekly basis, every Tuesday at the Station Branch at 26 Great Neck Road (2nd level) in the Gardens at Great Neck Plaza above Best Market. These are small, informal groups of people that get together to have conversations in English. Various conversation topics may be chosen. The beginner’s class is held from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and stresses basic grammar and spoken language, including vocabulary guided by audio-visual guides. Beginners are encouraged to stay for the second class.

English Language Conversation Second Level is held from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. and is for the person who has some fluency in English and wants to learn sophisticated vocabulary and discuss assigned reading materials. All are welcome to sit in on the beginner’s class. For further information, please call the Reference Department at 516-466-8055 ext. 218. Groups are facilitated by Librarian Barbara Buckley. Refreshments will be served.


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SCHOOL NEWS

Winter Community Education courses The Great Neck Public Schools Community Education Winter semester has begun. Warm up to a flurry of activity. Enjoy, learn, experience from our wide selection of courses, trips, and special events. Classes take place at the Cumberland Adult Center at 30 Cumberland Ave., which is one block south of Northern Boulevard off of Lakeville Road. To register, phone the office at 516-4414949, or visit the web site at greatneck.k12. ny.us—click on the Community Ed icon. If you haven’t received the Fall/Winter printed catalog, please call and we will be happy to send one right out to you. Groundhog Day Our latest theater trip is Groundhog Day, with lunch at Remi, on Wednesday, May 31. In the past, we have had an overwhelming response to our theater trips and we anticipate tickets for Groundhog Day to go fast. This musical opens on Broadway this spring from a sold-out run in London. Our recent theater offerings have included War Paint, Dear Evan Hansen, The

Glass Menagerie, Oslo, and Hello Dolly! Due to timing constraints, theater trips are advertised through e-mail, and not in our print catalog. Please be sure that we have your e-mail address to be in the know about new and upcoming events. You can also be waitlisted for any sold out trips. Day Trips We have the best day trips around. These include: “Holland!” at the Philadelphia Flower Show (Saturday, March 11); Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (Thursday, April 20); Newark, City Tour, Houses of Worship, and Branch Brook Park (Sunday, April 23); Chelsea Art Galleries and lunch (Tuesday, May 2); An Adventure in the East Village, walking tour and dinner at Hisae’s (Wednesday, May 3); Woolworth Building, tour and lunch (Sunday, May 7); Caramoor Estate, recital and house tour (Wednesday, May 24); and Madava Farms (in Dutchess County), home of Crown Maple Syrup (Thursday, June 8). Special Events “That’s Amore at Il Bacco”—Canasta enthusiasts will have great fun with an af-

We offer Chinese for travelers, French, Hebrew, Italian, and Spanish, at varied levels. Games Enjoy playing Bridge, Canasta, and Mah Jongg, for beginner and advanced levels. Humanities A potpourri of classes are offered: “Current Events,” “Italy: City by City,” “Some History You Ought to Know,” and” Talking Baseball.” Music & Performing Arts Enjoy “Singing for Fun,” participate in the Cumberland Singers, and learn how to play the piano. Personal Classes for Adults “Communicate To Be Heard,” “College Scholarships,” “Dating Essentials,” “Defensive Driving for Insurance and Point Reduction,” “Elder Law, Life Transitions, Maximizing Social Security,” “REAP” (Retired, Energetic, Active People), and “Wills, Trusts & Estate Planning.” Classes for Children & Teens “Chinese Language” for children, and “ACT and SAT/PSAT Preparation,” for teens.

Kindergarten enrollment period

Pre-K registration open Enrollment for the Great Neck Public Schools Universal Prekindergarten Program (UPK) remains open for the 2017–18 school year. This program is offered to all Great Neck School District residents at no cost. To be enrolled, children must be 4 years old by Dec. 1, 2017. The UPK program is located primarily at the Parkville School at 10 Campbell Street in New Hyde Park. There are morning and afternoon sessions. Bus transportation is provided to and from the Parkville location. In compliance with the New York State Education Department, some students can attend the

ternoon of card play and a delicious Italian lunch (Wednesday, Feb. 15); and the “Art and Beauty of Egg Decoration” (Saturday, March 25)—learn how to do egg embellishment just in time for spring. Sports, Fitness & Dance Enjoy classes in ballet, cardio fitness, classical dance (Duncan Technique), handweight training, Latin-style aerobics, line dance, low-impact aerobics, meditation, modern dance, movement for those with Parkinson’s, Pilates, seated exercise, tai chi, yoga, and Zumba. Fine Arts & Fine Crafts Classes include “Channeling Van Gogh,” “Collage, Drawing/Painting: Anything Goes,” “Independent Workshop for Figure Drawing,” “Jewelry Making,” “Painting,” “Pastels,” “Pottery on the Wheel,” “Hand Building,” “Printmaking,” “Stone Sculpture,” and “Watercolor.” English Language & Literature Experience these classes: “Joy of Reading Book Monthly Book Group,” “Poetry Writing Workshop,” “Write Your Heart Out,” and “Writers’ Workshop.” Foreign Languages

Great Neck Community School, the collaborative agency, at 225 Schenck Ave. in Great Neck. The school district does not provide transportation for this location. Enrollment for UPK is held at the Phipps Administration Building at 345 Lakeville Road in Great Neck. Call the Registrar’s Office at 516-441-4080 for information and to obtain a registration packet. Additional information can be accessed on the district Web site at greatneck.k12.ny.us—Parkville School logo in the scroll near the top of the screen.

The Great Neck Public Schools Office of Registration and Attendance reminds all resident parents and guardians that enrollment for kindergarten for the 2017–2018 school year will begin on Tuesday, Jan. 17, and run schooldays through Friday, Jan. 27, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Registration will be held at the Office of Registration and Attendance at the Phipps Administration Building at 345 Lakeville Road. It is not necessary to bring your child. All children who will attend public or private school kindergarten in September

2017 must be registered. In order to be eligible to enroll, children must have been born between Dec. 2, 2011, and Dec. 1, 2012. If a kindergarten registration packet has not been received in the mail, it may be picked up at the Office of Registration and Attendance, or the registration forms can be downloaded from the district Web site at greatneck. k12.ny.us. Please bring the following information to registration: (1) Proof of district residency (deed, current tax bill, or closing statement if ownership;

current signed lease or current rent receipts, if rental). (2) Three pieces of current, official mail. Online mail is not acceptable. (3) Child’s original birth certificate. (4) Parent or guardian valid photo ID. (5) Parental control papers (if applicable). (6) Immunization certificate signed and stamped by a physician or other authorized health agency. For more information about kindergarten registration, contact the Registration Office at 516-441-4080, or e-mail residency@greatneck. k12.ny.us.

Plaza poetry contest deadline extended Good news, poetry lovers. You now have another three weeks to submit your original poetry as part of the Village of Great Neck Plaza’s 7th Annual Poetry Contest. The Village of Great Neck Plaza, in conjunction with Long Island Traditions and Poetry Coordinator, Carolyn Raphael, has extended the deadline for submitting poetry until Monday, Jan. 30. Poetry entries must be postmarked by the 30th, to the Village of Great Neck Plaza, 2 Gussack Plaza, P.O. Box 440, Great Neck, NY, 11022, Attn: Poetry Contest. Note, this is a change from the original Jan. 10 deadline. Poetry submissions can also be submitted in person at Vil-

lage Hall during normal business hours, Monday through Friday, between 9 a.m. and 4:45 p.m. There is also a one-time entry fee of $15 (non-refundable), payable to Long Island Traditions, which must be included with any material submitted. Poets 18 years of age or older from Nassau, Suffolk, Brooklyn and Queens Counties are invited to submit up to three original unpublished poems as part of the contest. Poems must be single-spaced and typed, with one poem per page. Poetry contestants may submit poems on whatever subject and style desired, as long as each

poem does not go above a 30 line maximum. Each poem should have a title as well. Contestants should include two copies of each poem, one anonymous and one with the poet’s name and address below the poem. A cover sheet listing the poet’s name, address, phone number and email address, and title of each poem, should be included when submitting any entry. The judge will be Patti Tana, Professor Emerita of English at Nassau Community College (SUNY), and the Associate Editor of the Long Island Quarterly since it was founded in 1990.

In 2009 Tana was selected as “Poet of the Year” by the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association. She is the author of nine books of poetry, the latest of which is All I Can Gather & Give (J B Stillwater, 2014). Winners of the 7th Annual Poetry Contest will be announced on the Village’s website, www.greatneckplaza.net, Tuesday, March 15. An Awards Day reading will take place on Sunday, April 2 at 12 p.m. at the Great Neck Plaza courtroom. The first prize winner will receive $150 and a 20-minute reading at Awards Day, second prize winner will receive $75 and a 10-minute reading, and the third

place winner will receive $50 and a 5-minute reading. There will also be two awards for Honorable Mention; these poets will be invited to read their poems as well. Additionally, each of the three winning poems will be posted for one month on seven secure outdoor village sign posts, on the bulletin board in Village Hall, and in the waiting room of the Great Neck LIRR station waiting room. For any additional information, feel free to contact Carolyn Raphael, poetry coordinator, gnppoetry@yahoo.com, or Brian Hetey, mayorsassistant@greatneckplaza.net.


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Business&RealEstate Ready to sell or buy now or in spring? So far, we have had two snowfalls this winter, the first being a few inches, but the one on Saturday, Jan. 7 was six to eight inches in our local North Shore area. Are you still holding back, sort of contemplating putting your property on the market, maybe in the spring, when more conducive weather comes around (you can always ask buyers to take their shoes off or maybe offer them some booties or covers for their shoes) or are you procrastinating in moving ahead and really want to do it now? Don’t let the snow or cold weather hold you back; because it isn’t holding back those serious purchasers who are out there, searching for their first or second “place to call home.” So do not wait, the market is still hot and moving along quite nicely and inventory is still very, very low (4.3 months), demand is still far greater than supply and interest rates are still very low by historical standards of 6 percent (did you read my column from Dec. 30?). Just because it’s winter, doesn’t mean everyone has left the market to warmer climates (those are the snowbirds and snowflakes, who are probably not looking to buy immediately, some tire kickers and looky Lous too). Looking back many years in my records, I have found that some of my best and most qualified income and credit worthy customers have purchased homes, home owner’s, condos and coops and even some commercial investments, from December through March, where the crowds have dissipated and gone into hibernation. Moreover, the cash purchasers are also still around, looking

for that special place to raise their family and grow roots in a community and just get planted and away from that ever increasing “loss of wealth” in the “rental zone” where they are providing all the benefits of appreciation and tax benefits to their landlord. I am always asking myself the question: “Why not be your own landlord” and gain all the benefits of tax write-offs, appreciation and security of not having to pick up and leave every few years for various reasons? I also suggest to those buyers, to beg, borrow and steal (only kidding) to scrape up that down payment from family, relatives, even distant relatives or even your closest friends, if possible (pay them a decent interest rate, better than the less than 1% that everyone else is earning; with a payback period that is comfortable you and them). Accomplishing this monumental but doable task will allow you to go out and start searching for your next “place to call home, that you will own!” As a seller, you can always ask your buyers or your Broker’s purchasers for a written mortgage commitment or proof of funds to make sure that they are capable of purchasing. For many, this may be uncomfortable for you to do this; for it may seem intrusive to ask questions to a perfect stranger, right? But it really isn’t; just that you are trying to sell, possibly one of the most valuable assets that you possess and you surely want to make sure the individuals or family that are considering buying are in a solid position to qualify for their mortgage. If it is not subject to any financing, obviously, that’s easy, as long as they show you proof of funds, to know that they have the

PHILIP A. RAICES Real Estate Watch money in a bank or investment account. In some areas, there are some phony buyers, looking to get into homes to possibly vandalize or rob them at a later date and time or even when you are home. Don’t be surprised as to their friendly disposition because they might ask you questions and inquire as what you do for a living, where you work and how many hours a week you work. Thieves can be extremely sharp and finagle their way into having you provide the necessary information for them to do you harm or take your possessions. When you are not around. Although our economy has been improving and unemployment is under 5 percent, there are still families and individuals that are suffering and may choose the easy way to consider and take the illegal path to earning their money. Drugs are also causing some homes to be vandalized, for the items that can be pawned for cash to keep their habit going. Hiring the right professional real estate broker always goes a long way in securing the best and most qualified purchaser. He or she will hopefully vet those inter-

ested in viewing your home and will ask the right questions that will provide the best opportunity for you to get a real qualified income and credit worthy buyer and eliminate those that don’t meet the necessary requirements. As I had previously said, this can be an arduous, time consuming and uncomfortable task for you to do, because you are not seasoned at doing this and besides most homeowners don’t want to be involved and that is where we come in. You have a job or business and don’t have the time to undertake this important business of selling your home. This is one of the only professions where owners believe and feel that they can do our business (it’s not a job); granted, some maybe able to do it, but the vast majority, cannot do what a seasoned broker can do. People think, because they have sold a home or two in the past that today it’s the same. The real estate market as well as the technology that goes along in performing it, has changed drastically and has advanced to the point, that you really need to know what you are doing and unless you study this business; what you had to do years ago to find the right buyer was to just place an ad and send out some postcards to the surrounding areas to alert everyone. The old ways of selling real estate pales in comparison to what has to be prepared and completed today. To start and finish a sale so much has to be done; the rules and regulations, and all the required disclosures and paperwork alone, are cumbersome, but necessary. I have seen enough legal entanglements and law suits occur-

ring in this business, due to lack of knowledge and understanding to what has to be done. A knowledgeable broker will earn their commission by doing the necessary and crucial marketing and merchandising of your property as well as providing you the necessary and regular feedback about how the process is going. If you are a purchaser, the feeling of ownership will be indescribable and you will gain much more control over your destiny and surroundings. You have to start to finish. Go for it, what do you have to lose? You need to grab those interest rates before they go up again, possibly in the spring; or if you are a seller, keep in mind the cost of money, so increased interest rates could affect the price of your home. As interest rates go up, as in the past, the price of homes tend to fall. But don’t worry, it won’t happen overnight, but, it will occur eventually, so don’t wait. Find and interview those brokers that will perform the best for you and your family and do what needs to be done to complete the transaction. “Our Seller’s Guide for “Things to Consider When Selling Your Home,”just email me with your name, email and cell number. Phil Raices is the owner/Broker of Turn Key Real Estate at 7 Bond St. in Great Neck. He has earned designations as a Graduate Realtor Institute and Certified International Property Specialist. He can be reached by email: Phil@TurnkeyRealEstate.Com or by cell (516) 647-4289 to answer any of your questions or article suggestions.

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Recent Real Estate Sales in Great Neck Great Neck Real Estate Market Conditions Median sales price $832,500 Demographics near Great Neck, NY Population Population Density Median Age People per Household Median Household Income Average Income per Capita

City 9,972 7,503 41.4 2.9 86,722 39,686

County 1,338,712 4,702 41.2 3 97,049 42,286

304 Melbourne Road, Great Neck Sold Price: $1,248,000 Date: 10/07/2016 5 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Colonial # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 0.23 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $21,615 MLS# 2851277

3 Brookbridge Road, Great Neck Sold Price: $950,000 Date: 11/29/2016 3 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Tudor # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 85x103 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $14,174 MLS# 2842762

36 Clair Street, Great Neck Sold Price: $939,800 Date: 11/01/2016 3 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Tudor # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 60x100 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $12,181 MLS# 2849410

14 Hayden Avenue, Great Neck Sold Price: $778,000 Date: 11/17/2016 3 beds, 3 Full baths Style: 2 Story # of Families: 2 Lot Size: 60x120 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $13,799 MLS# 2870393

Editor’s note: Homes shown here were recently sold in Great Neck by a variety of real estate agencies. The information about the homes and the photos were obtained through the Multiple Listing Services of Long Island. The homes are presented based solely on the fact that they were recently sold in Great Neck and are believed by Blank Slate Media to be of interest to our readers.

CLIENTS EVERYWHERE. AGENTS RIGHT HERE. With a network of buyers from around the world, selling your Long Island home begins with a conversation…. Stop by to say hello. Great Neck Office | 11 Bond Street | 516.466.2100 Visit us at elliman.com/long-island 110 WALT WHITMAN ROAD, HUNTINGTON STATION, NY, 11746. 631.549.7401 © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


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Vigilant eyes billing residents for ambulances Continued from Page 1 that could now be recouped through billing and put back into improving our local volunteer ambulance services,” Celender said. “The Village of Great Neck Plaza and our sister peninsula villages are faced with very difficult and challenging times trying to manage increasing costs under the state-mandated property tax cap.” “Charging for ambulance services would help curb increasing budgetary expenses and help to offset raising taxes to pay for these services,” she added. “We know this is a huge undertaking by Vigilant but we feel it is essential that they take this route so our residents can find it affordable to live here and are continued to be provided with excellent emergency response services.” Village of Great Neck Mayor Pedram Bral said the goal of discussions between village officials and the fire company was to find ways to lessen the burden of taxes on residents. Bral said with residents paying Nassau County ambulance service taxes, village ambulance service taxes and health insurance costs, it is “unfair to the residents to be billed three times.” “I think what we’re trying to do as mayors is to find the best possible care for the residents and trying to make sure they’re not being charged multiple times for that care,” he said. “What the mayors are trying to do is find the best option.” Great Neck Estates Mayor David Fox said although officials would need to figure out the logistics of billing, it is a “win-win situation for everyone.” “There are always options and people looking at

what’s better and what’s worse,” Fox said. “But I can’t praise enough the concept that we have these people going out there and doing the work they do on a volunteer basis and then understanding that there are economics involved as well and wanting to make sure that

I

“ understand the complexities of the budgets and financial strain on the villages. I don’t think it’s unreasonable with the way insurance companies work now. It’s not an unreasonable request for villages to seek some sort of help in their budget process.” David Weiss CHAIRMAN OF THE FIRE COMPANY’S BOARD OF TRUSTEES

we stay healthy as villages and be able to support them to the extent we do.” Vigilant Fire Company Chief Josh Forst said as chief, he is “more than happy to do what the public wants,” but as a taxpayer, he was concerned with insurance companies not covering the full cost of service. “As a taxpayer it really bothers me that I might get a bill for an ambulance coming to my house when I already pay for it in my taxes,” Forst said. “If we were to start billing for ambulance service, I am fairly certain that my taxes will not be reduced. With insurance reim-

bursement being what it is, I now will most likely have to pay for that service out of pocket.” “I can’t imagine after 80 years of a resident paying pennies on the dollar for service, that they would want a four-figure bill, especially when our response times are well below national averages, and we just hired paramedics to make sure we are giving the residents the best available care,” he added. Forst encouraged residents to contact the fire company and village officials to let them know their opinion. Weiss said one of his concerns about billing for ambulance services is “what the residents will think” of the fire company. “We’re a volunteer service,” he said. “We’re not looking to make money.” But Weiss admitted that billing could help both villages in managing their costs and the fire company by providing “another avenue for us to grow.” “We at the fire company are committed to the community and committed to the officials to make this a better service, if possible,” he said. “I truly don’t believe there is another department or another service, whether paid or volunteered, that can handle the call volume, that know the community, that know the streets, that can get it done better than we can.” North Hempstead Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth and Kings Point Mayor Michael Kalnick declined to comment. Efforts to reach Saddle Rock Mayor Dan Levy and Thomaston Mayor Steven Weinberg were unavailing, while Kensington Mayor Susan Lopatkin was away and unable to comment.

COMMUNITY NEWS

Kings Point seeks to Chamber to host state create passive park officials at breakfast Continued from Page 2

Great Neck Chamber of Commerce Program Chairperson and Town of North Hempstead Councilwoman Lee R. Seeman will introduce recently elected public officials, state Sen. Elaine Phillips and Assemblyman Anthony D’Urso at the monthly chamber meeting on Thursday, Jan. 19 at the Inn at Great Neck, at 30 Cuttermill Road, at 8 a.m. Phillips, representing the 7th Senate District, is the former Mayor of the Village of Flower Hill. Prior to her public service, she was a financial analyst for Met Life and J.P. Morgan Securities and a Vice President in Institutional Sales at Goldman Sachs. D’Urso, representing the 16th Assembly District, was born in Formia, Italy, before immigrating with his family to the United States.

He served for more than 30 years as a public servant with the Department of Housing Development in New York City and then as Assistant Commissioner of the Office of Architecture, Engineering and Construction. He also served as a Town of North Hempstead Councilman, representing the entire town, before council districts were created. Each of the speakers will discuss their plans for their respective districts and how to move forward each of their goals. The public is invited to attend the breakfast on Thursday, Jan. 19 at the Inn at Great Neck at 30 Cuttermill Road in Great Neck. For further information, please contact the chamber at 516-487-2000 or info@greatneckchamber.org.

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domain.” “Private property is being taken from citizens as part of a ‘shell game’ that will ultimately result in the destruction of part of a 100-year-old forest in Kings Point Park so that the existing DPW site on Sunset Road can be sold for private development,” he said. Village officials have considered selling its Sunset Road DPW site in the past, but Kalnick said the village was no longer considering doing so.

Limmer said there was no cost estimate yet for the passive park on East Shore Road as the village was waiting to find out appraisal values of the land and the cost of creating the park. He added that as plans develop for the site, the board will hold discussions at public meetings. Kalnick said the Kings Point Police Department would ensure that only Kings Point residents use the park. “Access would be restricted to sunrise to sunset, which would also be enforced by village police,” he said.

Car crash claims 3 lives in Albertson Continued from Page 3 borhood is a 30 mph zone, so with a little bit of icy roads and you’re going beyond 30 miles an hour and you try to make a hard left hand turn, you just slide right off the road.” Damon Multani, who saw the crash, told NBC4 New York the car hit a patch of

ice and “slid right into the water.” “I was scared, I was definitely shocked when I saw him drive into the pond,” Alex Stephen, another witness, told the TV station. The state police did not return phone calls or emails seeking to confirm details of the crash.


48 The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

GN

DOT seeks sex abuse solutions at academy Continued from Page 1 port incidents of sexual assault and sexual harassment” at the Kings Point-based academy. The report also states that programs at the academy aimed at addressing sexual assault and harassment “tend to be reactive rather than based on a unified, strategic approach” and that academy leaders needed to present a “unified message” regarding sexual assault and harassment. “The audit reinforces what the Defense Manpower Data Center, the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, the USMMA Advisory Board and our numerous interactions with midshipman have told us; that while the academy’s culture is grounded in a sense of service, discipline and teamwork, our young people are at far greater risk of sexual assault and harassment than they should be and that there are things we can do now and over the longer term to put a stop to it,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx wrote to the academy’s superintendent, Rear Adm. James Helis, in a letter following the report’s release. In July, the Middle States Commission on Higher Education issued a warning to the academy about its accreditation status, citing the school’s failure to meet five of the agency’s 14 standards. The academy’s Sea Year, when midshipmen spend an academic year aboard a merchant vessel, was scrutinized by the accrediting agency. The Middle States report said the marine academy needs to take steps “to build a climate of mutual trust and respect on campus and during the Sea Year.” Academy officials suspended the program on June 15 to hold student training on acceptable conduct in regard to bullying and sexual harassment, but in July the program was partly reinstated to allow midshipmen to serve Sea Year on federal ships, but not on commercial

Kings Point-based United States Merchant Marine Academy vessels. In his letter to Helis, Foxx permitted the academy to restore its Sea Year program on commercial vessels as long as the marine academy and U.S. Maritime Administration, or MARAD, determine that a company has “complied with the credentialing criteria established” by the MARAD Shipboard Climate Compliance Team. The report, which interviewed 162 people associated with the academy, including leadership, faculty, students and others, found that “the academy and MARAD lack a program to ensure that shipping companies have adequate policies and procedures in place during Sea Year.” The U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Alumni Association and Foundation, or AAF, announced in October the creation of the Task Force on the Prevention of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment, a seven-member group of representatives from the maritime industry and different maritime academies. The task force released a report of

its findings last month, which stated it found “no evidence of a culture that condones sexual misconduct, nor a climate that facilitates precursory behaviors such as sexual coercion, sexual harassment, hazing or bullying.” Midshipmen are not worried about their personal safety while serving on commercial vessels during Sea Year, the report said. It noted that both male and female midshipmen were surveyed. The AAF report stated that midshipmen were unsure of what behaviors are categorized as sexual harassment, specifically when it came to verbal conduct. “Although midshipmen were clear about the definition of sexual assault, they were unable to give an equally consistent definition of sexual harassment,” the report said. The report also said that incidents of sexual assault and harassment have gone unreported because the “recipient” did not view the comments as sexual harassment or because midshipmen handle incidents internally and confronted the man or woman accused of sexual assault

or harassment. “Some midshipmen theorized that suspension of Sea Year has created a disincentive to report an incident out of concern that it would be used as a pretext to extend the suspension,” the report states. Foxx said to Helis that sexual assault and harassment was, in fact, a problem both on campus and during Sea Year, and pushed him to “take aggressive action” to stop any denial of the problem. “I further urge you to take aggressive action to put an end to denial and downplaying among those charged to be part of the solutions,” he said. “Those who perpetrate or condone these behaviors or look the other way must have no place at the academy, in the U.S. Merchant Marines or our nation’s Armed Forces.” A 2014-15 survey conducted by the Merchant Marine Academy found that 63 percent of women and 11 percent of men at the school said they had been sexually harassed and 17 percent of female midshipmen said they had been sexually assaulted. The president of AAF, James Tobin, said the auditor’s report was “an indictment of the academy’s leadership, whose efforts to date to address sexual misconduct fall woefully short when compared to the work of their peers at academies and colleges around the country, who are facing similar issues.” Tobin also said that the report shows no justification for the Sea Year suspension, nor does it provide evidence that the program “places midshipmen in harm’s way.” “We look forward to working with the academy and the Department of Transportation to ensure that Sea Year is restored – in full – so midshipmen can immediately resume their mission-critical training,” he said. “We cannot afford to further negatively impact the education and career prospects of even more students.”

School board urges bond issue approval Continued from Page 2 “These are our schools, this is our community and regardless of where you live, these are our children,” Prendergast said. “We’re really taking this opportunity to look at this one bond referendum to look at what we can do to enhance public education in Great Neck over the course of the next 20 years.” John Powell, the district’s assistant superintendent of business, said the proposed $95.41 million in spending would come from a bond issue of $85.9 million and about $9.51 million from reserves. One of the biggest upgrades as part

of the proposed bond would be the creation of a $6.58 million early childhood center, where children across the district would be offered a pre-kindergarten education, at the district’s Adult Learning Center on Clover Drive. The district currently has a universal pre-kindergarten program at Parkville Elementary School, but the location is more convenient for students living in the southern half of the district. Prendergast said the transformation of the Clover Drive facility into an early childhood center would offer prekindergarten to students zoned to begin kindergarten at E.M. Baker Elementary

School, Saddle Rock Elementary School and Lakeville Elementary School. As the facility currently houses the Adult Learning Center, Supportive Environment for All Learners and Pupil Personnel Services programs, the district is proposing to construct a building at the Cumberland Adult Center to relocate those programs. The proposed building would cost about $9.8 million. Prendergast said the early childhood center would also help alleviate overcrowding at E.M. Baker. Many of the projects school officials identified were related to renovated science labs and library and media cen-

ters, auditorium renovations, bathroom renovations and improved air conditioning and infrastructure in the district’s schools. Also at the meeting, the board approved the district’s 2017-18 school calendar, which includes recognizing the Lunar New Year as a holiday. The board voted last year to recognize the Lunar New Year during its 201617 school year, but the holiday falls on Jan. 28 this year, a Saturday. “We’re very proud that we were actually the first district on Long Island to go ahead and vote this in,” Berkowitz said.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

49

SCHOOL & CAMP DIRECTORY

Where Every Child is Known and Inspired to Excel, to Lead, to Care

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50 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

SCHOOL & CAMP DIRECTORY

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Join Us For An Open House Sunday, January 22nd Sunday, January 29th (Snow Date)

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

51

Sports LIU men’s basketball team eyes title BY T H OM A S G I LL E N With 14 games remaining in its 2016-17 season, the LIU Post men’s basketball team stands at 4-10, with a 3-2 record in the conference. Head coach Erik Smiles knows the team has to improve their game in order to contend for a championship this season, with six games remaining at home. “It seems like we play 36 great minutes every game and then don’t execute in the last four to six minutes. It’s important for us to clean up every game and remain consistent throughout the season,” Smiles said. Smiles’ goal this season is to lead the team to a championship after playing in the East Coast Conference Championship last season, when they beat the University of Bridgeport in the first game but lost to Saint Thomas Aquinas College 85-58 in the semifinals. “This year we are better seeded in the conference and we have great offensive skills,” Smiles said. “While our defensive skills are

getting there, we have six freshmen on the team who are still trying to get adjusted to the game.” One of those freshmen is Hall Elisias, an undecided major who is the fifth highest scorer on the team, with 99 points through 13 games. Elisias also has 26 blocks, 27 free throws, and 95 rebounds, with 58 coming in the defensive zone. About the team’s performance this season, Elisias stated, “we have all the pieces to be great, but there are certain spots in the game that kill us each week. I don’t think anyone is happy about this season, but there is always room for improvement.” Elisias played varsity basketball at Valley Stream South High School and was named All-State in 2016. His high school team won Nassau County Titles in 2014 and 2015 and a Long Island Championship in 2015. During his first semester playing at Post, Elisias stated that his mental toughness has been the biggest im-

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provement in his game and has helped him transition to college basketball. “The amount of work has been the biggest difference between playing in high school and college,” he said. “It’s not just about playing a game 40 minutes a week, it’s a 24 hour job that requires a lot of mental preparation.” After beating Roberts Wesleyan College 86-64 in a non-conference game on Saturday, Jan. 7, the Pioneers will play 12 games against teams in their own conference, including Daeman College, Mercy College, and the University of the District of Columbia. The team’s next game is on Wednesday, Jan. 11 at 7:30 p.m. against the University of the District of Columbia at LIU Post’s Pratt Recreation Center in Brookville. This article was originally published in the Pioneer, the award-winning student newspaper of LIU Post, www.liupostpioneer.com, and is republished here by Blank Slate Media with the permission of the Pioneer. Sports Continued on Page 61

PHOTO BY HALL ELISIAS

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY

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56 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ PAINTING

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est. 1978

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

nassau

57

COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS WEMPLOYMENT, MARKETPLACE

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Fax: 516.307.1046

e-mail: hblank@theislandnow.com

In Person: 105 Hillside Avenue Williston Park, NY 11598

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Open: Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thurs: 9am-5:30pm

Deadlines Tuesday 11:00am: Classified Advertising Tuesday 1:00pm: Legal Notices/ Name Changes Friday 5:00pm Buyersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide Error Responsibility All ads placed by telephone are read back for verification of copy context. In the event of an error of Blank Slate Media LLC we are not responsible for the first incorrect insertion. We assume no responsiblity for an error in and beyond the cost of the ad. Cancellation Policy Ads must be cancelled the Monday before the first Thursday publication. All cancellations must be received in writing by fax at: 516.307.1046 Any verbal cancellations must be approved by a supervisor. There are no refunds on cancelled advertising. An advertising credit only will be issued.

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Advertising Sales Executive Blank Slate Media Blank Slate Media, a fast-growing chain of 6 award-winning weekly newspapers and website, is looking for an energetic, service-oriented professional with good communications skills to sell display, web and email advertising. Earn up to $60,000 in the first-year representing the 6 Blank Slate Media publications and website as well the 5 publications and 1 website owned by Blank Slateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales partner, Litmor Publications. We are looking for an enthusiastic and service-oriented sales professional with good communication skills. Requirements: Minimum of 2 years outside sales experience. Newspaper sales experience a plus. Must have your own car. â&#x20AC;¢ Exclusive, protected territory â&#x20AC;¢ Opportunity to sell both print and online programs â&#x20AC;¢ A collegial, supportive sales team â&#x20AC;¢ Award-winning editorial coverage. â&#x20AC;¢ A separate newspaper for each community allowing advertisers to target their markets. And you to provide the most cost-effective way to advertise. â&#x20AC;¢ Represent media that produce superior response for clients. Compensation â&#x20AC;¢ Salary plus commission â&#x20AC;¢ Health insurance â&#x20AC;¢ Paid holidays â&#x20AC;¢ Sick days & holidays

To apply, e-mail your resume and cover letter to sblank@theislandnow.com or call Steve at 516.307-1045 x201 for more information.


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60 The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

▼ LEGALS

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Legal Notice LEGAL NOTICE ADOPTION OF RESOLUTION SUBJECT TO PERMISSIVE REFERENDUM BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF GREAT NECK PARK DISTRICT Notice is hereby given that the Board of Commissioners of the Great Neck Park District, at a regular meeting of the Board held on January 5, 2017, duly adopted the following resolution, which is subject to a permissive referendum: RESOLVED, that the Board appropriate the sum not to exceed $240,000 from the Park District’s Capital Reserve Fund to finance costs of acquiring eight (8) vehicles for Park District purposes; and be it further RESOLVED, that this resolution is subject to a permissive referendum as provided by law. Dated: Great Neck, New York January 6, 2017 By Order of the Board of Commissioners of the Great Neck Park District Dorina Bradley, Clerk to the Board GNN #144940 1X 01/13 /2017 #144940

LEGAL NOTICE RUSSELL GARDENS ASSESSMENTS NOTICE OF FILING FINAL ASSESSMENT ROLL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the final Assessment Roll for the Village of Russell Gardens for the fiscal year 3/01/20172/28/2018 has been filed with the Village Clerk at Village Hall, 6 Tain Drive, Russell Gardens, Great Neck, NY effective January 1,2017 where it may be examined by any person during Village business hours from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on any Village business day. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES STEVEN B.KIRSCHNER, MAYOR CHRISTINE BLUMBERG VILLAGE CLERK-TREASURER DATED:January 13,2017 GNN #144942 1X 01/13/2017 #144942

LEGAL NOTICE RUSSELL GARDENS ADOPTS BUDGET Please take notice that at a Public Hearing held on January 5, 2017

the Board of Trustees of the Inc. Village of Russell Gardens adopted its budget for the fiscal year commencing March 1, 2017 showing appropriations for estimated expenses and estimated revenues for said year. A copy of said budget is available at the office of the Village Clerk in the Village Hall, 6 Tain Drive, Russell Gardens,Great Neck,NY where it may be inspected by any interested person during regular office hours. Dated: January 13, 2017 BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES INC. VILLAGE OF RUSSELL GARDENS STEVEN B.KIRSCHNER MAYOR CHRISTINE BLUMBERG VILLAGE CLERKTREASURER GNN #144945 1x 01/13 /2017 #144945

Notice of Formation of BINYAN ENTERPRISES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/23/2016. Office location: Nassau County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 234642 Great Neck NY 11023. Purpose: any lawful purpose. GNN #144795 6x 12/23, 12/30/2016 01/06, 01/13, 1/20, 1/27/ 2017 #144795

Notice of Formation of PRIME BLOCK LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/14/2016. Office location: Nassau County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 234642 Great Neck NY 11023. Purpose: any lawful purpose. GNN #144796 6x 12/23, 12/30/2016 01/06, 01/13, 01/20, 01/27 /2017 #144796

Notice of Formation of TOP HILL ASSET LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/2016. Office location: Nassau County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

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SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 234642 Great Neck NY 11023. Purpose: any lawful purpose. GNN #144797 6x 12/23, 12/30/2016 01/06, 01/13, 01/20, 01/27 /2017 #144797

Notice of Formation of Linagallery LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/2016. Office location: Nassau County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 63 Old Field Lane, Great Neck, NY 11020. Purpose: any lawful purpose. GNN #144828 6x 12/30/2016, 01/06, 01/13, 01/20, 01/27, 02/03/2017 #144828

NOTICE OF SPECIAL DISTRICT MEETING GREAT NECK UNION FREE SCHOOL DISTRICT, IN THE COUNTY OF NASSAU, NEW YORK FEBRUARY 14, 2017 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a resolution of the Board of Education of the Great Neck Union Free School District, in the County of Nassau, New York, adopted on December 12, 2016, a Special District Meeting of the qualified voters of said School District will be held on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 from 7:00 o’clock A.M. (Prevailing Time) to 10:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time), at the following voting places: (1) the E.M. Baker School, 69 Baker Hill Road, Great Neck, New York, for those persons residing in Election District No. 1; and (2) the Great Neck South Senior High School, 341 Lakeville Road, Great Neck, New York, for those persons residing in Election District No. 2; for the purpose of voting upon the following Bond Proposition: BOND PROPOSITION RESOLVED: (a) That the Board of Education of the Great Neck Union Free School District, in the County of Nassau, New York (the ‘District’), is hereby authorized to undertake a capital improvement project (the ‘Project’), substantially as described in a Plan prepared for the District by BBS Architects Landscape Architects and Engineers PC (the ‘Plan’), which Plan is on file and available for public inspection at the office of the District Clerk, such Project to include (as and where needed): construction of a new building and additions to existing school buildings to provide instructional, auditorium, music, multi-purpose, and related support, office and mechanical space; roof and window reconstruction and/or replacement; interior reconstruction and/or reconfiguration, including improvements to facilitate access by the physically challenged; plumbing, electric, lighting, public address, heating, ventilation and air conditioning system improvements; replacement of lockers, casework, ceilings and doors; building envelope, exterior masonry, parking, fencing, field and drainage improvements, including a new parking lot; safety, security, technology and energy efficiency enhancements; and other improvements; all of the foregoing to include the original furnishings, equipment, machinery, apparatus and ancillary or related site, demolition and other work required in connection therewith; and to expend therefor, including preliminary costs and costs incidental thereto and to the financing thereof, an amount not to exceed the estimated total

cost of $95,407,955; provided that the estimated costs of the components of the Project as set forth in the Plan may be reallocated among such components if the Board of Education shall determine that such reallocation is in the best interest of the District; (b) that the amount of $9,507,955, currently on hand and available in the District’s General Fund’s unassigned fund balance, shall be applied to pay a portion of the cost of the Project; and (c) that a tax is hereby voted in the aggregate amount of not to exceed $85,900,000 to pay the balance of the cost of the Project, said tax to be levied and collected in installments in such years and in such amounts as shall be determined by said Board of Education; and that in anticipation of said tax, bonds of the District are hereby authorized to be issued in the principal amount of not to exceed $85,900,000 and a tax is hereby voted to pay the interest on said bonds as the same shall become due and payable. Such Bond Proposition shall appear on the ballots used for voting at said Special District Meeting in substantially the following condensed form: BOND PROPOSITION YES NO RESOLVED: (a) That the Board of Education of the Great Neck Union Free School District, in the County of Nassau, New York (the ‘District’ ), is hereby authorized to undertake a capital improvement project, and to expend therefor, including preliminary costs and costs incidental thereto and to the financing thereof, an amount not to exceed the estimated total cost of $95,407,955; (b) that the amount of $9,507,955, currently on hand and available in the District’s General Fund’s unassigned fund balance, shall be applied to pay a portion of the cost thereof; and (c) that a tax is hereby voted in the aggregate amount of not to exceed $85,900,000 to pay the balance of the cost, said tax to be levied and collected in installments in such years and in such amounts as shall be determined by said Board of Education; and that in anticipation of said tax, bonds of the District are hereby authorized to be issued in the principal amount of not to exceed $85,900,000 and a tax is hereby voted to pay the interest on said bonds as the same shall become due and payable. The voting will be conducted by ballot on voting machines or by paper ballot as provided in the Education Law and the polls will remain open from 7:00 o’clock A.M. (Prevailing Time) to 10:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time) and as much longer as may be necessary to enable the voters then present to cast their ballots. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that registration is permitted in the office of the District Clerk, Phipps Administration Building, 345 Lakeville Road, during the hours 9:00 o’clock A.M. (Prevailing Time) to 4:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time), Monday through Friday, up to and including February 9, 2017. A person shall be entitled to vote at said Special District Meeting who is a citizen of the United States, eighteen years of age, a resident of the School District for a period of thirty days next preceding the election at which he/she offers to vote, and is registered to vote at said Special District Meeting. A register will be prepared and will be filed in the office of the District Clerk. Any person shall be entitled to have his/ her name placed upon such

register, provided that he/she is known or proven to the satisfaction of such District Clerk to be then or thereafter entitled to vote at said Special District Meeting for which such register is prepared. The register of the qualified voters of said School District prepared for the Annual Meeting and Election held on May 17, 2016 shall be used as the basis for the preparation of the register for said Special District Meeting to be held on Tuesday, February 14, 2017. A person shall be registered to vote if he or she shall have permanently registered with the Nassau County Board of Elections or with the School District. Said register shall include (1) all qualified voters of the School District who shall present themselves personally for registration, and (2) all voters previously registered for any annual or special District election and who shall have voted at any annual or special District election held or conducted at any time within the four calendar years (2013-2016) prior to preparation of the register. Immediately upon its completion, the register will be filed in the office of the District Clerk at the Phipps Administration Building, 345 Lakeville Road, Great Neck, New York, and will be open for inspection by any qualified voter of the District between the hours of 9:00 o’clock A.M. (Prevailing Time) and 4:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time) on each of the five days prior to the day of the election, except Sunday, and between the hours of 9:00 o’clock A.M. (Prevailing Time) and 12:00 o’clock Noon (Prevailing Time) on Saturday, February 11, 2017; and at each polling place on the day of the vote. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that applications for absentee ballots may be applied for at the office of the District Clerk during regular business hours. If the ballot is to be mailed to the voter, the completed application must be received by the District Clerk no later than Tuesday, February 7, 2017. If the ballot is to be delivered personally to the voter at the office of the District Clerk, the completed application must be received by the District Clerk no later than Monday, February 13, 2017. No absentee voter’s ballot shall be canvassed, unless it shall have been received in the Office of the District Clerk no later than 5:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time) on the date of the vote. A list of all persons to whom absentee ballots shall have been issued will be available in the office of the District Clerk between the hours of 9:00 o’clock A.M. (Prevailing Time) and 4:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time) on each of the five days prior to the day of the vote, except Sunday, and between the hours of 9:00 o’clock A.M. (Prevailing Time) and 12:00 o’clock Noon (Prevailing Time) on Saturday. The boundaries of the Election Districts are as follows: Election District No. 1: Polling Place: the E.M. Baker School, 69 Baker Hill Road, Great Neck, New York. All that section of the School District lying north of the Long Island Railroad. Election District No. 2: Polling Place: Great Neck South Senior High School, 341 Lakeville Road, Great Neck, New York. All that section of the School District lying south of the Long Island Railroad. Only qualified voters who are duly registered will be permitted to vote. BY THE ORDER OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION GREAT NECK UNION FREE SCHOOL DISTRICT Dated: December 12, 2016 Michele Domanick, District

Clerk GNN #144800 4x 12/30/2016, 01/13, 01/27, 02/10/2017 #144800

NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Board of Education of Great Neck Union Free School District of the Town of North Hempstead, County of Nassau and the districts listed below, (in accordance with Section 103 of Article 5-1 of the General Municipal Law) hereby invites the submission of sealed bids for: FRESH PRODUCE Glen Cove City School District Great Neck Union Free School District North Shore Central School District for use in the schools of the District. Bids will be received unti1 9:30AM prevailing time on Friday, January 20, 2017 at the Purchasing Office, Phipps Administration Building, 345 Lakeville Road, Great Neck, New York 11020 at which time and place all bids will be publicly opened. Specifications and bid forms may be obtained at the same office. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive any informality in the bids, or to reject all bids, or to accept any bids which, in the opinion of the Board of Education, will be in the best interests of the School District. Any bid submitted will be binding for sixty (60) days subsequent to the date of bid opening. Board of Education, Great Neck Union Free School District, Great Neck, New York By: Jason Martin Purchasing Officer GNN #144934 1x 01/13 /2017 #144934

NOTICE OF RECEIPT OF TAX ROLL AND WARRANT PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the undersigned collector of taxes of the Village of Thomaston, in the County of Nassau, State of New York, has duly received the tax roll and warrant for collection of taxes within the Village of Thomaston for the year 2017-2018, and that I will attend for the purpose of collecting taxes listed on the tax roll at the Village Hall, 100 East Shore Road, Great Neck, New York 11023, from March 1, 2017 to March 31, 2017 during regular business hours. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that taxes will be received without interest by the collecting officer on or before March 31, 2017, or within thirty days of the date of first publication of this notice, whichever is later. On all taxes received after such date, there shall be added interest as provided by law until such taxes are paid. No partial payments of taxes may be made. Section 987(1) of the Real Property Law requires the collector, on or after the thirty first day following the expiration of the period during which taxes may be paid, without interest, to mail a notice to each owner of real property upon which taxes remain unpaid on the tax roll. Such notice must state, among other things, that the taxes on the property have not been paid. The expense of mailing such notice shall be an additional penalty of One Dollar ($1.00), chargeable against the parcel. Dated: January 10, 2017 Denise M. Knowland Village Administrator Village of Thomaston GNN #144956 2x 01/13, 01/20/2017 #144956


News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

61

Sports Westbury edges Port Washington BY G R E G ORY GIACONELLI The Westbury Green Dragons defeated the Port Washington Vikings 68-56 on Saturday afternoon, led by Jonathan Dean and Darius Young’s double double performances.

Westbury 68 Port Washington 56 Dean recorded 18 points and 10 rebounds while Young posted 12 points and 10 rebounds. Isiah Bien-Aise chipped in with 12 points and Khalid Ketchens added eight points and 12 rebounds for Westbury. Xavier Merriweather led Port Washington with 27 points. Port Washington head coach Sean Dooley said the team competed hard but couldn’t come up with the big shots in the final quarter. “We came out and executed for the most part,” Dooley said. “They made a couple of shots in the fourth quarter and we missed a couple. Basketball is a game of runs and they had the last run.” In the first quarter, Port Washington outscored Westbury 13-9. Merriweather led the way for Port Washington’s offense with nine points. He shot six points from the inside and capped off his opening quarter outing with a three point shot. In the second quarter, it was

a back and forth contest that saw both sides combine for 38 points. Jayln Donlap went 3-5 on the line and recorded seven points for Westbury. Merriweather continued his first half push with six more points in the second quarter and finished the half with 15 points. Garrett Ressa also added six points for Port Washington. Westbury outscored Port Washington 21-17 in the second quarter but both benches headed off to the locker room tied at 30 apiece. Dooley said the boys played well in the second quarter, especially on the transition. “We did a good job boxing out,” Dooley said. “That leads to good offense. You hit shots, you get rhythm and you feel good about yourself and that’s key.” In the third quarter, Westbury edged Port Washington 17-16 in the scoring and clinged onto a 47-46 lead heading into the final quarter. Bien-Aise led Westbury with five points while Jake Block led the Port Washington’s offense in the third. Block hit one shot from the inside, one from the three point mark and went 2-2 on the free throw line. In the fourth quarter, Westbury outscored Port Washington 21-10 and went on to win 68-56. Dean paced the Westbury offense with nine points, ending his 18 point game. Merriweather put up eight points for Port Washington in the final quarter. He made two three pointers and added a basket to fin-

Dominic’s 74-27. Kyle Murphy led Chaminade with 21 points while Bobby Connors recorded 12 points and seven rebounds.

Port Washington senior Xavier Merriweather (no. 22) 2. Port Washington senior Jake Block (no. 10) ish his 27 point game. Dooley said if the team was more patient in taking their shots in the final quarter, the outcome could have changed in their favor. “I think we got a little bit stagnant and quick on our shots,” Dooley said. “I thought we got some decent looks that we just didn’t knock down, that we were doing earlier in the game. We gotta knock down shots.” Weekly Boys Basketball Scores Tuesday, Jan. 3 Sewanhaka defeated Carey 56-23. Rahim Akinwunmi led Sewanhaka with 17 points, 11 rebounds and six assists while Giovanni Brice recorded 11 points and 11 rebounds. Roslyn defeated New Hyde Park 56-55. Ben Perez led Roslyn with 11 points while Jacori Clem-

ons led New Hyde Park with 22 points. Perez hit two free throws to put Roslyn ahead 56-52 with eight seconds left in the fourth quarter. Clemons sank a three point shot as time winded down in a last rally effort but the clock ran out. Great Neck North defeated Jericho 67-64. Julien Hakimian led Great Neck North with 25 points and 10 rebounds. Friends Academy defeated Mineola 47-32. Tayvon Alexander led Friends Academy with 13 points, five rebounds and five assists. Manny Martins led Mineola with 10 points. Oyster Bay defeated Wheatley 46-29. Devon Marmorale led Oyster Bay with 18 points and seven rebounds while Khalil Williams had 12 points, 16 rebounds and seven blocks. Michael Tragale led Wheatley with eight points. Chaminade defeated St.

Wednesday, Jan. 4 Hicksville defeated Port Washington 52-38. Connor McPartland led Hicksville with 28 points and four assists while Steve Pavlak chipped in with 10 points and five rebounds. Xavier Merriweather led Port Washington with 20 points. Manhasset defeated Calhoun 74-73. Peter Conlan led Manhasset with 30 points and five rebounds while Tom Santella had 11 points and 14 rebounds. Conlan netted two free throws with nine seconds left in the second overtime to seal the double overtime win. Great Neck South defeated MacArthur 57-48. Liam Blicher led Great Neck South with 16 points while Sheldon Henry recorded 11 points, eight assists and six rebounds. Herricks defeated Long Beach 59-44. Jordan Idaspe led Herricks with 29 points. Floral Park defeated Lawrence 59-37. Frank Phelan led Floral Park with 21 points. T.J. Cluess posted nine points, 12 rebounds and five assists while Brian Fox added 14 points for Floral Park. Friday, Jan. 6 Glen Cove defeated Floral Park 57-49. Jared Jackson led Glen Cove with 27 points. Kevin Ernest recorded 10 points while Chris Blissett collected five points and 12 rebounds for Glen Cove. Brian Fox led Floral Park with 16 points. Continued on Page 63

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62 News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

Mineola rides 2nd half surge in win BY G R E G ORY GIACONELLI The Mineola Lady Mustangs defeated the West Hempstead Lady Rams 57-24 on Friday evening, led by Victoria Venus’ 24-point performance.

Mineola 57 West Hempstead 24 Megan McCaffrey added 12 points for Mineola, which improved its record to 9-2 overall and 4-0 in conference play. Despite the margin of victory, head coach Dan Bailey said this was a game where they gutted it out and overcame a slow start. “We played a sloppy first half by turning the ball over and committing too many fouls,” Bailey said. “We played harder in the second half and came out with a pretty big win. We had more energy, intensity and dedication in the defensive end.” In the first quarter, each team recorded nine points apiece and combined for six fouls. McCaffrey led the Mineola offense with six points in the opening quarter. In the second quarter, Mineola co-captain Elizabeth Ryan scored six points while Venus added five to pace the offensive attack. Mineola took a 22-14 lead into halftime. Venus said going into the second half, they needed to get off to a good start to carry the momentum. “In the second half, we said we had to really pick it up as we were not playing the way we should have been,” Venus said. “That really impacted how we were thinking. We came out in the second half and just took it away from there.”

Mineola sophomore center Megan McCaffrey (no. 13) Ryan said the girls played a good team game in the second half and communicated on the court better. “We were able to talk more and worked together as a team,” Ryan said. “Basketball is a team sport. That’s what we had to do and that’s what we were able to do going into the second half.” In the third quarter, Mineola dominated West Hempstead 17-4. Venus and McCaffrey combined for 12 points in the quarter. In the final quarter, Venus took charge and posted 10 points for Mineola. She recorded four points from the interior and added six from the outside. Mineola went on to win 57-24. Venus said a big factor in her performance was her defensive play. “Overall, it all depends on your defense,” Venus said. “If you’re not having an offensive game, which I wasn’t in the beginning, your defense makes up for it.” Ryan, who finished with eight points in the game, said the secret behind Mineola’s success this season is due to Bailey’s coaching. “Coach Bailey is amazing,” Ryan said. “He brings us togeth-

er and is able to see everyone’s weaknesses. He pulls our heads together and makes us a better team.” Bailey said it was a combination of stout defense and clutch scoring that got his team the win. “We played some good defense and that translated into good offense,” Bailey said. “We began moving the ball better in the second half and we started making our layups.” Weekly Girls Basketball Scores Tuesday Jan. 3 Sewanhaka defeated Carey 59-12. Kate Weinschreider led Sewanhaka with 12 points, six assists and five rebounds. Destiny Hurt added 10 points and three rebounds while Ashley Cattle collected 10 rebounds for Sewanhaka. Floral Park defeated Lawrence 49-29. MaryKate Guerriero led Floral Park with 27 points and five assists while Faith Balletta recorded five points and 12 rebounds. Roslyn defeated New Hyde Park 47-42. Samantha Busch led Roslyn with 13 points and five assists. Joanna Mauceri led New Hyde Park with 15 points.

Jericho defeated Great Neck North 49-47. Marlee Lehrhoff led Jericho with 18 points and 11 rebounds. She scored 15 points in the second half. With 30 seconds left in the fourth quarter, Lehrhoff sank a three pointer and added two free throws to secure the win. Carolyn O’Byrne led Great Neck North with 13 points. St. Mary’s defeated Sacred Heart 52-45. Kadajah Bailey led St. Mary’s with 19 points. Wednesday Jan. 4 MacArthur defeated Great Neck South 34-31. Angeline Klein led MacArthur with 17 points. Klein made four free throws in the final two minutes, which gave MacArthur a onepoint lead. Shannon Myles’ two free throws with 35 seconds remaining extended the lead to three. Kristen Renta led Great Neck South with 10 points. Calhoun defeated Manhasset 44-30. Katie Healy led Calhoun with 20 points, eight rebounds and four assists. Elizabeth Kim led Manhasset with eight points. Herricks defeated Long Beach 40-26. Stephanie LaPlante and Chase McGahan led Herricks with 14 and 12 points respectively. Wheatley defeated Oyster Bay 64-24. Allison LaMonica led Wheatley with 21 points, five rebounds and five assists. Julia Braito recorded 13 points and five rebounds while Sam Rothstein had 12 points for Wheatley. Mineola defeated Friends Academy 62-42. Meghan McCaffrey and Vicki Venus led Mineola with 27 and 18 points respectively. Thursday Jan. 5 Port Washington defeated Hicksville 44-39. Rachel Rosen led Port Washington with a double double, 10 points and 10 rebounds. Rosen stole the ball and made two free throws with 1.9 seconds left to seal the win. Roslyn defeated Roosevelt

45-34. Samantha Busch led Roslyn with 14 points, eight rebounds and seven assists. Liana Drenis recorded 10 points while Emily Cohen posted seven points and 14 rebounds for Roslyn. Friday Jan. 6 Glen Cove defeated Floral Park 51-36. Destiny Howell led Glen Cove with 18 points. Grace Brady recorded 12 points and nine assists while Grace Woods chipped in with nine points and eight assists for Glen Cove. Natalie Hickman led Floral Park with 13 points. Elmont defeated Great Neck North 57-32. Zhaneia Thybulle led Elmont with 13 points and 11 assists. Kiera Holland and Gigi Faison also scored 13 points apiece for Elmont. Abigail Rabbany led Great Neck North with 14 points. St. Anthony’s defeated St. Mary’s 67-65. Maia Moffitt, who recorded 14 points for St. Anthony’s, sank a three point shot with three seconds remaining in overtime. Tamia Lawhorne, who led St. Anthony’s with 19 points and 20 rebounds, tied the game 56-56 with two free throws, after getting fouled with under a minute left in regulation. Kadajah Bailey led St. Mary’s with 29 points. East Rockaway defeated Wheatley 55-45. Alessia Drevnyak led East Rockaway with 20 points and 14 rebounds while Juliet McCarthy recorded 15 points. Allison LaMonica led Wheatley with 29 points. Saturday Jan. 7 Port Washington defeated Westbury 61-22. Tyler Owens and Rachel Rosen led Port Washington with 16 and 11 points respectively. Division defeated New Hyde Park 51-39. Emily Gillis led Division with 18 points while Nora Tracey recorded 15 points and 14 rebounds. Hannah Arkin led New Hyde Park with 12 points.

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, January 13, 2017

63

Floral Park runners rack up accolades BY G R E G ORY GIACONELLI The Floral Park varsity boys and girls cross country teams finished their respective campaigns with outstanding individual and team efforts. The girls finished as co-winners of Division 3B in Nassau Conference 3 while the boys posted a respectable .500 season in Conference 3, according to head coach Chris Renner. Renner said Emilee Becker, Kelly Courtney, Annaliese Nardi and Michelle Ashbahian received All-Conference honors and each played a vital role in allowing the girls to be crowned division cham-

pions. The girl’s biggest victory of the season came in the final league meet against Valley Stream North, bringing them to a three way tie for first place in the division, according to Renner. Renner said Matt Monahan and Paul Lubicich were named All County players for the boys team. According to Renner, Monahan finished in first place in each of the five Conference 3 league meets. Monahan ranked 14th out of 130 runners in the Bob Pratt Invitational at Sunken Meadow State Park. He also finished in ninth out of 183 runners in the Suffolk Coaches Invitational, which was

The Floral Park High School Boys Varsity Cross Country team also held at Sunken Meadow State Park. At the Nassau Coaches Invitational Meet, which took place at Bethpage State Park, Monahan placed second out of 96 runners.

The Floral Park High School Girls Varsity Cross Country team

According to Renner, the biggest milestone occurred at the State Qualifier Meet at Bethpage State Park, where Monahan scored a time of 16:50 in the 5K race.

Renner said Monahan advanced to the New York State Championships held at Chenango Valley State Park as a member of the Section 8 Nassau County Class B Boys Cross Country Team.

Westbury edges Port Washington Continued from Page 61 Roosevelt defeated Roslyn 85-60. Timmy Santana led Roosevelt with 31 points, 10 assists and six rebounds. Latrell Hollis recorded 11 points while Isaiah Stone scooped up 10 rebounds for Roosevelt. Johan Tenner and Omar Burns led Roslyn with 19 and 13

points respectively. West Hempstead defeated Mineola 53-46. Chris Jean-Louis led West Hempstead with 16 points and eight rebounds while Christian Martinez chipped in with 13 points. John McMahon led Mineola with 18 points. New Hyde Park defeated Divi-

sion 61-32. Nick Anthony and Tom Kamberis led New Hyde Park with 10 points apiece. Wheatley defeated East Rockaway 51-48. Stephen McCleary had nine points for Wheatley, including a free throw with 2.5 seconds remaining in the second overtime. East Rockaway’s Nick Parziale

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shot a three-pointer with 1:30 left in the first overtime to tie the game at 46. McCleary’s two free throws with 10 seconds remaining in regulation evened the score at 43. Michael Tragale led Wheatley with 18 points. St. Anthony’s defeated St.

Mary’s 48-31. Tyrone Lyons led St. Anthony’s with 10 points and 16 rebounds. Pierrce Perry led St. Mary’s with 14 points. Elmont defeated Great Neck North 65-54. K.C. Ndefo led Elmont with 18 points. Julien Hakimian led Great Neck North with 22 points.

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64 The Great Neck News, Friday, January 13, 2017

GN

“Making the Great Neck peninsula a wonderful place to work, live, & shop!”

Please Join Us for Business Over Breakfast With State Senator Elaine Phillips And Assemblyman Anthony D’Urso

Thursday, January 19th 2017

30 Cuermill Road, Great Neck Starts at 8:00 am FREE for Chamber Members $20.00 for Non-Chamber Members RSVP GreatNeckChamberMail@gmail.com For more information call : (516) 487-2000 Always stay up to date: www.greatneckchamber.org GreatNeckChamber

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