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CULTURE

The Garland Theater gets a facelift — and adds beer PAGE 31

FILM

Hunger Games is on fire with its latest installment PAGE 42

NOVEMBER 21-27, 2013 | INTERSECTION OF NEWS AND CULTURE

When the unthinkable happens, we search for meaning in the bent metal and broken glass INLANDER SPECIAL REPORT BY JACOB JONES PAGE 22


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WHAT CAN BE DONE TO MAKE OUR ROADWAYS SAFER? JEFF HARRIS

To make the roadways safer would be to restrict driving to no one. Maybe something a little bit more feasible? Feasible? I really don’t know if there could be anything done to make it safer, other than to provide better public transportation so people wouldn’t have to drive so much, especially in the city.

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I lived in New Orleans for 20 years, and their roads were awful. There were big sinkholes, pits in the middle of the street. Awful roads. And when I first moved to Spokane, the roads were great, but now six years later, I’m seeing the same potholes and the damage that the studded tires are leaving.

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I think that, a lot of times, bad drivers aren’t noticed or suspended because they go unnoticed. So perhaps cameras, which will catch those incidents of road rage and bad driving that might be a help to curtail some potential accidents and problems.

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I think the whole texting-and-driving thing is a big deal, because even though there’s awareness about it, people still do it. I think that’s one of the biggest things. How could we eliminate texting and driving? Honestly, I don’t know the best way to go about it, but it would probably be harsher ticket punishment.

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COMMENT | LAW

Reform By Amendment Making it an even 30 constitutional amendments makes sense BY ROBERT HEROLD

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he United States Constitution has been amended 27 times. Amendments we can refer to as “sets” account for 17 of the 27. First, of course, the Bill of Rights had 10 Amendments, all ratified in 1791. The second set is usually referred to as the “Civil War Amendments.” The 13th Amendment abolished slavery; the 14th extended due process and equal protection rights to the states (and included the clause that guaranteed the “validity of the public debt of the United States”); and the 15th guaranteed the right to vote to all “citizens of the United States” regardless of “race, color, or previous condition of servitude” (but not women). All were ratified between 1865 and 1870. Beginning 43 years later, well into the Progressive Era, along came a set of four Amendments, all of which were ratified between 1913 and 1920.  The 16th Amendment, ratified in 1913, gave the Congress the authority to tax income; this amendment was made necessary because of a Supreme Court decision that limited the existing taxing power of the United States.  The 17th Amendment, also ratified in 1913, grew out of the populist and progressive reform agendas and forced the states to choose their senators by public vote, not by state legislatures.  The 18th Amendment, ratified in 1919, was the soon-to-be-regretted Prohibition Amendment, reflecting the nation’s mood, especially that of Protestant Middle America. Come on, let’s wage a war on demon rum!  The 19th Amendment, ratified in 1920, granted women their long-overdue right to vote. (By then, many states had already granted women that right.) Since 1920, states have ratified another eight amendments, but none in sets. The 21st Amendment, ratified in 1933, repealed the 18th Amendment, ending Prohibition. The 22nd Amendment, ratified in 1951, limited presidents to two terms. The 26th Amendment, ratified in 1971, gave 18-year-olds the right to vote, which had everything to do with the Vietnam War.

court majority ruled that under the 14th Amendment, corporations must be granted the rights of persons. The irony of Citizens United is obvious. The Civil War may have become a foregone conclusion when the Taney Court ruled in the 1857 Dred Scott case that slaves are property under the Constitution. Along comes the Roberts Court, ruling not that the people are property but that property has the same rights as people. Dred Scott, judged by its consequences, is widely regarded as the worst opinion in Supreme Court history; Citizens United isn’t far behind. Until our elections are cleaned up, governance will be compromised.  An amendment specifying that all Presidential nominees sent to the Senate, if not voted up or down within 90 days of the nomination being received, shall be considered to have been confirmed. This amendment is necessary to end the outrageous actions on the part of some senators in the minority who specialize in governmental hostage-taking. James Madison, in “Federalist #10,” expressed concern not just about tyranny

I

W

t’s time to consider a new set of amendments, which, like both the Civil War and Progressive Era amendments, are needed to respond both to overly restrictive Supreme Court decisions and to issues that seemingly can’t be resolved through the usual processes. Three come to mind.  An amendment granting the President the authority to veto sections of bills — aka the lineitem veto. Both parties have supported giving the President this tool to reduce the deficit and better grapple with the economy; 43 governors already have the line-item veto.  An amendment overturning the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision. In this case, the

6 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013

“The American people are in the mood for reform.” of the majority but also tyranny of the minority. Today, if a single would-be minority tyrant abuses the tradition of “unanimous consent” and places a hold on a nominee, that nomination is stalled — maybe permanently. This is happening all the time, grinding the gears of government to a halt — and the hold usually has nothing whatsoever to do with the nominee. The practice should end, yet the Senate gives no indication of doing anything about it. Only a Constitutional amendment will do the trick. henever there have been “sets” of amendments, there have been great needs for the system to change. After the original drafting of the Constitution, there was 10 amendments worth of cleanup needed to make the founding document clear in its purposes. After the Civil War there was a need for moral change to be worked into the document. Again during the Progressive Era, social change demanded Constitutional change. We’re there again. Confidence in our institutions is at an all-time low, and the American people are in the mood for reform. Something has to change, and when that has happened in the past, our democracy has evolved. 


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

OPEN ALL DAY

THANKSGIVING

The Man from Camelot BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

J

ust a week after watching her husband die in Dallas, his blood splattered across her pink suit, Jackie Kennedy summoned journalist Theodore H. White. The First Lady trusted White, who had been good to Jack in his 1960 book The Making of the President. It was time, she decided, to write the first draft of her husband’s story. In White’s notes — released by the JFK Library the year after Jackie Onassis’ death in 1995 — the key moment emerges when she talked about happy times in the White House: “At night before going to bed,” she told White, “we had an old Victrola. He’d play a couple of records. … It was a song he loved… ‘Camelot’ … sad ‘Camelot.’” She quoted from the song: “‘Don’t let it be forgot that for one brief shining moment there was Camelot.’” Then, scribbled there in the margins of White’s transcript, she added (twice): “And it will never be that way again.” LIFE magazine published White’s story that week, with Jackie’s edits, and a grieving America ate it up: John F. Kennedy and his presidency were cemented into history as something magical. Camelot was real. Fifty years after those shocking moments in Dallas, we are more mesmerized than ever by the tragedy — that gory Zapruder film seems to be running a perpetual loop on TV this month. While that’s the searing memory for so many Americans who died a little bit that day, Jackie Kennedy’s careful curation of her husband’s life story — a pivotal story in American history — is what stays with me. John F. Kennedy was not what he appeared. Although seemingly full of vitality, he was crippled by pain, and he hid his infidelity behind his iconic family. Remembered as a great president, his policy record was mixed — he prevented one war (during the Cuban Missile Crisis), but launched another (Vietnam). Still, JFK remains frozen in time as our first modern president; he reshaped the office in ways that still define it. He was the first candidate sold like a commodity in the dawning media age, with handlers taking his message straight to the people, taming the press and side-stepping political bosses. He happened to be perfect for the part, and that allowed him to genuinely inspire an entire generation — his most valid claim to greatness. Every president and every candidate since has followed the JFK playbook, hoping to rekindle that magic. But the press is no longer complicit in the myth-making, and the public is more cynical and fame-fatigued. In the end, Jackie’s final epitaph that “it will never be that way again” pretty much nailed it. But for a moment, 50 years ago, Camelot came shining through our darkest night, and we wanted to — we needed to — believe. n

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COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

How do you feel about stores opening for Black Friday on Thanksgiving?

THINK CHRISTMAS NOT THANKSGIVING

JAMES GALLINA: Opening on Thanksgiving Day, particularly during dinner hours, is shameful. Opening on Black Friday is expected. STACY KOSKI: Takes all the fun out of Black Friday. Not cool.

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LETTERS

GMO POSTSCRIPT

Written by DANIEL J. SULLIVAN An Off tthe Wall Christmas Carol Farce

Earlier this year, the grassroots environmental network Friends of the Earth commissioned a series of urine tests on random people in countries across Europe to find out whether any glyphosate (Roundup) would show up in their urine. As reported in Mother Earth News, on average 44 percent of people had the herbicide in their bodies. An April 2013 report compiled at MIT found that glyphosate could be linked to a number of health effects — and that the damage manifests slowly, affecting cellular systems throughout the body over time. This cycle isn’t just dangerous — it’s flat-out unethical. JOHN FITZGERALD St. Maries, Idaho

practiced what Bernays preached — to great effect. It was Bernays’ Propaganda, published in 1928, that taught Goebbels how to “tell the big lie.” You can’t help but understand the implications for “controlling the past” when you read Bernays’ opening paragraph: “The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country.” An alternative newspaper ought to comprehend how thoroughly corporate-controlled mainstream media propagandizes its readership. The publishers of American history texts perform much the same sleight of hand; we’re a poorer polity for their practice.

FROM ORWELL TO BERNAYS

BRUCE MARKET Spokane, Wash. As Orwell reminded us, in his thinly veiled warning about history, “He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.” As but one example is the standard-issue American There’s been lot of hubbub about the two young men at Gonzaga who were confronted by a man demandhistory narrative describing Pearl Harbor as a “surprise ing money and shouting at them. Now they are going attack.” It wasn’t. Thanks to Robert Stinnett’s 20-year to look at the school’s policy on guns, and search of the National Archives, compiled there will be a long, drawn-out process in his book Day of Deceit, we learned a very that may get the NRA involved. The young different lesson. Send comments to American history, as taught in the editor@inlander.com. men are worried about how this will look on a résumé in the future and are quite schools, is too often a collection of myths concerned about how they will look to we need to cling to in order to sustain such perspective employers. national self-delusions as “the beacon of democracy” But not one word about the man who maybe was or “a Christian nation under God” when the historical disabled or disturbed and in need obviously. Instead of realities point in a different direction. Your reading list (“Learning For Life,” 11/14/13) is in- helping this man [they] thought it would be better to wave a gun at him to make sure a mere mortal would complete without at least one book that sets the record never darken their door again. Someone should ask straight. Howard Zinn’s The History of the American these two fine Christians attending a Jesuit school: People, or The Untold History of the United States by What would Jesus do? Oliver Stone and Peter Kuznick should be required reading. NORM ELLEFSON The father of the modern science of propaganda Cheney, Wash. was an American — Edward Bernays. Josef Goebbels

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KATHY GARRISON KALICH: It’s a personal choice to shop for more stuff instead of enjoy a traditional, relaxing Thanksgiving with family and friends, but often not a choice for retail employees. CHARLOTTE VANESSA: I feel for the localized management that had to tell their employees, since it wasn’t their choice most likely. NIC KRELL: Only in America do you gather with family to “give thanks” and then head to the store to buy more s---. THERESA ALLEN: It sucks, and it’s completely unnecessary. The amount of money earned is not worth it in the end if you have resentful, angry employees. HEATHERANN FRANZ: Consumerism. I am saddened that any employee is treated like a “thing.” The consumer forgets that while he or she is enjoying the freedom of a day off, the people serving them, whether in the gas station, in uniform, or in the restaurant, are real people with families and friends too. Most likely upper management has every holiday off while the minimum wage earners are making the corporation money. JENNIFER LOTT: I won’t even shop on Black Friday... definitely won’t be shopping on Thanksgiving. It should be a day for family and friends, not consumerism. There’s more than enough of that already. JANET ROBEL: Well, I think it is silly. But if that’s what retailers and shoppers want, and if workers can choose to work and make time and a half pay, more power to them. But I’m not interested. CHRIS PETERSON: Never shopped either day. I think we all need to slow down a bit. 


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COMMENT | SATIRE

Agree to Disagree BY ANDY BOROWITZ

M

oments after President Obama said last week that he would allow insurers to continue health plans that were to be canceled under the Affordable Care Act, leading Republicans blasted the President for agreeing with an idea they had supported. “It’s true that we’ve been strongly in favor of Americans being allowed to keep their existing plans,” said House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio). “But now that the President is for it, we’re convinced that it’s a horrible idea.” House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Virginia) went further in ripping the President, calling Mr. Obama’s tactic of adopting ideas proposed by him and fellow Republicans “beneath contempt.” “The President should be aware that any future agreeing with us will be seen for what it is: a hostile act,” he said. Minutes later, White House spokesman Jay Carney helmed a

hastily called press conference, hoping to stem the quickly escalating cooperation scandal. “The President understands that he has offended some Republicans in Congress by agreeing with them,” Carney said. “He wants to apologize for that.” But far from putting an end to the controversy, the President’s apology drew a swift rebuke from another congressional Republican, Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas), who called it a “blatant provocation.” “If the President is going to continue agreeing with us and apologizing to us, he is playing with fire,” Cruz warned. n

For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | HOLIDAYS

Winning the Weekend BY JIM HIGHTOWER

H

ere comes Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas! It’s a monthlong season of friends and family, spiritual reflection and time to decompress from our usual helter-skelter lives, right? Good lord, shout the corporate bosses, are you nuts? Do you think America is some kind of Norman Rockwell fantasyland? This is the Season of Mass Consumerism, bucko, so lift your tail end out of that La-Z-Boy and hit the malls — pronto! And if you happen to have a job in a chain store, don’t even think about taking a holiday, or you won’t have a job the next day. Let us now praise the one God we all serve: Mammon! Years ago, Macy’s started “Black Friday” as a kickoff to this Holy Month of Frenzied Commercialization. But it produced such a surge of profit that Walmart and other chains converted to the Church of Perpetual Selling. Black Friday used to begin the day after Thanksgiving. Last year, reaching for more, the Elmer Gantrys of Walmart dared to desecrate Thanksgiving itself by opening their doors to the Black Friday masses

at 8 pm — on Thursday night. This year — with Macy’s, Target, Toys “R” Us, J.C. Penney, Best Buy, Kohl’s and others also pushing the Friday Shop-A-Rama into Thursday — Walmart will open at 6 pm, intruding even deeper into Thanksgiving’s family dinner hour. And pushing excess to a new high, Kmart will open at 6 am on Thanksgiving morning. Yes, 6 am! Still, a Walmart executive says, “We thought 6 o’clock [pm] was the exact right time to win the weekend.” Wow — did you ever think of Thanksgiving as something to “win”? But then, your spiritual devotion to Mammon probably isn’t as ardent as that executive’s. Meanwhile, the same guy reports that the 1 million low-wage workers who’ll have to staff the Thanksgiving profit grab are “really excited to work that day.” Sure they are. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 11


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Breean Beggs, who represented Otto Zehm’s family, plans to run for Spokane County Prosecutor. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JUSTICE

The Outsider

Among those planning to run for county prosecutor and sheriff: one of the community’s most outspoken Smart Justice advocates BY HEIDI GROOVER

L

ast spring, amid panic about overcrowding, calls for a brand-new jail took over the regional conversation. But soon, a different voice emerged. A group of local reformers declared our region didn’t need more jail beds. Instead, they said, we needed to use the ones we had smarter. In the time since, the group “Smart Justice” has seen its ideas embraced by nearly every corner of local leadership. Support for its proposals — keeping nonviolent criminals out of jail, rehabilitating them in the community and tackling racial disparities in the criminal justice system, all while decreasing the number of inmates — has been snowballing, most recently within the findings of the

Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Commission. So if there’s a time for a reform-focused civil rights watchdog to make a move for elected office, this could be it. “If you talk to the police chief, the mayor, the county commissioners, the sheriff, the people who run Geiger [Corrections Center] and the jail, the judges — they’re all ready to go to work to put things together. The county prosecutor’s office, in my observation, has been largely absent in terms of leadership on that,” says Breean Beggs, a prominent local attorney who plans to run as a Democrat for Spokane County Prosecutor next year. After six years as director of the nonprofit Center

for Justice, Beggs now works in private practice, where he focuses on personal injury and civil rights cases and represented the family of Otto Zehm in their civil suit against the city. Zehm was killed in 2006 during a violent confrontation with police, spawning high-profile criminal and civil cases and calls for independent police oversight in Spokane. “[The prosecutor] is really the attorney for the entire county, the whole community,” Beggs says. “That’s the lawyer I’ve always tried to be, the lawyer for the greater good.” While the elected prosecutor doesn’t allocate funds for programs (that power belongs to county commissioners) and doesn’t alone determine whether every case gets prosecuted (the elected prosecutor oversees about 60 deputy prosecutors who work on cases), Beggs says his position could lead the office in a new direction. He says he’d start with expanding the office’s current efforts around “smart sentencing,” a move also recommended by the Regional Criminal Justice Commission in its draft report. The goal is to create an assessment to be used at various stages of the justice system in order to analyze how likely each offender is to reoffend and what programs will best reduce that likelihood. Beggs says he also would also create a process of ana...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 13


NEWS | JUSTICE “THE OUTSIDER,” CONTINUED... lyzing the potential cost of every case to compare alternative programs to incarceration. “We would give ourselves report cards as an office and as individuals to see how we’re doing on the challenge to reduce recidivism,” he says. “This is key to helping people be safer and to driving down costs.” While candidates have until May 16 to file to appear on the ballot, they have to register with the state Public Disclosure Commission soon after announcing Larry Haskell or beginning to raise money, so names are beginning to trickle in. Steve Tucker, the current county prosecutor, says he hasn’t yet decided whether he’ll run for re-election, but one of the office’s longtime deputy prosecutors has filed with the PDC. Retired Air Force lieutenant colonel Larry Haskell has been a deputy prosecutor at the county since 1998, except for a span from 200205 when he returned to active duty military service. Haskell says he’s open to reform ideas, but his primary focus is to increase the office’s community involvement. “We have good people and we do good work, but that’s not being communicated to the public,” Haskell says of the prosecutor’s office. “For me, the main effort is of course to increase community safety and promote trust in what we do. Trust is everything.” Haskell says the prosecutor’s office is indirectly affected by any negative high-profile incidents in law enforcement because it is a part of the greater criminal justice system. As prosecutor, he says he would attend more community functions, communicate with nonprofit leaders and law enforcement groups about ideas for improvement and lobby the state Legislature for funding. (In particular, Haskell says, he’d rather secure state funding for criminal justice programs than ask voters for a property tax increase,

because state money is more certain than putting the question to a vote.) Within the office, he’d look for more training opportunities for deputy prosecutors and staff, in addition to external training they already have access to through the Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys. “I’ve had a long opportunity to see what things we do well and things where there is room for improvement,” he says. Another deputy prosecutor, Patrick Johnson, has also filed to run, but says he changed his mind when Haskell filed and plans to support him “rather than divide the office.”

TAKING ON OZZIE

In a way, Douglas Orr says he’s been preparing for his run for years. The Spokane Police Department detective has an MBA, a master’s degree in organizational leadership and a Ph.D. in criminal justice, and now teaches courses at Gonzaga and WSU Spokane. Next, he plans to take on incumbent Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich. Orr isn’t shy in pointing out flaws he sees in Knezovich’s leadership. Knezovich has taken heat for pushing legislation, along with sheriffs from across the state, that would make it easier for him to fire deputies who misbehave. Knezovich has cited cases where even after violent outbursts or mistreatment of inmates, deputies have been reinstated

“We have good people and we do good work, but that’s not being communicated to the public.”

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to their jobs in his agency by a state arbitrator. In response to his legislative effort, which he plans to return to in the coming 2014 session, a group of former sheriff’s office employees calling themselves Integrity First (the name of a bill Knezovich supported) has said it is investigating the sheriff and accused him of misrepresenting crime statistics. Orr is not a member of that group, but says he believes Knezovich alienates union-represented employees by focusing on firing employees

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who could instead be “fixed.” “The current sheriff makes labor feel like they’re a liability,” he says. “I feel they’re an asset.” Both are running as Republicans, and both say they support body cameras for the department, a change the Spokane Police Department is also in the process of making. Orr says he’d negotiate for them with the union representing the deputies; Knezovich says they’ll be implemented outside of the bargaining process as soon as his department finds the funding. Orr calls himself a cheaper option for taxpayers because he doesn’t support building a new jail, which Knezovich does. Instead, Orr says, he’d support alternatives to incarceration like those pushed by Smart Justice to prevent the need for new jail beds. But that’s not enough, says Knezovich, who also supports some criminal justice reforms. The county jail, built for around Ozzie Knezovich 450 inmates, has recently housed as many as 650, creating what Knezovich calls a “dangerous situation.” “Sooner or later, something bad is going to happen,” Knezovich says. “We’re going to be looking for an answer and the only answer will be in the mirror.” Some argue effective alternative justice programs can prevent the need for a new jail; KnezovDouglas Orr ich disagrees. He says 70 percent of the jail population is made of “high-risk offenders” and many nonviolent offenders, like those charged with low-level misdemeanors, are already not being jailed because of overcrowding. “They work hand in hand,” he says of jails and alternative programs. “Just as you’ll never arrest your way out, you’ll never program your way out of this issue.” In response to criticism of his moves in Olympia, Knezovich is steadfast. Deputies should be held to “high standards,” he says. “The reputation of an entire agency can be damaged beyond belief by the act of one person,” he says. “This is not being kneejerk. It is the way we were taught in the academy. ... I hold this office to a very high standard. That’s the type of law enforcement agency citizens should ask for and demand.” n heidig@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

PHOTO EYE SEASON OF GIVING

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

By a two-thirds vote last Wednesday, the International Association of Machinists District 751 rejected an eight-year contract extension with Boeing that would have transformed the pension plan and limited yearly pay increases. As a result, despite a promised $8.7 billion in tax breaks from the state, the airline giant has begun to follow through on its threat to look elsewhere to manufacture the new 777X jet.

2.

As the Secret Service investigates a string of credit-card fraud cases, questions arose about a possible security breach at URM Stores, the local grocery wholesaler. URM has begun a forensic review of its systems.

3.

Tornadoes pummeled Illinois and other Midwestern states, spurring evacuations, delaying a Bears game at Chicago’s Soldier Field, and leaving at least six dead.

4.

Remains believed to be that of Ramona Childress, missing for a year, were uncovered last Thursday. A suspect in her murder, her former boyfriend Jason Flett, was accused of assaulting his current girlfriend with a crowbar. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Christina Napier helps 5-year-old Jordan Jensen read Christmas hymns during a “Candlelight Vigil Against Poverty” with Catholic Charities Spokane on Monday night. Dozens of attendees sang carols and carried electric candles through downtown to show support for local families in need this holiday season. Between songs, many participants shared stories describing how Catholic Charities had helped them during difficult times.

DIGITS

20

Percent of Coeur d’Alene Charter Academy students who leave the school to return to a more traditional educational setting.

Thur 11/21, Inlander

2.9

Percent increase in Spokane city’s sewage, trash, and water bills. This increase, approximately the rate of inflation, is much smaller than the 10 percent annual increases that had been called for in a rate study during former Mayor Mary Verner’s administration.

5.

Sixty-three horses, two dogs, and a cat were seized from an Airway Heights ranch by Spokane County animal protection officials on Friday. Many of the animals were seriously emaciated and dehydrated.

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SPORTS: The Cougs won last Saturday, but did fans humiliate themselves with the #MeganCoghlanSucks Twitter war? Weigh in on the blog.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Back to the Drawing Board The Spokane City Council explores a “safety valve” for the ombudsman; plus, lawmakers in Olympia look to fund the North-South Freeway WHAT THE COUNCIL WANTS

Last week, the Spokane City Council made impassioned arguments for police oversight, unanimously rejecting a proposed contract with the Police Guild because, council members said, it didn’t adequately empower the POLICE OMBUDSMAN. But just days later, the council seems prepared to accept something short of a “totally independent” ombudsman — as called for in the City Charter — who could open his own investigations. In a meeting Monday, five of the seven council members (Ben Stuckart and Jon Snyder were absent) discussed a “safety valve” option. The ombudsman would continue to sit in on Internal Affairs investigations, and a citizen commission could ask for further review in IA cases flagged by the ombudsman. But with the “safety valve” option, the commission could also turn to a third party, like a national oversight group or another city’s ombudsman, for extra examination if it remained unsatisfied. “We want the ombudsman to be able to bring us the net result of independent investigative authority,” Councilman Steve Salvatori says. Still unclear is whether the ombudsman will ever see the power to open his own investigations. Some have argued that charter language demands an ombudsman who

can open his own cases, even if his findings can’t be used in disciplinary decisions. But when the council proposed doing that through an ordinance last month, a guild attorney wrote an email to a city attorney, saying that such authority is subject to bargaining. — HEIDI GROOVER

ROLLING AHEAD

Republican lawmakers in the Washington State Senate have proposed a 10-year, $12.3 billion TRANSPORTATION PACKAGE that would fund the long-planned North-South Freeway to near completion. The proposal allocates $750 million to the freeway, fully funding an interim connection from Francis Avenue to Interstate 90. To pay for new projects and road improvements, the plan includes an 11.5 cents-per-gallon gas tax hike over the next three years. Sen. Michael Baumgartner, R-Spokane, calls the proposed package a “big win for Spokane.” “If there’s going to be a tax, I’m going to make sure we’re getting value and our fair share of projects,” Baumgartner says. As negotiations continue, Baumgartner says he’ll work to secure funding to improve State Routes 904 and 902. Senate Republicans are also seeking eight policy

reforms, including one that would transfer sales tax revenue from road construction projects away from the general fund and into the transportation budget. In June, House Democrats passed a $10 billion plan that included a 10.5 cent gas tax increase, a $480 million allocation to North-South Freeway and no policy reforms. Gov. Jay Inslee has said he hopes lawmakers can come together with an agreement before the University of Washington and Washington State football teams compete for the Apple Cup on Nov. 29. — DEANNA PAN

ETHICS LESSON

A Spokane police recruit was among the 25 out of 30 new officers reprimanded last week following an investigation into potential EXAM CHEATING at the state’s Basic Law Enforcement Academy in Burien, Wash. While officials concluded recruits had violated exam rules, their conduct did not “rise to the level of cheating.” A preliminary State Patrol investigation found almost all of academy’s class had accessed or passed around a study guide made up of questions matching those on exams. Officials say the academy had used the same exams year after year until training officers were essentially providing advance copies of test questions in “overly specific” review materials. The SPD has sent several new recruits to the state academy in recent weeks as part of efforts to increase staffing levels. Police Chief Frank Straub says one new recruit did have a copy of the study guide. “I don’t find fault with that,” Straub says. “They’re using whatever material they can to succeed. I don’t think anybody did it with any malintent. It was a study guide.” All recruits found in possession of the guide received a written reprimand from the academy. The officers in question retook a final written exam and all of them graduated as expected. The academy has since reworked its exam process. — JACOB JONES

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NEWS | EDUCATION week where kids can focus on a larger project, each quarter. “If we have students that are really interested in art, we might work on planning an arts program for young kids. It might be helping the MAC put together a type of exhibit,” McDonald says. “We’ll try to design it around what kids’ passions are.” The school would equip every student with a tablet or laptop, she says, and focus on math, science, and world languages. Monolingual students, for example, would take Spanish starting in middle school. While charter law doesn’t allow selectively choosing specific types of students, she says she wants to attract low-income students and English language learners. “My entire career has been spent in our underserved community,” McDonald says. “That’s the community and demographic, and students we are most interested in providing this opportunity.”

iLEAD SCHOOLS

Charter schools, like Coeur d’Alene Charter Academy, are now being proposed in Washington. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The Contenders

Three different charter schools, with vastly different visions for education, have applied for Spokane Public Schools’ authorization BY DANIEL WALTERS

S

pokane Public Schools stands alone: So far, it’s the only district in the state that’s seized the chance to become a charter school authorizer. While publicly funded, charter schools are their own entities, outside district control. That means Spokane students attending charters may draw revenue away from the district. But the district’s chief academic officer, Steven Gering, isn’t bothered. “That’s the one thing that we’re thinking about differently. We don’t see it as a loss,” says Gering. “It’s another great option for kids and families.” While dozens of groups, mostly representing schools in the central or western areas of the state, have applied for authorization through the Washington Charter School Commission, three chose to go through Spokane Public Schools. As they submit their applications this Friday, the three will pitch vastly different types of schools:

PRIDE PREP

PROPOSED START DATE: Fall 2015 GRADE LEVELS: 6th-7th initially, 6th-12th eventually Brenda McDonald has never run a charter school. But she has plenty of experience as an educator in Spokane, having spent eight years as Garry Middle School’s principal. A charter school’s freedom means she can make big changes to the school’s schedule without bargaining with the teachers union. She envisions Pride Prep as having more school days — 190 days per year —and longer hours, with school days lasting from 7:45 am to 3:45 pm. (Starting salaries would be significantly higher to compensate.) Those extra hours mean more prep time for teachers and more class time for students to get homework done. The extra days allow for an “intercession,” a separate

CURRENT PRESENCE: 10 online charter schools across California PROPOSED START DATE: Fall 2014 EXISTING SCHOOLS: One in Lancaster, Calif., another in Castaic, Calif. GRADE LEVELS: K-8 Instead of long lectures, iLEAD charter schools teach students by asking them “driving questions,” letting them explore the idea in groups, then asking them to embark on big projects based on their discoveries. “When adults get out of the way and kids are allowed to think and create, they create in-depth projects,” says Dawn Evenson, a Whitworth College graduate and one of iLEAD’s executive directors. Students work on four or five different projects a year. Last year, 4th- and 5th-graders presented business plans in a style inspired by the venture-capitalist reality TV show Shark Tank. A Civil War project for 8th graders culminated in a Civil War reenactment, where students researched real-life people, then portrayed them. There were soldiers and abolitionists, doctors and Southern belles. Students emulating inventors re-created inventions from that era, and students playing cooks re-created the period’s cuisine. “The adults who went expected it to be much less evolved than it was, and they were just blown away,” Evenson says. Several Spokane-area high schools, like the Community School and Riverpoint Academy, are already somewhat project-based. But iLEAD would expand the idea to every grade, from kindergarten through 8th. “We go beyond memorizing and test-taking,” Evenson says. “We teach them skills that make them successful in life.”

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PROPOSED START DATE: Fall 2014 CURRENT PRESENCE: 10 online charter schools across California GRADE LEVELS: K-12 Over the course of only two years in existence, the Academy of Arts and Sciences in California went from 82 students to nearly 1,000. That’s the magic of virtual charter schools — they can grow very fast, very quickly. Julie Troletti, director of operations for the academy, says the online model still requires students to put in classroom hours, but gives them a lot more flexibility over when they put in those hours. At the academy, everyone — even kindergartners — takes lessons online. Teacher lectures, office hours and small group discussions are all conducted over the web. When a lesson calls for students to interact with physical objects, those objects are shipped directly to students at home. When state standardized tests are given, churches and community centers near the students serve as temporary testing facili-

“If we have students that are really interested in art, we might work on planning an arts program for young kids.” ties. “If Mohammed doesn’t come to the mountain, the mountain comes to Mohammed,” Troletti says. The Academy of Arts and Sciences still has a physical presence: Teachers work out of centralized, computer-lab-filled learning centers, where they provide students with extra help and guidance. “We really offer an incredible academic program. Our students meet with our teachers one-on-one, either in-person or virtually,” Troletti says. “We don’t want them to fall through the cracks.”

A

n outside group, the National Association of Charter School Authorizers, will comb through the three Spokane applications and offer recommendations. The Spokane Public School’s board of trustees will give final approval. Even if they’re all approved, the law only allows for a maximum of eight charter schools a year — if authorizers approve any more than that, the names of the lucky eight will be pulled out of a hat, while the rest land on a waitlist. The final decision will be made in February.  danielw@inlander.com

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NEWS | FOOD

It Ain’t Over I-522 supporters lost their first fight to label genetically engineered foods in Washington; now it’s on to Round Two BY DEANNA PAN

W

hen the campaign to label genetically modified food in Washington conceded last week, Initiative 522 had definitely failed — 51 to 49 percent — with too few uncounted votes left to pull off a win. I-522 was leading in just seven counties, all on the western side of the state. The Yes on 522 campaign had been outspent 3-to-1. But as Sen. Maralyn Chase, D-Shoreline, one of the initiative’s legislative sponsors, says: “This is just the opening round.” Backers of GMO labeling are already vowing to return in 2016 with another ballot measure, and Chase and Rep. Cary Condotta, R-East Wenatchee, are preparing bills for the upcoming legislative session to keep the momentum for labeling alive. “I don’t think anyone should be disheartened,” Condotta says. “Forty-nine to fifty-one is not exactly a trouncing.” Almost two years ago, in January 2012, Chase and Condotta introduced identical legislation to label foods with genetically engineered ingredients in Washington, but neither bill moved out of committee. “Within two days, we had the suits flying in from Washington, D.C.,”

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Condotta says. “They laid a lot of money on the line. You’re not likely [to get GMO labeling] from the government. “If we have to do it through the initiative process to circumvent the legislature because they’ve been bought off,” he adds, “then that’s what we do.” This time around, labeling backers say that’s essentially what happened: Out-ofstate money from big agribusiness and food manufacturing companies pummeled Washington with political ads and leaflets. Labeling opponents, including Monsanto and DuPont Pioneer, spent $22 million to quash the measure — about $25 for each vote against I-522. The single largest donor to the No on 522 campaign was the Grocery Manufacturers Association, the nation’s largest food manufacturing lobbying group. It collected $11 million from a handful of its members, including PepsiCo, Coca-Cola and Nestlé. Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson sued the GMA three weeks before the election for illegally shield-

ing the identities of companies donating money and failing to register as a political committee. The case is still scheduled to go to trial. When the next legislative session starts this January, Chase says she’ll introduce legislation to “address the

“Why should these people be allowed to make illegal donations and still be able to use the money?” problems of the PDC [Public Disclosure Commission].” “Why should these people be allowed to make illegal donations and still be able to use the money?” she says. “This is what happens when you have out-of-state investors essentially investing in our election system and perverting it with their money. We’ve now gone from a

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food fight to a fight about saving our democracy.” Condotta says he plans to address the possibility of transgenic salmon entering the Washington market. The Food and Drug Administration is expected to soon approve the first genetically engineered salmon after concluding the fish poses no significant threat to the environment and is as safe to eat as its conventional counterparts. Condotta, who says he’s been contacting state tribes to assess their positions on genetically modified “Frankenfish,” plans to introduce legislation to label the fish (which Alaska has already done) or ban it outright in Washington. “I know the Native Americans are extremely concerned about this fish getting into natural populations,” he says. “So I’m very concerned about this product. I don’t know that we need a fish that grows twice as fast and twice as large.” Big food-manufacturing companies have made their strategy clear: According to internal GMA documents obtained by public Send comments to health lawyer and food blogger Michele editor@inlander.com. Simon, the GMA is pushing for a “statutory federal preemption which does not include a labeling requirement,” meaning a nationwide ban on mandatory labeling that would clamp down on labeling efforts in about 20 states across the country. That’s why labeling supporters are preparing for another fight as soon as they can — and in the next presidential election year, when voter turnout, particularly among eligible younger voters, will be significantly higher. In 2012, for example, 81 percent of Washington voters cast their ballots. As of Tuesday, voter turnout was a meager 45 percent — the lowest in the state in 10 years. If turnout had reached 51 percent, as election officials had predicted, Trudy Bialic, co-chair for Yes on 522 and public affairs director at PCC Natural Markets, believes I-522 “almost certainly would have won.” “We still need to regroup. We’re only 32,000 votes apart at this point,” Bialic says. “It’s a very small city that makes a difference in winning or losing.” 

LETTERS

Early Delivery! Due to Thanksgiving, we’ll be publishing a day early next week. So pick up your copy of The Inlander a day early, on WED. NOV. 27th at all your favorite rack locations.

Enjoy your holidays!

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 21


Destination Un


E

known Lives cut short, families torn apart, children mourned: the heavy toll of American roadways

Inlander Special Report By Jacob Jones

Margaret and Floyd Nordhagen were married 68 years. They died together in a car crash last month.

nclosed in the broken glass and crushed steel of a crumpled 1969 Plymouth Fury, Margaret Nordhagen sits next to the love of her life. Both of them are dying. For more than 68 years, Floyd had held her steady. Together they carved out a simple life near Chattaroy, raising four children and scores of cattle on 80 acres of hayfield and black pine. In his 92 years, Floyd boasted of few things except a strong heart and Margaret. A child of the Depression, he worked the Bremerton shipyard during World War II. He later logged, ran a salvage business, and for nearly 50 years farmed the land his parents tended before him. While Floyd left school after eighth grade, Margaret, 88, graduated as valedictorian of her high school. She worked most of her life as a bookkeeper for both Montgomery Ward and her church. She insisted on managing the family’s checkbook as well as the kitchen. Never apart for more than a few hours at a time, the Nordhagens held together through good years and bad years, anniversaries and Alzheimer’s, growing old side by side. She would follow him anywhere, and together they set out on a sunny October afternoon for a quick errand just 10 miles down the road. It's there on Newport Highway, north of Spokane, that the couple’s car collides with a Ford pickup, cutting their trip short. How do you say goodbye to such a man after such a long time together? We can never know. What is certain, though, is that as sirens close in on the crash site, Margaret reaches across the front seat. She grabs Floyd’s hand. Not to be left behind, she is still holding on as emergency responders check Floyd’s fading pulse.

W

hen Floyd Nordhagen was born in 1920, the automobile had yet to rise to its middle-class prominence under Henry Ford. Horses and trains still ruled transportation. Historians say only about 9 million vehicles were registered nationwide in 1920. That figure would nearly triple by the end of the decade. As of 2009, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates the country has more than 246.3 million registered vehicles. Across the United States, motor vehicle collision fatalities have steadily declined in recent decades, but close to 35,000 people still die along our roadways each year. While crashes may not kill as many as heart disease or cancer, the Centers for Disease Control indicates unintentional injury accidents make up the leading cause of death for Americans younger than 45, and car wrecks top the list of injury accidents. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports at least 346 people have died in car crashes in Washington state this year, including 29 just last month. And October deaths came in below average, with less than half of the 60 fatalities in May. The Nordhagens made headlines around the world on Oct. 13 after emergency responders found them holding hands in the wreckage. Local TV news drove their story

to national networks. It seemed fitting they would go together, a small comfort out of tragedy. But two other deadly crashes have shaken the Inland Northwest within days of that crash. Just eight days prior on Oct. 5, two 15-year-old girls died on a notorious curve in Spokane Valley. On Oct. 18, a young girl would be fatally struck while crossing Monroe Street. From the halcyon days of cruising Division to family road trips to the morning commute, Americans live on the highway. But death travels those same streets, and we don’t always make it where we’re going.

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undreds of students and community members pack the stands at the University High School football game on Oct. 11. An overcast Friday night, they gather with signs, face paint and tears in memory of their classmates Josie Freier and McKenzie Mott, who had died along a winding stretch of South Bates Road days earlier. During a memorial assembly, the school retires Mott’s soccer jersey, No. 9. A massive pile of toys fills the school gym, collected at the urging of Freier’s family, to be distributed in their daughter’s memory to area children in need over the holidays. Family and friends remember the girls as bright, kind and outgoing. Mott played soccer through school and FC Spokane for eight years. Photos online show her dancing, making funny faces, practicing soccer drills and trying on clothes with friends. “McKenzie Mott’s tragic end is the stone that the Lord has thrown into the pond of life we all live in,” her family writes in a statement, “and its ripples have touched all of us in this community in some way.” Freier left notes online describing her love of family, coffee, shopping and reading. She posted photos of holiday celebrations, movie quotes and celebrity crushes. She played silly games with her younger sister and doodled flowers on graph paper. In one unattributed poem posted to her Instagram account, she longs for the experiences she will miss: “things that i will never accomplish, places i will never go, and people i will never be able to love.” Homecoming pictures from last year show Freier and Mott smiling in pink and yellow dresses. They pose arm in arm with classmate Preston Maher, who would receive his driver’s license the day before the three loaded into his parents’ Infiniti I35 on Oct. 5, speeding away toward the “Ponderosa Jump.”

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s Marvin Nordhagen pulls up to his parents’ farm, the scattered cattle start bellowing across the lower field. After a decade of daily visits to check on his folks and tend the livestock, most cows know the sound of Marv’s approaching Ford F-150 pickup. A couple of dogs rush to greet him. Marv, who has an identical twin brother named Melvin, says his parents lived simple, unassuming lives. Their two-story farmhouse, originally built in 1882, has turned ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 23


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Flowers, photos and ribbons adorn the curve of South Bates Road where Josie Freier and McKenzie Mott died. JACOB JONES PHOTO gray with age. Several windows have been boarded up Marv says his parents became even more dependent and a blue tarp covers one addition. on each other then. He doubts either would have surStacked and strewn about the property sit rusting vived long alone. But he still seems somewhat baffled by tractors, aging RVs, car parts, wood piles, tools and buildhow their deaths have resonated with so many people in ing materials. so many different places. “The thing about Dad, he’s a child of the Depres“They never cared about impressing anybody,” he sion,” Marv says. “Pretty much everything he ever says. “Never did a thing in their lives to draw attention to owned, he still owned. … Dad wasn’t a hoarder in the themselves.” sense of needing to have stuff. He just couldn’t stand to ashington State Patrol troopers direct evening see it thrown away.” traffic around the mangled shell of the blue While Marv checks the house, the two dogs nose the Plymouth Fury. With paint, troopers mark nearby grass. A dozen cats prowl between the outbuildwhere the two damaged vehicles came to rest. Collision ings. Marv says his father had a weakness for animals, technical specialists map out the scene, calculating trajecoften naming his cows. He especially loved kittens, white tories, velocities and measuring “crush” damage. Amid ones most of all. the debris, they triangulate the likely point of impact Margaret spent 34 years with Montgomery Ward, between the vehicles. tracking the local department store’s finances. Marv says Trooper Jeff Sevigney, who once served as a WSP she often trained the men who would later rise to become collision “tech,” says investigators will catalog everything her boss. Family members remember her as a “worldfrom the weather to tire pressure to potential intoxication. class” worrier, who always knew what to do in a crisis. With that information, they can reconstruct the factors in Marv’s wife Lynn says Margaret also did all the cookeach collision. ing, serving impressive multi-dish meals during “Every incident is different,” he says. “Evholidays. She cooked many of those meals on a ery incident leaves its own set of clues.” wood stove in the corner of the kitchen. Send comments to The incident report for the Nordhagen The Nordhagens went to church service editor@inlander.com. crash lists road conditions as bare and dry. The multiple times a week, attending Elk’s Counaging sedan showed no signs of defect. Visibiltry Church of the Open Bible in recent years. ity was clear and the temperature hovered near Marv says they gave as much as 20 percent of 57 degrees as the Plymouth approached the intersection their modest earnings to charity. They never turned away at Lane Park Road. a neighbor in need. Witnesses told investigators the southbound PlymIn recent years, Alzheimer’s stole Margaret’s shortouth failed to yield, turning left across the northbound term memory. Her “recorder” had broken, Marv says. lanes and “leaving no reaction time” for oncoming traffic. The family had to take away the checkbook. She could A white 2013 Ford F-150 slammed into the front pasno longer be trusted around the stove.

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McKenzie Mott

Josie Freier

senger side of the Plymouth and shoved it off the road. Vehicle measurements show two tires went flat. The right-side mirror had been sheared off. The Plymouth sagged at least four inches to the right. And a ball joint beneath the vehicle cut a long gouge across the highway asphalt as the car wrenched sideways. The first trooper arrived within three minutes, the report states. Fire crews had started CPR on Floyd within seven minutes. They started CPR on Margaret moments later, just after Marv arrived at the crash following a call from a family member. Floyd and Margaret Nordhagen died at the scene. Their son says they were turning into the Big R Store to pick up cat food. They planned to stop at McDonald’s for hot-fudge sundaes afterward.

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pproximately 10 miles away and five days later, Elayna Jayne Noel Burrows-Gust follows her mother and 7-year-old brother across Monroe Street. For a 5-year-old, Elayna had an outsized presence. Family members say it made her easy to love and hard to ignore.


“Her voice was as loud as her hair was red,” family pastor Dale Jenkins says. Elayna loved ponies and riding bikes and the color purple. Family members say she enjoyed her Bible study group and always asked them to turn up the stereo. An online video shows the girl romping excitedly as she awaits an episode of SpongeBob SquarePants. She had her mischievous moments. More than once, she got into trouble with scissors, sometimes cutting her own hair or her brother’s hair. She even tried cutting the cat’s and the dog’s hair. And just a few weeks ago, Elayna had managed to get into some paint, Jenkins says. Her parents later discovered a series of tiny, colorful handprints stamped along the walls of their home. Investigators say the streetlights had just started to flicker on along Monroe Street when the family stepped off the sidewalk shortly before 6:30 pm on Oct. 18. Sarah BurrowsRoberts, 25, had Elayna on one side and her son Evan on the other as they crossed just north of Mansfield, near the Cenex gas station. Witnesses say the family made it to the inside northbound lane before a passing car hit them. The driver, a 67-year-old woman, told police she didn’t see them until she was “right on top of them.” Her passenger never had time to utter any warning. The next morning, the same day dozens gathered in Elk for the Nordhagens’ funeral, Elayna died from her injuries at Sacred Heart Medical Center. Despite serious injury, her mother and brother have been released and are expected to recover. Investigators have since pursued potential manslaughter charges against the mother after hospital tests detected methamphetamine in her system. The family has not commented.

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rayer candles, stuffed animals and wilted flowers line South Bates Road where it curves toward the Ponderosa Jump. Investigators say Maher was driving at near-highway speeds, allegedly trying to catch air off a rise in the road at Ponderosa, when his tire clipped the curb and catapulted the Infiniti into a nearby tree. Freier and Mott, sitting on the passenger side, were killed. Maher suffered serious injuries and spent several days in the hospital. A month later, Maher answers the door at his family’s two-story home. The teen has a small frame, made a couple inches taller by a spiked swoop of bangs. He introduces himself quietly and politely, but his family declines to comment on advice from an attorney. The following day, the Spokane

County Sheriff’s Office submits a recommendation to charge Maher with two counts of vehicular homicide. Even as a juvenile, a conviction could mean a lengthy prison sentence. The case now goes to the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office for a final decision on whether to file charges. In recent weeks, several others have died on Inland Northwest roads: u On Oct. 13, the day of the Nordhagen crash, Melissa Connors, 32, of Osburn, Idaho, and Shannon Wheeler, 38, of Silverton, Idaho, died when their car crossed into oncoming traffic along Interstate 90 near Kellogg. u On Oct. 17, Evelyn Emery, 93, of Spokane, crashed head-on into oncoming traffic along Highway 195, five miles south of Spokane. She died from her injuries four days later. u On Oct. 19, Matthew Clark, 21, of Colville, died when the truck he was riding in rolled along Aladdin Road, north of Colville. u On Nov. 9, Kelsey Heidecker, 20, of Spokane, was killed when the semitruck she was riding in struck a tree along Highway 195, seven miles south of Spokane.

“Her voice was as loud as her hair was red.” u On Nov. 15, Rodella Wickard, 60, of Pullman, died when a Chevy pickup crossed into her lane and smashed into the car she was riding in along Highway 195, six miles south of Colfax. “We don’t like to use the term ‘accident’ because accident implies that it was unavoidable,” Trooper Sevigney says. “People are driving cars and people aren’t perfect. We all make mistakes and, unfortunately, sometimes when folks make mistakes, people die.” Many highway shoulders have become makeshift memorials. They collect flowers and crosses and beloved mementos. In Montana and other western states, long-haul truck drivers on crooked mountain roads can count the small, white crosses lining each curve to help judge how sharp or dangerous the turn may be. Emergency responders see the same warnings. Sevigney says every trooper remembers the intersections or mileposts of their worst calls, often the places where children died. They watch American drivers, all of us, careening around in glass and steel, missing each other by a few feet, spared by mere inches. “It’s dangerous,” he says. “We’ve kind of become numb to it — until it impacts you somehow personally.” ...continued on next page

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NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 25


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A memorial dedicated to Elayna Burrows-Gust grows along a stretch of North Monroe Street.

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now falls steadily outside the Heritage Funeral Home as about 80 people file into its small chapel. Portraits of Elayna, smiling and wide-eyed, sit near the entryway. Soft piano tempers the silence as mourners settle into their crowded pews. A small white casket rests at the front of the room. Pastor Jenkins leads the group in prayer and opens the floor to share stories about Elayna. A few rise nervously. They tell of a sweet girl who teased her brothers, practiced Bible verses and left a mark on each person there. Jenkins offers that they may take comfort in Elayna’s innocence. She has surely gone to her Lord in heaven. He has prepared for her a mansion. “I’m pretty sure it has handprints on the wall,” he says with a light chuckle. “If not already, I’m sure soon.” Together the group sings the children’s hymn “Jesus Loves Me” over the quiet plinking of the piano. Her mother, released from the hospital just days earlier, sits

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near the casket. Loved ones kneel beside her. Sorrowful music plays over a slide show of Elayna’s life. Photos depict her as an infant, turning into a toddler, growing into a kindergartner. Tissue boxes circulate down each row. Some mourners lean into each other’s shoulders to weep as photos roll by of Elayna holding an Easter egg basket, standing in front of a Christmas tree, toting her backpack to school. Many of the pictures come from the same holidays or gatherings, suggesting how difficult it can be to fill a slide show with so few years to look back on. “A 5-year-old should not be gone from us,” Jenkins says, adding, “There is a lot that we don’t understand. There is a lot that occurs in this world where we don’t know what to do.” But in Elayna’s brief time, she touched many. Jenkins says he sees her outsized presence, her spark still shining within those who knew her.

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illions of commuters take to the road each day. Tens of thousands of Spokane drivers travel our shared roadways, connecting and crossing throughout the city. We speed along our parallel lanes. We merge in and out of each other’s lives. We idle side by side at red lights, lost in our own journeys. Some of us will not make it. The flashing lights and sirens will close in. Investigators will set to measuring. But some things cannot be measured. Despite all the telling of stories, all the collecting of evidence, and all the calculations on points of impact, our trajectories and legacies remain mysteries. We all just keep careening around, intersecting and bypassing. Who knows what marks we leave on the people we pass by along the winding paths of our lives? An incident report may catalog our birth dates, times of death and next of kin. But only those close to us will know whether we gave freely of ourselves, valued friendship or chased dreams. Only they will know whether we loved Elayna, age 5 CHRIS BOVEY PHOTO poetry or ponies or white kittens. In recent days, Marv Nordhagen says he has come to terms with his parents’ fate. Floyd and Margaret spent a lifetime together and now they rest side by side in the Chattaroy Cemetery. Their reliable Plymouth has gone to a towing company as scrap. Marv says his parents lived on their own terms. They raised their children to believe they could accomplish anything. They took care of their neighbors. But beyond that, they exemplified a steadfast and uncommon love that even strangers could recognize as they clung together amid broken glass and twisted steel. “You don’t see a lot of real love in the world today,” he says. “Not that kind of love. … I think people want to have the kind of love that it looked like they had. That’s why it grabbed people’s attention.” Our paths may be uncertain and our destinations unknown, but if you look, there are lessons scattered along the road.  jacobj@inlander.com

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Holiday Pulse Shopping “Shopping at KIZURI (35 W. Main • kizurispokane.wordpress.com) makes a world of difference,” says owner Kim Harmson. “Shopping here is good for the planet because it’s earthfriendly, good for the people because it’s Fair Trade, and good for you because you’re going to find gifts that you won’t find anywhere else.” No wonder the store’s name was taken from the Swahili word for “good.” Located in the Community Building, Kizuri brings globally sourced, environmentally responsible products like soaps, housewares, indigenous art, textiles, clothing,

Events

ECLECTIC CHOICES

furniture, jewelry and much more to one convenient spot in the Inland Northwest. That makes it the perfect place to browse for distinctive, exotic gifts from economically disadvantaged areas. Some of the store’s most popular items include winter knits from Nepal, clay La Chamba cookware from Colombia, and African baskets from Rwanda. “I even have an eco-friendly bamboo iPhone amplifier,” says Harmson. “It’s really cool — this amazing thing that’s so low-tech but really powerful.” The inventory at WONDERS OF THE WORLD (621 W. Mal-

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON, DOWNTOWN SPOKANE IS THE PLACE TO BE. COME VISIT THE INLAND NORTHWEST’S MOST EXCITING DESTINATION.

lon • wondersoftheworldinc. com) in the Flour Mill is handpicked by globetrotting owner Pamela Barclay; every item is indicative of her idiosyncratic eye for finds. Opulent stones and crystals, ornate masks and intricate jewelry are just a few of the wide-ranging items you’ll encounter here. Like its name suggests, THE FRENCH QUARTER (1311 W. Sprague) is much more country-specific. Its hand-rolled truffles with Guittard chocolate, fleur de sel, gourmet chutneys and authentic wines and cheese nevertheless make inspired (and delectable) gifts.

HERE COMES SANTA CLAUS

Nov. 22 at 6 pm - Santa is coming to town a little early this year, before Thanksgiving. While scrooges may say “bah humbug,” those who enjoy the magic of the season will be at River Park Square for the big man’s arrival at 7 pm. It’s an event everyone in the family can enjoy, starting at 6 pm with face painting, free hot chocolate, and of course, the official lighting of the mall’s towering Christmas tree that’s also sure to light up faces young and old. As festivities begin, elves will hand out jingle bells, so that when Santa comes down the escalators, everyone can ring him in with cheer. Then he’ll plop right down into his big chair, open for business, making those lists and checking them twice. All ages are welcome to tell him their Christmas wishes and get their pictures taken, too. It doesn’t get any more festive than this. Free • River Park Square • 808 W. Main • 363-0304

ICE SKATING

Now Open - Riverfront Park’s Ice Palace is now open through March 2, Tue-Sun from 11am-5pm, and also Tue-Thu from 7-8:30pm and Fri-Sat from 7-10pm. Extended holiday hours TBA. Adults $4.50; kids age 3-12, military and seniors (62+) $3.50. Skate rental $3.50. (Free admission coupons available from participating downtown retailers, good from Nov. 22-Dec. 19, excludes skate rental.) spokaneriverfrontpark.com (625-6601)

OUR TOWN

Nov. 21-Dec. 14 - See this classic play telling the story of smalltown America at the turn of the 20th century. Performances held Wed-Sat at 7:30pm; select Sat and Sun matinées at 2pm. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (4557529)

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA

WONDERS OF THE WORLD

AMERICAN IDIOT

Nov. 22-23 at 8pm - The hit Broadway musical based on rock band Green Day’s album of the same name follows three suburban youths dissatisfied with the establishment who seek to make an impact on the world. $30-$75. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000)

BADA BING COMEDY SERIES

LIKE THE PILGRIMS, JAN, THE TOY LADY, IS GRATEFUL FOR THE SPECIAL PEOPLE IN HER LIFE:

Nov. 23 at 8pm - Laugh out loud at the fourth installment in the Bada Bing series, featuring Dan Cummins, Marc Yaffee and Spokane’s own Harry J. Riley. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-4704)

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Nov. 22 at 8pm - The popular rock opera group celebrates 15 years of touring with a final, encore tour of its multi-platinum record “The Lost Christmas Eve.” $31-$61. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000)

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Nov. 22-24 from 12-5pm - Wineries and tasting rooms across downtown Spokane join forces to host a weekend of wine tasting, food sampling and holiday gift giving ideas. Participating Spokane Winery Association wineries. Map at spokanewineries.net

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Nov. 22-Dec. 22 - A holiday musical telling the true story of the ships that transported Christmas trees across the Great Lakes. Performances held weekly Thu-Sat at 7:30pm and Sun at 2pm. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507)


Nightlife The PEACOCK ROOM LOUNGE (10 S. Post • davenporthotelcollection.com) in the historic Davenport Hotel has an unbeatable combo: Jazz Age flair and incredible double martinis. That’s probably why it remains a perpetual hit with theatergoers as well as the downtown happy hour crowd. Should talk ever run as dry as the award-winning martinis, there are plenty of conversation starters — like the colorful ceiling made of 5,000 pieces of stained glass, or the stuffed peacocks perched on the walls. “The Peacock is a popular stop, especially during the holidays,” says Matt Jensen, director of marketing for the Davenport Hotel Collection. “Nothing puts you in the holiday spirit more than a tour around the mezzanine of the Davenport to enjoy the holiday trees, listening to the live holiday music in the lobby, and then retiring with a martini and appetizer in the Peacock Room.” TWIGS (808 W. Main • twigsbistro.com) takes equal

The Clean Team keeps KEEPING IT CLEAN Downtown Spokane clean and friendly all year round. In addition to keeping our streets and

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sidewalks clean, they remove snow and ice from crosswalks; look for the green uniforms. See downtown Spokane the way they did in 1913 — by horse and carriage. These free rides are sponsored by Spokane Teachers Credit Union and run through Christmas Eve (Fridays starting Nov. 29 from 3-8 pm, Saturdays-Sundays from noon-5pm, & Tue, Dec.24, from noon3pm.) Pickup is at the corner of N. Wall and W. Main. Visit: Downtown. spokane.net Call: 456-0580 is brought to you by the Downtown Spokane Partnership and the Business Improvement District in conjunction with the Inlander. For more info go to DowntownSpokane.net NIGHTLIFE - Wine Tastings FOOD - Pizza and More

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pride in its martinis. Try the Orange Creamsicle (with flavored top-shelf vodkas and muddled oranges) or the Sophisticate (Hendrick’s Gin muddled with cucumbers). There’s some interesting variety in its appetizers, too, which include crab and artichoke dip, Moroccan beef and butternut squash flatbread. With more than a hint of irony, THE

VOLSTEAD ACT (12 N. Post • facebook.com/VolsteadAct) takes its name from the legislation that launched the Prohibition Era in 1919. Its emphasis is actually on trendy “pre-Prohibition” craft cocktails, which use freshsqueezed juices and herbs to enhance the taste of high-quality alcohol instead of masking lowgrade bootleg liquor.

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Food For outstanding food in an outstanding setting, there are few places in Spokane that rival ANTHONY’S (510 N. Lincoln • anthonys.com). This restaurant — part of a respected Pacific Northwest chain — specializes in sustainably caught regional seafood and boasts a renowned vista overlooking the Spokane River falls. The menu depends on the freshest seasonal catches.

FINE DINING

Annie Hong, social media and public relations manager for Anthony’s, recommends ordering the shellfish — “oysters on the half shell, clams, mussels and Dungeness crab” — to experience some of the restaurant’s best early winter dishes. “Once you’ve completed your holiday shopping, hop across the river to Anthony’s and treat yourself to the freshest Northwest seafood

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around,” she says. “You can enjoy seasonal cranberry cocktails and special holiday desserts as you soak in our breathtaking view of Spokane Falls!” At SANTÉ (404 W. Main • santespokane.com) in the historic Liberty Building, your meal has been thought through from start to finish. And here “start” means the very first possible step: by sourcing local produce

and humanely raised livestock with great care. The presentation is always impressive. As is the taste. WINDOWS OF THE SEASONS (303 W. North River Dr. • facebook.com/RedLionAtThePark) also focuses on the local — particularly when it comes to drinks. In addition to offering a sizable lineup of local beers and wines, the restaurant inside the Red Lion Hotel at the Park features many regionally inspired cocktails. Savor its traditional American fare of steaks, stews and chops complemented by scenic views of Riverfront Park.

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Updating an Icon Nearly seven decades in, the Garland gets a facelift — with a beer on the side BY CHEY SCOTT

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he brand-new carpet with a swirling, circular pattern of burgundy on a background of charcoal grey is littered with trampled popcorn pieces long before the lights dim. On a blustery Friday night, moviegoers form a jumbled line inside the 68-year-old Garland Theater’s lobby, waiting to order the famously overflowing brown paper bags of bottomless popcorn and sides of soda and candy. A bespectacled teenage employee in a black T-shirt leans over the new, yet vintage-inspired, concessions counter to hear orders above the crowd’s din and begins to furiously shovel the feather-light kernels into bags. Though most of the couples and families go for the classic indulgence of movie theater popcorn, a few pick from items on a small menu displayed in a stand on the counter. The card features the Gar-

YOUNG KWAK AND SARAH WURTZ PHOTOS

land’s new food offerings, launched in late October, along with the option to enjoy a glass of beer or wine during a flick. Most of the menu entries — hot dogs, nachos and flavored popcorn — are what you’d find at a big multiplex chain, but none come prepackaged or kept in a rotating food warmer all night. Theater owner Katherine Fritchie — a petite woman with short, pixie-style hair and a loud, hearty laugh — points out that it’s closer to bar food than anything else. She says the intent was to offer a variety of higher-quality snacks at an affordable price, and in portions that could easily be shared or serve as a meal. “We’re not trying to gouge consumers, just trying to make enough of a profit to keep the business going,” Fritchie says. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | FILM 2ND

DECEMBER 12 – 23 Kroc Center

1765 W. Golf Course Rd, CdA Produced by Laura Little Productions, Courtesy of CCT

Tickets can be purchased at:

1323 Sherman (Corner of 14th & Sherman, CdA) 208-391-2867 www.traditionsofchristmasnw.com

“UPDATING AN ICON,” CONTINUED... The new snack menu was mostly developed by local chef Joshua Martin, formerly head chef at South Perry’s Casper Fry restaurant before leaving to teach at the Inland Northwest Culinary Academy at Spokane Community College. Highlights of Martin’s Garland menu include a fresh fruit and cheese plate ($12), a warm olive platter with hummus ($11) and the “Nacho Libre” ($6) which comes drizzled with cilantro sour cream and loaded with traditional toppings. Rounding it out are three specialty hot dogs ($8 each), including a vegan dog.

Popcorn isn’t the only food option at the Garland these days.

B

ack in 2010 when Fritchie opened Bon Bon, the cozy, hip bar adjacent to the Garland, she hoped serving drinks to customers inside the theater would eventually become a reality, too. Fritchie expected that reality had arrived when the Washington state Legislature passed a measure earlier this year allowing some movie theaters to serve alcohol to of-age patrons. That new law, however, prevented theaters with more than 120 seats per screen from being able to do so. The Garland has 565. Fritchie and her staff went back to the drawing board and discovered that the Garland was eligible to apply for the liquor license for already existing sports and entertainment facilities. Though it was more than a little disheartening to find out the theater was eligible for the pre-existing liquor license all along, Fritchie says it made implementation a little easier. Like at a sporting event, alcoholic beverages can be consumed inside the auditorium and in the presence of minors, as long as the of-age imbibers are properly identified and wear visible wristbands, bestowed by Bon Bon’s bartenders. In this case, the Garland’s are neon yellow, allowing staff to easily identify them in the dimly lit theater. Customers who wish to have a drink or two during a film can choose from beer or wine offered at Bon Bon, but the theater’s new liquor license restricts spirits or cocktails from being served.

F

ood and booze aren’t all that’s new at the iconic, single-screen theater, which for decades has been the go-to spot to see films that have already opened on multiplex screens. Shows are still offered at an affordable $4.50, with special screenings of older classics for $1 on “Totally Tubular Tuesdays.” In early October the Garland closed for several days while new, red-upholstered seats were installed. At the same time, new carpet and a handcrafted wood concessions counter that complements the theater’s mid-century origins were installed. Along with the purchase of a digital projector this past spring, the Garland has come full circle in its modern updates, all while maintaining a retro charm reminiscent of its debut on Thanksgiving Day 1945. Fritchie, who bought the Garland in 1999 and the building it’s housed in a few years later, sees the recent upgrades as necessary to sustain the theater in the long term. She hopes that the investments pay for themselves by keeping customers coming back. “I don’t think that just because we have a lower ticket price that there should be a lower expectation for what you’re getting,” she says. n Garland Theater • All shows $4.50; except Tuesdays shows $1 • 924 W. Garland Ave. • garlandtheater.com • 327-2509

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CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER AMERICAN IDIOT I

t’s been almost a decade since Green Day, known then by most as the snotty punk rockers behind Dookie, reinvented themselves with the sprawling, wildly popular American Idiot. The record, touted as a rock opera, was released less than two months before the reelection of George W. Bush, a time when the jingoism brought on by 9/11 was waning and young Americans were tiring of the two wars being waged on the other side of the world. Green Day tapped into that restlessness with this perfectly timed album, which would go on to become the second-biggest seller of its 26-year career. Sociopolitical inspirations aside, the record is also remarkable in that it revived the notion of the rock opera — American Idiot had characters, namely Jesus of Suburbia, who escapes his chained-down upbringing for a real world he wasn’t quite prepared for. Along the way there’s love, war and a hell of a lot of pissed-off youth energy. Some called it a punk-rock Tommy. By 2009, those two wars were still going, as was American Idiot, which was now being transformed into a major musical production, something the band had always intended. “We always thought that somehow there should be some sort of staged version, because that’s what we were thinking in our heads,” Green Day frontman Billie Joe Armstrong has said of the album. Armstrong, who grew up a rough-and-tumble Bay Area punk, as unlikely a musical composer as you’re likely to find, penned the book along with Tony Award winner Michael Mayer, who was also hired to direct. In April 2011,

901 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 5 09. 227 . 7 638

CD Release Party Punk rock and musicals can co-exist. the musical ended a 400-plus-show run on Broadway, including several performances with Armstrong playing the role of drug dealer St. Jimmy. The production, touring North America through May and stopping off in Spokane for two shows this weekend, continues to cement American Idiot as one of the more impressive pieces of pop art of the early 21st century. Apparently, punk rock can leave a mark. — MIKE BOOKEY

Friday, Nov 22 7pm | $10 All Ages w/ Normal Babies SPONSORED BY

a portion of proceeds go to Women’s and Children’s Community Kitchen

American Idiot • Fri-Sat, Nov. 22-23, at 8 pm • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • $30-$75 • inbpac.com • 279-7000

For Your Consideration BY EMERA L. RILEY

DAN CUMMINS

GU GRADUATE & LOCAL COMIC ICON FEATURING HIS CEREBRAL OBSERVATIONAL HUMOR

MARC YAFFEY

RIGHTFULLLY CONSIDERED ONE OF THE KINGS OF NATIVE AMERICAN

HARRY J. RILEY

COMEDY

LOCAL RISING STAR & 2 TIME WINNER OF THE VALLEYFEST PG COMEDY

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ALBUM | A decade into making music, THE 1975 has performed under several different names, honing a pop mix mildly reminiscent of the ’80s the four 20-somethings barely experienced. Filled with lusty, angsty, heavily accented, rapid-fire lyrics, their eponymous new album is perfect for the Anglophiles among us. Poppy, hip and filled with boyband essence (swooshy hair and the like), The 1975 brings back the feelings of youth, from partying too hard to chasing after girls who will never like you back.

GAME | Combining the farming aspects cherished by Harvest Moon lovers and the real-time fight-andslash that Zelda fans know and adore, RUNE FACTORY 4 is the kind of game that makes real life look lame. This Animal Crossing-esque RPG hybrid for the 3DS is kickin’ simply because there’s so much to do. After you lose your memory falling out of an airship, you’re adopted by a dragon and are free to spend your days doing whatever — farming, fighting, fishing, making friends, mining, crafting, cooking, competing in festivals, and maybe even getting married.

PLACE | For those too hipster to continue shopping at the suddenly corporate Value Village and Goodwill, GLOBAL NEIGHBORHOOD THRIFT is the place for you. Still featuring classic sales, like all shoes for — dare I say it, Macklemore? — 99 cents, and a price range from zero to $10, it’s the kind of store that keeps thrifting cool. And all of the profits go to supporting refugees, which makes it all the more tempting to max out the fun punch card they give you when you spend $15.

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NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | COMEDY

Funny Man Why Spokane comic Dan Cummins just keeps getting more humorous BY LEAH SOTTILE

D

an Cummins is an easy kind of funny. When you talk to him, it doesn’t feel like he’s trying to make you laugh… he just does. And so does he. It’s easy to see that the Spokane-bred comic has changed in the past three years, since he moved from the Lilac City and got serious about his career in Los Angeles. He’s parted ways with a lot of his absurdist material, shed the onstage persona of his earlier days. Now he stands at the mic, acts like himself and talks about his life, which is so much funnier than anything he could have made up. In anticipation of his show Saturday night at the Bing, we called up Cummins to chat about his shifting style and why he still writes jokes about his kids.

this and that. I started doing that in Crazy with a Capital F, but the next album, for some reason, I told myself that everything that I say that I did is going to absolutely be true.

INLANDER: When we last talked to you in 2009, it seemed like you were on the cusp of something huge. What have you been up to since then? CUMMINS: Right — I was just about to do The Tonight Show for the first time. And I was just about to tape the hour special for Comedy Central and move down to L.A. All that stuff happened and things are good. It’s interesting, though: you put certain expectations on yourself in this business. It’s like “household name or bust.” And that really is so unfair, no one does that with another job, like “I’m going to be the president of this company or it isn’t worth it.” But things are better, things are moving up. I had help from unexpected places, like Pandora. Pandora has given me new life. Over a million stations have been created based on my stuff.

Does she care that you use her in a bit? Actually, the audience gets more upset on her behalf than she gets. I do have her permission for this. It’s funny, because I would talk about all of these things that have kind of a hateful spin on them, and [the audience is] totally cool with all that. Then I’d tell them “I’m going to play a voicemail [from my fiancée]” and they were like “Whoa.”

Since you’ve moved to L.A., it seems like your style has changed quite a bit. I haven’t put up enough videos of the newer stuff. There’s that Leno video of the newer style. … On the Hear This album, just even listening to it, it’s very different than what I recorded in Spokane. I just fell in love with stories, like real stories. I’m a big David Sedaris fan. I love writing jokes, I like to go on imagination hunts to weird places in my mind. [But] it became more important to me to reveal more of what I think about

34 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013

I’m sure that if you are telling true stories, they’re going to come across as more authentic. You’re just naturally going to be more passionate about it. … I talk about my fiancée, we talk a lot about communication stuff. I do a little bit about men/women communication styles. And I talk about how her stories can be longwinded, but I play a legitimate voicemail of hers onstage that she didn’t leave to be funny, it’s something she truly left me.

That’s funny, because in the piece we wrote about you before, you talked about the toll your career took on your family. But that doesn’t deter you from writing jokes about them. I definitely don’t ever want to do a joke that will be damaging. The closest I get is that joke where I say, “When you have more than one kid, you love them the same. But you like one better.” That joke has made me more nervous. But on the CD, I definitely talked [my daughter] up more, and on this material, I feel like I comedically owed her to make her look like the good guy. n Bada Bing! Comedy Series feat. Dan Cummins, Marc Yaffee and Harry J. Riley • Sat, Nov. 23, at 8 pm • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • $15 • All-ages • ticketswest.com • (800) 325-SEAT


CULTURE | COLLEGE HOOPS

Jazmine Redmon can handle the ball and also provides solid defense. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Ready to Launch

Gonzaga’s women have reloaded for another run at a WCC championship BY ROBERT HEROLD

down. The Gonzaga women would win that matchup against Idaho, but their head coach says the team is a “work in progress,” and that he’s “cautiously optimistic” about the season to come: “Ever since 2010 (when Vivien Frieson, now an assistant coach for the team, hit that 15-foot jump shot to beat Texas A&M, sending GU to the Sweet Sixteen) we have always had two players who could do three things well; score, rebound and handle the ball.” With Taelor Karr, last season’s West Coast Conference Player of the Year, having graduated, senior Haiden Palmer’s play and leadership will be even more critical to the team’s success this season. “We now have kids who are doing one or two things well, but not three,” said Graves. He tossed out two examples: “Shelby Cheslek plays strong defense, but is still working on her offense. Jazmine Redmon can handle the ball and plays very tough defense; but she isn’t a real scoring threat, nor is she even a natural point guard, yet that’s the position we need her to play.” Several weeks ago Kelly told me that backup point guard was his biggest concern. While he hadn’t decided on his full lineup, he had settled on a backup at the point: “Danielle Walter. We’re going with Danielle; she takes care of the ball, is showing herself to be a competent passer, and can score.” The Zags are picked to finish first in the WCC. Graves, while positive about his team’s chances, took note of four strong contenders:

San Diego, BYU, St. Mary’s and newcomer Pacific. As it turned out, Idaho played one of those games Graves’ teams have never liked — mostly halfcourt, with guards who can penetrate and kick out to hit 3-point shooters. Worse yet, GU had a terrible shooting night. Still, Graves’ “work in progress,” with Palmer putting the team on her back, found a way to win ugly. Keani Albanez started and scored 13 points. Graves played his entire bench as he and his staff searched for the combinations that worked best. Five players logged more than 20 minutes each. Another four played 10-plus minutes apiece. Two days later against Tennessee-Martin, GU got the kind of matchup Graves’ teams like best — a team that likes to run. With Palmer once again leading the way, Albanez showing off her summer work, Sunny Greinacher mixing it up on the boards and hitting her mid-range jumper, Walter impressing everyone in her role as backup point guard and the team’s shooting back up to the 50-percent range, Gonzaga ran away, winning 91-54. Last week the Zags headed to Oklahoma, where they lost 82-78 on Thursday to the 11thranked Sooners in a tight game that came down to the final minutes. Their nonconference schedule gets brutal in December, with road games against Wisconsin, Ohio State and third-ranked Stanford in the span of a week. Still, Graves remains optimistic about his squad. “I really do believe that we can compete against all these teams,” he says. A “work in progress,” no doubt, but this much now seems clear: They can compete — winning ugly and winning on the run. n

Spokane, Washington Saturday, November 23 Plantes Ferry Sports Complex NCAA.com/tickets

Hosted by Great Northwest Athletic Conference and Spokane Sports Commission

NCAA is a trademark of the National Collegiate Athletic Association.

W

ith his opening game against Idaho only 24 hours away, Kelly Graves still didn’t have a starting lineup nailed

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 35


William Webster and his wife Cody Webster opened Webster’s Ranch House Saloon two weeks before their wedding. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Webster’s Own A stalwart of the culinary scene finally settles down with a new bar and smokehouse BY LISA WAANANEN

W

illiam Webster says he just couldn’t pass it up. Outside his new smokehouse and bar on North Monroe Street, cold rain is turning the neighborhood gray. Across the street is a boardedup hardware store and a parking lot; next door there’s a credit union and more open lots. Cars rush through the intersection where Northwest Boulevard splits off to

36 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013

Indiana Avenue. Webster sees a place to put down roots. “Everyone’s like, ‘Oh, you’re in that neighborhood.’ We’ve heard that since we started this project,” he says. “And it’s funny — it’s a blue-collar neighborhood, we’re not, like, in the ’hood.” Webster, 39, has reason to be confident. Ever since he opened Herbal Essence in 2003 after earning acclaim

at Ankeny’s, each subsequent project — Isabella’s, Zola, Geno’s — has been a little bit farther from the city core. And the crowds have followed. No other local chef has opened and sold as many successful spots in the past decade. But this one is different. Until now, he’s never owned the whole property. And he’s never put his own name on the project. Here, it’s spelled out in 150 belt buckles embedded in the bar: WEBSTER’S. Webster’s Ranch House Saloon is a team effort. Webster and his new wife, Cody, spent the summer staying up late making plans and building out their ideas. They did most of the construction themselves, giving the bar a pared-down Western theme with metal-and-wood walls trimmed with rope and washing boards. They placed the belt buckles and poured the bar. They got slabs of wood for tabletops from a man who was selling carved bears at the fair, then finished and built the tables themselves. William created the food menu; Cody did the drinks. And the work hasn’t slowed down. “She helps take care of the front of the house, I take


care of the back of the house,” William says. Two weeks after the restaurant opened in early October, William and Cody were married. “I think I was more worried about the restaurant than the wedding, to be honest,” Cody says. “The wedding seemed easy compared to all this. It was like a vacation.” They didn’t want to alienate the folks who frequented the spot when it was previously Working Class Heroes, and Webster’s is a place where the beer-swilling, meat-eating football crowd will feel right at home. A screen fills a wall for showing games, and there’s sand out back for volleyball next summer. But the casual, unhurried atmosphere belies the creative menu and attention to detail that characterizes any Webster establishment. Smoking meats is an opportunity to do something different, William says, and the smaller menu, prepared daily by longtime chef Noah Leffel, keeps the quality consistent. “It’s what I enjoy,” William says. “You get to spend more time fine-crafting 10 items instead of building a gigantic menu like at Isabella’s or at Geno’s.”

$17.Salad9Entrée5 Dessert

NEW 3-Course Dinner Menu 5-9 pm daily

SALADS Green salad or Caesar salad ENTRÉES Baby back ribs Safari Room gumbo Braised short ribs Creole chicken pot pie Herb grilled wild salmon MINI DESSERTS German Chocolate Cake • Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie Crème Brûlée • Chocolate Mousse • Key Lime Pie • Cheesecake

Webster’s Reuben sandwich.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The menu includes a few salads, but the true focus here is on anything “so rich it melts in your mouth.” Soon, they’re planning to do Kobe beef sliders topped with pan-seared pork belly. Don’t be shy about ordering the “Wolf Turds” — deep-fried, bacon-wrapped jalapeño, stuffed with cheeses and sausage — or try the smoked brisket. “Once you get brisket done right — we didn’t get it right at first, it took a month of cooking to make it right,” he says. “But once you get brisket smoked right, it’s money. It’s perfect.” Served in Mason jars, the no-nonsense cocktails are made with high-end spirits, including Maker’s Mark and Jim Beam. Cody recommends the Jameson & Ginger. There are beer specials during games, and a $5 food menu during happy hour that’s been drawing the after-work crowd. It’s not downtown — and the Websters like it. They met through the same late-night circles that revolved around the MarQuee Lounge, but those days were over even before the MarQuee closed. The Websters are happy to open the doors and let the neighborhood discover the drinks and food for themselves. That’s how it was at Zola, William recalls — he and Dan Spalding decided to open the doors on a Tuesday and a few dozen people showed up. That’s how it happened at Isabella’s, too. “This is how everything of mine is ever done,” William says. “When you put that hype so high in the beginning, you seem to decline. You get that massive rush in the beginning — I like it the opposite direction.” n Webster’s Ranch House Saloon • 1914 N. Monroe • Open Mon-Thu, 11 am-midnight; Fri-Sat, 11 am-1 pm; Sun, 10 am10 pm • facebook.com/WebsterSaloon • 474-9040

Baby Back Ribs

509 789 6800 • Davenport Tower 111 S. Post St., Downtown Spokane • davenporthotelcollection.com

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 37


FOOD | MOBILE

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We understand. Brandi Elder and John Gardner with their newly opened juice truck. JOE KONEK PHOTO

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veryone is exposed to foods that aren’t good for them — things too heavy in salt, butter, caffeine, sugars and GMOs, says

John Gardner, the owner of Beet It Up mobile raw juice bar. But he admits he eats bad things sometimes, too.


“We’ll never be perfect,” says Gardner. “[Beet It Up is] a good source for you to feel better if you can — detox, clean yourself out and maintain proper nutrition.” Beet It Up is the name of the mobile raw juice bar that Gardner started with Brandi Elder last month. Gardner hosts a reggae radio show on KYRS, teaches West African hand percussion and recently started a group called the Organic Beets Drum Collective, which is where he got the name for the juice bar. He loves beats and beet juice, Gardner says. Almost every juice ($5.50) on the menu has beet in it, and everything is made from certified organic produce. The Beet It Up combines apple, carrot, beet and lemon. It’s a good choice for juice-drinking beginners, says Elder, as it’s the most basic on the menu and has a little tang from the lemon. The Veggie Hut is a little heavier on the vegetable side, with apple, celery, cabbage, carrot, lemon, cucumber and beet, while the La-Beet-O adds only a hint of beet to a mixture of pineapple, pear, carrot and ginger. Gardner and Elder also blend up smoothies ($5.50) like the Irie Solution with banana, pineapple, berry blend, spirulina, kale and hemp milk. There’s also the choice of building your own juice, getting a cup of organic fair-trade coffee or sipping some yerba maté. It’s all about emphasizing health, nutrition and fitness, says Gardner. He and Elder have been into juicing for about 15 years. “This is how we live, so we want to bring it to the community on wheels,” Gardner says. The two plan to be at places like farmers markets, music festivals and other events and locations around Spokane, and to eventually swap out their trailer for a food truck. Gardner says they’ll do a full launch in the spring, but for now to check their Facebook page to find out when and where they’re parked. Look for the 1969 Prowler with red, yellow and green stripes and a big grinning beet. n Beet It Up Mobile Juice Bar • facebook.com/beetitupmobilejuicebar • 768-5646

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bÕÃĤq à NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 39


FOOD | WINE

Sipping Season It’s the last weekend before the holidays, and you need some wine BY MIKE BOOKEY Ana Hopkins Photography

3318 W Northwest Blvd 509-327-8277 www.theflyinggoat.com FlyingGoatPub The Flying Goat

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he holidays are coming and you need some wine. Perhaps you need it for your Thanksgiving feast, or that reluctantly attended office Christmas party. Maybe a couple of bottles are going out as gifts this year. More likely, you just need a glass of wine because, well, it’s the holidays. Spokane’s increasingly robust wine industry knows what you’re thinking, and it’s on the same page, rolling out the annual

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Holiday Wine Festival in the days leading up to the first weekend of the holiday season. Organized by the Spokane Wineries Association, nearly all of the region’s wineries are participating on Friday, Saturday and Sunday afternoons this week, greeting local oenophiles with specialty tastings, wine releases and perhaps the opportunity to stock up for the aforementioned occasions. The multipurpose event mostly means that wineries are open during the allotted hours, typically offering special tasting opportunities. At Arbor Crest Wine Cellars’ tasting rooms — at the winery’s Cliff House Estate and River Park Square — the wine-loving masses flood through over the course of the weekend, getting an early start on the Thanksgiving holiday, says tasting room manager Shelby Enevold. Get the scoop on the local food scene Arbor Crest is offering cheese with our Entrée newsletter. Visit pairings, wine specials and gift Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up. packaging during the threeday-event. At downtown Spokane’s Barrister Winery, owner Greg Lipsker uses the event to roll out new wines. This weekend, he’ll debut his 2011 Merlot and a 2010 Cabernet Sauvignon made from grapes plucked from the 40-year-old vines of the Bacchus Vineyards. Bottles of these new releases, along with Barrister’s other standbys, are all on sale, with your $5 tasting fee going toward a bottle purchase. Lipsker says that in past years, the Holiday Wine Festival has yielded significant sales, but he’s not sure who’s buying for friends and family and who’s just loading up their own cabinet. “I think it’s kind of the kickoff to the holidays,” says Lipsker. “But I don’t know that there’s a lot of gift buying going on,” he says with a laugh. 

ENTRÉE

Holiday Wine Festival • Fri-Sun, Nov. 22-24, from noon to 5 pm each day • For a list of wineries and a map, visit spokanewineries.net

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We missed you, too, Katniss.

We Did Start the Fire Jennifer Lawrence and company raise the stakes in The Hunger Games: Catching Fire BY SETH SOMMERFELD

“H

ope. It is the only thing stronger than fear. A little hope is effective. A lot of hope is dangerous. A spark is fine, as long as it’s contained … So, contain it.” These words from the totalitarian President Snow (Donald Sutherland) in The Hunger Games perfectly state the thesis of the sci-fi series. In the second installment, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, the spark grows into an uncontainable blaze. Almost a year after surviving their stint on the annual government-mandated televised child murder competition, victors Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) and Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson) live torn between the bourgeois control of the Capitol and the serfdom of their home, District 12. A cloud of tension hovers over their relationship in the wake of Katniss faking a romance with Peeta in order to survive the Games, while she actually pines for Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth). Their victory sparked the hope that President Snow feared, and to quell the potential for uprising, he and the conniving

42 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013

warfare are constantly being echoed; Catching Fire’s message feels rather blunt, but the point gets across. When President Snow’s plans continue to go awry, he unexpectedly thrusts Katniss and Peeta back onto the Hunger Games’ battlefield. This time allies play a much more crucial role for the duo from District 12, allowing for depth to be added to the fellow competitors, something mostly lacking in The Hunger Games. There’s the brazenly cocky warrior Finnick (Sam Claflin), the sarcastic, angry-at-everything Johanna (Jena Malone), and a pair of intellectuals, Beetee (Jeffrey Wright) and Wiress (Amanda Plummer). Their battle for survival on the new jungle battleground offers up more surprises than found in the original. new Gamemaker, Plutarch Heavensbee (Philip Seymour Apart from some moments of overwrought whimHoffman), concoct a plan to destroy the symbol Katniss pering that make dramatic moments feel melodramatic, has become, painting her as a member of the Capitol elite Lawrence delivers a solid performance, and Hutcherson before snuffing her out. succeeds at making the somewhat From the movie’s carefully framed openemasculated Peeta seem troubled and THE HUNGER GAMES: ing shots of Katniss in a frigid forest, Catching steadfastly noble, instead of a twoCATCHING FIRE Fire establishes its visual style as a cut above dimensional wounded bird Katniss Rated PG-13 its predecessor. Credit goes to the series’ is forced to drag along. For his part, Directed by Francis Lawrence new director Francis Lawrence (I Am Legend) Sutherland deftly embodies menacing Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh and cinematographer Jo Willems (Limitless, evil, never making President Snow Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth Hard Candy). The film’s use of gorgeous, seem over the top or crazed. His calm cool blue light adds an element of arresting confidence is much more disconcertcohesion. ing than any outburst. A victory tour Katniss and Peeta must take through Catching Fire hits on the touchstones of a drama’s the impoverished districts clearly conveys the story’s classic second act (though the studio pulled a Harry Potthemes of classism; the haves in power versus the weak, ter and split up the final installment, The Hunger Games: numerous have-nots. At every stop, they’re paraded in Mockingjay, into two separate movies). After seeing the front of the working peasants to deliver hollow, prewritoriginal’s spark of hope ignite in Catching Fire, it won’t ten speeches, while the hostile crowds begin altercations be easy having to wait for the next chapter to watch the with faceless government guards. These themes of class world burn. 


FILM | SHORTS

OTHER OPENING FILMS DEAR MR. WATTERSON

IN 1995, 10 years after it debuted, Bill Watterson decided to bring his comic strip Calvin and Hobbs to an end. Since then, the impact of mischievous young boy and his pretend tiger continues to inspire young illustrators and writers — some of whom are interviewed for this love letter to the comic strip and its author. Directed by super fan Joel Allen Schroeder with Kickstarter-generated funds, the documentary also features interviews with a bevy of other cartoonists, but does not feature an interview with Watterson himself. The guy is known for his Salinger-like reclusiveness. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

THE CHRISTMAS CANDLE

The year is 1890, and the village of Gladbury, deep in the English countryside, is about to witness a miracle. Every 25 years, an angel grants a wish to whomever receives and lights a special candle. The new minister, David Richmond (Hans Matheson), does not believe in such nonsense and hinders the belief in the candle by ushering in the electric age via lights in the church. As minister and candle maker clash and tragedy strikes the town, both theologies collide in this good-hearted film based off Mac Lucado’s best-selling novel. (ER) PG

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

It’s 1985, and Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey), an occasional bull-rider and full time electrician, lives his life between the sheets of stranger’s beds on a noxious combination of alcohol and cocaine, sheltered in a haze of his own homophobic, red-neck stereotype. When he’s diagnosed with HIV and given 30 days to live, Woodroof decides — after being abandoned by his friends and lov-

ers — to live anyway. Across the border, he discovers drugs that could prolong lives of HIV victims but that are not FDA approved. Smuggling them across the border, and teaming up with transvestite Rayon (Jared Leto,) the two work to sell drugs to a community that is quickly dying off, as Woodroof finally begins to see past people surface. (ER) R

FROZEN

Inspired by Hans Christian Anderson’s classic fairy tale “The Snow Queen,” the Disney take focuses on two sisters, Elsa (voice by Idina Menzel), who has the magical ability to manipulate snow and ice, and Anna (voice of Kristen Bell), her adoring younger sister. When Elsa’s powers go out of control and she freezes the whole kingdom, she has no choice but to hide away in shame. Anna knows that her sister didn’t mean to cause such havoc and decides to track her down and unfreeze their beloved kingdom. Along the way, a talking snowman and an ice-seller decide to help. (ER) PG

WADJDA

Wadjda is a film that details beginnings. Directed and written by Haifaa Al-Mansour, the first ever Saudi Arabian woman film-maker, the feature describes the life of rebellious Wadjda (Waad Mohammed) who, after fighting with a neighborhood boy she shouldn’t have been playing with, discovers a green bicycle in a store that she must have. Her mother, preoccupied with the fact that her husband may take on a second wife, dismisses the notion because it is improper for a girl to ride a bike. Precocious Wadjda refuses to give up, though, and begins to earn money using her wits and entrepreneurship skills in this feminist and humanitarian film. At Magic Lantern. (ER) PG

NOW PLAYING 12 YEARS A SLAVE

Based on his autobiography, this film tells the story of Solomon Northup, the free man turned slave in pre-Civil War U.S. It’s a heart wrenchingly amazing story about a man conned into slavery despite being a free citizen and his desperate fight for freedom. Chitewel Ejiofor finally gets center stage, but the film also features an all-star cast including Brad Pitt and Paul Giamatti. Definitely a powerfully artsy take on an old subject. (KS) Rated R

ABOUT TIME

British, redheaded and freckled, Domhnall Gleeson knows how to be awkward, because he already looks the part. Then you add Rachel McAdams and have a dramatic romance. The story follows 21-year-old Tim who finds out he’s inherited his family’s curse: the ability to time travel. Turns out, it’s a great way to get a girlfriend. A moment becomes moments, and his gift allows him to take a little more from each one. (KS) Rated R

ALL IS LOST

We never learn the name (or anything else) of the grizzled yachtsman (Rob-

ert Redford) whose eight-day fight to survive on the open sea is chronicled in J.C. Chandor’s magnificently primal All Is Lost. After all, how in the world are we supposed to sympathize with our soggy protagonist if we don’t know details about a rift with his daughter, or a childhood trauma he needs to overcome, or even why he’s sailing alone in the middle of nowhere? Chandor refuses to waste time on such frills, allowing Redford’s status as iconic figure to do much of the heavy lifting. The result is a kind of pure visual cinema that tramples the listlessness of other films that call themselves “action movies.” (SR) Rated PG-13

BAD GRANDPA

The Jackass crew makes its triumphant return as Johnny Knoxville takes on 86-year-old Irving Zisman, while he and his grandson, Billy, played by Jackson Nicoll, travel across country. Apparently the fake old people doing bad things trope hasn’t been beaten to death with a stick just yet, as Zisman performs prank after obnoxious prank on unsuspecting victims, who can’t believe this ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 43


FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

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“grandpa’s” behavior. (But, of course, they attempt to help him through his illegal or just plain stupid predicaments.) Some of the highlights include, in typical Jackass fashion, thievery, crashing into giant penguins and putting a child stripper routine into a beauty pageant. (ER) Rated R

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New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the havenots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. Another great film from director Paul Greengrass (United 93, the first two Bourne entries). (ES) Rated PG-13

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Some people are bonkers, as evidenced by the four runners featured in this gorgeously produced documentary. They are each running in four different races, each entailing a five-day, 155-mile trek through some of the planet’s most brutal deserts. At first the film seems like a simple, “look-at-these-weirdos” type story, but soon things turn much, much more serious. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight Rises) stars in and makes his writing-directing feature debut as Jon, a nightclub hopper who likes and regularly scores with the ladies, but gets more satisfaction watching porn at home on his laptop. There aren’t too many sex-porn-addiction comedies out there, but this one kind of shines. A great supporting cast: Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore as possible love interests, Tony Danza and Glenne Headley as Jon’s parents, only make things better. (ES) Rated R

ENDER’S GAME

Decades after Earth repelled an invasion by  insect-like aliens who killed tens of millions of humans, the planet is preparing for another invasion by the “Formics” that may or may not come by training  all kids in tactics and strategy in the hopes of  finding a new “Julius Caesar or a Napoleon” who will win the war  decisively. Andrew “Ender” Wiggin (Asa Butterfield) is plucked from his regular school to attend the orbiting Battle School, because Colonel Graff (Harrison Ford) and Major Anderson (Viola Davis),

crazy effects that dazzle, while also sometimes distracting from the story. (SR) Rated PG-13

who run the place, think he could be the legendary-scale genius they’re  looking for. (MJ) PG-13

ENOUGH SAID

Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a divorcee, is facing the possibility of an empty nest, as her daughter goes off to college. As she bonds with similarly situated Albert (James Gandolfini) and the two click, it seems like the perfect romance. Eva also befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), whose only flaw is her tendency to rag on and on about her ex-husband. When this friend’s ex-husband turns out to be her new boyfriend, Eva suddenly finds herself looking at Albert through Marianne’s eyes. (ER) Rated R

ESCAPE PLAN

Ray Breslin (Sylvester Stallone) breaks out of prisons for a living. But when his last job goes wrong and he is effectively buried in a high-tech security facility so far off the map his own team can’t find him, he knows he’s been set up. Recruiting fellow inmate Emil Rottmayer (Arnold Schwarzenegger) to make one last escape from the most fortified prison in the world might seem a little cheesy, but the big explosions and promises of punishment make up for it in this actionoozing flick. (ER) Rated R

FREE BIRDS

As Thanksgiving approaches, so does, apparently, the turkey buddy films. When two turkeys from opposite sides of the track team up to stop the Thanksgiving slaughter, they travel back in time to the very first Thanksgiving to take turkey off the menu, permanently. What ensues is a bunch of silliness and a lot of turkey jokes, just in time for the holiday season. Starring the voices of Owen Wilson and Woody Harrelson. (ER) Rated PG

GRAVITY

Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope and then all hell breaks loose when pieces of a destroyed satellite come their way. Thus begins a series of domino effect crises: Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life to make it to the station alive? Director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) uses

INEQUALITY FOR ALL

This film takes a look at the ever widening economic gap, following former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich as he attempts to shed light on the shrinking middle class. The 2007 Occupy Wall Street brought attention to the economic disparity that has emerged in American society today, but Reich takes it further, tracing the very origins of the gap, and discusses what can be done to improve an economy where the majority of the wealth is held in the hands of a very few. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Rated PG

LAST VEGAS

When Billy decides to finally tie the knot to a much younger woman, he calls out his senior friends for one last hurrah, which of course means a bachelor party in Las Vegas. What ensues is typical “I’m old” jokes — from not knowing who rapper Fifty-Cent is to the always hilarious complaints about medication and bad hips — this flick covers age by laughing at it. Features an all-star cast of actors including Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Kline.  (ER) Rated PG-13

MUSCLE SHOALS

The laid-back documentary Muscle Shoals celebrates this little-known chapter in American music history with equal measures of affection and respect. Talking heads like Keith Richards and Bono speak about the place almost reverently (a little odd in the latter’s case, given that U2 has never recorded there), while others give their props to the humble studios’ formative influence on their careers. Also features some excellent interviews with the queen herself, Aretha Franklin. At Magic Lantern (SD) Rated PG

THOR: THE DARK WORLD

After the events of The Avengers, Thor (Chris Hemsworth) battles and brings peace to the ethereal nine realms. Back on Earth, his love, astrophysicist Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), waits and continues to research with her quip-happy assistant Darcy Lewis (Kat Dennings). Unfortunately, the nine realms are coming into alignment for the first time in millennia, causing invisible interdimensional portals to appear, threatening to destroy the universe. (SS) Rated PG-13 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

12 Years a Slave

97

Gravity

96

All is Lost

88

Hunger Games 2

73

Don Jon

59

Ender’s Game

57

Thor: The Dark World

57

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FILM | REVIEW

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V

ince Vaughn isn’t very funny in the latest Vince Vaughn comedy, and it’s his best movie in years. In Delivery Man, Vaughn plays David Wozniak, a well-intentioned screw-up who works as the delivery man at his family’s butcher shop. When his girlfriend Emma (Cobie Smulders) announces she’s pregnant and essentially breaks up with him in the same conversation, his world snaps into focus; being a father for the first time could really change things for him. That “first time” thing is just a little off, as he’s informed that a sperm bank he donated to decades ago accidently overused his sample, resulting in 533 offspring. Now a group of 142 of Wozniak’s previously unknown children, now in their 20s, are suing to find the identity of their father, codenamed Starbuck. Delivery Man is an almost direct translation by writer/director Ken Scott of his 2011 FrenchCanadian film Starbuck. While billed as a comedy, humor isn’t Delivery Man’s strength. But what the movie lacks in laughs, it more than makes up for in sweetness. Vaughn’s jokes fall relatively flat — in part because they play too much on the same everyman buffoonery shtick he trots out for every role — but Chris Pratt delivers the comic punch as Wozniak’s best friend and lawyer Brett. His belittling takedowns of Wozniak and jokes

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to his four little kids as an exasperated father consistently hit the mark. When Wozniak is given a portfolio with profiles of all 142 offspring, he sneakily seeks them out and becomes a “guardian angel.” He’s an unexpected helping hand, whether enthusiastically subbing for a DELIVERY MAN busker son or helping a daughter during a Rated PG-13 medical emergency. Directed by Ken Scott While meeting his Starring Vince Vaughn, Chris offspring one by one, Pratt, Cobie Smulders Scott’s script and Vaughn’s performance allow Wozniak to develop character depth well beyond Vaughn’s stereotypical parts; he’s more concerned with empathy than finding the next zinger. Through the bonds Wozniak develops with his kids (and their relationships with each other), Delivery Man touches on themes of personal connection, family and destiny in a natural way. And while it appears only one of Vaughn’s children is the least bit overweight and every potentially bad situation goes right, the momentary leaps of faith don’t make the story feel less genuine. Delivery Man might not be the comedic romp moviegoers expect, but its heart certainly is in the right place. 

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After three decades of ups and downs, the Meat Puppets aren’t just the guys who played with Nirvana BY LAURA JOHNSON

T

he song wasn’t his. “Nothing on the top but a bucket and a mop / And an illustrated book about birds,” warbled Kurt Cobain during Nirvana’s classic MTV Unplugged in New York sessions. He was borrowing “Plateau” from the Meat Puppets, an obscure altrock band that wasn’t even part of the Seattle scene. From the cozy stage, a greasy-haired Cobain puffed on a cigarette and invited the act to play backup to the chagrin of MTV, which would have preferred a bigger name to that of the ultra-indie Meat Puppets. That was 20 years ago, a moment in time that arguably was the Meat Puppets’ most memorable. Two more of their songs — “Oh, Me” and “Lake of Fire” — were performed at that show. A year later, the three-piece would find a hit with “Backwater.” But after 1994, things fell apart. Bassist Cris Kirkwood, who had started the band with his guitar-

ist brother Curt, found solace in a drug the other Kurt knew a lot about: heroin. For an entire decade, the demons of drug addiction ruled Cris, leaving Curt to carry the torch.

T

hey began as a nearly-punk outfit in Phoenix at the start of the ’80s. The Meat Puppets’ debut album — 14 tracks that clocked in at 21½ minutes — saw frontman Curt screeching out indecipherable lyrics over howling guitars and pounding drums. On the next album, Meat Puppets II, the band pulled away from that hardcore sound, dabbling in psychedelia and country and forcing Curt to actually sing — which didn’t stop the band from doing shows with other punk groups. “That’s where we started out, we liked to play fast,” Curt says from his tour van during a recent phone interview. “We were never just punk, but

that’s how we got in. But that’s where the creativity was, in the punk scene.” By 1985, the Kirkwood brothers and drummer Derrick Bostrom got out of the hardcore scene, choosing instead to do their own shows. Five years and four albums later, London Records came calling, leading to a tour opening for Stone Temple Pilots and the all-important cameo with Nirvana.

T

he forgiveness part wasn’t easy. But there wasn’t some “prodigal brother” moment, with dramatic scenes of weeping and hugging, when the Kirkwoods reunited in 2006. Cris simply said he was sober and that he wanted back in the band. He had gone to prison in 2004 after a confrontation with a security guard the previous year that left him with gunshot wounds, serving nearly a year behind bars. That opened his eyes; that was ...continued on next page enough.

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | ALT ROCK “THE ESCAPE,” CONTINUED...

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“He had the troubles behind him,” Curt says. “It was obvious there was change.” Since then, the music has been the main focus. This year, the group, now featuring Shandon Sahm on drums and Curt’s son Elmo on rhythm guitar (on tour only), released Rat Farm, its 14th full-length album and a quieter, more introspective record. The live shows are where Curt strives to improve his craft. “It’s a sick musician ego thing; you’re only as good as your last show,” he says. A bus driver and busboy in his formative years, Curt says the Meat Puppets soldier on because this is what they know how to do. They’re old now, with gray streaks through not-as-long hair. But for a band that began more than 30 years ago, they couldn’t survive without the interest of new fans. “It’s been that way for a long time, that I’ve started seeing the younger generation coming out to our shows,” Curt says. “But there’s still a few folks that are as old as us coming out.”

T

his week marks the 20th anniversary of the seminal MTV concert; this year is the 20th anniversary of Nirvana’s final album In Utero. Seemingly every music outlet wants the Kirkwoods’ reactions. Instead of being annoyed, Curt displays a positive attitude. His band is still around, still alive, sharing a recollection. “Our past bears rehashing, especially with the Nirvana stuff,” he says. “No matter how many times you tell it, it’s still an enigma in the cool way that legends are. This one, Nirvana, for some reason, people are still scratching their heads, asking, ‘What happened here?’” n lauraj@inlander.com Meat Puppets with Blackwater Prophet, Colourflies, The World Taken • Sat, Nov. 23 at 7 pm • The Hop! • 706 N. Monroe • $10 • All-ages • holdmyticket.com

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R E D N O W EVER

MUSIC | ROCK

A T N A S E R WHE ? S A E D I S I H GETS ...

Josh Berwanger, left, and Michael Hutcherson start anew with Josh Berwanger Band. REBECCA ARMSTRONG PHOTO

Life Sentence

ecret s s i h w o n k We

Josh Berwanger had to get out of music to find out it was his calling BY LEAH SOTTILE

W

hen our conversation is suddenly cut short, Josh Berwanger calls back from his tour van — stuck somewhere in Austin, Texas, traffic — and says it’s because his cellphone antenna hit the ceiling of the van. “Does your cellphone really have an antenna?” I ask. “Yeah, it’s one of those Zack Morris brick phones,” he says. He’s kidding. But you get the sense he likes making jokes like this. Berwanger is by no means geriatric, but when it comes to music, he’s been around. His old band, the Anniversary, got its start in 1997, signed to Vagrant Records and kept playing until nearly a decade ago. He’s old enough to have been through a big, dramatic band breakup, move home again, cast music away from his life, get married, have a kid, get divorced, go to school, become a high school basketball coach and then decide to play music again. “Whoever I was around, I was like, ‘I’m done with [playing music], it’s so stupid,’” he says. “I was telling myself that. But it’s just like a breakup. You say to everyone that you’re done with a girl, but deep down, you’re like, ‘I love that girl.’” Berwanger says he remembers early conversations with the Anniversary’s original drummer, Michael Hutcherson, about restarting the band. Both were slowly realizing they had too much left to achieve with music to just break up with it.

“Michael and I were just talking about how a lot of goals that we had set for ourselves as younger musicians and as kids, we still hadn’t met yet,” Berwanger says. “[We said] ‘We need to go and meet these goals that we had for ourselves. … He doesn’t drink, he doesn’t smoke, and music to him is what makes him happy in life. And that’s the exact same way I feel.” His new group, the Josh Berwanger Band (or sometimes just Berwanger), makes poppy, hand-clappy, upbeat American rock ‘n’ roll — the soundtrack of a convertible, top down, rolling past fields of grain and majestic purple mountains. But underneath that sound are lyrics fraught with loneliness and longing. It’s a deeply satisfying juxtaposition: the kind of music that physically moves you while speaking to the pains of your own heart. Berwanger says this band has had to start from scratch. Where the Anniversary’s shows were booked by an agent and promoted by publicists, Berwanger is getting used to playing house shows and DIY clubs and selling his own merch all over again. “I’m f---ing happy to do that. … You have to start over and you can’t have any ego about it.”  Josh Berwanger Band with the Mayfields and Scott Ryan • Sat, Nov. 23 at 9 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • $5 • 21+ • 838-1570

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NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK QUARTER MONKEY

Q

uarter Monkey travels in a short bus. Painted white, slapped with the band’s logo, there’s no way people don’t notice when the local alt-rock trio comes rolling through. The band, with a new four-song EP, Got No Name, drives that honkin’ vehicle to the Bing on Friday for its first CD release show since 2008. The most awesome thing? Proceeds will go to Women & Children’s Free Restaurant charity in Spokane. — LAURA JOHNSON Quarter Monkey CD release party with Normal Babies • Fri, Nov. 22 at 7 pm • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • $10 • All-ages • bingcrosbytheater. com • (800) 325-SEAT

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 11/21

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Hector Sosa BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, DJ Yasmine BUCKHORN INN, Texas Twister THE CELLAR, Robby French J CLUB 412, Helmet with Thirion X, Storm Normandy FEDORA PUB, CdA Charter Academy Jazz & Choir Combos GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Manwithnoname CD Release feat. Twitch MC, Home Grown Heroes, Hounds of hell, DP, Kid Buddha, DC Gesus, P-Kane, Royal Flush Productions JOHN’S ALLEY, Kory Quinn & Bitterroot JONES RADIATOR, Oracles Kitchen J KNITTING FACTORY, Pretty Lights with Odesza J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Cedar & Boyer, BIAS LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind J MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Sean Knox O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, Flying Mammals, The Tone Collaborative, Bodhi Drip, Moksha World Fusion RICO’S, Palouse Subterranean Blues Band SPLASH, Steve Denny THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, Pretty Lights After Party feat. Mesca ZOLA, Cruxie and the Zola Thanksgiving Party

Friday, 11/22

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Kosh BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn

50 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013

METAL ODYSSEY

P

erhaps you like your music loud, a little aggressive, sometimes a little scary, but always finely crafted and expertly played. The local band you need to check out is Odyssey. The trio has played shows around Spokane for a few years, and they’ve grown up and left behind their cool metal hairstyles. But their music, as influenced by Rush as by Dream Theater, continues to push the line of technicality. As heavy as it is, the band has softened in the best ways recently, adding songs that are downright poppy. It’s fun, impressive stuff performed by some of Spokane’s hardestworking musicians. — LEAH SOTTILE Odyssey with Czar, Isthmusia, Infrablaster and Honey Badger • Sat, Nov. 23 at 8:30 pm • Checkerboard Bar • 1716 E. Sprague • Free • 21+ • 535-4007

J BING CROSBY THEATER, Quarter Monkey CD Release Party (See story above), Normal Babies BOLO’S, Whack A Mole BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Haze THE CELLAR, Current Flow J CHAIRS COFFEE (340-8787), Open Mic of Open-ness COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Strictly Business, Bill Bozly COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Bridges Home THE COUNTRY CLUB, Luke Jaxon Band CURLEY’S, Torino Drive FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Shiner THE FLAME, DJ Wesone GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Justin Renteria, OneSlurr, Miraj, Felon, Vexxem, Fenatic, Thomas Crown IRON HORSE BAR, Johnny Qlueless IRV’S, DJ Prophesy

JOHN’S ALLEY, Acorn Project JONES RADIATOR, Six Foot Swing J KNITTING FACTORY, Trapt with Thirty Three, No Resolve, Somatic J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Diane Copeland THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Brothers Ov Midnight, Man Eats Face LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls J MOOTSY’S, Yardsss & Southerly, Teen Blonde, members of Jazz and Nude Pop NYNE, DJ C-Mad PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Mike and Shanna J THE PHAT HOUSE, Working Spliffs REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Kory Quinn and the Comrades ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Ryan Larsen THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (443-3796), DJ JWC, Armed & Dangerous

SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Truck Mills THE SHANTY (208-664-9590), The Three Brothers SILVER FOX (208-667-9442), Usual Suspects J SPOKANE ARENA, Trans-Siberian Orchestra TWELVE STRING BREWING COMPANY (241-3697), Eric Neuhausser THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Show Me Your Tattoo V feat. Death By Pirates ZOLA, Raggs and Bush Doktor

Saturday, 11/23

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Andy Day BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BING CROSBY THEATER, Anna Nalick BOLO’S, Whack A Mole BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Haze THE CELLAR, Current Flow

J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin, Tyler Coulston J CHECKERBOARD BAR, Czar, Isthmusia, Odyssey (See story above), Infrablaster, Honey Badger COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Strictly Business, Bill Bozly COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Angela Marie Project COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Ken Rokicki THE COUNTRY CLUB, Luke Jaxon Band CURLEY’S, Torino Drive FEDORA PUB, Mike Morris THE FLAME, DJ Wesone FLYING PIG CAFE (863-9591), Nick Grow GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Meat Puppets (See story on page 47), Colourflies, The World Taken, Blackwater Prophet HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET (624-1349), The Converters


IRON HORSE BAR, Johnny Qlueless IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Bret Mosely JONES RADIATOR, Dru Heller J KNITTING FACTORY, Aaron Carter with DJ MC Squared LA ROSA CLUB, Josh Hedlund J LAGUNA CAFÉ, RobinsongTHE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Floating Crowbar THE LARIAT, The Ricks Brothers Band LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Truck Mills LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dario Re

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. J MOOTSY’S, Josh Berwanger Band (See story on page 49), The Mayfields, Scott Ryan NYNE, The Divine Jewels OVERBLUFF CELLARS, RBMC Jazz, Floating Crowbar, Cursive Wires J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Mic RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve REPUBLIC BREWING CO., The Hobos ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Ryan Larsen J THE SHOP, Sam Endress THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Bonfire Knights ZOLA, Hot Club Spokane

Sunday, 11/24

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Michael’s Music Technology Circus J SPOKANE ARENA, Zac Brown Band with Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue (See story on page 52) ZOLA, Bill Bozly

Monday, 11/25

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Open mic J CALYPSOS, Open Mic PJ’S BAR & GRILL, Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck J RICO’S, Open mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander and friends

Tuesday, 11/26

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn CARR’S CORNER, KTFO Rap Battles feat. Pest, DJ Killmore and more THE CELLAR, Max Daniels FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE HOP!, EDM Generation” feat. DJs Brandon Deane, Sonic Tsunami, Felon KELLY’S IRISH PUB, The Powell Brothers LION’S LAIR (456-5678), DJs Nobe and MJ J RED ROOSTER COFFEE CO. (3217935), Open mic RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (443-

3796), Open mic with Frank Clark SPLASH, Bill Bozly THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJ Q THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Cross My Heart ZOLA, The Urban Achievers with Dan Conrad

Wednesday, 11/27 BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn CARR’S CORNER, DJ Wesone J CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Steven Harris EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho J THE HOP!, Thy Art is Murder IRV’S, DJ Prophesy J KNITTING FACTORY, Butterball Bash feat. Seven Cycles, Concrete Grip, Project Kings, Coming Alive J LATAH BISTRO, Kalliope J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Andy Rumsey NYNE, Holiday party with DJ Case, Stone Tobey, Kainbridge One J THE PHAT HOUSE, Be Open Mic with Mike Bethely RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic SUKI YAKI INN (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared

THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Zac Wirchak ZOLA, The Bucket List

Coming Up ...

BABY BAR, Likes Girls, Nov. 28 KNITTING FACTORY, All That Remains, Motionless in White, Soil, Helldorado, Nov. 29 THE PEARL THEATER, Home for the Holidays with Shook Twins, Anna and The Underbelly, Nov. 29 BIGFOOT PUB, Six-Strings n’ Pearls, Nov. 29-30 JONES RADIATOR, Vinyl Butter Reunion, Butterball, Nov. 30 SPOKANE ARENA, Pearl Jam, Nov. 30 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, Benefit

Show feat. the mother, Dec. 4 MOOTSY’S, Angry Xmas Tour feat. Abadawn, Mine+Us, Eraserface, Dec. 4 BELLTOWER, Runaway Symphony CD release party, Dec. 5 KNITTING FACTORY, Adventure Club with Dvbbs, Dallask, Hunter Siegal, Dec. 5 JOHN’S ALLEY, Gypsy Lumberjacks, Dec. 5 JONES RADIATOR, Moses Wiley, Sally Bob Jazz, Dec. 6 THE HOP!, 5 Times Over, The Nixon Rodeo, Beyond Today, Coming ALice, Undercard, Dec. 6 KNITTING FACTORY, Smile Empty Soul, Acidic, First Decree, Evolved, Dec. 6

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 51


STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

THEATER A CLASSIC, ADJUSTED

Our Town, Thornton Wilder’s American classic, draws out what’s meaningful about the mundane happenings of everyday life. Set in the fictional New Hampshire town of Grover’s Corners, the three-act play spans a decade and typically requires a cast of 34 to 38 actors, director Michael Weaver says. That’s far more than Interplayers could even fit backstage. So for this production, eight actors will play the whole town. Interplayers worked with the Wilder estate, which agreed to sanction a production with a smaller cast — as long as not a single line of the play was changed. It’s a classic for a reason, after all. — LISA WAANANEN Our Town • Thu, Nov. 21 through Sat, Dec. 14, show times vary • $12-$28 • Interplayers Theatre • 174 S. Howard St. • interplayerstheatre.org • 455-7529

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

52 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013

MUSIC GO SHORTY

The Zac Brown Band’s opener is who you really should be flocking to see Sunday night. New Orleans prodigy Trombone Shorty (aka Troy Andrews) will entertain the Spokane Arena before the ZBB, and his crew will do it better. The 27-year-old trombone and trumpet player boasts a fusion of jazz, hip-hop and funk unlike anyone else, proving that young people can do a lot more than twerk. Don’t miss this soon-to-be-legend in action. — LAURA JOHNSON Zac Brown Band with Trombone Shorty • Sun, Nov. 24, at 7 pm • $45-$69.50 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanearena. com • 325-7328

MUSIC CHRISTMAS COUNTDOWN

We all know how “farewell” tours tend to go — an artist says it’ll be their last time performing live, only to retract the announcement when they return for a reunion tour. But prog-rock band TransSiberian Orchestra is saying goodbye for real to its current tour of the holiday rock opera The Lost Christmas Eve, released back in 2004 and first performed live last year. Even though TSO plans to continue touring, this could be fans’ last chance ever to see the best-selling holiday album performed in its entirety. — CHEY SCOTT Trans-Siberian Orchestra: The Lost Christmas Eve • Fri, Nov. 22, at 8 pm • $30.50-$60.50 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanearena.com • 325-7328


THEATER OH, CHRISTMAS TREE

SAMUEL SARGEANT PHOTO

Way back when, before most had even imagined the technological conveniences of modern life, like semitrucks and interstate highways, transporting perfectly conical evergreen trees from remote, snowy forests to urban homes was quite the undertaking. This year, the Spokane Civic Theatre’s Holiday Schooner offers a glimpse into the oft-harsh realities for the men who braved their lives to bring a familiar piece of the Old World to the German immigrants living in late 19th century Chicago. Based on real events, the award-winning musical tells the story of a schooner ship captain and his crew, who traversed the frigid, storm-tossed waters of the Great Lakes just to provide their neighbors some holiday cheer. — CHEY SCOTT The Christmas Schooner • Nov. 22-Dec. 22, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm (except Thanksgiving), Sun at 2 pm • $22-$30 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard St. • spokanecivictheatre.com • 325-2507

BETH EARNED HER

degree IN OUR EVENING PROGRAM.

THEN EARNED A NEW

POSITION.

When Beth Vercic-Scott wanted to add a new chapter to her career, she enrolled in

COMEDY FUNNY FEASTING

Whitworth’s evening program to earn

Gathering around the dinner table with family is sometimes the best part of the holidays. Uncle Jim tells really good jokes, and the senile grandparents are the only people keeping everyone else sane. Ever thought that scene would make a great comedy show? Well, every Friday in November the Blue Door Theatre is putting on an improv show based on the funnies at your holiday table. They’ll take audience suggestions to create an inspired comedy about the hilariousness surrounding the traditional family gathering. — KATELYN SMITH Family Dinner • Fridays in November at 8 pm • $7-$9 • Blue Door Theatre • 815 W. Garland Ave. • bluedoortheatre.com • 747-7045

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

YFC FALL FUNDRAISER Event benefiting local at-risk youth served by the nonprofit, with dessert and refreshments. Nov. 21, 7 pm. Free, donations accepted. Youth for Christ, 4603 N. Market St. spokaneyfc.org (327-7721) PHILIPPINES DISASTER RELIEF CONCERT Performances by members of the Filipino-American Association of the Inland Empire (FAAIE), traditional Filipino cuisine, an auction, raffle and more. All proceeds donated to the Red Cross for Typhoon Haiyan relief. Nov. 23, 5 pm. $35. Chateau Rive, 621 W. Mallon (533-5350) SPOKANE HUMANE SOCIETY’S FURR BALL The Spokane Humane Society’s annual fundraiser gala features silent and live auctions, dinner, dancing and adoptable pets. Nov. 23 at 6 pm. $125.

her B.A. in Organizational Management. “I wouldn’t be in my current position as a physician recruiter at Rockwood Health Systems without my Whitworth bachelor’s degree,” Beth says. With a convenient evening schedule that let her continue to work during the day, it was a perfect way for Beth to take the next step.

Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanehumanesociety.org (467-5235) CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE 18 holiday trees are displayed and available to win as part of a fundraiser raffle benefiting the Spokane Symphony. Trees are located on the mezzanine of the Davenport (Dec. 3-14 from 10 am-9 pm) and on the 2nd floor of River Park Square (Dec. 3-15, from 10 am-mall closing). Free to view, $1/raffle ticket. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanesymphonyassoc.org

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. See weekly schedule online. Thursdays, 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. uncledscomedy.com (483-7300)

Is it your time to take the next step? Contact us today.

Beth Vercic-Scott

Apply now. Visit whitworth.edu/evening or call 509.777.3222.

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 53


EVENTS | CALENDAR FAMILY DINNER Live comedy improv show based on audience suggestions about their family members. Fri at 8 pm through Nov. 29. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) MICHAEL GLATZMAIER “GIVING THANKS” Live improv comedy show. May not be suitable for all-ages. Nov. 22, 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) BADA BING COMEDY SERIES The fourth installment of the series features Dan Cummins, Marc Yaffee and Harry J. Riley. Nov. 23, 8 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Allages. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) ALL-AGES COMEDY OPEN MIC Second and fourth Thurs of the month at 6 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. bootsbakery.com (703-7223) GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch, improv or anything weird. Five min. max/ performer. Every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. (847-1234)

COMMUNITY

THURSDAY NIGHT DANCE Community dances featuring live music by local bands. Thursdays, 7:30-9:45 pm. $5.50. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (535-0803) HELP THE HUNGRY FOOD SORTING Join other volunteers to sort and pack

produce and other bulk food items for delivery to local emergency food outlets. Ages 14+. Shift times and need vary, sign up online. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. 2-harvest.org (252-6267) JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE 40-minute family lake cruises with a visit to Santa. (No cruise on Thanksgiving Day.) Daily at 5:30, 6:30 & 7:30 pm, now through Jan. 1. $5-$20. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. 2nd Ave. cdalakecruises.com (208-664-7268) SANTA’S ARRIVAL AT RIVER PARK SQUARE Pre-arrival festivities include hot chocolate, face painting, a holiday sing-a-long, tree-lighting and more. Nov. 22, 6 pm. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main. riverparksquare.com (389-5879) TREE OF SHARING Community members can pick up a tag noting gift items requested by local charities serving those in need. Gift items must be returned by Dec. 12 for distribution to recipients. Pick up tags at Northtown, Spokane Valley, or River Park Square malls between Nov. 22-Dec. 12. treeofsharing.org (290-0002) CATCHING FIRE COMPETITION A Hunger Games-inspired party with competitions and more. Grades 6+. Nov. 23, 3 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld.org (893-8400) COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER Women & Children’s Free Restaurant and Community Kitchen hosts a traditional Thanksgiving meal with smoked turkey, gravy, fresh fruits and vegetables and more. All are welcome. Nov. 23, 4-7 pm. Free. Rogers High School,

People & Pets Welcome

1622 E. Wellesley Ave. wcfrspokane.org (324-1995) SANTA EXPRESS The annual kids’ gift store benefits the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery and features allowance-friendly gift items for children to purchase for friends and family. Nov. 23-Dec. 23, Mon-Sat from 10 am-8 pm, Sun from 11 am-6 pm. Crescent Court Bldg., Skywalk level. $0.50-$8/item. Crescent Court, 707 W. Main. vanessabehan.org TURKEY TROT OPEN HOUSE Learn how to look for signs of wild turkeys, how to call a turkey and more. Nov. 23, 10 am-3 pm. $5. West Valley Outdoor Learning Center, 8706 E. Upriver Drive. olc.wvsd.org (340-1028) SOAP FOR HOPE DRIVE The sixth annual toiletry drive benefits local charities. Donations can be dropped off at any local AAA office through Dec. 31 AAA Downtown Spokane, 1717 W. Fourth Ave. aaa.com/soapforhope SCHOOL’S OUT DAY CAMP Day camps during Thanksgiving vacation include activities such as swimming, rock climbing, crafts, games and more. Lunch and snacks provide. Ages 6-13. Nov. 26 and 27 from 9 am-4 pm. $45. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. krocccda.org (208-667-1865) TOM’S TURKEY DRIVE DISTRIBUTION Help Second Harvest food bank distribute 7,000 Thanksgiving meals during KREM 2’s Tom’s Turkey Tuesday. Nov. 26, 5 am. Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. 2-harvest. org (252-6257) COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER The third annual community dinner includes traditional dishes and is free to

Benefitting Washington Basset Rescue & Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary

$1 Raffle Tickets Games with Prizes Silent Auction PHOTOS WITH

MADDIE

(the Bulldog of Gonzaga)

SUn, DEC 1st  12 - 2:30PM LINCOLN CENTER’S MONROE BALLROOM 1316 N. Lincoln St., Spokane

$5 Santa Claws Photos

(Kids, Fur-Kids, or the whole family)

Dog and Cat Food Drive  Adoptions  Howliday Shopping

For more info, visit:

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FREE EVENT with over 15 non-profit vendors! 54 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013


community members. Nov. 28, 11 am-4 pm. Free. Fedora Pub, 1726 W. Kathleen Ave. (208-765-8888)

FILM

ENOUGH SAID Drama starting Julia Louis-Dreyfus and James Gandolfini. Rated PG-13. Nov. 21-24, show times vary. $6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL Screening of films included in the 9th annual film festival, hosted by SOLE to raise funds for its programs. Pre-party from 5:30-6:30 at The Readery ($35). Nov. 22, 7 pm. $10-$35. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. (208-263-9191) SILENT FILM NIGHT Three comedies featuring the historic LCHS organ and well-known silent film organist, Brad Miller. Students perform vaudeville acts between films, event benefits LCHS Drama. Nov. 22, 6 pm. $5-$10. Lewis & Clark High School, 521 W. Fourth Ave. (990-6560) DOCTOR WHO: THE DAY OF THE DOCTOR Special screening in 3D, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the long-running BBC sci-fi series. Nov. 25, 7:30 & 10 pm. $15. Regal Cinemas, 4750 N. Division. (509-482-0209) QUENTIN TARANTINO FILM FESTIVAL Screening of the WWII-era drama “Inglorious Basterds.” Nov. 26, 7 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) RUSH Film based on the true story of Formula 1 race car drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Nov. 29-Dec. 1, show times vary. Nov. 29-Dec. 1 $6.

Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208882-4127) HALF THE SKY Documentary screening as part of the 29th annual Festival of Fair Trade (Nov. 29-Dec. 1). Nov. 30, 2 pm. $5. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. magiclanternspokane.com (448-6561)

FOOD

TASTEFUL THURSDAYS Live music and product samples every Thursday through Dec. 19, featuring local food vendors and musicians. Thurs from 5-7 pm. Free. Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. 5th St. (208-882-8537) WINTER WARMERS & HOLIDAY BREWS Tasting and educational session featuring winter seasonal and special-release beers. Nov. 21, 6:30 pm. $15. Total Wine & More, 9980 N. Newport Hwy. (466-1644) HOLIDAY WINE FESTIVAL Wineries and tasting rooms across the Spokane area host a weekend of wine tasting, food sampling and holiday gift giving ideas. Nov. 22-24 from noon-5 pm. Participating Spokane Winery Association wineries. Map at spokanewineries.net PINKIES OUT TEA TASTING Tasting of select loose leaf teas in celebration of Spice Traders’ 2nd anniversary. Nov. 22, 3-6 pm. Free. Spice Traders Mercantile, 15614 E. Sprague. spicetradersmercantile.com (315-4036) PINOT NOIR TASTING Learn about this versatile and globally-produced wine. Reservations required. Nov. 22, 7 pm Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (343-2253)

SARFF Family Owned & Operated

Sandpoint

A Hometown Place To Be

• TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY Nov. 29 at 5 pm. Santa arrives 6 pm! Holiday entertainment and hot cider in Jeff Jones Town Square. • GET YOUR JINGLE ON Thurs. Dec. 6-8. Shopping specials and door prizes downtown all weekend. • GUY’S NIGHT OUT Thurs. Dec. 20. Evening shopping and specials downtown for last minute shoppers. • SANTA AT THE NORTH POLE Saturdays Nov. 30-Dec. 21 from 11am-3pm. Visit Santa Claus in the Cedar Street Bridge.

FREE PARKING IN THE CITY LOT THANKSGIVING THROUGH NEW YEAR’S DAY

Our Family Cares for Your Family

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Photo courtesy Bonner County Daily Bee

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NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess MOODY CALL

Ten months ago, while studying abroad, I had one wonderful night with a girl. We kissed and danced the night away. She lives in Brazil, but we’ve communicated regularly via Skype and email. I’ve never felt such a strong connection. Recently, I asked what she wanted, and she said to be together in the same country. We started imagining that, and she became extremely attached, wanting reassurance about our future that I couldn’t yet AMY ALKON give. I confessed to feeling guilty about causing her emotional strain. She flipped, seeming like a totally different person. She said it wasn’t the first time someone had worried about how attached she was and said she’d start being more distant with me. Angry, I briefly blocked her on my phone so I wouldn’t communicate anything rash. She later complained about her texts bouncing back, and I explained what I’d done and why. She lost it, saying she was “sick of this” and “done.” That was two weeks ago. Should I attempt reopening communication? I feel I’m missing the opportunity of a lifetime if I don’t. --International Love Here’s a woman who flips out when you worry aloud that you aren’t making her happy fast enough. The prospect of being with someone who does this is the “opportunity of a lifetime” the way Hurricane Sandy was the vacation opportunity of a lifetime, complete with the chance to swim in the Jersey shore’s finest restaurants and mingle with celebrities (well, wave to Sean Penn if a disaster recovery photo op took his rowboat past the roof of your motel). A long-distance relationship is a relationship that’s miles from reality. Much of its power comes from what’s missing. For example, there are a lot of blanks left by “seeing” somebody by Skype and email. Nature (and human nature) abhors a vacuum, so you fill the blanks with your projections of who the person is, drawn from romantic memories and hopes of who you’d like them to be. The love you feel may, in part, be a love of how your conversations make you feel about you: that you’re witty, charming, and a great romancer. And of course, love that’s out of reach tends to have the strongest pull, a la Romeo and Juliet. Frankly, if their families hadn’t basically been the Crips and the Bloods with linguini and instead had been all “Hey, you crazy kids, be home by curfew,” it probably would have been a matter of weeks before Juliet was sneaking out behind the palazzo with Marcello and then Luigi. You find out whether you can have a life with a woman by experiencing her day to day -- seeing whether she chases you around with a cleaver when you forget to wash a glass or when you draw the line at picking up ladyproducts at the drugstore. You could propose living in the same place for a month -- after getting in touch to tell her how wrong you were. (This is basically catnip for women, and whether you were actually wrong about anything is immaterial.) But consider all that goes into a relationship with someone from another country (travel expenses, residency permits, and difficulty finding work and even getting a work permit). Maybe it makes sense to deem what you had as “one wonderful night with a girl” -- before you get to Brazilian customs and find yourself answering “Do you have anything to declare?” with “Yes, I think I’m making a big mistake.”

THE BLURT LOCKER

I’ve been on two dates with a woman, and she’s agreed to a third. We kissed on the second date and have been talking every night, but she seems to be playing it a little cool (letting me do all the calling, etc.). Perhaps I should also play it cool, but I’m dying to tell her I like her. Is there a magic number of dates you have to go on before it’s okay to do that? --Bitten Tongue There are solutions that cause more problems than they solve, like giving your car a car bra, which traps moisture underneath and eventually leads to two-tone paint. (And besides, what happens if your car doesn’t have a bra, someone sees its nipples and it gets embarrassed?) Announcing that you like someone you’ve gone out with twice is another one of these problem-causing solutions. If this woman is at all ambivalent (a healthy way to feel early on), telling her you like her wouldn’t make her like you, but it might make her uncomfortable enough to flee. So, go ahead and say those “three little words” -- as long as they’re “You free Friday?” Rest assured; she knows you like her. Because you’re still around, because you’re calling every night, and because when you kissed her, you apparently didn’t spit afterward, wipe your hand across your mouth, and say “Eeeuw!” n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR WINE TASTING Friday’s tasting features Thurston Wolfe winery, Saturday features Lullaby Winery. Nov. 22, 3-6:30 pm and Nov. 23, 2-4:30 pm $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com (838-1229) NOVEAU WINE BARREL TASTING Organic wine tasting, hors d’ouvres, live music, arts and crafts sale and more. Nov. 23-24 from 12-5 pm. Free admission. China Bend Winery, 3751 Vineyard Way, Kettle Falls. chinabend.com (509732-6123) AMERICAN-ITALIAN CLUB DINNER Spaghetti dinner. Nov. 24, 12-6 pm. $5$9. Gonzaga Prep, 1224 E. Euclid Ave. (467-6389) BLACK FRIDAY WINE SPECIAL Class on the best value wines to stock up on for the holiday season. Nov. 29, 7 pm $20. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (509-343-2253) SCOTCH SOCIAL The annual event hosted by the Connoisseur’s Club, features 18 varieties of Scotch, cigars and appetizers. Nov. 30, 6-10 pm. $70. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane.com (327-8000)

MUSIC

MAKE MUSIC MATTER Concert benefiting two local organizations, LETEM Play and the Spokane Youth Symphony. Nov. 21, 7 pm. $10 suggested donation. The Bing, 901 W. Sprague Ave. makemusicmatterspokane.com (227-7404) CHRIS PROCTOR Concert by the winner of the U.S. National Fingerstyle Guitar Championship. Nov. 22, 7:30 pm. $10. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash St., Bonners Ferry. thepearltheater.org (208-610-2846) TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA The popular rock opera group performs “The Lost Christmas Eve.” Nov. 22, 8 pm. $31-$61. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (279-7000) WHO IS BENJAMIN BRITTEN? Educational presentation and performance to celebrate the 100th birthday of the composer/musician, featuring the MCS Children’s Choir. Nov. 22, 10 am. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. sandpointconservatory.org (208-265-4444) HEIDI MULLER & BOB WEBB Traditional American folk music concert. Nov. 23, 7:30 pm. $5-$10. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown. (229-3414) NORTHWEST SACRED MUSIC CHORALE Fall concert featuring works by Lord Nelson Mass and Franz Joseph Haydn, featuring local soloists and accompanists. Nov. 23 at 7 pm and Nov. 24 at 3 pm. $12$15. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. nwsmc.org (208-762-9956) GONZAGA WIND SYMPHONY & PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE “Aurora Awakes” concert featuring music by contemporary American composers. Nov. 24, 3 pm. $7, free for GU staff/students. The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. (313-6733) SPOKANE STRING QUARTET “The British Invasion”-themed concert. Nov. 24, 3 pm. $12-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokanestringquartet. org (998-2261) ZAC BROWN BAND Country music concert by the Grammy award-winning band, also featuring Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue. Nov. 24, 7 pm. $45$70. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) KEVIN WOODS TRIO Concert also fea-

turing Dru Heller and Scott Steed. Nov. 25 at 9:30 & 11:30 am. Free. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3500) SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS Local women’s chorus specializing in fourpart a capella harmony in a barbershop style. Meets Tuesdays at 6:45 pm. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Rd. (218-4799) CELTIC THUNDER World music concert. Nov. 29 and 30 at 7 pm. $45-$60. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-6700)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

FOURTH FRIDAY PUB PEDDLERS Meets monthly, Nov. 22 at 7 pm, departs at 8 pm. The Swamp, 1904 W. Fifth Ave. pubpeddlers.blogspot.com (922-3312) 2013 NCAA CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIPS Division II men’s and women’s championship races. Nov. 23, 9 am. $5, tickets available only at the event. Plantes Ferry Sports Complex, 12308 E. Upriver Dr. spokanesports.org (456-5812) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club. Meets Mon, Wed, Sat from 7-9:30 pm. $2. North Park Racquet Club, 8121 N. Division St. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780)

WEEKEND COUNTDOWN

Get the scoop on this weekend’s events with our newsletter. Visit Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up.

SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sundays from 4:30-7 pm and Wednesdays from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. wccc.myspokane.net (448-5694) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Meets Wed, 6:30-9 pm and Sun, 1:30-4 pm $2. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (456-3581) RACE TO THE MIDNIGHT SUN Presentation on the Yukon River Quest, an annual 444 mile canoe and kayak marathon. Nov. 25, 7 pm. Free. Mountain Gear Corporate Offices, 6021 E. Mansfield Ave. (209-3066) BRRC TURKEY TROT A fun run/walk to raise money and food donations for Second Harvest Food Bank. Nov. 28, 9 am. Donations accepted. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (868-6433)

THEATER

GREASE THE MUSICAL Produced by the Rogers High School Drama Dept. Through Nov. 23, Thurs-Sat at 7 pm. $5$7. Rogers High School, 1622 E. Wellesley Ave. (354-6551) INSPECTING CAROL Comedy about a theater troupe’s attempt to produce “A Christmas Carol.” Through Nov. 24, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Spartan Theater at SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3592) OUR TOWN Updated adaptation of the classic play by Thornton Wilder. Nov. 21-Dec. 14, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, select Saturday matinees on Nov. 30, Dec. 7 and 14. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529)

SECOND SAMUEL Comedy. Through Nov. 24, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) ALMOST, MAINE Romantic comedy, performed by the SCC Players. Through Nov. 24, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. (533-7387) AMERICAN IDIOT Performance of the musical inspired by Green Day’s album of the same name. Nov. 22 and 23 at 8 pm $30-$75. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) THE CHRISTMAS SCHOONER Holiday family musical. Nov. 22-Dec. 22, ThuSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Bring a non-perishable food item on Nov. 22 or 23 and get a ticket for $11. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) THE CHRISTMAS TOY SHOP Holidaythemed play. Nov. 22-Dec. 15, show times vary. $10-$12. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org (325-4886) THE DINING ROOM Readers theatre production by the North Idaho College drama club. Nov. 22, 6 pm. Donations accepted. Calypsos Coffee, 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA. (208-769-3220) NORA Play adapted from the 1879 script for “A Doll’s House.” Through Nov. 24, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org (276-2775) A CHRISTMAS CABARET An evening of music, stories and laughter featuring Ellen Travolta with Mark Cotter and Jack Bannon. Nov. 29-Dec. 21, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm. $20-$25. CdA Resort, 115 S. 2nd Ave. achristmascabaret.com (208-435-4000)

VISUAL ARTS

CATHERINE FRESHLEY Landscape acrylic paintings on wood and canvas. Artist reception Nov. 21 from 5-7 pm, runs through Dec. 18. Free. South Perry Pizza, 1011 S. Perry St. (290-6047) WHAT IS ART? Exhibition of artwork from Gonzaga’s permanent collection. Runs through March 8. Gallery hours Mon-Sat from 10 am-4 pm. Public walkthrough Dec. 6 at 10:30 am. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone. (313-6613) SPOKANE ART SCHOOL FACULTY SHOW Showcase of work by instructors in the nonprofit. Artist reception Nov. 22 from 5-8 pm. Runs through Feb. 1, 2014. Tinman Gallery, 811 W. Garland. tinmanartworks.com (325-1500) WINE & CANVAS Guided painting class with cocktail refreshments available. Open to all-ages. Nov. 22, 6:30 pm $35/ person, materials provided. Spokane Airport Ramada Inn, 8909 W. Airport Dr. (206-999-1682) FIBER, FEATHERS AND LEATHER Monthly exhibition featuring the work of the co-op’s artists. Nov. 23-Dec. 7. Manic Moon & More, 1007 W. Augusta Ave. (413-9101) HANDMADE ORNAMENT SHOW The annual show features handmade tree ornaments by local artists. Nov. 29-Dec. 1, Fri-Sat from 10 am-6 pm, Sun from 10 am-3 pm. Tinman Gallery, 811 W. Garland Ave. (325-1500) NORTHWEST TREASURES Handmade


ornaments in copper, felt, glass, metal and more by local and regional artists. Through Dec. 31, open Mon-Sat. Free. Gallery Northwest, 217 E. Sherman Ave, CdA. thegallerynorthwest.com (208-667-5700) “30-30-30” 30 participating artists created 30 works of art over 30 days, with each piece selling for $30 during a one-day exhibition. View art before the sale on Dec. 5 from noon-5 pm and Dec. 6 from 8 am-3 pm. Show/sale on Dec. 6 from 4-7 pm. Third Street Gallery, City Hall, 206 E. Third St, Moscow. (208-883-7036)

WORDS

AUTHOR PAMELA PROEHL The author reads from and signs copies of her book “Heartbreak Killer.” Nov. 21, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) NATURE WRITER BARRY LOPEZ Presentation by the award-winning writer as part of the SCC President’s Speakers Series. Nov. 21, 7 pm. Free. SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. (533-7045) KATE MCLACHLAN The author talks about and signs copies of her historical fiction novel “Murder and the Hurdy Gurdy Girl.” Nov. 22, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) RANDY SHAW BOOK RELEASE The KREM 2 anchor’s new book “Spring Fever” is a autobiographical compilation on his career and the stories he’s covered. Nov. 23, 2-3:30 pm. Free. First Street Bar & Grill, 122 W. First, Deer Park. (276-2320)

LISA BORDERS & RON MACLEAN Double header event featuring both authors reading from and signing copies of their work. Nov. 26, 7 pm Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206)

ETC.

THE PLANT FARM’S POINSETTIA TOURS See more than 9 acres of poinsettia greenhouses, featuring more than 20 varieties. Nov. 22-23 at 11 am, and hourly from 1-3 pm. Free admission. The Plant Farm, 14208 E. Fourth. plant-farm.com (926-9397) CUSTER’S CHRISTMAS ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW The 37th annual show features local and regional vendors offering items including jewelry, woodwork, holiday decor, art and more. Nov. 22-24, Fri 10 am-8 pm, Sat 10 am-6 pm, Sun 10 am-4 pm. $7, good all weekend. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. custershows. com (924-0588) TED TALK DISCUSSION Weekly discussion group. Meets Wednesdays at 5:30 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. chatham@labaratoryspokane.com 

Fit a degree into your life. CCSonline.spokane.edu

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Winery

A S S O C I AT I O N

HOLIDAY WINE FESTIVAL

FRIDAY, NOV. 22nd – SUNDAY, NOV. 24TH 12PM to 5PM Start a new holiday tradition when you share wine and friendly conversation with wine enthusiasts at Spokane’s renowned wineries. Find perfect holiday gift ideas and enjoy special “Holiday Wine Fest” discounts at select wineries.

Win 4 Tickets $ & 50 Gift Card to

Pick up winery tour maps at each location, or visit spokanewineries.net Tasting fees may apply.

December 12 - 15

Make an evening of it with the Corkage Free Program.

spokanewineries.net

Center INB Performing Arts e.com an ok Sp ay dw BestofBroa

GO TO è inlander.com/milliondollarquartet Tickets for opening night (Friday, December 12th, 2013), non exchangeable, & not redeemable for cash

NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 57


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58. A flower is pretty when it’s in this 59. Toupee 65. Genoa goodbyes 66. Glass of “This American Life” 67. Title character in a 2009 animated film subtitled “The Squeakquel” 68. Inflicted upon 69. Place for inks or oinks 70. ____ list DOWN 1. Sept. follower 2. Try to win 3. Tiny troublemaker 4. Super ____ (game console) 5. “Nicely done!” 6. Entered traffic 7. Bud drinker? 8. Space bar neighbor on a PC

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I Saw You

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Crossing Paths On November 14, as a result of my job, I had the pleasure of crossing paths with you while you were at your job. We spoke several times while I was there. You are petite and were wearing a knit cap. Your eyes are beautiful and I cannot get over the way they were lit up by the lighting in the downtown market where you work. I didn’t see a wedding or an engagement ring. The Inlander is available in your store and as a result I would hope that from time to time you pick one up and read the “I Saw You” ads. I left you my number for work related questions but was unable to approach you in a manner that could be considered unprofessional. If you do in fact read this, and... if you do remember me and would like to get a cup of coffee, please get a hold of me at the number I gave you.

you came to.......but no. You held onto it ‘til you got to a recycling bin. It made me smile. I love seeing the small good deeds in the world. Reminds me of all the GOOD people that surround us day to day. Thanks for being a good citizen. And inspiring me that day. I still think of it on my drive to work.......and finally decided to write. Everyone deserves a CHEERS for their good deeds. No matter how small.

day. When we waved at you, you said something - even though we couldn’t hear it, we’re pretty sure it was crazed profanities of one kind or another. You seem totally normal and well-adjusted. Let’s get coffee sometime.

Dentist Office Briana, we talked for a bit while waiting at the dentist a couple months ago, we are both from California, should have asked for your number, lets get together!

You Saw Me

laughter, adventures, fun, love and tears. You truly are my match made in Heaven and I am blessed to be your wife. You offer me support, encouragement and have stood by my side through good times and not so good times. I love you more than words could ever express. I look forward to our future together full of many more wonderful memories. You will always be my “Mr. Amazing”, my DOUBLE RAINBOW ALLLLLL THE WAY ACROSS THE SKY!! =D Love, Almond Joy

Great Floors in the Valley. To the most handsome gentleman that helped me pick out carpet for my rental house, which the previous tenants ruined. You were very kind, professional and understanding of my situation. I believe your name was Mike? If you would like to help me choose more carpeting for my other homes, please respond. Supplement Store I saw you. Supplements store. Gym regularly. You took my parking spot one day, I laughed and wasn’t sure if your truck would fit there, but as I left, I waved. I kick myself whenever I don’t make eye contact with you, smile at you, say Hi or get your name. Having more friends is always nice. Please feel free to stop and talk to me, you should know who you are by now. PJ’s To the girl that was standing at the service desk last Friday at about 5pm at Safeway on 29th and southeast blvd, you mentioned you worked at PJ’s and IHOP. I was wondering if I could have my breath back…because you took it away when I met you, coffee sometime. I would really like to get to know you, I just got a really good vibe when I met you. Bon Jovi You: maroon shirt working security. Me: section 104, purple sweater and offered to buy you a beer. You know where I live, come find me.

Mysterious Myra I met you at Andy’s at the end of October. I hope to see you there again. I like your knitted hat and scarf.

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” Priest Lake Porta-Potty Hottie: Tall, brown bearded Ranger at Priest Lake. Waiting outside the Porta-Potty at Lionhead to do my usual cleaning rounds. You exited and locked eyes with me. My words caught in my throat, mostly because of the stench. You; medium height, dirty brown hair piled on top of your head in a hopeless knot, no makeup, look like you just woke up. I wish the smell had not been so strong, I might have struck up a delightful conversation with you. Come to Priest often? There aren’t a lot of women up here, especially ones willing to use the Porta-potty. If you visit again I would love to show you around the fresher smelling side of Priest Lake. Neato Broken Mic Arriving late, right before the last poet rocked the broken mic, with your beautiful smile and happy presence, you drew attention of the crowd. Quickly sipping mulled wine, you suggested your friends to out Twigg at the mall. I’m grateful I got to partake in your Twiggin’ adventure. Mojito was sweet. You were sweeter.

If you have any amazing stories from the I SAW YOU section, send them to ChrisB@inlander.com because we are going to be doing a story about them. Thanks!

Barter Faire Person “Yes, we were at the end of the Blue Lane - Lost your business card, will be in Chewelah November 30+December 1, at the Arts + Crafts Show . Let’s chat over coffee, drinks,You / Me + reconnect/ Hope to see you there??”

Cheers Fireman To The Rescue A huge, super-sized thank you/cheers to the Fireman that pushed my car out of the intersection of Trent and Argonne on Tuesday morning, the 12th of November. My car stalled and wouldn’t start, a tow truck was on the way but in the meanwhile folks stuck behind me were none too happy. Thank you for your assistance, kindness, and concern. Signed, the grateful lady in the Mercedes-Benz.

Genevieve You’re awesome. Dave Best Mom Thanks for being the best mom in the world. I love you. I can’t wait for WWE in December. I’m excited. And I can’t wait to see John Cena vs Ryback. We love you from JAYMES and RYLAN. Veterans Helping Veterans Thank you to Veterans “S” and “S” at SFCC for finding and returning a fellow Veterans wallet! It saved us a lot of hassle to renew ID, etc. You went to a lot of effort to contact the VA and report that you had found it and they in turn relayed the information to us! You are AWESOME!!!!!! You Life Me Up much like a cairen that requires a delicate balance to stand strong. Warding off destruction, yet marking a path, beholding beauty.

RE: Augusta and Raymond I saw Jeers you and see you everyday there. You are about 5’2, beautiful hazel but sometimes green eyes, and Stop Sign To a neighbor a few you are the best thing that has houses down... It was the morning ever happened to me. You make of November 13th, and I assume we everyone around you feel better were both on our way to work. You about themselves with the way were behind me, and followed me you laugh and smile. I love every out of our neighborhood. Stop sign minute I get to spend with you #1 for you was no problem! THANK and want to spend even more time YOU! We both turned, and you with you. I have seen you for over decided that me going 30 MPH 6 years now and you are more wasn’t fast enough for you. (The and more beautiful everyday. I speed limit is 25. My bad...) Riding have seen you for the last 4 years my a** won’t make me go faster. As become the absolute best mom I slowed down for stop sign #2, that our child could have ever asked for. I know that I have made mistakes but I want to and need to change for us. I know that I have hurt you and I know I can’t take any of it back but I wish everyday that I could so I don’t ever have to see you hurt again. Submit your Cheers at Come back to me and let me prove inlander.com /sweet all of this to you. I love you very very and be entered to win: much.

Be Cheerful! ...get free sweets

Environmentally Friendly Runner I #25 Division Bus 11/12/13 night saw you running north on Belt, around 8:00 you were going to the small blonde woman, near Shadle, mall. We had a nice conversation re: a couple Wednesdays ago, on my work experiences. I am wondering drive to work. You were running - if you would like to continue the which made me think about how I conversation over coffee? Courtesy of should be - as I watched you stop Happy 1st Anniversary and pick up an empty bottle in To My German Chocolate. the gutter. It was garbage day, so I SAW YOU: Standing outside our Thank you for choosing everyone’s trash cans and recycling ground-level office window, just… me! ...... to share your Winners drawn bi-weekly at random. bins were out. I wondered if you staring in at us. It’s not one-way Must be 18 or older to enter. would just throw it in the first can glass, so we could see you clear as “I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

1 Dozen “Cheers” Cupcakes


Jeers

Jeers

Jeers

looking BOTH ways twice due to the thick fog and it being the main road through town, coming to a complete stop, LIKE YOU ARE SUPPOSE TO DO, you had the audacity to HONK! Wow, lady... It is unpatience drivers like you who cause accidents! Lucky for you, you can sign up at a local driving school for $425 to relearn, you obviously forgot, what a stop sign is for. I thought about giving you the benefit of the doubt, maybe you were late for work? The more I thought about it, the more pissed off I became, and I hoped you WERE late for work! I assume we’ll be seeing a lot more of each other, unless you move. (CROSSING MY FINGERS!) And the next time you honk at me for abiding the rules of the road, I won’t just flip you the bird.

German Shepherd for years in Otis Orchards. One day it was gone and I thought that poor dog is finally free. Now, to my horror, you have gotten a new puppy and he is in the exact same spot. What is wrong with you people? How can he be your watch dog on a chain?

cookie. We think it’s going to be a good day. Until we draw hearts on the door to the freezer and are suddenly treated like villainous degenerates. One of you smugly asks if we are going to clean up what we drew, and I wonder what you could possibly mean. Seriously? You want me to clean up hearts drawn in condensation? And you even have the nerve to threaten to call the cops. Yes, SPD is really going to care. You say that customers complained, well I don’t believe you for a second. I think you saw my boyfriend and I, smiling and laughing, despite our troubles and scars, and you just had to put us in our place. Nothing disgusts me more than people who attempt to make other people FEEL BAD for just being here. You are the ones who should be ashamed of yourselves. We weren’t harming anyone and you came along and pooped all over our hearts. You are terrible people. When you sleep at night, are you better than everyone else in your dreams? Or is that just a lie you believe in your waking life to make yourself feel better?

Disgusting Do you know students are allowed to stand up on school buses. There is one district where this is allowed day after day, month after month. Is this a safe place to put your children? I’ve called the superintendent, transportation department, also the principal of the school where the buses are coming from. All the results were ignored. Thanks, but no thanks. How long de we have to put up with this problem. Because I love German Shepherds I drove by your beautiful chained up

Parents of Violent Kids I just wanted to take a minute of my day to say jeers to the parents that take their violent kids to the play areas at the malls. If your kid is having a bad day, is in the middle of a fit, or just doesn’t get along well with other kids maybe you should reconsider where you take your kids to play. Almost every time I take my daughter, there is some kid that is hitting other kids, scratching, bullying, or is just way to big to be playing there and is running into the little kids. I understand sometimes it is hard to control your kids, but as a parent you need to step in. When your child is going up and hitting/ attacking other kids, pay attention! Get off your damn iphone and be a parent. Management Jeers to you, angry, cold-hearted men. What a wonderful grocery store just shamed to be managed by you, and also employing the other one of you. Let me break it down for you; enter my boyfriend and I, at the local grocery store to do some shopping for ourselves and the kind woman we stay with. We stop by the bakery and the lovely, cheery sweetheart working behind the counter gives us a

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Ode To The One That Sliced My Tire On November 18, between 10 and 11:00 am, I was treating my disabled vet husband to lunch at the Jack in the Box on N. Market street. We went out the door to find my back tire had been cut. I work 2 jobs to support my family, and this was an un-necessary expense. God knows what you did, and you will pay.

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NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 61


Good Trade-Offs

Connor Simpson wanted to trade his sweaters; now he has a business BY ELI FRANCOVICH

H

An actual sweater available on the site: “If you like sailing and sweaters then this piece is for you. This sweater is a cotton knit that features two sailboats and a shoreline on both the front and back. This sweater can keep you warm on a windy boat ride or just express to your peers how much you like sailing.”

62 INLANDER NOVEMBER 21, 2013

e said school was a lot like riding a stationary bike. He’d pedal faster, work harder and still not get anywhere. So 22-yearold Connor Simpson dropped out of Whitworth University and visited a Lutheran monastery in Michigan. Two weeks later, Simpson emerged with a vision — he wanted to make bartering cool again. He didn’t go to Michigan planning on starting a company. At that point he was trying to figure out whether he wanted to keep working at GreenCupboards (which acquired an online competitor earlier this year and now operates under the corporate name etailz) or get another job. A monk at the monastery, Rev. John Cochran, pushed him to think bigger. “He thought I had more to offer,” Simpson says. “He wanted me to sit down and meditate and think about what I’m passionate about.” Simpson is passionate about sweaters. At that point, he says he had more than 60. He was known around Whitworth as the sweater guy. He was running out of closet space, but still wanted more. So he looked online to see if there was any place where he could trade sweaters. There wasn’t. “So I kind of playfully wrote a business plan,” he says. The idea was simple. An online store where you can view others’ clothing — known as closets. If you see something you like, you can propose a trade or buy the item outright. He pitched it to family and friends and responses were positive. In the spring of 2012, he entered Spokane Startup Weekend and won the Best User Interface and Design category. Using that momentum, Simpson recruited three others, promising only equity in the yet-to-be-established business. “We kind of just started working out of my basement,” Simpson says.

“We had a lot of creative energy. Planned out a lot of the things we wanted to do with the company, wrote the business plan, things like that.” After a brief attempt at trying to write their own code for the website, the three pitched their idea to the Spokane Angel Alliance and got $100,000 in seed capital. Simpson’s father Tom is president of the Alliance and a co-founder of etailz. Simpson says his dad told him he would invest the equivalent of the money he would have been spending on tuition. Three other local businesspeople invested as well. That allowed Simpson to hire Limelight Marketing Group to build the website. The beta site went live on June 20. Barters Closet now has about 300 users and 800 items. Simpson hopes to expand the scope of the site, eventually making it possible for users to trade anything — even a hammer for a sweater. Philip Glenn, 21, says he spends more than 50 hours a week doing graphic design for the company. Glenn, who started in April 2012, says it was the company’s concept that hooked him. “I like alternate methods of getting what you want,” Glenn says. “Instead of spending money to get something, I like the idea of being able to trade something for it.” Barters Closet is designed with different types of people in mind, Simpson says. For now he’s focusing on college students looking to change their style, parents with growing children, and dieting and gym groups. He says the website is modeled after online social networks, so relationships and trust can be built up. “What we’re trying to do is make bartering kind of mainstream again,” he says, “because it’s kind of a lost art.” n


NOVEMBER 21, 2013 INLANDER 63



Inlander 11/21/2013