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INSIDE VOL. 23, NO. 11 | ON THE COVER: CHRIS BOVEY ILLUSTRATION

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY CULTURE

5 13 18 25

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

28 30 34 39

GREEN ZONE ADVICE GODDESS BULLETIN BOARD LAST WORD

41 44 45 46

EDITOR’S NOTE

A

s journalists, we spend most of our time spotlighting problems worthy of the public’s attention. It’s our honest attempt to make the world a little bit better. But with our last issue of the year, we decided to look back at 2015 through a different lens, seeking evidence of PROGRESS in our community. We started with one question — How far have we come? — that inevitably led to more. For one: How do you actually measure progress? In the end, we gravitated toward stories that showed growth — businesses that opened, others that expanded, people whose careers took off and, because we’re suckers for Macklemore and Spokane’s own Ryan Lewis, one epic music video. (Coverage begins on page 18.) Also this week: In News, read about the local NAACP chapter’s efforts to rebound after RACHEL DOLEZAL (page 13), and in Comment, we have a guest editorial (page 8) from the chairwoman of Spokane’s OMBUDSMAN commission, with a frank assessment of SPD’s progress this year. — JACOB H. FRIES, editor

PROCESSED BY SLAVES PAGE 17

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COMMENT | IDAHO

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W

ild winds almost blew our corner of the world off the planet this past Nov. 17. Now that winter had its official start on Dec. 21, will wild ice and wild snow follow? Even the most conservative critics now must recognize that the globe is actually warming up season by season. The results from the recently concluded Paris Conference, which involved 196 international parties, give some hope for a worldwide curb on carbon-belching, man-made machines of every variety. I’ve lived in North Idaho long enough to have a tale or two to share this holiday season, about local winters when they were longer and much colder than those we enjoy/endure today. Almost six decades ago, my husband Scott and I moved from boringly sunny California to chilly North Idaho in search of a four-season climate. We wanted snow to ski on, and most important, ice on which to skate. Right off the bat, we hit be-carefulwhat-you-wish-for territory. But we wished for cold and were ecstatic. The first year, the temperature dropped to zero before Thanksgiving. We merrily skated on little Avondale Lake. That January, we skated all over Hayden Lake, shoveling our names in the snow when it covered the ice. It was late April before the ice finally melted off Hayden. I remember that Scott took a quick dip in the lake — water so cold he required an immediate slug of restorative brandy.

The ice was slick, with the water lapping at its edges. The iceboat danced in the wind. Unfortunately, at one turn Pat slipped off the boat and painfully injured his hip. His ice-high friends propped him up against a tree onshore, handing him a flask of spirits to ease the pain, while they kept flying over the ice until dark. The excitement of speed and fear made them just too giddy to quit. You can guess that some individuals sometimes just had to fall in. It was not unusual for a skater to get a foot wet, or to pull out a child or dog to safety. In the distant past, a team of horses

The ice was slick, with the water lapping at its edges. The iceboat danced in the wind...

M

oving in to Coeur d’Alene, old-timers told us tales of the ice industry that flourished until the availability of electric refrigerators ran the ice delivery service out of business. In those earlier days, Valley Ice and Fuel Company employees would deliver large chunks of ice to the back-porch iceboxes of homes around town. The ice was carved out in massive chunks from Fernan Lake and Lake Coeur d’Alene and stored in a warehouse just a few blocks from Sanders Beach. Up until very recent times, Fernan Lake would freeze solid every year. Families would turn out en masse to skate, stumble, fall and just have a grand old time. Clamp-on skates that could be adjusted to boot size were passed down from sibling to sibling. The smallest kids moved uncertainly on double runners. Tempting fate, crazy old guys and teenage boys would drive cars onto the ice to spin and slide, just for the fun of it. In the late ’50s, our pal Patrick Flammia introduced his friends to an iceboat, which on a windy day could give its riders a scary thrill, zipping back and forth across Fernan Lake under sail power in seconds each way. The fellows ventured onto Lake Coeur d’Alene one windy day when the sun was high.

reportedly sank through the ice beyond reach of horrified bystanders. But in general, if the weather was cold enough, the ice would hold.

P

erhaps the worst ice disaster in my memory was the loss of the king of the lake, Fred Murphy, who rode his snowmobile right through the ice on Lake Coeur d’Alene in the winter of 1986. Fred and his wife Ginny lived year-round in a home on Casco Bay that could be reached only by boat. In winters when the ice covered the lake, their children skated to school. His son Loren once told me about the mystic joy of skating home by moonlight after a high school event. It has been a long time since Lake Coeur d’Alene has completely frozen over. Even the smaller, shallower lakes can’t be relied upon for solid wild ice. It’s commendable that wild ice has been replaced by ice rinks, built by younger, energetic ice enthusiasts who now provide artificial ice for future stars to engage in the great sport of ice hockey. It’s easy to long for totally green, non-carbonreleasing natural ice, just as it’s easy to long for young bones and sturdy legs to skate with. We have to start from now and go forward, not backward, in time or technology. Here’s wishing you the ice of your choice — on skates or in a glass — snow for snowmen, soft landings, warm hearths (and hearts) and good health and good times in 2016 — and beyond. Peace on Earth! n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Home Design is a Work of Art

Onward and Upward BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

W

e, the media, are pretty good at pointing out the problems. Here at the Inlander, of course, we aim to include some reporting on how to improve the situation — a postscript of hope, if you will. But over on TV, there’s often a steady diet of shootings, prowlings and the latest weather catastrophe. At times, it can feel like we’re marinating in gloom. Or as Donald Trump so succinctly likes to put it: “We’re doomed!” So to rise above it all here on the edge of 2016, we’re digging deep into the good old days of pioneer journalism to revive the “Progress Edition.” Back when the West was still being won, newspapers serving outposts of all sizes and prospects published a progress edition to mark the ground gained. These were the days when cities competed with each other in the size of their parks system, the height of their courthouse and whether the railroad decided to come through. The prize was new settlers — humanpower to make their city even bigger and better. Of course our ideas about growth have become more nuanced in the years since Manifest Destiny, but quality-of-life concerns and pride of place matter more than ever. There are winners and losers — no city’s prosperity is guaranteed — and every region makes its own future, project by project, year by year. With all the cacophony, it can be hard to recognize progress, so put the controversies aside for a moment and consider some of the highlights from 2015. On the beer-and-pizza index, for example, we’re booming. And the Inland Northwest may have just had its most productive budget session ever in Olympia. Take that, Tacoma!

J

ust a month from now, the good citizens of Iowa will congregate for their traditional presidential caucus that, some say, will have no actual bearing on the selection of our next president. But it does mark the official start of the presidential campaign. As we’ve done in 2008 and 2012, we’ll devote an entire column to that race and others; we call it Trail Mix, which you’ll find in this space starting next week. My Publisher’s Note will take a break, but starting in February I’ll offer up a monthly column. In Trail Mix, we’ll do some of the heavy lifting of separating fact from fantasy, with a dash of the ridiculous. Of course, choosing our leader is serious business, so we’ll try to arm you with the information you need to participate in our democracy wisely. n

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COMMENT | GUEST EDITORIAL unacceptable candidate. Fortunately, Raheel Humayun appears to be eminently qualified and, in November, accepted the employment package offered. Unfortunately, the only qualified candidate forwarded by the committee is not a U.S. citizen, so we are now in the process of trying to get Humayun a visa. Accordingly, we still need the interim ombudsperson who never made it out of committee. A new selection committee has been formed and is being very diligent in moving forward. We hope to have finalists for the interim ombudsperson by mid-January. As chair of the OPOC, I was encouraged by what appeared to be a new spirit of getting this done as efficiently and effectively as possible. Yet last week I learned

In spite of the year of setbacks and frustrations, I expect 2016 to be a year of accomplishments. CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

A Year of Disappointment A frank assessment from Spokane’s police ombudsman commission BY DEB CONKLIN

W

hen it comes to Spokane’s law enforcement functions and the citizen oversight envisioned by Proposition 1 (now Article 16 of the Spokane City Charter), 2015 has been a year of disappointments, despite finally having the Office of Police Ombudsman Commission (OPOC) in place. Ombudsman Tim Burns announced his resignation on Dec. 12, 2014 — more than a year ago — yet we still do not have even an interim ombudsperson. The selection committee, chaired by the Spokane city attorney, began

meeting in January, but refused to recommend candidates for the interim, in spite of the clear language of the Spokane municipal code and a unanimous May resolution from the city council. The selection committee finally forwarded three names for the permanent ombudsperson to the OPOC in mid-July. Within 24 hours, remarks by candidate Allen Huggins on social media were discovered that raised serious questions about his ability to win the trust of our community. A formal background check done by the OPOC (after learning that the selection committee had failed to do one), made it clear that problems with candidate Robert Breeden’s tenure in Florida made him an

that it has taken four weeks for the city just to complete a contract with the immigration attorney who had been agreed to even before Humayun accepted the offer. In spite of the year of setbacks and frustrations, I expect 2016 to be a year of accomplishments. The city council has made some improvements to the ombudsman ordinance, and we will continue to improve the ordinance. We will have an interim ombudsperson in place early next year who will stay until the permanent ombudsman takes office. In contrast to the first selection committee, which did virtually all of its work in closed session, the OPOC’s entire process took place in open session with significant public participation. The new selection committee appears to be committed to a similar level of transparency. With an ombudsperson in place, we can deal with the full year’s backlog of complaints, and restore the public confidence that there is real civilian oversight of SPD. Continued work on the ordinance will ensure that the OPO is never again vacant for more than a year. We move forward with a commission and an OPO committed to engaging the community, listening to all parties and providing real oversight for Spokane. n Deb Conklin, a United Methodist pastor and a former deputy prosecutor involved in social justice ministries in Spokane, currently serves as the chair of the Office of Police Ombudsman Commission.

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FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT THE 10 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015


COMMENT | FROM READERS

NORTHERN QUEST PRESENTS

JAKE THOMAS PHOTO

ON INLANDER.COM

Readers respond to last week’s story, “Grazed and Confused,” on the battle between the Washington State Department of Ecology and the state’s cattle ranchers over protecting water sources while maintaining the ranchers’ livelihoods: JOHN ROSKELLEY: I’ve hunted pheasants throughout southeast Washington for 55 years and have seen firsthand how environmentally destructive grazers and agricultural growers have become as technology has advanced. First of all, there’s no excuse to allow cattle to eliminate streamside vegetation and pollute the public’s creeks and rivers. Ranchers need to follow established law and the Department of Ecology’s Olympia-based managers need to allow its enforcement officers in the field to do their job. Wheat farmers and agri-business are more often than not the Darth Vaders of conservation. I have photos of creeks and streams in Spokane, Whitman, and Asotin counties, which I can’t add to this comment page, that show complete elimination of wetlands and streams; creek realignment via backhoe; and total destruction of creek and stream wildlife habitat by using herbicide spraying and burning, cultivation to the edge of the waterway and sometimes into it, or removal of vegetation by backhoe. You don’t have to take my word for it, or my photos. All you have to do is go on Google Earth and use its historical satellite imagery. All the destruction is right there at the click of a mouse. The Conservation Reserve Program was a good program to curtail erosion and enhance wildlife habitat, but that program seems to be in decline, possibly from rising wheat prices or a change in the remuneration per acre. The Ruckelshaus Center tried to come up with some pilot programs to increase farm profitability and, at the same time, enhance environmental protections, but so far this process is in limbo. The groups couldn’t agree. As this process struggles with a few pilot programs since 2009, the farmers have used the time to eliminate wildlife habitat and destroy wetlands and creeks, knowing full well they may be regulated in the future. And advanced technology allows them to get this done on the steepest and wettest ground. It’s a good article, but it should have been expanded to cover a number of creeks and streams in Eastern Washington, including Deadman Creek and the Little Spokane. YVONNE THOMPSON DAVIS: I live on a lake in northeast Washington that is dying/dead. The EPA tested the waters of the lake and the creek inlet and found that the level of E. coli was 1,200 parts per million coming into the lake from the creek. There are cattle being grazed in/along the creek north of the lake, but the cattle rancher and landowner say that cows have grazed there for 100 years, so it is OK. There are probably some other factors contributing to the death of the lake, but you can not tell me that when E. coli levels are bad at 100 ppm that 1,200 ppm is OK. n

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Spokane NAACP President Naima Quarles-Burnley, at a fundraiser in November, has sought to draw in other community groups into the organization.

ACTIVISM

After Dolezal After becoming the subject of international mockery and scrutiny for its former president, the Spokane NAACP becomes a less leader-focused organization BY DANIEL WALTERS

A

t a crowded NAACP fundraiser at a Northern Quest Resort & Casino banquet hall in November, the speeches don’t mention the name “Rachel Dolezal” once. Back in June, the Coeur d’Alene Press had revealed that Dolezal, a white woman, had been posing as black,

including in her column in the Inlander and in her role as Spokane NAACP president. In an instant, Dolezal and the NAACP had been thrust into an international media whirlwind, facing scrutiny, mockery and debate. But at this event, Spokane NAACP President Naima Quarles-Burnley brushes off the impact of her predeces-

KRISTEN BLACK PHOTO

sor with an understatement. “Well, we’ve had quite an interesting year, haven’t we,” she says. Laughter ripples across the banquet hall. Then Quarles-Burnley moves on to more serious topics: The Voting Rights Act, incarceration and inequity in education. “As we look at Spokane Public Schools, we recognize the expulsion rate of students of color, and the suspension rate for students of color, is much higher than it should be,” she says. “In Spokane, a person of color is eight times more likely to be jailed than a person of Caucasian descent. Our freedoms are under fire.” In the half-year since the Dolezal news broke, the Spokane NAACP’s focus has once again turned toward defending those freedoms. Doing that has meant dressing the wounds left by the controversy — and the wounds that predated it. “We had to rebuild trust,” Quarles-Burnley says. “People began to question the integrity of the organization.” ...continued on next page

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 13


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Rachel Dolezal, at a MLK rally last January, became a media sensation over the summer.

The outgoing message on the NAACP voicemail shows just how chaotic things got this year: “Please be advised if you left us a message during the month of June, it was deleted due to a system overload.” Even before June, the year had been tumultuous. Two other vice-presidents of the organization had resigned during Dolezal’s brief tenure, meaning that Quarles-Burnley, a local minister for Bethel A.M.E., vaulted from third in line to the presidency. The Dolezal controversy, Quarles-Burnley says, caused the group to pause for self-reflection. “What was the culture of our organization?” she says. “Why were we so central-focused on the president, when there were a lot of other people doing things?” Despite only being president since January, Dolezal had become synonymous with the NAACP’s public persona. She was the one quoted in newspapers, up front in photographs. In March, the community rallied in support of Dolezal herself, who had claimed to have been the victim of nine hate crimes in the past decade. Later reporting called several of those claims into question. For Quarles-Burnley, this was a cautionary tale about the dangers of putting too much of the organization’s reputation in the hands of one person. “[Quarles-Burnley] works hard, she’s tireless,” says Sandy Williams, creator of The Black Lens, a newspaper focused on Spokane’s black community. “She knew, I believe, that she needed to mend some fences and build some bridges.” Part of Quarles-Burnley’s bridge-building technique has been to shift the focus away from the office of president. That strategy was evident at the June 19 press conference after the Dolezal news broke. “We chose not to have a press conference where I was the only speaker,” Quarles-Burnley says. “It became, hopefully, apparent to the community that there were many more people behind the scenes.” Instead, she brought a row of chairs for the entire executive team, and they answered questions as a group. They’ve pushed back against the idea, popular in some national media stories, that Dolezal deserved full credit for the recent gains the organization had made. “With regard to the accomplishments of Ms.

Dolezal, she was only president of the Spokane NAACP for five months,” Quarles-Burnley wrote in an email to Vice in its recent sympathetic profile of Dolezal. “While she did bring new ideas and new energy, the record does not support that as a single individual she increased the perceived or actual power or influence of the Spokane NAACP.” At the end of June, the Spokane NAACP held a meeting titled “Conversation: Moving Towards Healing,” all about dealing with the feelings of betrayal and mistrust stemming from the Dolezal scandal. She says they met personally with some of the members who protested Dolezal. A few have returned to meetings, while others have remained at a distance. In the months since, the Spokane NAACP membership of about 200 has actually grown. During the chaotic summer, about 30 new people joined, says Quarles-Burnley. Each month since, they’ve added three or four new members. Spokane NAACP Vice President Phillip Tyler says lapsed members, who once felt isolated by the focus on the president, have returned to the fold. “They’ve had a conversation with me: ‘I’m coming back after not being active for a long time because I feel that I can have a voice in the organization,’” Tyler says. “I think that speaks volumes. By lauding the efforts of one, it marginalizes the efforts of many.” At NAACP meetings, he says, the executives have concentrated on listening over talking. “One of the biggest things I’ve heard, to be honest, is that people did not know the NAACP had a presence in Spokane until it blew up in the national spotlight,” Tyler says. Even fewer knew that anyone — black, white, Hispanic, American Indian — could join. In response, the Spokane NAACP wants to be visible everywhere. It has not only filled open committee slots in the NAACP, it’s linked up with other advocacy groups like the American Civil Liberties Union, the Asian Pacific Islander Coalition, the Council on American–Islamic Relations and Planned Parenthood. “The NAACP is going to have fingers or tentacles in so many different community and governmental organizations that our influence can’t be cut off because one person becomes inactive or becomes ineffective,” Quarles-Burnley says. “[So] that no one thinks ever again that you take down one individual and then an entire organization is going to crumble.”


YOUNG AND OLD

Not everyone’s as optimistic. Bob Lloyd, a member of the Spokane NAACP since 1974, came to the November fundraiser banquet. The sizable attendance — more than 300 — did little to temper his discouragement. “Everybody showed up in the NAACP banquet. They’re all going to say they’ve paid their dues,” Lloyd says. “But they’re not going to do a damn thing.” Upon witnessing the international feeding frenzy over Dolezal, he’s skeptical that anyone would be raring to take on local power structures now. “Who would put their neck out there now?” Lloyd says. “You promote leaders and you push them up there on a pedestal, where you can push them off at will.” The Dolezal fallout did have a sort of chilling effect, QuarlesBurnley says. The NAACP has became more careful to avoid saying anything inflammatory, or anything that could be taken out of context. In Lloyd’s case, his frustration has simmered for a long time. But he’s cautious: He doesn’t want his willingness to point out flaws to dampen the enthusiasm of those who are trying their best. For him, the tenure of the comparatively young Dolezal imbued the NAACP with the energy it needed. As a lecturer at Eastern Washington University, she recruited a crowd of young, racially diverse college students to attend NAACP meetings. When she left, Lloyd says, the young people disappeared too. Lloyd says he wants the NAACP to be less in the hands of old ministers, and more in the hands of passionate youngsters. “Something happens when you age. You have mortgages. You worry about retirement,” Lloyd says. “You’re not dreaming anymore. You’re trying to hold onto the little bit of nothing that you’ve got.” To recruit younger members, Tyler says, the NAACP has been contacting local college organizations, like black student union groups. He suggests using tools like Facebook and Instagram to keep the youth engaged. Williams, the Black Lens founder, points to an occasional divide in the local NAACP, defined by a split between the young and the old, between newcomers and veterans. There are echoes of the national debate over Black Lives Matter, in a year where the movement’s protests have shut down highways and even disrupted rallies for progressive presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. Do you work through the existing system to make changes, the debate goes, or try to upend it? Williams argues that you need both strategies. “One of the reasons Martin Luther King was as effective as he was is you had Malcolm X, too,” Williams says. The local NAACP often takes the cooperative route. They’re partnering with Spokane Public Schools to address discipline disparities. They’re working with law enforcement groups to implement “smart justice” reforms. Quarles-Burnley is on the Police Leadership Advisory Committee, the organization tasked with picking the new police chief after Frank Straub’s sudden ouster in September. It’s also tasked with figuring out what a “culture audit” of the organization would look like. “That needs to be done sooner than later,” QuarlesBurnley says. At other times, as with controversies over Confederate flags and blackface Halloween costumes, the Spokane NAACP has been rapid and unequivocal in its condemnation. In the August issue of The Black Lens, Quarles-Burnley lambasted Patrick Rushing, mayor of Airway Heights, for feeling he could “callously disregard and disrespect” African Americans by comparing Barack and Michelle Obama to a monkey and a gorilla, respectively, on Facebook. Two weeks later, Rushing resigned. But plenty of work remains. On Monday, a grand jury in Cleveland refused to indict the cop who shot and killed Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old black child, within seconds of spotting Rice’s weapon, which turned out to be a pellet gun. “It is a reinforcement that, systemically, black lives do not matter as much the lives of [other] people,” Quarles-Burnley says. For 96 years and counting, the Spokane NAACP has been fighting to change that. n danielw@inlander.com

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 15


NEWS | BRIEFS

NEWS | DIGEST

Official Review

PHOTO EYE MAJOR AIR

An investigator is selected to examine the Condon-Straub scandal; plus, candidates line up to replace Todd Mielke PUBLIC PROBE

Spokane Mayor David Condon and Council President Ben Stuckart settled on a former federal prosecutor as their pick to investigate the city’s handling of SEXUAL HARASSMENT ALLEGATIONS against the former chief of police as well as other personnel decisions and the release of public records. The city council is expected to vote to approve the recommendation at its meeting on Monday. Kris Cappel, a principal consultant for the Seattle-based Seabold Group, has experience prosecuting and investigating a variety of crimes during her 11-year career as an attorney. As a federal prosecutor in New York, Cappel prosecuted crimes such as murder, kidnapping, extortion, fraud and public corruption. She also has experience in employment law investigations. At the center of the probe in Spokane is Frank Straub, who was ousted from his position as police chief in September. Since then, LETTERS details surrounding Condon’s Send comments to decisions have trickled out. Former editor@inlander.com. police spokeswoman Monique Cotton accused Straub of sexual harassment in April. She was transferred to a new position in the parks department in May without a formal inquiry into her accusations while Straub remained chief. Police brass have also accused Straub of vulgar and inappropriate language, yelling and threatening to terminate their employment. Then there’s the matter of Straub’s claim against the city to the tune of $4 million. A joint committee made up of Councilwoman Karen Stratton, city council attorney Brian McClatchey, private attorney Laura McAloon and City Utility Director Rick Romero will continue to narrow the scope of the investigation. (MITCH RYALS)

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Four-year-old Nathan launches down a hill at Franklin Elementary School a couple of days before Christmas. With the Inland Northwest covered in several layers of snow for the holidays, temperatures for the next week will dip down below 20 degrees with patchy, freezing fog blanketing the area. Better bundle up!

On Inlander.com MORE INLANDER NEWS EVERY DAY

THE COMMISH

With Republican Spokane County Commissioner Todd Mielke leaving the board at the end of January, the names of POTENTIAL REPLACEMENTS have started to trickle in to the Spokane County Republican Party. Josh Kerns, legislative aide for Washington state Rep. Jeff Holy and co-owner of a small marketing graphic design company, was among the first to throw his hat into the ring. He’s already rounded up a long list of endorsements for his candidacy, including Spokane City Councilman Mike Fagan, state Rep. Matt Shea and state Sen. Michael Baumgartner, and the bloc of libertarian Spokane Valley councilmen. In certain respects, Kerns is more fiscally conservative than the current Republican-dominated board members. Kerns says that his positive relationships with community members would help bridge the divide between local Republican factions. Former state Sen. Jeff Baxter has also declared his intention to seek the county commissioner seat. Spokane County GOP chairman Dave Moore says he’s heard from six others who’ve expressed some interest in the position, and expects the other serious contenders to announce shortly after New Year’s. On Feb. 6, at New Life Church in Spokane Valley, the Spokane County GOP precinct officers are scheduled to vote on their top three nominees to send to the two remaining commissioners. Commissioners Al French and Shelly O’Quinn will make the final decision. (DANIEL WALTERS)

16 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

STILL THE SEASON Still in the holiday spirit? Last week, the Inlander listed some of the best TV CHRISTMAS EPISODES of all time, from Lost’s “The Constant” to Doctor Who’s powerful sci-fi spin on A Christmas Carol to the best animated Christmas special of a property based on a popular newspaper comic strip, “A Garfield Christmas Special.” We also got Simpsons writer Michael Price to weigh in on one of our favorite Simpsons Christmas episodes, “’Tis the 15th Season.” Check it out on the blog, and complain in the comments about us not including anything from The Office. (DANIEL WALTERS)

BACK TO BUSINESS Spokane City Council will resume work next week after taking a holiday break. One of its first orders of business will be a proposed revision to council rules that would allow people to speak only once a month during its OPEN FORUM period, where the public can directly address the city’s lawmakers on almost any topic. The council also will consider a delayed ordinance mandating that most private employers in Spokane allow workers to earn paid time off to deal with illness or domestic violence. Council President Ben Stuckart says he’ll also take steps in the coming weeks to prevent a controversial initiative petition concerning how the city handles immigrants from reaching the November 2017 ballot. (JAKE THOMAS)


NEWS | SEAFOOD

Peeled Back

Why America’s favorite seafood is tainted by slavery, and how you can avoid it BY JAKE THOMAS

I

f you’ve recently tumbled a bag of frozen shrimp into a frying pan for dinner, there’s a chance that modern-day slave labor had a hand in preparing your meal. Thai shrimp processing plants hold captive and enslave Burmese immigrants, forcing them to work 16 hours a day pulling guts, heads, tails and shells off of shrimp bound for grocery stores and restaurants across the U.S., according to an investigation by the Associated Press. The enslaved workers, according to the AP, began their day at 2 am and labored under supervisors who threatened them with violence, denied them medical care and referred to them only by designated numbers. The AP also found that slave labor is used to catch other seafood that makes its way into global commerce. “Children worked alongside [adult laborers], including a girl so tiny she had to stand on a stool to reach the peeling table,” reads an AP report. “Some had been there for months, even years, getting little or no pay.” Shrimp processed with forced labor can be found in supply chains of grocery stores and retailers in all 50 states, the AP says, including Walmart, Kroger and Whole Foods, as well as restaurant chains Olive Garden and Red Lobster. In response to the AP report, Whole Foods, Red Lobster and Olive Garden’s parent companies issued statements denying that they used shrimp peeled by slave labor. Each company based their statements, in part, on assurances from Thai Union Group, a large seafood supplier, that announced that it cut ties with the processing facilities at the center of the AP’s report. But Myriam Fallon, communications coordinator for Greenpeace, takes statements like these with skepticism, noting Thailand’s long struggle with human trafficking and the difficulty of tracing supply lines in the country. “It’s very difficult to prove that it’s not tainted if you’re buying from that region,” says Fallon. On a recent trip to a local Walmart, the Inlander found bags of frozen shrimp imprinted with a “Product of Thailand” label from a brand the AP has linked to slavery. Walmart previously issued a statement expressing alarm about what the AP uncovered, but stopped short of saying its supply line was affected. Melinda Merrill, a spokeswoman for Fred Meyer, told the Inlander that the grocery chain’s parent company, Kroger, takes the situation seriously. But she could neither confirm nor deny that shrimp peeled by Thai slave labor could be found in Fred Meyer stores. “At this point all I can tell you is that we are working with our suppliers,” she says. When asked how to avoid shrimp tainted by slave labor on a Reddit “Ask Me Anything” post, Martha Mendoza, an AP writer who worked on the story, responded that almost every grocery store had been affected, before adding, “If you live near the sea, buy local.” Managers at local seafood companies Northstar Seafoods and Fisherman’s Market Grill & Sushi both say the AP story hasn’t affected their business because they get most of their shrimp from Mexico. Local restaurants Milford’s Fish House and Clinkerdagger say the same. Steve Kelly, assistant general manager for seafood giant Pacific Seafood, says his company harvests its shrimp in Texas. Despite vows of reform and calls for boycotts, Mendoza, writing on the Reddit AMA, says the problem remains: “There is more oversight in seafood to protect dolphins than there is to protect humans.”  jaket@inlander.com

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 17


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18 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

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It was hard n Spokane. Th ade a big in downtow of hotels m Grand Hotel m enport fa ily June 17 across from av D e th to on tion hen it opened tel, which impression w vention Center. The ho Con aurants, the Spokane st rooms and three rest er ue g nu 6 ple, a mb features 71 out 400 peo ab hite w to g s b in jo er w provided 600. The to to se ri n io on ill to that could so cost a reported $135 m ch d continued hi w an structure, ane skyline n. ok Sp e th ed of downtow build, reshap the east side people on d en tr n io n nt whe a revitalizat is so consiste feel like “The reaction tell us that they don’t ty. It ey ci Th er . g by much big enter the lob orate but rather a rp e, co an , ok en Sp ns they’re in ys Matt Je sa ,” el fe t at or s th enp ting for Dav definitely ha les and marke sa of r to ec ir d E BOOKEY) Hotels. (MIK

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 19


Progress Edition Q&A WITH GRANT FORSYTH, CHIEF ECONOMIST AT AVISTA CORP.

INLANDER: WHAT IS THE FIRST METRIC YOU CONSIDER WHEN EVALUATING THE STRENGTH OF THE LOCAL ECONOMY? FORSYTH: The main indicator I look at is employment. It’s been an incredibly strong year for employment growth in Spokane and Kootenai counties. When the numbers come in, I think we’ll have 3 percent job growth this year, and we haven’t seen that kind of growth since 2006. We got hit pretty hard by recession in 2008 and took longer to recover than other areas. WHY IS THAT? There’s a couple reasons. We started to see the benefit of the low interest rate policy that the Federal Reserve implemented. We also got past some bigger policy issues with health care. Once the Affordable Care Act passed, the health care sector started to hire again, and I think that’s one of the things that really helped the region because the service sector started to grow. Health care is a big part of that. WHAT ABOUT UNEMPLOYMENT IN THE REGION? We’re seeing very low unemployment rates. They’re back down to what I would consider normal levels. In Kootenai County, for example, the unemployment rate may come in under 5 percent. That’s incredibly low. HOW ARE WE LOOKING GOING FORWARD? An indicator for future growth that I like to follow is initial claims for unemployment insurance. For Spokane and Kootenai counties combined, initial claims have fallen to levels below those in 2006, when claims were way down. That’s another sign that the labor market is very strong, and the balance has shifted toward workers. It signals continued growth into 2016. We’ll start to see upward pressure on wages, which we have not seen for quite a while. Also, a leading indicator of future growth are permits for construction. I follow both commercial and residential permitting, and both came in very strong this year, which is pretty strong signal that we’ll have continued growth into 2016. As permits for construction increase, that’s a strong indicator of employment growth and overall economic activity in the region. DO YOU HAVE ANY CONCERNS? There’s still some continued uncertainty about the future of Fairchild Air Force Base. I think the military would like to go through another round of base closings as it did several years ago. Another other issue is that Canada, an important partner for us in this region, is not seeing as much growth, and the dollar is much stronger. It’s more expensive for Canadians to buy our goods and come here as tourists. And finally, there are concerns if the winter peters out on us and we’re left in a situation with low water and high fire danger. Another year of severe fires is not going to be good for the regional economy. (MITCH RYALS)

20 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

SPOKANE POLICE EXPAND USE OF BODY CAMERAS

The Spokane Police Department bought 220 body cameras in the spring of 2014. As of mid December of 2015, 203 officers were sporting the playing-card-sized cams. The rest are reserved for training and new hires. So far, a total of 6.22 terabytes of footage has been logged. That’s 4,836 hours. There have been 235 requests for body camera footage; 168 of those have been filled. The biggest gripe among officers? There’s no official policy in place that tells them how and when to activate the cameras. Currently, the draft policy provides guidelines but no official rules, meaning there are no repercussions for violating them. Tim Schwering, director of strategic initiatives for SPD, says the policy should be codified within a few months. (MITCH RYALS)


ERN ZES LANTM E S E N I CH IVAL MES ERI FEST S VISITOR Rather than simply surpass expectations, the inaugural Washington State Chinese Lantern Festival this past fall simply denied anyone an accurate guess at how positively received it would be. After more than a year and a half of planning and weeks of setup, the grassy slopes of Riverfront Park were awash in vivid colors and light each evening for seven full weeks — two weeks longer than originally scheduled. Organizers with Spokane Parks & Recreation and Visit Spokane projected that the culturally immersive experience would sell around 50,000 tickets (priced between $12 and $17 per person), but final attendance estimates reached 80,000 event-goers. Those visitors also spent an estimated $4.6 million in the city as they attended the festival, booking more than 800 hotelroom nights, Visit Spokane reports. (CHEY SCOTT)

O

about The festival drew

. YOUNG KWAK PHOT 80,000 people

COEUR D’ALENE’S URBAN DEVELOPMENT AGENCY MOVES FORWARD

Coeur d’Alene’s urban development agency, ignite cda, faced criticism in the weeks leading up to November’s city council election. Toby Schindelbeck, a local business owner looking to unseat longtime incumbent Ron Edinger, came out in support of dissolving the agency and giving control of the public funds it manages to elected officials. In November, Dan English knocked off conservative incumbent Steve Adams, who also voiced support for nixing ignite cda. State Senator Mary Souza called out the organization for spending $120,000 on a rebranding and “public relations campaign” when the board voted to change the name from Lake City Development Corporation to “ignite cda.” With victories for Edinger and English, and $6.5 million in tax increment funds for the 2015-16 fiscal year, ignite cda is full steam ahead. Projects on its radar in the next few years, according to Executive Director Tony Berns, include a partnership with the city to reconstruct Mullan Road ($1.6 million allocated) and a collaboration with the University of Idaho, North Idaho College and Lewis-Clark State College on a shared education facility ($2.5 million allocated). Also in the works is another partnership with the city to rebuild Seltice Way along I-90 in 2017 ($3.5 million allocated). “Our goal is to create value for the community,” Berns says. “And we’re always looking for partnerships to create that value, both public and private.” (MITCH RYALS)

BEN JOYCE’S ART BLOWS UP Spokane artist Ben Joyce’s work has become familiar to people in the Inland Northwest through a number of public displays of the works he calls “abstract topophilia,” including large pieces at the Spokane Convention Center and Gonzaga University’s Jepson Center, as well as smaller pieces in numerous area galleries. His bright, distinct style of aerial landscapes makes favorite subjects like the Spokane River running through downtown or the area around Lake Coeur d’Alene burst from any wall they’re on. In 2015,

Joyce’s efforts to display his art beyond his adopted hometown kicked into high gear, with abstract topophilia being displayed at Google headquarters in the Bay Area, at bus stops throughout Las Vegas and in the collections of musicians like the Game and Pharrell, who spied Joyce’s work at the L.A. radio station where one of the artist’s childhood friends works as a producer. So enamored were they with Joyce’s style, they took the paintings off the station’s wall after their visits and brought them home. (DAN NAILEN)

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 21


Progress Edition

SPOKANE SCORES BIG IN OLYMPIA

After the most recent legislative session was gaveled to an end, Spokane had secured money for new investments in transportation and education. One of the biggest gets for the Lilac City was the green light from lawmakers for Washington State University to build the state’s second medical school, along with $2.5 million to get started. The school, which will focus on rural and primary health, will start classes in fall of 2017 if it can get funding and accreditation lined up in time. When lawmakers voted to raise the gas tax to fund transportation infrastructure projects, Spokane landed $879 million to fund the south half of the North Spokane Corridor, a long-sought-after project that would connect I-90 with U.S. 395; it’s expected to make it easier to move freight and people and decrease congestion. Other goodies in the transportation package included $8.8 million for a controversial pedestrian bridge that will link the University District to a stretch of East Sprague Avenue, and $15 million in funding for the Central City Line, a trolley-like electric bus line that’ll serve a six-mile stretch of Spokane. The new line has been a priority for the Spokane Transit Authority for years. Although voters narrowly turned down a ballot measure in April to shore up funding for bus service and the Central City Line, the STA says that the vote was by no means a referendum on the project, which it says will not only help people get around, but also have a catalytic effect on the city’s economy. State Sen. Andy Billig, D-Spokane, adds that the other big win is the legislature’s investments in education. Specifically, he points to a tuition reduction for colleges and investments in early learning that he says will be a particular benefit to the city’s large number of lowincome families. (JAKE THOMAS)

22 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

LOCAL MUSIC SCENE STILL MOVIN’ AND SHAKIN’

This year, three new music venues opened, while others, like the Bartlett, Big Dipper and Knitting Factory, continued to bring in exciting acts. In February, Thomas “TC” Chavez opened PINNACLE NORTHWEST, aka the Pin, downtown in the Sprague Avenue space formerly known as Club 412 and the A Club. He held onto the Hop!, his other venture, but as its Monroe Street building was being sold, he let it go and kept the all-ages Pin. Over the past year, the mid-sized venue has given many local bands their start and hosted numerous hiphop, metal and screamo acts. It’s going strong. THE OBSERVATORY quietly opened in November in the old Blue Spark location downtown on Howard Street, touting delicious, high-end bar food and a happy sense of community. It wasn’t until last weekend that the venue’s newly installed stage and light/sound system was first utilized (by Fun Ladies and the Smokes, no less). Local promoter Jeff Glinski, in charge of bringing music to the 162-capacity venue, plans to lure acts that would normally pass up Spokane. Expect shows a few times a month. The doors of the new PALOMINO opened with a DJ bash on Halloween. For the first time since June, people experienced the handsome 500-capacity space on Lidgerwood, right across from the Spokane Eagles Lodge. Formerly known as the Palomino Club, owner Marc Fechter and business partner Wendy Jordan have so far hosted club nights, fundraisers, drag shows, fashion shows, local rock bands and jazz nights. The owners say the new year will bring bigger acts. (LAURA JOHNSON)


ST THWE R O N G D B INLANIS GETTING I BEER Our beer industry was in a state of expansion in 2015. Not just in terms of new breweries popping up, which they certainly did; our existing beer makers made strides to bolster the region’s output and quality, signaling that this beer boom is no temporary thing. We saw this most substantially in established brewers investing in their future. IRON GOAT BREWING, which has long operated in a hard-to-find spot in east Spokane, bought a historic former auto shop on Second Avenue and is in the process of turning it into a 10,000-square-foot production space that will also feature a pub and outdoor beer garden. Iron Goat, which started bottling its beer this year, resulting in sales that far exceeded expectations, is selling it as quickly as they’re making it. “When you have demands for beer and you don’t have the facility to make it, that’s frustrating,” says co-owner and co-brewer Paul Edminster. The new space is expected to open in the coming months. NO-LI BREWHOUSE also felt a little cramped this year, so when they wanted to put their Born and Raised IPA in cans, they didn’t have the space to brew that much beer. They found a partner in ORLISON BREWING CO., which was able

oom. YOUNG KWAK lison’s new tapr Or at nt pi a s e pour er Markus Low

to contract out some of their space in Airway Heights to bring No-Li’s cans into existence. Orlison, in turn, has also expanded, adding a taproom in downtown Spokane while also pushing their sales into Canada and the East Coast. In Idaho, LAUGHING DOG BREWING celebrated its 10-year anniversary by expanding for the third time with a 19,000-square-foot production plant north of Sandpoint that includes increased fermentation space and a canning line. We also saw our overall brewery numbers bump up yet again. In Spokane, BLACK LABEL BREWING arrived in downtown’s Saranac Commons while BELLWETHER BREWING took up residency on North Monroe Street, making old-world beers, and 238 BREWING CO. opened up in Green Bluff. On East Sprague Avenue, BENNIDITO’S BREWPUB began making Northwest-style beers, as well as their beloved pizzas. Arbor Crest expanded to make beer with its fledgling SQUARE WHEEL BREWING COMPANY. In Cheney, NEW BOUNDARY BREWING became that city’s first beermaker in more than 100 years. Across the state line, DAFT BADGER BREWING brought new beers to Coeur d’Alene. (MIKE BOOKEY)

PHOTO

Manag

WASHINGTON STATE STORES SELL MILLIONS WORTH OF POT

Recreational marijuana stores in the Inland Northwest sold a total of $42 million worth of product since retail pot stores opened in July 2014, according to an analysis of numbers from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board. Since recreational marijuana stores opened, they had steadily reported higher sales month after month as more producers came online and helped make the price of legal pot more viable. In November of this year, something unusual happened: The amount of pot sold at recreational stores dropped slightly, from $75 million to $70 million. Sales in the Inland Northwest similarly dropped, by about $4.4 million to $4 million. Eric Skaar, general manager at Sativa Sisters (Spokane County’s topselling store), says that after seeing “crazy growth,” the slight dip may be an indication that the market is fully realized. “People have a lot of other bills right now,” he adds. One definite change coming to marijuana in 2016 is the merger of the state’s recreational and medicinal markets, to be implemented as part of the Cannabis Patient Protection Act, which was signed into law in 2015 and is expected to shutter many of the state’s medical dispensaries. After meeting new licensing and training requirements, recreational stores will be allowed to sell to the medical market. Skaar says that Sativa Sisters is going that route to keep its customer base up. (JAKE THOMAS)

MACKLEMORE AND RYAN LEWIS TAKE OVER ‘DOWNTOWN’ In July, whole sections of downtown Spokane were blocked off. People were mad about the inconvenience, but all was forgiven when the reason for the closures came to light: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were filming a brand-new music video with local film production company North By Northwest for a then-unknown song. While the news was surprising, it made sense that Lewis would want to film in the town where he grew up. The Internet went wild with hastily taken cellphone photos of strange dance for-

mations, motorcycles and what looked to be people wearing 1970s attire. In late August, the five-minute-plus, funky hip-hop masterpiece “Downtown” was released, showing off more than 13 distinct Spokane locations and even a surprise cameo from famed Mariner Ken Griffey Jr. As of press time, the video has received more than 83 million YouTube views. Sure, the whole video is silly, but it’s ours. It could be the best Spokane tourism video of all time. (LAURA JOHNSON)

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 23


Progress Edition

THE BLACK LENS OPENS EYES TO THE BLACK COMMUNITY

When local social justice advocate Sandy Williams launched The Black Lens in January, it was intended to be an independently run newspaper focused on positive news — all the stories about the good things happening in Spokane’s black community that were being overlooked. “I thought it would be lighthearted,” says Williams (pictured). “And then life happened.” Mostly, she’s thinking of the moment, about halfway through the year, that the nation became fixated by local NAACP President Rachel Dolezal, a white woman who had been passing herself off as black. “Everybody cared so much about that, but didn’t care about the [racial] disparity in the jail populations,” Williams says. “That’s where the paper took a turn.” It shifted, and became more willing to sink its teeth into hard news and investigative work. It still mentioned positive news — like Bethel A.M.E. opening its doors to the community after the windstorm — but also started featuring headlines like “Black students in Washington not prepared for thousands of unfilled STEM jobs” and “Local man shot in the back.” It seized upon the story of Airway Heights Mayor Patrick Rushing caught sharing racist comments and images on Facebook. The paper’s success shows there’s appetite for tough coverage. The issues have grown from 12 pages to 16 — even occasionally 20 — pages. Her advertising is growing. She’s broadened her reach — you can find The Black Lens in several local libraries — and doubled the number of copies from 500 to about 1,000. “It’s growing so fast I’m having a hard time keeping up, which is a good problem to have,” Williams says. (DANIEL WALTERS)

24 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

The Blackbird opened in the historic Broadview Dairy building. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

FOODIES FEAST ON NEW INLAND NORTHWEST OPTIONS A sure sign that a community’s food scene is growing up is a boom in new restaurants, and 2015 was no different. Wandering Table chef/owner Adam Hegsted opened the GILDED UNICORN in the old Catacombs, focusing on craft cocktails and comfort pub food in the funky basement location. Hegsted wasn’t the only familiar face to open a new place. Manito Tap House’s Patrick McPherson opened BLACKBIRD TAVERN + KITCHEN in the historic Broadview Dairy building, offering fun, upscale Southern fare. When Walt Worthy looked for someone to put in charge of the signature restaurant of his new Davenport Grand, he tapped chef Ian Wingate to lead TABLE 13, a massive space with a far-reaching menu to match. In Post Falls, the TIMBER GASTRO PUB took the old Hot Rod Cafe and transformed it into a ruggedly chic spot featuring everything from burgers to pizza, along with hipster touches like

housemade pickles and logging-themed craft cocktails. SLICING IT UP: In the search for perfect pizza, there are several new options. Some are chains new to the region like BLAZE PIZZA and MOD PIZZA, but if you like to keep it local, try out PICCOLO ARTISAN PIZZA in Liberty Lake, REPUBLIC PI from the folks behind Flying Goat Pizza or HOLESHOT PIZZA & BREW in the River Park Square food court. BENNEDITO’S opened a brewpub on East Sprague where you can enjoy a slice, and DAVID’S PIZZA opened again after a four-year hiatus between locations. NOT-SO-SECRET SUSHI SPOTS: Japanese cuisine thrives in these parts. KYOKO SUSHI in Sandpoint turned an empty storefront into a must-stop sushi spot. KAIJU SUSHI AND SPIRITS in Coeur d’Alene offers late-night treats from its basement location on Sherman, with rolls named for monsters in Japanese movies. In Spokane,

SPOKANE SPICE COMPANY NABS A HOT DEAL

It’s not hard to find the colorfully labeled jars of flavor in shops around here, thanks to the Spiceologist calling the Inland Northwest home. It’s also not hard to find the all-natural seasonings, spice blends and rubs elsewhere in the U.S. at more than 800 retailers, including culinary-ware behemoth Williams-Sonoma. When the phone rang in February, Spiceologist’s co-founders — chef Pete Taylor and blogger/photographer/ recipe creator Heather Scholten — never expected Williams-Sonoma’s senior buyer to be on the other end, asking if they could get some of the Spokane company’s products in stores before the holiday season. Add that to a list of stores carrying Spiceologist’s rubs and patent-pending kitchen counter organizer, the Spiceologist Block, that includes Marshalls, T.J. Maxx, Cost Plus World Market and Bed Bath & Beyond. After such a big year for the growing startup (born from the first Startup Weekend Spokane back in 2012), what’s next? More spice lines and grocery-ready products are planned to launch as early as January. (CHEY SCOTT)

SUSHI SAKAI moved from Spokane Valley to just off Gonzaga’s campus on Hamilton, and QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN brought visually stunning sushi to Five Mile. RELOCATIONS, OPENINGS AND FAMILIAR FACES: It took MADELEINE’S CAFÉ AND PATISSERIE six months to move, and it felt a lot longer for people who love their breakfast. THE GLOBE sat empty for years before returning with a menu of bar food a bit fancier than the old spot’s pub grub. THE BULLDOG that opened in Gonzaga’s new Hemmingson Center isn’t the same as the beloved old spot, but it’s got the old sign and cold beer on campus. Post Falls’ killer French restaurant Fleur de Sel opened a satellite spot on South Hill, FLEUR DE SEL ARTISAN CREPERIE, while Saranac Commons expanded to include MEDITERRANO’S fresh Med flavors; CAFFÉ AFFOGATO’S Italian-style coffees are a perfect complement to its neighbors’ food. (DAN NAILEN)

SPOKANE VALLEY’S ZAYCON BYPASSES THE GROCERY STORE

Like so many of the biggest innovations of recent years, Spokane Valley-based Zaycon Fresh’s brilliant epiphany was more about taking something away than adding something. CEO Mike Conrad and his fellow co-founders figured out that people could get frozen chicken breasts much cheaper, and much, much fresher, if they ditched the grocery store entirely and just picked it up from a refrigerated truck in a parking lot that brought the chicken directly from the farm. For Zaycon, it meant no inventory costs, no storage costs and — thanks to pre-ordering — no wasted product. For Conrad, it’s meant going from living on welfare to running a thriving national business. The company started in 2010, but this was the year it exploded, focusing on scaling from a $17 million business to as high as $70 million. To assist them, they had the expertise and investment of Executive Chairman Rick Braddock, the former president of Citibank and former CEO of Priceline.com. “We think the market could be as many as 40 million households,” Braddock told the Inlander. (DANIEL WALTERS) n


ASCENDING ARTIST

Jeff Weir The Coeur d’Alene artist spends a lot of time in the forest, painting its inhabitants BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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ike most folks who earn their living outdoors, arborist Jeff Weir knows two seasons: summer, when a typical workday can be sunup to sundown, and winter, when he might not work at all. Back in November, the 23-year-old Weir, who hadn’t had more than two days off since Memorial Day, was really looking forward to a break from pruning branches and tree removal. Then the windstorm hit. “I worked so hard all summer and was so excited to paint,” says Weir, whose images of bear, elk and foxes first grabbed our attention at a North Idaho coffee shop. Although he hunts some, spends time with his bride of one year, Katerina, and is still trying to get his own tree-service business off the ground, what Weir really likes to do during his off-season is work on his art. “I’m an impressionist,” says the mostly self-taught artist, who credits his great-grandmother, Orvilla Weir, and local artist Kyle Paliotto with helping him develop his style. His great-grandmother, he says, was the president of arts clubs and taught college classes in Ventura, California. ...continued on next page

Jeff Weir with two of his oil paintings. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 25


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

Jeff Weir at work in his home studio in Post Falls.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“ASCENDING ARTIST: JEFF WEIR,” CONTINUED... She left him a prized scrapbook of her photos, color palettes, and carefully annotated mixing instructions, such as which colors make the best deer fur. Weir met Paliotto four years ago while on a tree-service job at Paliotto’s residence. He didn’t know Paliotto had won awards from the prestigious C.M. Russell auction and the American Impressionist Society, but admired the elder artist’s work. The two struck up a friendship. “Jeff brings an unadulterated freshness to the canvas,” says Paliotto, who shares Weir’s love of the outdoors and is known for his en plein air paintings. Paliotto recounts the first time he saw Weir working on a piece: a commission for a 25-foot alligator sculpture made out of wood. “I found him with a fire going, his chainsaws out, and a can of beans on the fire for lunch,” Paliotto says. “He scratched his head over the correctness of the alligator’s

26 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

anatomy, but I could see his heart and soul were transferring to the piece, and it was already hugely successful.” Weir describes his relationship with Paliotto more bluntly. “I have a tendency to drive over to his WEEKEND house unannounced, C O U N T D OW N clear out a space in the Get the scoop on this storage room of his stuweekend’s events with dio, change the radio, our newsletter. Sign up at and start bugging him,” Inlander.com/newsletter. says Weir. Weir doesn’t do much chainsaw carving these days, preferring a palette knife to carving tools. His studio is actually a desk in his living room. Or it’s the living room floor when he’s working on a large painting, like the ones for a January

show titled Jeff/Jeff, a collaboration with Coeur d’Alene artist Jeff Spencer at Emerge. This will be the second time Weir has shown work at Emerge; the first was at the nonprofit organization’s annual pop-up show this past summer. The plan, says Weir, is to continue honing his oil-painting skills with his characteristically expressive, sometimes humorous wildlife paintings. “I always like playing with angle of eyebrows,” Weir says of the bear in a recent painting, whose seemingly pensive expression contrasts strongly with his mammoth size on the canvas. Weir also likes creating contrast with warm and cool colors, such as the bear’s golden fur and the cool blues and white of the snowy ground he is walking on: “The outdoors have always been the biggest inspiration to what I paint.” n


CULTURE | DIGEST

TV THE BEST OF 2015

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY MIKE BOOKEY

5. DRUNK CONSPIRACY-THEORY LAWYER TALKS DOWN THE LYNCH MOB | FARGO FX

For most of Fargo’s brilliant second season, Nick Offerman’s Karl Weathers, a conspiracy-theory-spouting lawyer, is played for laughs. When he walks into a jail, drunk, to represent a client, he’s a comedic character. But when the Gerhardts, the local mob family, lay siege to the jail, threatening to kill his client, he’s tasked with talking them down. His character goes from fool to hero — drunk, terrified, but with a desperate eloquence that would cause Saul Goodman himself to weep.

4. A TRULY TERRIFYING HAUNTED HOUSE YOU’RE THE WORST FX

You’re the Worst received a lot of praise this year for its frank (and deadly serious) take on depression, which manifests often, not so much as sadness, but as nothingness. Subjected to an extreme haunted house — a hilarious mash-up of grisly horror movie tropes (“They’ve got a real-life Babadook!”) — for a moment, the light breaks on Gretchen’s endless gloom. But just for a moment.

3. REV. MATT JAMISON FINDS REDEMPTION THE LEFTOVERS HBO

The Leftovers is by its very nature an unsubtle show. So it’s no surprise that the perennially tortured Rev. Matt Jamison’s (Christopher Eccleston) favorite book of the Bible is Job. In last season’s Jamison narrative, he throws away his soul; this season he reclaims it, sacrificing a literal ticket to paradise to the son of the man who beat him. Like Job, his faith is repaid.

2. FORREST CAN’T REACH THE EXTINGUISHER REVIEW COMEDY CENTRAL

Most TV sees stubbornness (see below) as heroic. Reviewing what it’s like to be a “little person,” life reviewer Forrest MacNeil (Andy

Peter Capaldi as Doctor Who Daly) walks around on his knees. When a fire starts in his father’s kitchen, Forrest is too “short” to reach the extinguisher. Instead of dropping the act, however, Forrest lets his father’s house burn to the ground. I give this scene… five stars.

1. THE DOCTOR SPENDS BILLIONS OF YEARS PUNCHING A WALL | DOCTOR WHO BBC

Trapped in a torture chamber, even death provides no escape for The Doctor. Death simply resets him. But he doesn’t give up: He is killed and reborn, killed and reborn — trillions of times over billions and billions of years — each time launching a few futile punches at the diamond wall that blocks him from his way out. The lyrical editing and Peter Capaldi’s triumphant, emotionally raw acting turns the scene into myth. — DANIEL WALTERS

SPORTS DIGITS

177

That’s the number of shots Gonzaga senior center Shelby Cheslek has blocked in her career, the most in Gonzaga women’s basketball history. The record-breaking rejection came in the waning seconds of the Zags’ 66-59 win at Loyola Marymount last week, helping seal a game in which Cheslek also had 10 points and 12 rebounds. The Pullman native, currently 10th on the West Coast Conference all-time list for blocked shots, looks to climb up the rankings as the Zags continue conference play.

TV There’s a good chance you’re not reading this because you already discovered Netflix’s MAKING A MURDERER, and as a result no longer participate in any activity not directly related to watching this unfathomably captivating reallife crime drama. The gist: a poor, uneducated guy named Steven Avery was convicted of sexual assault in 1985 and spent 18 years in a Wisconsin prison before being exonerated by DNA evidence that pointed to a different man. Avery sued the bumbling small-town sheriff’s department that railroaded him in that investigation, but as folks were being deposed in that suit, wouldn’t ya know it, Avery suddenly was a suspect in a fresh murder case. Unlike NPR’s Serial or HBO’s The Jinx, which relied on digging into the past, Making a Murderer had a documentary crew following Avery as these new allegations came to light a decade ago, giving the series a very present-tense feel. TWITTER Fans of good journalism know Charles P. Pierce as a tough reporter in the Boston area and then a deft sports columnist. Now at age 62, Pierce may have found his best gig yet as Esquire’s political columnist during the impossibly bizarre 2016 presidential campaign. At the handle @ESQPOLITICS, you’ll find quips from Pierce and links to his writing, much of which points out corporate media’s inability to handle Donald Trump as his ego-fueled hate machine continues to spiral further and further into the depths of insanity. Pierce’s commentary digs and twists deep into the soul of America. BOOZE Folks with Oregon connections know Townshend’s Tea Company for their cozy teahouses and artisanal drinks. So you may do a double take when you see the Townshend name in your liquor aisle. THOMAS & SONS, the distillery spin-off of the tea company, has just brought two varieties of their liqueurs into Washington. We tried both the Sweet Tea and the Smoke Tea, and didn’t know what to think of these tea-leaf-distilled creations at first — other than they really taste like tea. It was a visit to their website, where we found a recipe for a gin-and-Sweet Tea cocktail called the Robert Palmer, that converted us. n

Serving Spokane for 30 years Supporting 80 Local Artists The best in custom framing

409 S. Dishman-Mica Rd.

 where Argonne meets 4th Ave  Open Tues-Sat • (509) 747-0812 DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 27


Flourish bakes their own bread daily in Sandpoint. CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO

OPENING

Thriving on Local

UPDATE

ENOTECA

Sandpoint makes a favorable environment for new Flourish eatery BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

E

ven though they’d only been open two weeks, Vicki Reich and business partner Marah Jacobs quickly realized that their hanging chalkboard menu needed to be larger and easier to change, in order to adapt to serving predominately local and organic food. Although they’re able to get some local ingredients consistently, like meat, dairy products and the Wheat Montana flour in their scratch-baked goods, availability of other items varies according to season and farmers’ ability to provide volume. For example, Wheyward Goat Cheese Co. in Vay, Idaho, and Ione, Washington’s Ramstead Ranch provide the chèvre cheese and pork used in Flourish’s pork loin sandwich ($9.50), yet the coconut in their homemade trail mix can’t be grown in the Northwest. Having to adapt to what’s available, says Reich, makes them more creative. So this being winter, hearty greens

28 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

and root vegetables are in season. Roasted squash appears in a salad ($9) or with Fontina cheese and kale in a sandwich ($8). Other sandwich options include roasted golden ENTRÉE beets Get the scoop on local from food news with our weekly RonEntrée newsletter. Sign up ningers at Inlander.com/newsletter. out of Moyie Springs, Idaho ($7) and grilled cheese with Tillamook cheddar, Willamette Valley Cheese Co. Fontina and Wheyward chèvre ($7.50). Lacking on-site cooking facilities has been another spur to creativity for the duo, who have decades of experience in the food and grocery industries. “The reason that I started [Flourish] is that I have been passionate about local foods and growing local food businesses

for several years.” says Reich, a former store manager at Winter Ridge Natural Foods, Jacobs, who also worked at Winter Ridge as well as Seattle’s award-winning Chaco Canyon Organic Cafe, does all the baking at Flourish’s next-door neighbor, Pend d’Oreille Winery. In addition to the menu giving credit to local providers — Springs of Hope dairy, Selkirk Sausage, Evans Brothers Coffee — all labels and signage includes the percentage of local ingredients, so customers know exactly what they’re getting. They also know where their money is going. “We’re just trying to keep our dollars here,” says Reich.  Flourish • 301 Cedar St., #105, Sandpoint • Open Tue-Fri, 7 am-4 pm; Sat-Sun, 8 am-4 pm • facebook.com/ flourishsandpoint • 208-263-5125

702 N. Spokane St. | Post Falls 208-457-9885

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hings have come full circle at Enoteca for owners John and Ann Eckhart. Although they were involved with the original owners more than a decade ago, John’s retirement from the lumber industry put him back in charge of the business. “I binge-watched five seasons of Game of Thrones, then got bored,” he says with a laugh from the newly relocated and expanded Enoteca. There are actually two spaces. The bar is beautifully appointed, with high-top seating and comfy chairs around a fireplace, adjacent to a small retail establishment. They also ship beer via their online business (beership.com). Sandwiched between Raci Erdem’s White House Grill and Oval Office restaurants in Post Falls, Enoteca is working with Erdem to offer food from one or both dining establishments. Other reasons to check out Enoteca’s new location: trivia night, whiskey Wednesdays, 12 rotating taps, member discounts, craft cocktails from the full bar, and both beer and wine tastings. — CARRIE SCOZZARO


FOOD | OPENING

At The Davenport Grand

Bartender Nehemiah Zilar makes a cocktail at the Observatory.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Sweet and Simple A favorite downtown location is reborn as the Observatory BY FRANNY WRIGHT

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toasted PB&J served on paper in a basket is delivered to a customer sitting at the bar. Behind the bar, a telescope on a shelf sits next to a large picture of a skeleton sipping a cocktail. Such is the scene at the Observatory, a new bar and restaurant downtown now open and serving simple, quality sandwiches and cocktails. Owner Alicia Purvis-Lariviere hopes that the Observatory, located in the spot previously occupied by Underground 15, and before that the Blue Spark, creates a comforting vibe that extends through the cocktail and food menus. “We have a small menu, but we do everything on it really well and from scratch,” says Purvis-Lariviere. “We want our basic menu to play into the overall experience.” One of Purvis-Lariviere’s intentions when opening the Observatory was to keep prices reasonable while offering options for customers to spend a little more if they want, which can be seen in the premium well of liquors typically offered as back-shelf options and all food items, which are $10 and under. The food menu lists sandwiches, soups, salads and rotating specials, with sauces and condiments made in-house. Brunch is now being served on the weekends from 9 am-1 pm, including a freshly squeezed mimosa and a biscuit royale — bacon, egg, cheese and sausage gravy stacked high on a biscuit — for $10. Lead bartender Nehemiah Zilar and bartender James Hunt have brought a following of cocktail enthusiasts to the Observatory. Referred to as “Yin and Yang” by Purvis-Lariviere, the pair combines their knowledge of liquors and liqueurs to create their unique drinks. Many elements of the cocktails offered are made in-house, including grenadine, simple syrup and freshly squeezed juices. Happy hour takes place from 3 to 6 pm Monday through Friday, including $5 Moscow Mules and freshly squeezed screwdrivers. Four different kinds of specialty toast ($3) are also available during happy hour. The Observatory stocks a wide selection of whiskey and bourbon, along with 10 taps of mostly local and regional beers. “We’re not trying to hide under garnish and a nice plate,” says Purvis-Lariviere. “And so far, people seem to be enjoying that.” n

Now open and serving highly addictive small plates from $6.50-$13 each Dinner and Whiskey Bar Tuesday - Saturday 5 PM - Close Open Table Online reservations — table13spokane.com

davenporthotel.com • 509.598.4300

The Observatory • 15 S. Howard • Open Mon-Fri, 11-2 am; Sat-Sun, 9-2 am • observatoryspokane.com • 598-8933

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 29


It Follows

IT WAS A VERY GOOD YEAR

Mad Max: Fury Road

Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter

A look back at the top 20 films of 2015

Inside Out

BY SCOTT RENSHAW

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very year, it feels as though I start this column in the same way: I don’t know exactly what it means to say “it was a good year for movies.” Some years, it’s about knowing you’ve seen movies for the ages; there may be only a few of them, but you know they’ll stick with you forever. Other years, it’s about depth. That’s what 2015 felt like to me: My favorite 20 films were all good enough that reshuffling the order wouldn’t change things all that much. I feel obliged to go all the way to 20 this year, because stopping arbitrarily at 10, or even 15, risks omitting something I know I want to mention — especially some

30 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

films that were released primarily to video-on-demand, or otherwise never made their way into local theaters. So with that, here we go. 20. Spotlight: Perhaps the odds-on favorite for Oscar’s Best Picture, Tom McCarthy’s fascinating procedural may partly turn journalists into heroes, but it’s also a reminder of how many factors can conspire to keep an important story hidden from public view. 19. Girlhood: Writer/director Céline Sciamma crafts a terrific portrait of a black French teen girl wading through the roadblocks that boys, friends and society in general throw up against finding anything that can give her a

sense of power. 18. Creed: The history of the Rocky franchise may fuel a lot of what works here — including Sylvester Stallone’s wonderfully emotional performance — but Ryan Coogler also finds some new, fresh energy in the story of Apollo Creed’s illegitimate son. 17. It Follows: The high concept — presenting the relentless pursuit of a murderous supernatural entity as a sexually transmitted disease — is enough to kick-start the scares, but David Robert Mitchell adds terrific visual chops and a perfect ’80s-retro score for the year’s best thriller.


16. Son of Saul: Géza Röhrig’s fierce performance — as an Auschwitz internee determined to find a way to give a young boy a ritual Jewish burial — drives this drama that’s not just “another Holocaust movie,” but a tale of how focusing on one small act of humanity can somehow overcome incomprehensible horror. 15. Shaun the Sheep Movie: Aardman Animations makes charming family entertainment seem so effortless, and the Plasticine adventures of farm animals looking for their missing owner is both hilarious and a better-choreographed example of action filmmaking than most Hollywood blockbusters. 14. The Duke of Burgundy: Please get past Peter Strickland’s basic premise — a period piece about two women in a dominant/ submissive lesbian relationship — to find a pair of terrific central performances, and a story about the hard work of trying to be the person your partner needs you to be. 13. Bone Tomahawk: In a year full of violent Westerns, S. Craig Zahler’s revenge yarn was the best, somehow taking elements like cannibalistic “troglodytes” and crafting a suspense tale full of great performances, phenomenal dialogue, hard-to-watch brutality and startling moments of heartbreaking humanity. 12. Clouds of Sils Maria: The stellar performances by Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart — as a middle-aged actress and her personal assistant — provided the anchor for Olivier Assayas’ complicated examination of how hard it can be to deal with the simple passage of time. 11. Brooklyn & 10. Carol: Unexpectedly, two of the year’s best were stories of young women trying to define themselves while working in department stores in 1952 New York. Saoirse Ronan’s lovely central performance as a fresh-off-the-boat Irish immigrant lifted Brooklyn’s perfectly pitched narrative of love and homesickness, while Carol found Todd Haynes’ breathtaking directing powering the “love that dare not speak its name” story between Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara. 9. Jafar Panahi’s Taxi: The Iranian filmmaker — banned in his country from making movies — takes his camera undercover for a disorienting mix of documentary and fiction, creating a perfect portrait-in-miniature of a culture where it’s never clear how much “reality” you ever get to see. 8. Phoenix: Nina Hoss gave the performance of the year as a Holocaust survivor essentially forced to pretend to be herself, in a psychological thriller that featured 2015’s most devastating final scene. 7. Kumiko, The Treasure Hunter: The Zellner brothers took a story loosely based on an urban legend — about a Japanese woman trying to find the snow-buried treasure from Fargo — and turned it into a wonderfully mournful meditation on loneliness and the need to be understood. 6. The Forbidden Room: Guy Maddin’s fascination with silent film and other vintage forms explodes into a wild series of nested narratives, each one more hilariously absurd than the last. 5. Inside Out: Pixar takes a high concept — personifying the emotions inside the head of an adolescent girl — and uses it to find resonant truths about the experience of growing up, and making peace with what’s left behind in the process. 4. 45 Years: A long-married couple (Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay) finds preparations for an engagement party shaken by information from the past in Andrew Haigh’s wrenching study of the way an entire lifetime of memories can be reframed in an instant. 3. The Look of Silence: Joshua Oppenheimer’s follow-up to The Act of Killing continues to explore the legacy of the Indonesian genocide, this time discovering how hard it can be to find closure and grant forgiveness when those who have done harm can’t imagine seeing what they’ve done as a crime. 2. Timbuktu: Abderrahmane Sissako’s portrait of a village overrun by a fundamentalist Muslim militia isn’t just a compelling drama, but probably the 2015 film that feels most essential for every American to see and grasp some sense of this complex world. 1. Mad Max: Fury Road: It’s hard enough to revisit a decades-old franchise and make it seem like anything but a cash grab. George Miller took huge risks all over the place — recasting Max (Tom Hardy), focusing the story instead on a woman (the magnificently minimalist Charlize Theron) — and created something that exploded with both visual imagination and genuinely powerful emotional content. 

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THE MAGIC LANTERN

FRI JAN 1ST - THU JAN 7TH

BROOKLYN (106 MIN)

Fri-Sun: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00 Tue-Thu: 2:00, 4:15, 6:30 ROOM (114 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 7:20 Sun: 6:15 Tue-Thu: 6:45

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS

MACBETH (117 MIN) Fri/Sat: 5:00 Sun: 4:00 Tue-Thu: 4:30 TRUMBO (124 MIN) *last weekend! Fri/Sat: 2:30 Sun: 1:30

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

MOVIE TIMES on

THE HATEFUL EIGHT

Searchable by Movie, by Theater, or Time

Quentin Tarantino returns with another dive into historical fiction, and the trip includes faces familiar (Kurt Russell, Samuel L. Jackson, Tim Roth) along with new ones joining his nearthree-hour tale (which includes an intermission) of a bounty hunter (Russell) taking a deadly captive (Jennifer Jason Leigh) to Red Rock, Wyoming, for a hanging. He’s waylaid to a remote stagecoach stop on a mountain pass, where he meets men of questionable intentions (Walter Scoggins, Bruce Dern, Michael Madsen, among them). Mayhem, as any Tarantino fans know, ensues when a blizzard strands the group for days. (DN) Rated R

NOW PLAYING ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: THE ROAD CHIP

Your favorite trio of high-octave critters is back for the latest installment of their enduring franchise. This time around, Alvin and the gang are out to stop Dave (the human played by a post-My Name Is Earl Jason Lee) from getting married and have to get all the way to Miami to accomplish that. (MB) Rated PG

THE BIG SHORT

Adapting Michael Lewis’ nonfiction book with Charles Randolph, comedic director Adam McKay lays out the stories of the investment banking insiders — including fund managers Michael Burry (Christian Bale) and Mark Baum (Steve Carell) — who saw the mortgage collapse coming as early as 2005, and began to realize how much the game was rigged. (SR) Rated R

32 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

CAROL

Already at the top of numerous critics’ lists of 2015’s best films, Carol is a sweeping story of forbidden love between two women — Carol Aird (Kate Blanchett) and Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara) — in 1950s New York City. Eleven years in the works, the historical drama carefully examines how repressive society was in response to homosexual relationships as Carol and Therese struggle to express their feelings while trying to hide their secret. (CS) Rated R

CHI-RAQ

Spike Lee’s latest offering takes us to the rough streets of Chicago for, believe it or not, an adaptation of the ancient Greek play Lysistrata. Here, the women of Chicago go abstinent to stop the men in their communities from committing horrific acts of gun violence in an ongoing gang war. (MB) Rated R

CONCUSSION

Will Smith stars in this provocative drama as Dr. Bennet Omalu, a respected doctor who discovers that concussions suffered by professional football players are causing serious brain damage. It’s the movie the NFL really hopes you don’t see. (MB) Rated PG-13

CREED

Donny is an angry orphaned teen, rescued from the foster-care system by the widow (Phylicia Rashad) of boxing legend Apollo Creed from the Rocky series. She has learned that Donny is the illegitimate son of her late husband and has decided to take responsibility for him — and that unique backstory of a tough kid brought into a life of privilege gives Michael B. Jordan the opportunity for a terrific performance. Donny then heads into the ring for a boxing career with help from his trainer, none other than Rocky himself (Sylvester Stallone, of course). (SR) Rated PG-13

DADDY’S HOME

Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg try to recapture the comedic chemistry they showcased in The Other Guys in this story of a strait-laced radio executive and nice-guy stepdad to two kids (Ferrell) who has to contend with the unexpected return of their oh-so-cool biological father (Wahlberg). Soon enough, the two dads are competing for the children’s affection through increasingly ornate and slapstick-y feats of parental gymnastics. (DN) Rated PG-13

THE DANISH GIRL

Eddie Redmayne stars as Lili Elbe, a Danish artist who was a groundbreaking figure for the transgender community. Directed by Tom Hooper (Les Misérables, The King’s Speech), The Danish Girl is largely fictionalized, but uses the story of Elbe and her relationship with Wegener as inspiration. (MB) Rated R


FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING THE GOOD DINOSAUR

The latest offering from Pixar is this computer-animated story that gives us an Earth that was never hit by the asteroid that knocked off the dinosaurs, and thus people and the mega lizards live together on the planet. When an Apatosaurus named Arlo is orphaned after his dad dies in an accident, he tries to make his way home and along the way befriends a boy named Spot. (MB) Rated PG

HEART OF A DOG

Laurie Anderson directs this documentary about the death of her beloved dog and does so with a unique approach. Anderson is a well-known visual artist who employs her transcendent visuals to a mind-bending story that has been collecting fans the world over during its festival run. (MB) Not Rated

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY — PART 2

In the last installment of the franchise, Katniss Everdeen (the amazing Jennifer Lawrence), doesn’t lead the rebels of District 13 in what everyone hopes will be a definitive assault on the Capitol. Instead, she’s bringing up the rear with the propaganda filmmaking team, making videos that will hopefully sway the hearts and minds of the Capitol citizens, who naturally aren’t on the rebels’ side. She’s going to take down President Snow, no matter what it takes. (MJ) PG-13

JOY

Writer-director David O. Russell once again teams up with Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper, this time to tell the seemingly odd-choice story of Joy Mangano (played by Lawrence), the self-made woman who invented the Miracle Mop and became a home shopping legend. (ES) Rated R

LEGEND

As both of the identical Kray twins, Tom Hardy is a wonder, carrying his body, comporting his face, and subtly shifting his voice in ways that never leave the viewer in any doubt as to which brother he is embodying at any given moment. The Krays are violent, narcissistic men with no thought for anyone but themselves (except, perhaps, the mother who worships them) as they rule the criminal underworld of London’s East End in the 1960s. (MJ) Rated R

MEET THE PATELS

Actor Ravi Patel was nearing 30 and still single when he decided to let his family help find him a wife in the traditional Indian fashion. So, he took a camera along and documented the process in this comedic documentary about love, culture and family. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

Room

86

Star Wars: The Force Awakens

81

The Big Short

81

Theeb

80

HG: Mockingjay 2

65

Trumbo

60 57

Sisters DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

POINT BREAK

Since it’s been 24 years since the original Point Break gave us Keanu Reeves and Patrick Swayze in the only surf movie that’s also a crime flick, we have a remake. But this time the extremesport-loving criminals are a little more sophisticated, and are actually ecominded, Zen-following idealists who steal money from corporations and give the cash to the poor. (MB) Rated PG-13

ROOM

Jack lives with his mom (Brie Larson) in Room (no “the”), the only place on earth the 5-year-old has ever known. Room is a dingy toolshed supplied with nothing more than life’s essentials (a single bed where they both sleep, a toilet, dilapidated fridge, ancient TV and unreachable skylight) where Jack and Ma go through their daily regimen of washing, exercising, reading, eating, etc. On Jack’s fifth birthday, his mom decides to tell her son about the outside world… and hope for a life outside of Room. (MB) Rated R

SISTERS

Amy Poehler plays Maura Ellis, who’s recently divorced and trying to take care of everyone in the family while Tina Fey is Kate Ellis, a single mom who can’t hold down a job. When their parents announce that they’re selling the house where the sisters grew up, they head home to clear out their old things. But instead of saying goodbye to their past, they opt to relive it in the form of a huge party with their old high school friends, only with a personality twist: Maura will get to be the wild thing, and Kate will have to stay sober and responsible. (SR) Rated R

SPOTLIGHT

In 2001, the Boston Globe editor-inchief Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber) asked the paper’s “Spotlight” investigative news team — Walter “Robby” Robinson (Michael Keaton), Mike Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams) and Matt Carroll (Brian d’Arcy James) — to turn their attention to the case of a Catholic priest accused of sexually abusing several children. And as they begin digging — at first reluctantly — into the case, they discover that the Catholic Archdiocese

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

of Boston might be engaging on a massive scale in hushing up cases of abusive priests. (SR) Rated R

STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS

If you are reading this, we assume you are just now learning of this film’s existence here on the 33rd page of our venerable publication and not from the marketing you may have seen on a cereal box, soda can, bottle of brake fluid or tube of hemorrhoid cream in your household. The seventh installment of George Lucas’ iconic franchise is set to be the biggest yet, full of all the big scifi visuals we’d expect from new director J.J. Abrahams. As for the plot...umm, well, um, the pictures on this burger wrapper are a little vague on that end. (MB) Rated PG-13

SUFFRAGETTE

Carey Mulligan stars as Maud Watts, a Londoner who was born and raised in a laundry, in 1912 London as the fight for women’s right began to take hold. As a group of women campaign for voting privileges in a movement led by Emmeline Pankhurst (Meryl Streep), a detective tries to undermine and dismantle their efforts. (PC) Rated PG-13

THEEB

Theeb (played by newcomer Jacir Eid) is a young Bedouin boy who is forced to fend for himself after he jumps camp to follow his beloved older brother Hussein (Hussein Salameh) on a mission to guide a British army officer (Jack Fox) to a long-abandoned well. Set in 1916, this Jordanian film from director Naji Abu Nowar is the country’s official entry into the upcoming Academy Awards. At Magic Lantern. (MS) Not Rated

TRUMBO

A celebrated screenwriter (Kitty Foyle, Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo) and novelist (Johnny Got His Gun) when the Red Scare machine revved up, Dalton Trumbo was one of the more prominent Hollywood players to be called to appear before the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1947 to discuss his perfectly legal involvement in the Communist Party. Here, he’s played brilliantly by Bryan Cranston in a story that can be overly theatrical at times. (KJ) Rated R 

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THE HATEFUL EIGHT

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PG-13 Daily (11:45) (2:45) (3:30) (5:45) 8:45 9:30 In 2D Daily (12:30) (1:00) (1:30) (2:20) (4:00) (4:30) (5:20) 6:10 6:30 7:00 8:20 9:00 10:00 Fri-Sun (10:00) (10:30) (11:20) 10:20PM

JOY

PG-13 Daily (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:00)

DADDY’S HOME

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:15) (4:30) 6:45 9:00

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PG-13 Daily 9:45 In 2D Daily (2:10) (4:45) 7:15 Fri-Sun (11:40)

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SISTERS

R Daily (2:10) (4:40) 7:10 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:40)

THE GOOD DINOSAUR

PG Daily (1:15) (3:30) Fri-Sun (10:50)

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY PART 2

PG-13 Daily (1:10) (4:10) 6:50 9:40 Fri-Sun (10:30) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 1/1/16-1/7/16

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 33


LOCAL SCENE

Showin’ Up

The best concerts of 2015, as recalled by Inlander music writers and contributors

S

pokane’s music scene continues to surprise. Sure, we didn’t get tour stops from superstars like Beyoncé or Justin Timberlake, but the bands and musicians we did score more than kept us going in the past 12 months. Here are the greatest shows of the year; the ones that made us feel something grand.

SLEATER-KINNEY

Knitting Factory | Feb. 8 Talk about your triumphant returns — Sleater-Kinney’s first show after a decade hiatus, right here in Spokane, was most noteworthy for how quickly it made fans forget that the trio of Corin Tucker, Carrie Brownstein and Janet Weiss had ever stopped. They launched the show with two songs from their excellent comeback album, No Cities to Love, and blazed through a set of propulsive indie rock and punk that showcased their innate feel for each other as musicians, and as a band with its fans. Twenty years after forming, Sleater-Kinney’s Spokane show was a thrilling, unforgettable return to form. (DAN NAILEN)

LUCINDA WILLIAMS

Bing Crosby Theater | Feb. 14 Lucinda Williams is a legendarily mercurial performer when it comes to the stage. There’s no denying the poetry, grace and grit that comes through her songs’ recorded versions, but on stage she can be uneasy, even combative. Her Valentine’s Day show was, aptly, a love fest, with Williams generously thanking the crowd for its rapturous response to her and her band. The cheers were well deserved, as Williams drew on no less than nine of her albums for a set of blues, folk, country and rock highlighted by songs from her latest album, Down Where The Spirit Meets The Bone. (DN)

NEKO CASE

Bing Crosby Theater | April 20 What’s this? No Kelly Hogan? While it’s true that her monumentally talented harmony partner and comic foil was laid up in the bus with the flu, her absence served as a reminder of the power of Neko Case’s own vocals. When two performers are so naturally complementary, and their deliveries have become so entwined over 17 years of touring and recording, it can be hard to reconcile one without the other. Thankfully for us, when Neko opened the show with an a cappella version of “Nearly Midnight, Honolulu,” it almost seemed as if she was tuning the very room to her voice. Instantly, she reminded us of why we were there. (GAWAIN FADELEY)

GEOGRAPHER

The Big Dipper | May 7 After beckoning the crowd closer, then even closer still, Mike Deni and crew launched into “I’m Ready,” the lead single from the San Francisco-based, synth-heavy, indie-rock project’s third full-length, Ghost Modern. It seemed odd that a crowd would react so enthusiastically to such melancholic material, given that Ghost Modern is about Deni’s effort to see beyond his nihilistic view of the world. But, as it turns out, synths can make even the most glass-half-empty lyrics sound optimistic. Older material was just as well received. “Play that shit, man!” one fan yelled upon hearing the opening line to fan favorite “Kites” from 2010’s Animal Shapes. And play that shit, they did. (AZARIA PODPLESKY)

NEUTRAL MILK HOTEL From top down, Neil Young, Shania Twain, Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen and Neko Case were among the artists who impressed in the Inland Northwest this year.

34 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

Knitting Factory | June 5 In early 2015, Neutral Milk Hotel announced they’d disband. June 9 would mark their final show. Just days before that final date, Lilac City fans witnessed one of the band’s


alleged last-ever performances. That night, I wanted to ask every person wildly singing along with the band where they were the first moment they heard this music, and how Jeff Mangum’s strange lyrics changed them. The fact is, this folk-rock, Irish-influenced ’90s music has changed people. Intermittently, fans raised their hands to the sky in worshipful reverence, as if to pull the music in through their fingertips. The night was a spiritual awakening. (LAURA JOHNSON)

NEIL YOUNG

Spokane Arena | Oct. 2 Ol’ Shakey’s stop at the Arena this past fall had all the trappings of classic Neil: bizarre theatrics, stomping, a pump organ, furious guitar abuse and enough Boomer rage to satisfy the most righteous class-warrior. Oh, and some of the greatest songs of the 20th century. Young and his touring band, Promise of the Real (featuring Willie Nelson’s sons Lukas and Micah), dove right into his nearly 50-year catalog and delivered a satisfying mix of hits and deeper tracks, including a handful of numbers from his new record, The Monsanto Years. Tears were shed, joints were passed, and my fist pumped uncontrollably for two and a half hours. (GF)

SHANIA TWAIN

Spokane Arena | Sept. 12 At 50, Twain, who proved that her vocals were still on point after not touring for years, was the best-looking person in Spokane that September night. She strutted and stomped around the Arena stage in thighhigh platform boots, flipped her amazing mane of hair around, sparkled and smiled, and looked like she was having a blast, even going into the audience at one point. She was a singing goddess in the spotlight, helped majorly by a rowdy backing band and a state-of-the-art stage setup worthy of the Super Bowl. (LJ)

“WEIRD AL” YANKOVIC

Northern Quest Resort & Casino | Sept. 13 He didn’t begin his show onstage. That would have been far too ordinary. Instead, the comedic singer began “Tacky,” a parody of Pharrell Williams’ “Happy,” in the venue’s loading area, walking and singing to a camera that was piped onto a large stage screen. Eventually making it to the performance space — of course, clad in his obligatory Hawaiian shirt — we welcomed him. While Yankovic’s 2014 album Mandatory Fun went to No. 1 on the Billboard charts, the new songs didn’t receive the same response as his older work, like “Amish Paradise.” This packed-in two-hour show was satisfyingly funny and creative, family-friendly but still smart as hell. (LJ)

CHEAP TRICK

Spokane County Fair & Expo Center | Sept. 17 Proving age ain’t nothing but a number, the classic rock heroes (and 2016 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees) hit the fair and killed with a high-energy, high-volume set. Deep album cuts and new songs intermingled with monster hits (“Surrender,” “Ain’t That A Shame,” etc.) from Cheap Trick’s 40-year catalog. Robin Zander’s voice held up through his shout-along choruses, Rick Nielsen’s guitar playing was entertaining as hell, and when bassist Tom Petersson led them into an unexpected feedback-laced cover of the Velvet Underground’s “I’m Waiting for the Man,” there was no doubt this was a timeless rock band, not just another oldies act. (DN)

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE

INB Performing Arts Center | Dec. 15 Despite being rescheduled more than two months after their original planned trip across the Cascades (due to the birth of bassist Nick Harmer’s daughter), Spokane still turned out to see these beloved Westside rockers. They didn’t disappoint. With vocals that have always sounded richer and more emotionally charged live than on any record, Ben Gibbard was in a world of his own on stage. DCFC’s set took us as far back as 1998, in between, and then back to the present with the best from 2015’s Kintsugi. A slightly older audience was evidence of the band’s lasting legacy, guiding so many emotional teens through their early 2000s angst. (CHEY SCOTT) n

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 35


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ALT-FOLK MONARCH CD RELEASE

N

ew Year’s Day falling on a Friday in 2016 means the celebrations continue all weekend. On Saturday, the local alt-folk four-piece Monarch (previously called Parable) hosts a masquerade party in honor of their new EP release. Concertgoers are encouraged to wear masks and their best New Year’s attire, and this band’s music is certainly worth celebrating. These are tight, Glee-esque choir harmonies that lyrically focus heavily on life and light and love. Instrumentation is sparse, with guitars and banjos filling in what voices don’t. Songs like “Island” show off the breezy Hawaiian spirit of the band, the place they first formed. — LAURA JOHNSON Monarch Masquerade EP release show feat. 1 Tribe, Flannel Math Animal and Nate Stratte • Sat, Jan. 2, at 8 pm • $6/$8 day of • All-ages • Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 863-8098

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

New Year’s Eve

J THE BARTLETT, New Year’s Eve with Pickwick J THE BIg DIPPER, Monumental NYE Bash feat. Rise and Shine, the Drag, the Colourflies, Rylei Franks, Jordan Collins BoLo’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE BooMERS CLASSIC RoCk BAR & gRILL, Kostapalooza, Randy Campbell acoustic show BooTS BAkERY & LouNgE, The Song Project J BuCER’S CoFFEEHouSE PuB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BuCkHoRN INN, The Spokane River Band BuLL HEAD TAvERN, NYE with Bobby Bremer Band THE CELLAR, Laffin’ Bones J CHAPS, Spare Parts CHECkERBoARD BAR, Masquerade New Years Celebration CoEuR D’ALENE CASINo, Shiner, Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia CoEuR D’ALENE INN (208-7653200), New Year’s Eve feat. The Ryan Larsen Band, Rox Music CRAvE, Stoney Hawk CRuISERS, New Year’s Eve feat. Thunder Knife, Children of Atom, Pipers Rush CuRLEY’S, Tell the Boys DouBLE TREE HoTEL(455-9600), Tuxedo Junction Big Band FIzzIE MuLLIgANS, Chris Rieser and the Nerve THE FLAME, DJ WesOne gARLAND PuB & gRILL (326-7777), The Usual Suspects gooD TIMES TAvERN (208-7772694), ax Man John Bybee and the Mixed Company Band HANDLEBARS, Nightshift HILL’S RESoRT (208-443-2551), Dan Conrad and the Urban Achievers

36 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

HIP-HOP LOU ERA

T

he Bartlett normally doesn’t host pure hip-hop events. Indie hip-hop, sure, but on Saturday, the venue brings in a slew of artists new to its stage. Lou Era, who lives in Spokane but grew up in Los Angeles, headlines this regional hip-hop showcase bringing in artists as far as Pullman and Seattle. The show’s Progress Report title refers to fans checking in with Lou Era; seeing how far his flow and rapid-fire lyrics have come, and how far he still wants to go. Formerly known as just Lou or This Is Lou, Lou Era plans to drop an EP and tour nationally in the next six months. As his motto goes, the show will certainly look so Seattle but feel so L.A. — LAURA JOHNSON Hip-Hop Night: Ryker Management Presents: Progress Report feat. Lou Era with DJ Felon, Yodi Mac, All Day Trey, Ceez Carter and Ivy Team • Sat, Jan. 2, at 8 pm • $8/$12 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

THE HIvE, New Year’s Eve Ball feat. The London Souls HogFISH, Apollo Live IRoN HoRSE BAR, JamShack THE JACkSoN ST., DJ Dave THE JAMMER, Johnny & the Moondogs JoHN’S ALLEY, NYE feat. Flying Mammals JoNES RADIAToR, ‘80s party feat. DJ Lydellski, DJ Orange kELLY’S IRISH PuB, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots kNITTINg FACToRY, NYE Party feat. Invasive, Over Sea Under Stone, Broken Identity, Zaq Flanery J LAguNA CAFé, NYE with Pamela Benton THE LARIAT INN, New Year’s Eve feat. Ricks Brothers LEFTBANk WINE BAR, Nate Stratte LIoN’S LAIR (456-5678), New Year’s Eve party

LooN LAkE SALooN (233-2738), Six-Strings n’ Pearls MAx AT MIRABEAu, New Year’s Ballroom Bash with Willie B Blues Band MIk’S (208-666-0450), Affaire De Coeur New Year’s Eve Party with DJs Brentano and Kenya NASHvILLE NoRTH, NYE with Kristy from American Young, Luke Jaxon and more J NoRTHERN QuEST CASINo, New Year’s Eve with Blue Öyster Cult AND Just Plain Darin NYNE, NYE with DJ C-Mad o’SHAYS IRISH PuB & EATERY, Open mic with Adrian and Leo J THE PALoMINo, Masquerade Ball feat. Perfechter Productions PEND D’oREILLE WINERY, Ron Criscione PINNACLE NoRTHWEST, NYE Masquerade Ball feat. DJ Felon

plus: Squad, Fuxxy, Marty McFly, Bon Panda Breaks, 1Slurr, Kronvict, Radikill, Alonestar, Kirby, Vumen-X RAzzLE’S BAR & gRILL (208-6355872), Bad Monkey RED LIoN HoTEL AT THE PARk (3268000), New Year’s Eve with the Cronkites RED LIoN HoTEL RIvER INN, NYE celebration feat. Dirty Martini J RED RooM LouNgE, Elton Jah NYE Reunion Show THE RIDLER PIANo BAR, NYE feat. dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler RoCkER RooM (208-676-2582), NYE party feat. DJ Rogue SANDPoINT EAgLES LoDgE (208263-3514, Texas Twister SCHWEITzER MouNTAIN RESoRT, New Year’s Eve at Schweitzer feat. Flying Mammals SPokANE AIRPoRT RAMADA INN

(838-5211), Bobby Patterson and The Fat Tones SPokANE CoNvENTIoN CENTER (279-7000), Glow New Year’s SWAXX, NYE with DJ Gestut, Benji Franks THE RoADHouSE, Cowboy Boot Ball New Year’s feat. Steve Starkey uSHER’S CoRNER SALooN (4820700), NYE at Armed & Dangerous zoLA, NYE feat. UpperCut

New Year’s Day

BEvERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BISTANgo MARTINI LouNgE (6248464), GRE3NE/Ron Greene BoLo’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE BooMERS CLASSIC RoCk BAR & gRILL, Kostapalooza CoEuR D’ALENE CASINo, Shiner, Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia CRAvE, Stoney Hawk CuRLEY’S, Tell the Boys


Saturday, 01/02

BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE (9241446), Jan Harrison, Doug Folkins, Pat Barclay J THE BARTLETT, HIP HOP NIGHT: Ryker Management Presents: Progress Report feat. Lou Era, Yodi Mac, All Day Trey, Ceez Carter, Ivy Team (See story on facing page) BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Monarch EP release feat. 1Tribe, Flannel Math Animal, Nate Stratte (See story on facing page) BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

Sunday, 01/03

COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church HOGFISH, Country Percussion presents open mic ZOLA, Troubadour

THE BEST FILM OF THE YEAR IS NOW

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Monday, 01/04

W I NNER

J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Monday Night Spotlight feat. Carey Brazil J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Two Kniights, Deformer, Bad Hex, Boat Race Weekend RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with MJ The In-Human Beatbox ZOLA, Fusbol

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Tuesday, 01/05

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, The Rub BROOKLYN DELI & LOUNGE, Open Mic FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness KELLY’S IRISH PUB, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MIK’S, DJ Brentano SWAXX, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx ZOLA, The Bucket List

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS , STEPHEN HOLDEN

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★★★★

ONE OF THE YEAR’S VERY BEST FILMS. I WANTED TO CHEER! ”

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CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

FRIDAY, JANUARY 1

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BIG BARN BREWING • 16004 N. Applewood Ln, Mead • 238-2489 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CALYPSOS • 116 E Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208665-0591 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • (208) 773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 THE FOXHOLE• 829 E. Boone • 315-5327 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 HANDLEBARS • 12005 E. Trent, Spokane Valley • 309-3715 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 THE JACKSON ST. • 2436 N. Astor • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N Market St, Mead • 4669918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN RAIL PUB • 5209 N. Market • 487-4269 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N Lidgerwood St • 242-8907 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 PINNACLE NORTHWEST • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside . • 822-7938 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD • 205 N Sullivan Rd • 891-0880 SWAXX • 23 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 TAMARACK • 912 W Sprague • 315-4846 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AlliedIntegratedMarketing_Carol_123115_4S_CPR.pdf

Wednesday, 01/06 EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES (368-9087), Open Mic with T & T THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, DJ Lydell LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kori Ailene LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 PINNACLE NORTHWEST, DJ Freaky Fred THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Jam with Steve Ridler SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open mic THE ROADHOUSE, Open mic with Vern Vogel and the Volcanoes ZOLA, The Bossame

d n t a n e d n e p e d n I l, Loca Free since 1993

u

Coming Up ...

NEWS FROM SYRIA TO SPOKANE 18 MUSIC AN EPIC DAY WITH DEF LEPPARD 47 PULLOUT THE SPOKANE ARENA AT 20 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

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SEPTEMBER 24-30, 2015 | THINK GLOBAL. LIVE INLAND.

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2015-2

THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, Stepbrothers, Jan. 8 THE BIG DIPPER, Songwriter’s Festival feat. the Marco Polo Collective, the Way Home, Andy Rumsey, Nate Greenburg, Paul Abner, Bradford Little, Gabe Knox, Jan. 8 THE BARTLETT, Bristol album release, Jan. 8 NYNE, Silver Treason CD release show with Whiskey Dick Mountain, Jan. 8 MOOTSY’S, Cursive Wires, Jan. 9 THE BARTLETT, Car Seat Headrest, Jan. 11 THE BIG DIPPER, KYRS benefit show feat. Itchy Kitty, Phlegm Fatale, the Bight, Jan. 16

R’S LANDE THE IN

BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Kostapalooza J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE, Dan Maher J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Shiner, Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Ron Greene CRAVE, Stoney Hawk CURLEY’S, Tell the Boys FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Chris Rieser and the Nerve GOOD TIMES TAVERN (208-7772694), ax Man John Bybee and the Mixed Company Band HANDLEBARS, Nightshift IRON HORSE BAR, JamShack THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Karrie O’Neill MIK’S, DJ Beatkeeper - Jason Zareski NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin THE PALOMINO, DJ Funk, DJ Perfechter J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Artist Expose with Eazzy Duz It feat. Benji Franks, Sean Thomas, Treveezy, Courage, Ally, The DZA, Django, Billy Cartel, Anthony DaReal, King Skelle, Lightfoot, Young East, God Squad THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J THE SHOP, Daniel Hall THE SNAKE PIT (208-682-3453), Alan Golub & Friends SWAXX, S.A.W. Threshold

ZOLA, Uppercut

u

FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Chris Rieser and the Nerve HANDLEBARS, Nightshift THE JACKSON ST., Karma Circle LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil MIK’S, DJ Beatkeeper - Jason Zareski NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE (4479900), Open Mic THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler ZOLA, Uppercut

O C T. N O V.

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DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 37


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU UNPLANNED CHRISTMAS DATE Thank you to the perfect stranger for being my date at the movies on Christmas Day! You asked to sit next to me and the smell of your cologne was fabulous. I meant to ask you why you were they by yourself (like me), but I am an old-fashioned girl and was waiting for you to ask me. You shot out of the theatre so fast I did not get a chance to say thank you. So, if you ever want to meet again for a movie at the Spokane Valley 12, I would love to watch another movie with you ; ) TO SAASHA ROSE GARVIN I know now I have no right to ask you or anyone for a second chance or even a first or last chance for that matter. Just need you to know that I miss dancing with you. The way you always tried showing me the right way to do things. Last but not least I miss holding on to you when we slept, and I love your cool peace toes. Hope that you might find it in your heart to come see me soon, even just to have coffee. I really do need you in my life. — Love always, David Lee McLaughlin

CHEERS AMAZING CREW FROM THE WHITE ELEPHANT Thank you Doug Esmay, and all of the crew at The White Elephant. They made my 3 yr old son's Christmas as bright as a star on a tree. Then they went even further to make sure that the rest of my families Christmas was just as bright. We had a house fire and lost a

tremendous amount. Doug and the crew came up with enough gifts for our whole family to feel the love this season. I don't know how I can ever repay the sheer joy you have given us! I can however promise my family and I will always remember and cherish the efforts made by you wonderful people to restore our faith in others, and the power of love! — Thank you for a Christmas Miracle! Sincerely, The Skocilich Family RENEWED FAITH IN THE HUMAN SPIRIT So much gratitude for the couple with the old beagle that helped me with my truck in the snow on Ben Burr Road. You both were so nice and you just made my day. Thanks to the gentleman that took the time to pull me out of the ditch. It warmed my heart and gave me a reminder, through times of turmoil and hardship, the human spirit is ultimately kind and gracious. Cheers to the hearts of all. COFFEE ON A ROTTEN DAY To the "regular" customer who loaded a gift card to be used on following customers at the Starbucks on N. Sullivan in the Valley: I was having a horrible day and being given the news of a car repair I can't afford while so close to Christmas. I decided to splurge and try to cheer myself up with a hot drink and pastry. Imagine my surprise when the barista told me my order was taken care of. Thank you so very much. While it may have been a little thing for you, it was just the surprise and smile I so desperately needed. Merry Christmas! HWY 2 DEC. 10 ACCIDENT To Amy and Linda, I lost your number but not your help and consideration on that night we needed you all the most. THANK YOU ALL SO VERY MUCH. You all made sure we got to the hospital and tried hard to get Officer Sanders' attention at the accident. And what I did not know was that you all had lost your dear aunt that same morning in an Auto accident as well, and yet took the time and care to see that we were cared for. Again, Thank you all and a very very Merry Christmas and a very healing happy new Year. PSB SAVES XMAS! Big cheers to Perry Street Brewery for lending me the missing faucet to pour my beer on Nitro in time for Christmas. You guys are holiday heroes!

RANDOM ACT OF KINDNESS You were behind me in Kohl's department store on Christmas Eve. You bought a wallet as a gift for me. I'm not even sure I got your name I really want to tell you thank you again!! If there were more people in this world with a heart as big as yours, this world would be a much better place! Thank you so much !!

38 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

BIG MAN Jeers to the guy in the white pickup driving past Manito Park on Grand

why you deserved it. When that didn't work you started an affair with the boss. I hope destroying people's relationships, trust and good will was worth it. Because in the end you still can't do the work your seeking, unless its a position on Sprague. BRIAN SETZER CONCERT SPOILER To the fat middle-aged guy in the first row of the Brian Setzer concert Saturday.

If there were more people in this world with a heart as big as yours, this world would be a much better place!

HELLO BATMAN Happy Birthday! Saving your birthday present for you. Realizing from recent events that life and time are very precious and shouldn't be dawdled away without some happiness involved. Soon you will be at the six year mark. Do you choose to spend another six the same? Loving you always no matter what happens. Your Batgirl. PAYING IT FORWARD To my wonderful customer who tipped me on Christmas Eve. I want to thank you. I know you are going through some hard times and you still find it in your heart to pay it forward. So cheers to you for being the kind person you are.

JEERS FESTIVE SPIRIT... NOT To the drivers going to the NorthTown Mall 12/21/15 around 5 pm. My daughter's car broke down on the corner of Wellesley and Division on a snowy, cold and wet afternoon. And not one person got out or stopped and asked if she needed help. A young, small girl got out to push her vehicle in the slush and snow, and instead of even asking her if she was OK or if there was anything you could do for her, you ALL swerved around her and splashed the snow and wetness upon her. Honking and impatiently trying to get to your destination. Oh the Holiday

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

#wtbevents

cheer is upon us! My children have turned into young adults who always stop and ask if a person needs helps, even if they are unable to help, they ask. Thank you for confirming my lost faith in humanity. Enjoy your Holidays and Merry Christmas to you!

— RANDOM ACT OF KINDNESS

around 4:45 Tuesday evening. My family was crossing Grand in the crosswalk when you whipped out from behind a car that stopped for us and came toward us. I was waving my arms to make sure you saw us. We couldn’t really run out of the way of your approaching truck with the ice on the street, and you were coming up on us fast! You stopped in the crosswalk and got halfway out of your car to angrily yell at us that you saw us and were trying to stop but couldn't because of the ice, scaring the two 10-year-old girls that were with me. If it is too icy to stop, maybe you shouldn't be whipping around cars toward people in a crosswalk? Did stopping on the crosswalk to yell at a woman and two little girls make you feel like a big man? The addition of yelling “F--- You” to us was the cherry on top of our interaction. Your vocabulary and demeanor are as impressive as your driving abilities.

Your pathetic narcissistic display (jumping up repeatedly and pointing to the band members like you were directing them, forcing your Santa-hatted woman companion to a offer a cheap flower bouquet to Setzer) was not just a minor distraction to the people behind you who came to see the band. It was not just annoying, it was rude. You lacked any awareness of how ridiculous you looked, both to the audience members forced to suffer your antics and to Brian Setzer and his orchestra, who were doing their best to put on a great show. Next time, stay home and strut around your apartment to a CD and let the rest of us enjoy the real show. 

BROKEN TRUST Jeers to me for hiring you, our company hired you thinking you could do the work, we put a lot of trust into you and all you did was steal, lie and cheat. Yes, we have the proof in all matters. We felt sorry for you because you swore you had lupus, but it was just an excuse to smoke pot on the job and not do your job, all you wanted from our small company was more money when you clearly couldn't give us any reasons

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email related details to getlisted@inlander.com.

FILM SING ALONG WITH ELSA

People aren’t over Frozen yet. The film came out more than two years ago, and we’re still referring to “Let it Go” like it’s as fresh as ever. This weekend, you can sing the catchy songs, along with all your kids’ favorites — Olaf, Elsa, Anna and Kristoff — performed by local musicians on the Bing Crosby Theater stage while the film plays. The event will include door prizes, a live reindeer on stage and a meet-and-greet session with all of the characters. — LAURA JOHNSON Frozen: A Sing-Along Party • Sat-Sun, Jan. 2-3, at 2 pm • $20/$15 for 12 and under • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

COMMUNITY BEING HUMAN

How do we define what it means to be a member of the human species? A big traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian that’s heading to Spokane for a quick, month-long run seeks to answer this question and more, hosting fascinating guest lectures, educational programs and interactive exhibit components. The replicas in the exhibit are just like what you’d see at the National Museum of Natural History, and for its Spokane run, more than 40 programs at Spokane County Library District branches are planned, including workshops on Stone Age survival skills, our region’s own Salish heritage and kids’ activities that let young learners paint like cave people and explore the wonders of human DNA. — CHEY SCOTT Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human? • Jan. 5-Feb. 2; open daily during library hours • North Spokane Library • 44 E. Hawthorne • scld.org/humanorigins

OUTDOORS TAKE A HIKE

The recent snow means that these New Year’s Day events allow for stunning escapes into winter wonderlands. To encourage residents to get outdoors and enjoy Washington’s diverse natural landscapes, the state Parks and Recreation Commission has organized hosted events in parks across the state, including our own backyard. At Mount Spokane, take the family out for a guided snowshoe hike (a Sno-Park permit is required for this event, which meets at Trail 130). At lower elevation, park rangers are hosting a guided hike along Deep Creek or the Centennial Trail, depending on how much snow is on the ground. Join that event by meeting at the Deep Creek parking lot, just past the Nine Mile Dam. — CHEY SCOTT

BENEFIT VERBAL SPARRING

In one corner, you have Spokane-area state senators Michael Baumgartner, a Republican, and Andy Billig, a Democrat. In the other, it’s Rogers High debaters Rylee Cesal and Hana Knowlton. The event? The second edition of “Rhetoric in the Ring,” in which local politicians verbally battle students in a benefit for the Rogers High School Debate Club. Enjoy all manner of zingers, oneliners and knowledge-dropping by some of the area’s finest minds. And from the politicians, too. — DAN NAILEN Rhetoric in the Ring II: Senators vs. Students • Wed, Jan. 6, at 5:30 pm • Howard Street Gym • 165 S. Howard • Facebook: Rhetoric in the Ring II

SPORTS CONFERENCE BATTLE

After an unexpected run to the Sweet 16 during last year’s March Madness, coach Lisa Fortier and the Bulldogs are off and running in their West Coast Conference schedule. After a pre-Christmas road trip that covered more than 7,700 miles, the team returns to the cozy confines of the Kennel for a battle against Santa Clara. The team just lost Emma Wolfram to injury for the rest of the season, but Shaniqua Nilles is back from her own knee injury as the Zags pursue another conference title. — DAN NAILEN Gonzaga vs. Santa Clara • Sat, Jan. 2, at 2 pm • $3-$10 • McCarthey Athletic Center • 801 N. Cincinnati • gozags.com/tickets

First Day Hikes • Fri, Jan. 1, at 10 am (Mt. Spokane) and 1 pm (Riverside) • Free; no Discover Pass required • Mt. Spokane and Riverside State Parks • parks.wa.gov

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 39


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

PUTTIN’ ON THE RITZ After the Symphony’s New Year’s Eve concert, ring in the new year at the annual gala hosted by the Spokane Symphony Associates in support of the orchestra. Includes live entertainment by Master Class Jazz Orchestra, hors d’oeuvres, door prizes, late night fare, midnight champagne toast and more. Dec. 31, 9 pm-1 am. $85/person. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post. spokanesymphony.org A REASON FOR FREEZEN A fundraiser event before/after/during the Polar Bear Plunge at Lake CdA. Attendees of the plunge are invited to bring donated items to Sander’s Beach, including warm socks, hats and gloves to donate to the local St. Vincent de Paul warming center. Jan. 1, 10:30 am. on.fb. me/1mfdYNK (208-415-0116)

COMEDY

STAND-UP OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300) STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. (838-6688) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) STAND-UP OPEN MIC Mondays; sign-up at 9:30 pm, show at 10 pm. Ages 21+. No cover. The Foxhole, 829 E. Boone. facebook.com/thefoxholespokane (315-5327) TRIVIA + OPEN MIC COMEDY Trivia starts at 8 pm; stick around for open mic comedy afterward. Tuesdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. Checkerboard Bar, 1716 E. Sprague. (535-4007) FIRST THURSDAY COMEDY Laugh out loud with live standup comedy the first Thursday of every month in Impulse Nightclub. Each edition of the show features funny local folks from around the region. $10. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford. northernquest.com

COMMUNITY

CAMPBELL HOUSE HOLIDAYS The historic mansion at the MAC is decorated for Christmas and open for visitors to explore at their own pace (no formal tours). Also includes an activity, craft and four living history interpreters on site. Dec. 30-31 and Jan. 1-2, from 12-4 pm. $5-$10 museum admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) FIRST NIGHT SPOKANE Spokane’s annual New Year’s Eve celebration showcases the performing and visual artists in our community. See website for complete event details/schedule. Dec. 31. $15-$18. Riverfront Park & Downtown Spokane. firstnightspokane.org (795-8691) CDA NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATIONS The New Year’s celebration includes two fireworks shows, at 8 pm and again at midnight, over the lake at the Resort. Also attend a Great Gatsby-themed party (all-ages until 9 pm) at the Resort Convention Center, with tickets from $15-$75. There are also family lake cruises ($20/ person), adult cruises ($25/person, 21+) and dessert cruises ($25-$35) during the fireworks show. Dec. 31. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com

40 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

GLOW NEW YEAR Hosted by the Negative Split/Glow Run folks, a NYE event all about glowing bright, with a mechanical bull, live DJ, dancing and more. Dec. 31, 8 pm. $17-$27. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. nsplit.com INVENTION CONNECTION A family friendly NYE event with staff on site to help you imagine and create inventions with Little Bits, Legos, Arduino, Minecraft and more. Dec. 31, 5-8 pm. Free. Spark Center, 1214 W. Summit Parkway. sparkwestcentral.org JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE Daily, 40-minute evening cruises on Lake Coeur d’Alene offer views of the CdA Resort’s annual Holiday Lights Show, and includes a visit to Santa’s Workshop. Through Jan. 3, departing nightly at 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm. $6/ages 6-12; free/ages 5 and under; $19.75/seniors (55+); $20.75/ adults. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com (208-765-4000) NYE FAMILY CELEBRATION Spokane Public Library branches host a family NYE event to ring in the new year without having to stay up late. Includes stories, crafts, a countdown and more. For families and kids of all ages. At the Indian Trail, Shadle and South Hill branches. Dec. 31, 11 amnoon. Free. spokanelibrary.org SPOKANE WINTER GLOW SPECTACULAR The second annual holiday light display throughout Riverfront Park, free and open to the public nightly at 5 pm, through Jan. 1. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. (625-6601) FREE STATE PARKS DAY As part of the Discover Pass legislation, residents are offered access to any state park without needing a pass. Includes access locally to Riverside and Mount Spokane State Parks. Upcoming free days: Jan. 1, Jan. 17-18, March 19, March 26, April 22, May 8. Free. parks.wa.gov WINTER ENCAMPMENT A modern interpretation of traditional winter lodging, food and activities. Enjoy the Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s tradition of oral history as Cultural Director Quanah Matheson tells the story of the Coeur d’ Alene’s winter activities. A lighting shows also features tribal music, more than 15 teepees and 50 animals. Through Jan. 2, Fri-Sat, from 7-9 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com (800-523-2464) BEER FLOW YOGA Local yoga instructor Lily Fife hosts her monthly yoga + beer class at Perry Street Brewing, a gentle yoga flow followed by beers and socializing at the brewery. Arrive early to save a spot/sign waiver. Jan. 2, 10:45 am. $15. Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry St. on.fb.me/1QDafGQ (509-279-2820) CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING Offered by Boy Scout Troop 400. Drop off your natural tree for recycling for a $5 donation requested. We will also come pick up your tree (within 15 minutes of CVHS) for a $10 donation requested. Visit our website to schedule tree pick-up. All proceeds benefit the troop. Jan. 2-3 and 9-10, 9 am-3 pm. $5-$10. Central Valley High School, 821 S. Sullivan Rd. troop400.net/trees (927-6848) FROZEN: A SING-ALONG PARTY Kick off the new year with Friends Of the Bing and local, award-winning musician Nicole Lewis as Elsa, along with Olaf, Kristoff and friends. Jan. 2-3, at 2 pm. $20/ adults; $15/kids. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com SPOKANE ISLAMIC CENTER OPEN HOUSE The local mosque opens to the public who is invited to come and learn more about the area’s Muslim community over refreshments and conversation.

Jan. 2, 11 am-2 pm. Free. Spokane Islamic Center, 6411 E. Second. spokaneislamiccenter.org (482-2608) PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOL INFO NIGHT A meeting offering information on Brilliance Charter Academy of Math Literacy, a proposed K-6 public charter school planned to open Sept. 2017. Jan. 5, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Post Falls Library, 821 N. Spokane St. (208-691-5617) EXPLORING HUMAN ORIGINS: WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE HUMAN? The Smithsonian’s national traveling exhibit invites audiences to discover what we know about human evolution and how we know it. Visitors may view replicas and images from the Smithsonian’s popular human origins exhibit at the National Museum of Natural History. Experience more than 40 educational panels, interactive kiosks, hands-on displays, videos, 3D skull casts, and a large reproduction bronze statue. Jan. 5-Feb. 2, open daily from 10 am-6 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) WEE MAC EXPLORATION SESSIONS The MAC revives its pre-K museum educational exploration sessions, with activities to foster exploration and social development in prep for Kindergarten. Kids and a parent will engage in art activities and viewing, discover walks, songs, story time and more. Tuesdays from 9:30-11:30 am. For kids ages 4-5. $5/two people. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org JOB BOOT CAMP A 3-part workshop for anyone looking to improve their job application and interviewing skills, especially those with a particular job opening in mind. Price includes all three sessions. Register at sparkwestcentral.org. Jan. 7, 6-8 pm. $10. Spark Center, 1214 W. Summit Parkway. sparkwestcentral.org

FILM

CASABLANCA A champagne toast to one of the greatest movies of all time. Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart), who owns a nightclub in Casablanca, discovers his old flame Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) is in town with her husband, Victor Laszlo (Paul Henreid). Laszlo is a famed rebel, and with Germans on his tail, Ilsa knows Rick can help them get out of the country. Dec. 31, 8-9:30 pm. $10. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. (208-255-7801) HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY PART 2 As the war of Panem escalates to the destruction of other districts by the Capitol Katniss Everdeen must bring together an army against President Snow, while all she holds dear hangs in the balance. Rated: PG-13. Jan. 1-3, show times vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) TRUMBO In 1947, Dalton Trumbo (Bryan Cranston) was Hollywood’s top screenwriter until he and other artists were jailed and blacklisted for their political beliefs. Dalton used words and wit to win two Academy Awards and expose the absurdity and injustice of the blacklist, which entangled everyone from gossip columnist Hedda Hopper (Helen Mirren) to John Wayne, Kirk Douglas and Otto Preminger. Rated R. Jan. 1-3; show times vary. $4-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) ARTIST TRUST POP-UP STUDIO Facilitated by Frances McCue from Creative Ground, and in creative collaboration with Spokane filmmaker Adam Boyd, this workshop is the second in a series of Artist Trust’s Pop-up Studios hosting creative activities with artists and arts

supporters. Jan. 7, 5-7:30 pm. Free. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. thebartlettspokane.com

FOOD & DRINK

TASTYTHURSDAYS Wine tastings are hosted every Thursday evening, from 5-7, sampling something new each week. $5/ person; fee waived if you find a bottle you love and buy. Live music and light appetizers offered. Uva Trattoria, 309 E. Lakeside Ave. (208-930-0573) NEW YEAR’S EVE MASQUERADE A masquerade party with prizes, drink specials and more. Dec. 31, 10 pm-1 am. Free admission. Steady Flow Growler House, 328 N. Sullivan Rd., Ste. 8. on.fb. me/1PjNdDs (509-598-8297) NYE SCOTCH & CIGARS CELEBRATION Scotch and cigar pairings on the heated outdoor patio, with a full food menu available for purchase and drink specials. Dec. 31, 6 pm-1 am. Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe. facebook.com/Prohibition.Gastropub.Spokane1 (474-9040) SUPPER CLUB Chef/owner Kristen Ward prepares a 5-course, rustic, French-style meal that features flavors of the season, paired with diverse collection of wines (+$20/person). Reservations required. Dec. 31, 6-8:30 pm. $65/person. [Sold out] The Ivory Table, 1822 E. Sprague. ivorytable.com (202-2901) COMMUNITY COOKING NIGHTS Each class offers a positive and relaxed environment to learn valuable scratchcooking skills, and to apply those skills to simple, healthy, and cost-effective meals. All recipes are based on what is readily available through Spokane County food banks. Register online. Wednesdays in January, from 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front. secondharvestkitchen.org (252-6246)

MUSIC

NEW YEAR’S EVE BALL The second annual event benefits Angels Over Sandpoint, and features live music by The London Souls. Ages 21+; doors open at 9 pm. Dec. 31, 10 pm. $40. The Hive, 207 N. First St., Sandpoint. livefromthehive.com ((208) 457-2392) SPOKANE SYMPHONY: BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY The Spokane Symphony and Chorale join the multitudes around the world who celebrate New Year’s Eve with a performance of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. Beethoven’s masterpiece is considered by many to be the best and most joyous piece of music ever written, and has become an exciting part of the holiday revelry in downtown Spokane. Dec. 31, 7:30 pm. $16-$28. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) NORTHWEST SACRED MUSIC CHORAL: A HOLIDAY CHORALE SPECTACULAR The chorale’s winter concert features guest artists Paul Grove and the Crescendo Community Chorus. Jan. 3, 4-5:30 pm. $16-$22. Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, 127 E. 12th Ave. nwsmc.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

NEW YEAR’S EVE AT SCHWEITZER Ring in 2016 on the mountain with live music and entertainment for the whole family, with a big celebration party in Taps.

Dec. 31; tickets go on sale for activities on Dec. 1. Dec. 31. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) NYE AT SILVER Celebrate the departure of 2015 with a day of skiing and snowboarding, with the tubing hill open until 6 pm. Then hit up Noah’s to welcome in 2016, or hit up the Silver Rapids Indoor Waterpark for kid-friendly countdown events. Dec. 31. Silver Mountain Ski Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com FIRST DAY HIKES A fun yet moderately difficult family snowshoe hike on Trail 130. Meet at 10 am at the snowmobile parking lot. Hosted as part of Washington Star Parks’ statewide event. *(A seasonal or one-day Sno-Park permit is required for vehicle access to the park.) Jan. 1, 10 am. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. bit.ly/1Zm3wT4 FIRST DAY HIKES (RSP) Depending on snow conditions, this ranger-led hike will either follow the Deep Creek Interpretive Trail or the Centennial Trail. Learn about the natural world of the park and about the history of the Civilian Conservation Corps that built the park in the 1930s. Meet at 1 pm at the Deep Creek parking lot. Held as part of Washington State Parks’ statewide event. Jan. 1, 1 pm. Riverside State Park, Spokane. bit. ly/1Zm3wT4 BEST HAND SKI & SNOWSHOE POKER RUN An outdoor event in conjunction with Idaho Free Ski Day. Come ski the loop (8 km/5 miles) or snowshoe on Jeanette’s Jaunt. Cards will be dealt along the route. All ability levels are welcome. Light refreshments provided. You can warm up and toast marshmallows afterwards at the campfire. Jan. 2, 11:30 am1:30 pm. $10-$12, $25/family. Fourth of July Pass, Idaho. panhandlenordicclub. com (208-755-2575) GOTH RUGBY WINTER TRAINING Spokane’s first boys high school rugby club is holding indoor winter conditioning/ training through end of Feb. 2016 to prep for the 2016 spring season. New players welcome. Meets Wed/Sun, from 7:309:30 pm, through Feb. 28. Free. SYSA Indoor Sports Center, 730 N. Hamilton. gothrugby.com (228-8170) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun, from 4:30-7 pm and Wed, from 7-10 pm. Also meets for beginner-friendly nights at the HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo, Liberty Lake, on Tue, from 7-9 pm. ($5) $8/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. (869-9229) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4:30 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (535-0803) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm. $3/visit. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. spokanetabletennis.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. REGINA PATS: Regular season hockey match. Jan. 9, 7:05 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com SPOKANE HEALTH & FITNESS EXPO An expo offering free seminars, demos, classes, health tests, samples, fitness apparel vendors, info booths for local fitness/training programs and more, including the “Fittest at the Fairgrounds” cross fit games. Admission good all weekend. $8/adults; $4/ages 6-12. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. spokanehealthfitnessexpo.com


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sensible pricing from local shops, some of which he says charge upward of $17 a gram. Chris Rice, budtender at Royal’s Cannabis, says the sky’s the limit for the marijuana industry in 2016. “There’s always going to be growth in this industry, just because it’s so new,” he says. Unlike McCrea, Rice is excited about combining the recreational and medical markets, because it will give recreational shops the opportunity to sell plants and seeds to patients looking to grow their own plants. He notes that patients still will need a medical card to buy those products. Along with an optimism regarding the industry’s overall growth, Cinder Manager Justin Hutcherson is looking forward to further development of marijuana-related laws and progress toward a more accurate system for monitoring impaired drivers. TreeHouse Club Manager Shaun Durkin hopes the community will get to see the benefits of the state’s legalization and taxation of marijuana in the form of tax money trickling back into the county. Devon Swanson, budtender at Satori, is proud of Washington’s marijuana industry for setting the bar for other states on their paths to legalization. Swanson, who sees 2016 as the Year of the Educated Customer, is looking forward to learning even more about the industry himself. “There’s all these amazing values to cannabis that haven’t even had the proper time to be tapped into yet,” he says, “so for us to be finally scratching the surface and finally having the scientists that want to pursue cannabis, it’s an amazing thing.” 


EVENTS | CALENDAR

THEATER

LUCKY ME A comedy about love, bad luck, aging, and airport security. Jan. 1-17; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$24. The Modern Theater Spokane, 174 S. Howard. themoderntheater.org (509-455-7529)

VISUAL ARTS

17TH SMALL ARTWORKS INVITATIONAL The Art Spirit hosts its 17th annual invitational, featuring works by 37 regional artists and more than 225 new works. Through Jan. 2; open daily from 11 am-6 pm. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery. com (208-765-6006) FIRST NIGHT SPOKANE JURIED ART SHOW First Night Spokane’s annual juried show open to all opens the night of December’s First Friday, Dec. 4, from 5-8 pm. Art is on display daily through Dec. 31, and is also open during First Night festivities. Free. Kress Gallery, 808 W. Main, third level. firstnightspokane.org (795-8691) NATURE CONNECTS: LEGO BRICK SCULPTURES The MAC displays 27 giant sculptures created from nearly 500,000 LEGO bricks, created by nationally-renowned, award-winning artist Sean Kenney, the first artist to be named a LEGO Certified Professional. A build-your-own sculpture contest accompanies the exhibit: LEGO enthusiasts. Through Feb. 7, 2016; gallery hours Wed-Sun, 10 am-5 pm. Museum admission applies. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) NILÉ LIVINGSTON The new downtown gallery, in partnership with EWU, opens to the public with a debut exhibit by the visiting artist from Philadelphia, whose work focuses on transcending cultural bias and building community. Dec. 31, from 5-9 pm with an artist reception Jan. 7, from 6-9 pm. Richmond Gallery, 228 W. Sprague. richmondartcollective.com ARTS BUZZ A time to learn what arts and culture-related activities are in the works for the Cd’A area. Held on the first Friday of each month, at 9 am, in the chamber’s conference room. Coeur d’Alene Chamber of Commerce, 1031 N. Academic Way. artsincda.org FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Receptions are held on the first Friday (January’s event is on Jan. 8 due to New Year’s Day) of the month, from 5-8 pm. For complete event details, visit Inlander.com/FirstFriday. DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS A group show featuring the paintings of Brian Frink, the drawings/collage of Brad Schwartz and the ceramics of Lisa Soronaka. Jan. 4-Feb. 5; gallery open MonFri, 8:30 am-3:30 pm or by appt. Artist talk with Brian Frink on Jan. 20, at 11:30 am in Bldg. 24, Rm. 110. Free admission. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu (533-3500) WORLD ON FIRE Abstract paintings from the Pacific Northwest by Laura Allen, Lisa Daniels, Ken Susynski, Veronica Reeves and Fiona Lau. Jan. 1-March 31; opening reception Feb. 5, from 5-8 pm. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanearts.org

WORDS

ORIGIN STORIES INK’s Origin Stories is a comic and graphic-novel style drawing and writing playshop that inspires students’ (grades 4-8) creativity and builds story-telling skills. Limited spots; register for free at sparkwestcentral.org. Meets the first Saturday of the month, Jan. 2-March 5. Spark Center, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org READING: BEVERLY THOMPSON The writer reads from her book, “Covered in Ink: Tattoos, Women and the Politics of the Body” and shares video clips from her documentary “Covered”. Many of the tattooed women interviewed for her book and documentary are from Spokane. Jan. 2, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) SIGNING: GERALD HICKMAN The author signs his book, “Good Times in Genesee: A Tale of Two Families” in which he reflects on the history of his hometown Genesse, Idaho. Jan. 2, 1-3 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) EXPLORING HUMAN ORIGINS Dr. Rick Potts, paleoanthropologist and curator of the traveling exhibit, defines the main themes and messages of “Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?” Explore how fossils, archeological remains and genetic studies all shed light on our connection with the natural world. Jan. 5, 7-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (509-893-8350) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) EXPLORING THE MEANING OF HUMAN EVOLUTION Dr. Connie Bertka and Dr. Jim Miller, committee co-chairs of the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program, lead an engaging community conversation about human evolution. Jan. 6, 7-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) RHETORIC IN THE RING II: STUDENTS VS. SENATORS Featuring Rogers High School Students in friendly sparring matches with Spokane-area Washington State Senators Michael Baumgartner and Andy Billig. This event benefits the Rogers High School Speech and Debate Club. Jan. 6, 5:30 pm. Donations accepted. Howard Street Gym, 165 S. Howard. on.fb.me/1S9fZaK

ETC.

NEW YEAR’S BALLROOM BASH Includes live music by the Willie B Blues Band, hosted by Dean Jaxon of 101 FM’s morning show. Tickets also include party favors, raffle/prizes and a midnight champagne toast. Dec. 31, 6:30 pm-1 am. $30/$35. Max at Mirabeau, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. on.fb. me/1mqECUd (924-9000) SPOKANE MOVES TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION The local activist group meets on the first Tuesdays of the month at 6:30 pm. All are welcome. Donations accepted. Liberty Park Methodist Church, 1526 E. 11th Ave. s-m-a-c.org (844-1776) n

DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 43


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess WHEN HARRY BENT SALLY OVER THE HOOD OF THE CAR

My girlfriend’s “best friend” is a straight guy. I trust that she THINKS he’s just her friend. However, as a guy, I know that if he could hit it, he would. FYI, I’m not really a jealous or insecure person, and my guy friends complain about this same scenario, so this can’t just be my stuff. —Annoyed There’s a saying, “A true friend accepts who you are and helps you become who you can be” — for example, a person who’s naked in her true friend’s bed, feeling really guilty about cheating on her boyfriend. Sorry to be less-than-reassuring, but you and your guy friends are right: For many men, the friend zone is a holding area where they wait to Mr. Sneaky backmassage their way into the sexfriend zone. In a study of 88 opposite-sex friendships by evolutionary psychologist April Bleske-Rechek, men were more attracted to their female friend than vice versa and more likely to assume she also had the hots for them -- a belief bearing little correspondence to how the woman actually felt. Women, on the other hand, tended to assume their male friend had only platonic intentions. And sure, some male friends are just looking out for their female friends — but others do it in the way a hungry lion looks out for the limping gazelle. Bleske-Rechek’s findings align with research by evolutionary psychologists Martie Haselton and David Buss suggesting that we evolved to make protective mistakes in perception — erring in favor of whatever assumption would be least costly to our mating and survival interests. Men tend to overestimate women’s attraction to them because they lose more by missing a possible mating opportunity than by making asses of themselves hitting on a woman who isn’t interested (and, in fact, would eat a live pigeon to avoid having sex with them). Women, however, tend to underestimate men’s interest, because they have a lot to lose from believing a cad will stick around to be a dad. You aren’t without options here, though it’s probably best to refrain from dusting off the old flintlock and challenging the guy to a duel at dawn. Showing jealousy suggests you have reason to feel threatened (like maybe he really is all that). Instead, simply be the better deal. Consistently show your girlfriend that you’ve got what women evolved to prioritize in men — a willingness to invest time, energy, and resources — like by really listening when she talks instead of uh-huhing her while blowing up alien invaders on your phone. Do this stuff not because you’re afraid of losing her (which stinks of desperation) but because you haven’t forgotten that you love her. And as a show of how secure you are, maybe even encourage her to hang with him — that is, whenever she’s all “Golly, it’s been months since I spent the better part of an hour at the mall trying to decide between two slightly different vanilla-scented candles.”

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I’m a 41-year-old male sports fan, and every girlfriend I’ve had has initially claimed to like sports. But once I’m all in, she admits that she never liked sports at all. Why can’t women just be honest in the beginning? —Bugged

©2015, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

44 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

Travelers is one of the nation’s leading insurance service organizations and we’re looking for motivated Customer Service Reps with backgrounds in customer service to join our team in Spokane. Join us at our OPEN HOUSE JOB FAIR for INSTANT interviews on: Saturday, Jan 9th from 10AM to 2PM

DUPE DREAMS

Say you like camping. A woman who likes you claims she likes camping, too, perhaps believing that she could like camping — not quite connecting it with everything she absolutely hates, like peeing in a hole. Of course, women aren’t the only ones who claim to be a little more woodsy or literate or…sportif…than they actually are. However, men tend to lie to get sex, while women tend to lie to get love. But because women evolved to be the nurturers and peacekeepers of the species, they are probably more likely to say yes or okay to stuff they’re not very yes or okay with. (Some confuse being a pleaser with being kind and giving in healthy ways.) Men, on the other hand, evolved to be the competitors of our species and are more comfortable with conflict — starting in infancy, when they’re beating up the kid in the next crib. What’s essential to figure out is whether the lie is a little “I like what you like!” stretchie or part of a disturbing pattern — suggesting she’s either a pathological liar or a gaping void looking to use love as Spackle. Expect hyperbole at the start, and ask probing questions to see whether a woman is truly into sports — beyond challenging some other woman to a cage fight over the last pair of DKNY ankle booties in a 9 and a half narrow. 

HIRING EVENT / OPEN HOUSE Travelers Insurance is growing and so could YOU!

travelers.com/careers Travelers is an equal opportunity employer. We actively promote a drug-free workplace. ©2015 The Travelers Indemnity Company. All rights reserved. Travelers and the Travelers Umbrella logo are registered trademarks of The Travelers Indemnity Company in the U.S. and other countries.

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DECEMBER 31, 2015 INLANDER 45


All Is Not Lost As man-made tragedies strike around the globe, it’s important to remember that humans aren’t always the worst BY LAURA JOHNSON

T

he wallet was gone. My boyfriend remembered placing it in his coat pocket after making a purchase at the crowded Seahawks Pro Shop. He recalled the feel of its leather against his hand in that pocket when seeking warmth against the biting wind. But that evening outside the Link light rail station in Seattle, the pocket held no public transportation passes, no hefty wad of cash and no wallet. Lost, stolen, gone forever? No answers came. Panic flamed in his blue eyes. We retraced the many steps back to the Pro Shop. By that time, most of the sidewalks were cleared of jackedup football fans. The rain-slicked walkways showed no evidence of a dropped wallet. Anger mounted. The Pro Shop visit proved fruitless. We could call the stadium lost-and-found department the next day, they said. These things have a way of turning up, they said. Finally, back at the light rail station, we were headed home, hearts low after such a thrilling tailgate experience, followed by his Browns falling to my Seahawks. He threw down the cheap DVDs won in the morning’s white elephant exchange, stomping Eddie Murphy’s Norbit face

46 INLANDER DECEMBER 31, 2015

into the concrete. “Yeah, get it!” one of the guys at the stop called out, egging him on. We damned the state of humanity the whole light rail ride home. Who were these people who would steal a wallet just days before Christmas? What sort of situation brings someone to that place? Why do people suck? No sentences I could form would make this better. Nothing I could say would assuage the feeling of loss. The calls were made to alert the credit card company and bank. Arriving at my parents’ Seattle suburb home, they listened to our tale of woe. The living room Christmas tree lights twinkled, unable to brighten the dark cloud of emotions. My father offered a story. Last year, he’d helped a man change a tire at an I-90 rest stop. He’d then happily roared off in his Ford truck into the sunset. A day later he received a call from the North Bend police department. They had his wallet. The man with the car trouble had turned it in. My grandmother also recently had a lost purse returned to her. Other than my family being forgetful, these stories showed a hopeful outcome. Lovely for them, but my

Sometimes, the lost is found.

JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION

boyfriend’s wallet was still gone. The cellphone ringing broke the silence. An unknown caller. Geico. Did they have permission to give out my boyfriend’s phone number? Patched through, the caller on the other end announced that he had the wallet. The man was staying at a hotel near the airport, not too far away, he said, and off we went to greet the good Samaritan. We arrived at a stately hotel bar where the middleaged man and his woman, decked out in blue and green, were waiting. They waved. We waved. And there it was, the old wallet fully intact. They had spotted it through a swiftly moving crowd on the sidewalk nearby the Pro Shop’s doors. “Can I buy your drinks?” my boyfriend asked. Instead, the man’s only request was for us to sit down. He wanted to know how someone from Ohio ended up in Seattle. Plans to drive back over the snowfilled pass that night quietly evaporated. It was clear we were supposed to be there with those good people in that moment. We chatted for an hour, basking in the glow of gin and relief. Later, as we drove back home, again there were no words. It was the notion that we’d been proven wrong. There are normal, everyday folks who are willing to help strangers. Not because their religion dictates it or they need to fill some service requirement, but because we’re all human. After all the terribleness of San Bernardino and Paris and so many other heartbreaking tragedies in 2015, I’m glad to go into the New Year with fresh perspective. For humanity, even in the smallest gestures, there is always hope. n


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