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DO YOU KNOW OF ANY HAUNTED PLACES IN SPOKANE? TUCKER BRAUER

It’s not here, but an old movie theater I worked at in southern Idaho — the basement. There was rumors that there was a couple murders there, and these people still haunt it.

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No. Have you ever been to a place you thought was haunted? I went to the Winchester Mystery House. The wife of Winchester, who made the guns back in the 1800s, she thought she heard spirits or ghosts or something, and she had séances all the time and the ghosts told her to keep building on her house to appease the spirits.

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I don’t know. Do you have any places that you’ve been to that you think are haunted? I haven’t really been to any… Oh! The Siemers Farm at night, the pumpkin patch. Up at Green Bluff? Yeah!

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Haunted places in Spokane: The Bing Crosby Theater, the Fox Theater, the Garland Theater, the steps up on the South Hill… Do you like to go there and get haunted? I haven’t been there in years. They don’t let you go there around Halloween anymore — you have to sneak in.

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The only haunted place that I have read about is the haunted doctor’s house up on the South Hill where he would murder his patients and put them down the garbage chute or something like that. I read about it in a freakin’ weird Spokane book.

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group called the Friends of Democracy Corps (Clinton Democrats, mostly) has come out with a most thoughtful and disinterested study of today’s Republican Party. The writers begin: “If you want to understand the government shutdown and the crisis in Washington you need to get inside the base of the Republican Party.” Their study relies heavily on Republican Party member focus groups. The writers, Stan Greenberg, James Carville and Erica Seifert, open with the general observation that today’s GOP base should be viewed not as a cohesive whole but as a kind of political confederation. They are united around some common concerns, but they differ on many policy fronts — call them “states” of Republicanism: “Evangelicals,” “the Tea Party,” and “Moderates.” The writers listed the key findings: Republicans all associate Obama with ever-bigger government; they see the Democrats creating, especially though health care, yet one more “dependent minority which will give them a governing majority”; and, in one interviewee’s words, “the problem is Republicans failing to stop [Obama].” Here, however, emerge the fault lines within the confederation. The Evangelicals have “a deep sense of cultural and political loss,” the loss of community and a “deep cultural rot.” Homosexuality is very threatening to Evangelicals. Tea Party Republicans, however, don’t care all that much about any of these social issues; their focus is on “loss of liberty and decline of responsibility.” They are much more concerned about big government, regulations and dependency. And the Moderates, which the writers estimate make up only about a quarter of the party membership? They remain committed on “market-based economics.” But on social issues, not only do they not share the concerns of the Evangelicals, they actually support many of the very policies that the religious right abhors, e.g., gay marriage and immigration reform. The writers found that the “the base (all three parts) believe that they are losing politically and losing control of the country.” The words used by focus group participants were “worried,” “discouraged,” “scared” and “concerned.”

T 6 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

he writers have produced a 30-page report, and I can’t do it justice in a single column. That noted, a few observations. First, while it might come as a big surprise to the so-very-troubled GOP, I must say that I don’t know of a single Democrat (and I know more than a few) who regard Barack Obama to be even a flaming liberal, let alone a socialist. His own base views him sitting not much to the left of the likes of Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. Consider: Ike endorsed the New Deal. He

created an agency that is today the Department of Health and Human Services, now responsible for administering the health reform law. He undertook the single largest public works project in the history of the country — the Interstate Highway System. He enforced integration on Arkansas. It was his nominee to the Court, Earl Warren, who wrote the Brown v. Board of Education decision. Ike also ended the Korean War, but did so by accepting that Truman’s containment strategy was preferable to what his conservative “base” really wanted: “making the world safe for democracy” by any force necessary. He forced the South Korean regime to accept the same deal that the Truman Administration had already negotiated (and were being called “Commies” for their trouble). And Nixon? My goodness; Dick dined with Mao and with Zhou. He created the conservatives’ nemesis, the Environmental Protection Agency. He signed into law the Occupational Safety and Health Act, also a conservative target. Nor should we forget that Nixon had his own “Obamacare,” which likely would have become law had Ted Kennedy not insisted on a broader bill (which he later regretted). Given their litany of woes, instead of denouncing Obama, Republicans ought to praise him for taking on this festering economic and social problem — a problem that has needed to be fixed for a long time, i.e., that we spend too much and our results are comparatively poor.

B

y denigrating this family man, this slightly left-of-center Democrat, the GOP looks only at shadows on the cave wall. Their paranoid hatred for Obama is actually selfdefeating. Yes, they are “losing control,” and yes, “community” is under siege; but Barack Obama has nothing to do with it. He has become a diversion, a kind of placebo anxiety pill. What’s causing loss of control and community? Among the candidates are globalization, technology, Wall Street, materialism and environmental degradation, with urbanization cutting several ways. Setting aside that nothing can ever justify shutting down the government nor risking U.S. credit, the paradoxical truth of the matter that is that if loss of control and community are their concerns, in Obama they have perhaps their biggest ally. On the list of “family men” and presidents with a communitarian instinct and personal appreciation for the importance of gaining control, Obama has to be at the top. 


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Not Enough “We” BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

“W

e the people of the United States…” So starts a story that continues to be written every day. Along the way, there have been ups and downs, war and peace, heroes and kooks, but we have generally worked, for 237 years now, toward a more perfect union. I think it’s because of that one word at the start of the Preamble to our Constitution: “We.” That’s a powerful name to encompass common cause, shared prosperity and the whole being bigger than the parts. United we stand. Somehow “We” has given way to “Me,” however, leading to a big “Sorry, We’re Closed” sign hanging over our nation today. But the “Me” was there at the start, too, right in the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson’s indictment of royal, decadent Europe. That’s where he threw down the then-revolutionary notion that all men hold “certain, unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” Of course Jefferson added, “to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among men,” but everyone likes to remember the “Liberty” part most of all. We’ve even got a whole Statue of Liberty devoted to “Me.” So our my-way-or-the-highway politics aren’t a complete surprise: It’s “Me” on the steroids of unlimited election spending and endless campaigns. It’s Thomas Wolfe’s “Me Generation” finally putting the “Boom” in Baby Boomers. And if this was a movie, the catchphrase could be: “Works for me!” The father of our country worried about the “Me” — especially in the form of me-first factions that we call political parties. He hated them. Parties, George Washington warned in his Farewell Address, can “become potent engines, by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people and to usurp… the reins of government…” Sound familiar? Maybe America needs therapy? Psychoanalyst Viktor Frankl survived the Holocaust, so he viewed America as the hero — even as he saw our inner conflict. He analyzed our character in Man’s Search for Meaning. “Freedom,” he wrote, “is not the last word. Freedom is only part of the story and half of the truth. Freedom is but the negative aspect of the whole phenomenon whose positive aspect is responsibleness. In fact, freedom is in danger of degenerating into mere arbitrariness unless it is lived in terms of responsibleness.” Degenerating into arbitrariness? Um, we’re already there, Doc. Perhaps a Statue of Obligation could remind us that balance is the key to America — between the freedom and the responsibility, the “Me” and the “We.” Until then, it’s left to the vast majority of us who live that balance to embrace and defend that crucial little word: “We.” 

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COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

Snow: Something to look forward to or to dread? ALAN PATTERSON: Real snow, yes! Slushy bone-cold teaser snow, no. ANNA MARIE MARTIN: Dread. Although, driving in snow is fun... scratch that. Dread. JENNIFER WILLIAMS: Love it! I grew up in Seattle and I love it that we have all four seasons here! AUSTIN LEVI ROBB: Looking forward to it! If one doesn’t like it, why live here? California is still where you left it... JACK OHMAN CARTOON

REALLY,

SHANE MAGGART: Both! Love it at first, hate it later in the season. That’s part of living in a four-season climate, though.

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK.

LYNETTE BISHOP: Dread!! No thanks!! BARBARA DOUGLAS: Love it! Bring it on! KATE LASSWELL: Depends — are we talking endless snow, like a bad Lionel Richie duet played on repeat from October through April? Or are we discussing some well-timed glorious couple months of attractive snowfall? Because I’m all for the second one.

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JENNIFER VINCENT: For me, small amounts are more than enough. Trying to navigate it in a wheelchair is very challenging!! AARON ROGERS: First month is great! After that keep it in the mountains. My low back is already feeling it.

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LETTERS

GIVE THEM A JOB

Larry Waters 208-762-6887

SHELL DUDLEY: Dread, and California is too liberal and expensive so until I find something better I learn to deal with it.

I feel the kids on the streets (“It Takes a Village,” 10/3/13) are there for more than one reason. They can blame their parents, society, whatever they choose, but they want their independence. They will sacrifice food, warmth, shelter… whatever, sometimes, to gain that independence. It’s also a part of rebellion. True, I had a father who was not kind to me, and I can’t say that I wouldn’t have left home had I been of the age to do so. I think a solution is that truly they do want recognition. A need to be “needed” and “of importance” to someone, anyone. If they are going to be on the streets, maybe they could use a job. Perhaps a “sidewalk deputy” of some sort. They could report to the police, have a

special code number they can use on a pay phone, and be rewarded with meals, a night in a hotel (to see what normal feels like again with a clean bed and shower) and even a movie ticket. They could become the “eyes” of Spokane, not only to report crime, but needs of areas and neighborhoods regarding security. Now, that’s a need? Not enough police force in Spokane, I have read. If they felt they were “upholding” the law, maybe they would become peacemakers, lawabiding citizens of importance. JUDITH A. YANCEY Spokane, Wash.

ELISABETH WEISNER SIMONS: This Texan dreads it. It will be my first winter here and I really don’t know what to expect. I’m trained and experienced in dealing with hurricanes and tornados, but have no idea what to do with snow! KELLY J STOPHER: Depends on who is mayor — one who wants to get reelected and is smart enough to plow the streets or one who doesn’t. NANCY LAZARUS TAYLOR: I love it; it’s the other people driving in it that I dread. 


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COMMENT | SATIRE

Grizzlies and Fire Ants BY ANDY BOROWITZ

A

s the partial government shutdown grinds on, Americans remain deeply divided over what kind of wild animal they would most like to see Congress mauled by, according to a new poll released earlier this week. While a majority of Americans say they would enjoy seeing Congress torn limb from limb by a ferocious bear, there is disagreement over which species of bear would be best suited for that assignment. When asked, “What kind of bear would do the best job of savaging Congress with its fearsome paws?”, Americans gave grizzly bears the highest job-approval rating, followed by polar bears. Black bears were a distant third. But the poll showed that there also was strong support for the idea of Congress being set upon by a pack of rapacious animals, with rabid hyenas the first choice of many

respondents, followed by feral dogs and cats. While insatiable, bloodthirsty mammals were most often cited as the animals Americans would like to see eviscerate Congress, there was significant support for another scenario, involving Congress being consumed by a swarm of predatory insects. Fifteen percent of those surveyed “strongly agreed” with the statement, “Being torn limb from limb by a grizzly bear or devoured by a pack of rabid hyenas is too good for these people. They should be eaten, very slowly, by a colony of hungry fire ants.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | FOOD

The Prize Goes To… BY JIM HIGHTOWER

A

s Lily Tomlin has noted, “No matter how cynical you get, it’s almost impossible to keep up.” For example, imagine if a group announced that this year’s “World Environmental Prize” will be awarded to BP for its unique contribution to the ecology of the Gulf of Mexico. Too absurd, you say? Right, but try this one: An Iowa group announces that the “World Food Prize” will go to Monsanto for pushing its patented, pricey, genetically tampered Frankenseeds on impoverished lands as an “answer” to global hunger. This would be so morally perverse that the “cyn” in cynical would be spelled S.I.N. Yet it’s actually happening. Rather than encouraging sustainable farming and self-sufficiency in impoverished communities as a way to alleviate poverty and malnutrition, the World Food Prize has been “won” by a profiteering, biotech, seed-and-chemical monopolist that’s the freakish opposite of sustainability. Monsanto is globally infamous for bullying family farmers, bribing and corrupting governments, stiffing indepen-

dent scientific inquiries into its hokum, running false ads and fraudulent PR campaigns and going all-out to keep consumers from knowing that the crops produced by its seeds contain alien, bioengineered DNA and have not been tested for long-term health and environmental problems. Why would this avaricious outfit get any sort of award, much less one that can give it a false legitimacy as a corporate “savior” for the world’s poor? Perhaps because Monsanto is a major funder of the World Food Prize. Indeed, the foundation that hands out the award is headquartered in downtown Des Moines, Iowa, in a historic building that recently got a spiffy remodeling, thanks to a $5 million donation from — you guessed it — Monsanto. How cynical is that? Even Lily Tomlin wouldn’t have imagined it. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 11


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12 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013


I

Michael Cannon

Raising the Stakes As the election nears and money pours in, Spokane’s City Council races get contentious BY HEIDI GROOVER Candace Mumm speaks at a forum hosted by the Spokane Alliance earlier this month. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

n 30 battering seconds, they’re targeted for backing from unions, support from the Spokane Tribe, tax votes and property crime increases. “Spokane can’t afford a council bought and paid for by outside special interests,” a deep voice says over photos of Spokane City Councilman Jon Snyder and candidate Candace Mumm. The ads, airing on local TV and paid for in part by a political action committee for which Mayor David Condon helps fundraise, are the latest in what has become a fiercely contentious campaign season for two seats on the Spokane City Council. In response to the ads, Snyder’s campaign manager told supporters “serial killers get better treatment on TV.” Mumm chided her opponent, Michael Cannon, saying he should call for the ads to be taken off the air. Meanwhile, he’s continued to criticize her union support and called her “ill-prepared” and “wishy-washy.” The race between Cannon and Mumm for the 3rd District and another, where Snyder is defending against a challenge from John Ahern, are attracting big-name money and attention. That’s because, while nonpartisan, they have the potential to shift the balance of the council from the current 4-3 conservative majority. In the last year the group has voted 4-3 on significant issues, like the 2013 budget and reorganization of the city’s police and fire departments that created more positions exempt from civil service. Candidates say voters’ choices next month — for conservative candidates backed by the mayor or liberals supported by Council President Ben Stuckart — will set the council’s tone for the years to come. Cannon and Mumm have raised more than $130,000 between them as they vie for the seat representing northwest Spokane being vacated by conservative Nancy McLaughlin. Cannon, who sat on Condon’s transition team, now works as a manager at Bank of America Merchant Services and chairs the city’s Housing and Human Services Board. Mumm, a former financial advisor, TV reporter and city Plan Commission member, is now CEO of a housing development company. She worked as a spokeswoman for former Mayor Mary Verner when Condon challenged her and for Democrat Rich Cowan, who lost a bid against U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers last year. Since the start of the campaign, Cannon and Mumm have said improving public safety will be the biggest issue facing the city in the coming years. But both say they’re generally happy with the mayor’s 2014 budget, which proposes hiring 25 new police officers and renewing services at fire station No. 9 on the South Hill. Mumm says she’s still worried that long emergency response times in north Spokane are causing insurance costs to increase, demonstrating a need for improved service in fast growing areas like Five Mile. She says she wants to learn more about the mayor’s fire task force, which released its final report in August, but doesn’t yet have ideas for paying for improved service. Cannon says he’s unsure about the mayor’s proposal to take a 2 percent property tax increase because he wants more information about how it would be spent. (The city can increase property taxes 1 percent each year, but since it didn’t do so last year, it can now increase them by 2 percent.) Condon has said he wants to direct property tax increases at capital spending, most immediately for new police cars. Even with that information, Cannon is unsure. “The citizen posture is, ‘Convince us 2 percent is necessary,’” he says. “I’m not convinced either way.” ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 13


Sunday, Oct 20 NAMI

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NEWS | ELECTION 2013 “RAISING THE STAKES,” CONTINUED... Mumm says she supports taking the 1 percent increase, but if she was on the council she would push for it to be spent on more officers than the mayor’s proposed 25, instead of on equipment. Both say they supported the council’s recent votes aimed at the downtown core, but split on the question of strengthening the city’s sit-lie law. The set of new and amended ordinances the council passed prohibit unruly conduct at the STA Plaza, skateboarding on sidewalks and having vehicle prowling tools. The sit-lie ordinance amendment, postponed because of constitutional concerns, would extend the hours of the city’s current sit-lie ordinance to outlaw sitting or lying on downtown sidewalks except between 3 and 6 am. Some have worried the move could effectively outlaw homelessness. Cannon says he supports the change as a way to “decrease criminal activity downtown” and believes police would try to get homeless people access to services before arresting them under the ordinance. Mumm says she’s worried about the scope of expanding the ordinance, pointing first to the non-homeless population. “If we’re sitting there getting ready to watch the Lilac Parade, does it apply to us?” she says. “It’s a fairness issue.” (The ordinance, as on the books now and under the proposed changes, excludes people “participating in or attending a parade, festival, performance, rally, demonstration, meeting or similar event.”) The two differ again on a trend at City Hall toward creating more exempt employee positions — those appointed by the mayor instead of hired through the civil service testing process. This year, the council has approved such changes in the police, fire and parks departments. Cannon says he believes allowing department heads to have more power to hire and fire small numbers of top employees brings flexibility and efficiency. Mumm says the “protections [of civil service] outweigh the lack of flexibility.” “When the public dollars are at stake and the public trust, it’s

City Councilman Jon Snyder, left, and challenger John Ahern important to have the public involved through the Civil Service Commission,” which oversees the civil service process, she says. Recent moves around the Office of Police Ombudsman and a contract with the Spokane Police Guild have brought the question of police oversight back to the forefront. After the city announced it had reached a tentative agreement with the guild, the council held off on a proposal from Councilman Steve Salvatori that would have given the ombudsman independent investigative powers, which local voters supported in a city charter amendment in February. Instead, the council amended Salvatori’s ordinance to only establish an ombudsman commission, saying they’ll discuss further authority once the agreement is approved by the guild and becomes public. While the timeline is unclear, there’s a chance that could happen after new councilmembers are seated. Mumm and Cannon both acknowledge they weren’t armed with the same information about the agreement the council had when it voted, but Cannon calls the vote to amend Salvatori’s ordinance “perplexing and disappointing” and says he would have voted to pass the original ordinance. Mumm says she doesn’t know how she would have voted on that. Both say they support indepen-

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dent investigative authority for the ombudsman and would vote against a police contract that doesn’t include such authority. Cannon criticized Mumm on this issue after she was asked at a KSPS debate whether she would approve a contract without independent investigations and didn’t respond definitively. He’s also gone after her for taking campaign contributions from the Spokane Tribe, despite saying she has no position on the tribe’s controversial casino project near Fairchild Air Force Base. Mumm says she doesn’t believe the issue is city business. “This is going to be something decided at the state and county level,” Mumm says. “I support Fairchild, but this is not a city issue.”

I

n the District 2 race, Ahern’s name recognition from a decade in the state House of Representatives has secured him nearly $23,000 in campaign contributions, including from the House Republican Organizational Committee and the Republican Party of Spokane. During his time in Olympia, Ahern sponsored bills that strengthened anti-drunk-driving laws and funded a veterans’ home in Eastern Washington in 2001. He also was outspoken against same-sex marriage and abortion. (Once, while in the Legislature, he asked a group of Spokane high school students lobbying for Planned Parenthood, “How many unborn babies have you guys killed in the last year?”) Now, he says, that time in the Legislature can serve Spokane. “I’ve made some real good friends, both Republicans and Democrats,” says Ahern, 78. “I could be an adjunct lobbyist at no charge to the city.” Snyder, who unsuccessfully ran for a seat in the state House last year, is a first-term councilmember who emphasizes his focus on public transportation and making the city more pedestrianand bike-friendly. He supports Spokane Transit Authority’s 20year plan and a 2015 ballot measure to fund it. He acknowledges that he and Ahern agree on many issues, but says he has more energy for the job. “This is a hard job. This is a bigger than a full-time job masquerading as a part-time job,” says Snyder, 44. “It takes time and effort and energy and hours to do it effectively. You need to be able to listen to folks. My opponent thinks this whole race is about ideology.” While Snyder voted against adding more positions in the police, fire and parks departments exempt from civil service rules, Ahern says he favors the push toward more mayor-appointed positions. He worries there may be people who are more qualified for a job, but do poorly on civil service tests. Snyder says he believes the civil service system could be improved. When pushed for specifics, he points to an effort led by Stuckart to study the system for potential upgrades. Ahern has focused his talking points on making the city more business-friendly, though his pitch hasn’t changed much since before the primary. He wants to convene a group of local business owners to ask what regulations they’d like to see changed or done away with. He’d also ask others in City Hall to choose more local businesses when awarding contracts, but says he wouldn’t push for a formal policy change. “I think they’ll get the message pretty quickly,” Ahern says. Snyder says he’s already worked to make the city more welcoming to business and development. During his time on the council, he and Councilwoman Amber Waldref pushed for a rule change that allows renovated buildings to use fire hydrants across the street instead of mandating that owners go through the expensive process of installing a new hydrant directly in front of a renovated building. Ahern says he would have done even more, though he’s not sure of specific regulations he would change. He also says he would have been a “lot more forceful” on public safety issues, like cuts to police staffing in last year’s budget. (Snyder points out that he voted against that budget because of cuts, but lost 4-3.) “What we’ve got at stake here is a vision for Spokane,” Snyder says. “Are we going to invest in our future … and make decisions for the most amount of people in our community?” n heidig@inlander.com

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

An 11-year-old Fort Colville Elementary student was found guilty last Friday of conspiring to commit first-degree murder after he plotted to kill a female classmate in February “because she was really annoying.”

PHOTO EYE FIND YOUR BREATH

2.

Police say a man was shot and killed in Hillyard last Tuesday after he threatened another man who had agreed to exchange a Blu-ray player for pills and sex with the victim’s girlfriend.

3.

The U.N.-backed Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which is overseeing the destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons, received the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize.

4.

Police used pepper spray and “flash-bang” devices on hundreds of college students in Bellingham over the weekend after the partiers refused to disperse and began throwing beer bottles, cans, cinder blocks and lawn chairs at officers, police cars and a city bus.

5.

Kathy Shellabarger, left, and Patti Sooy, right, take part in a free yoga class that closed down a block of Main Avenue and attracted about 100 people on a brisk Saturday. The event was a part of last week’s grand opening of yoga apparel giant lululemon’s new downtown store.

DIGITS

58

MacBook Air laptop computers stolen from Evergreen Elementary in Mead last week, valued at about $69,000. Police say three brothers, 8, 14 and 15, have admitted involvement and 52 laptops have been returned.

250,401

SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

As the government shutdown continues and a potential default looms, members of Congress continue to scramble for a plan to reopen the government and potentially change certain provisions of Obamacare. Despite optimism over a Republican proposal early this week, the White House said Tuesday that negotiators were “far from a deal.”

ON INLANDER.com Signatures turned in to the Washington Secretary of State by supporters of Initiative 594, which would expand background checks for gun purchases.

What’s Creating Buzz

CONTEST: The 2013 Inlander Short Fiction Contest is here. The theme is “Bridges,” and we need your stories by Nov. 22. We’ll print our favorites in December. Learn more on the blog.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Friends and Enemies A critic of Spokane Public Schools gets a big payout; plus, Inslee touts “cap and trade”

FLAWED RECORDS

Laurie Rogers has been a long-time critic of SPOKANE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. She doesn’t like the way math is taught. She doesn’t like the adoption of Common Core standards. She wrote an entire book called Betrayed: How the Education Establishment has betrayed America and what you can do about it. And now, the district that she has been so frustrated with has agreed to pay her $130,000. Rogers had sued Spokane Public Schools, accusing it of failing to respond correctly to a 2011 public records request. And the district realized she was right and needed to pay her. Mark Anderson, associate superintendent, says the district learned they made several mistakes, including incorrectly redacting personal email addresses, failing to include an index explaining every redaction and omitting requested district emails before 2008. In response to the challenge of increasing records requests, Anderson says the district’s hired a staffer with more experience dealing with records requests. It’s also created a committee to look at other ways to make records more requests more efficient. This past legislative session, Spokane Public Schools supported a bill that would have allowed a Superior Court to reject certain records requests and would have placed re-

strictions on the amount of time that public agencies could spend fulfilling such requests. The intent of the district’s support for the bill, Anderson says, was not to limit transparency. It was to figure out a way to address the balloning cost. Last year, he says, the district spent $350,000 dealing with records requests. — DANIEL WALTERS

UNDER FIRE

A 28-year veteran of the Spokane Fire Department has filed a $2.5 million claim against the city alleging unlawful retaliation in the wake of his recent termination over accusations he threatened a fellow firefighter via email and violated city weapons policies. City officials announced the firing of CAPT. KEVIN SMATHERS last week, alleging Smathers sent a threatening message to an SFD lieutenant over his personal email. A six-month internal investigation determined Smathers had also violated city policies by keeping a set of brass knuckles in his work vehicle and three city-owned firearms in a personal safe. Attorney Bob Dunn, who has handled several termination lawsuits against the city, is representing Smathers. Dunn describes Smathers as a highly decorated employee facing “payback” for previously reporting the lieutenant’s

driving under the influence. Dunn calls the allegations “bogus,” arguing Smathers made no threat of violence in his email message and never violated any specific regulations. An arbitration hearing may be pending on the matter, Dunn says. The city has not yet filed a response to the retaliation claim. — JACOB JONES

CARBON CONTROL

To get the state closer toward meeting an ambitious set of goals aimed at curbing GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said he would support a statewide “carbon cap and trade” system at a meeting Monday with the bipartisan Climate Legislative and Executive Workgroup. A cap and trade system gives businesses a financial incentive to reduce their carbon emissions below state limits by allowing them to trade or sell any unused pollution “credits.” “My preference at the moment is to have an economywide cap on emissions and use market-based mechanisms to distribute that allocation right for the emissions,” Inslee told the Olympian. “I think it’s a preferable way because it combines the certainty of the cap or an absolute limit with using the market as the most efficient way to address where the allocation of the emissions are.’’ Among Inslee’s other suggestions to fight global warming were policies limiting the carbon content of transportation fuels, plans to phase out coal-fired power plants, a push for energy efficient construction, and potential pilot programs to modernize the state’s transportation system. In 2008, the Washington Legislature adopted targets requiring the state to cut global warming-producing gases by 2020, 2035 and 2050. A final report from the workgroup concluded that the state won’t meet its benchmarks with current state and federal policies in place. — DEANNA PAN

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NEWS | ELECTION 2013

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By its official explanation, Proposition 1 is about protecting Fairchild. But that’s only part of the story.

Time to Decide As ballots go out this week, here are some of the issues you’ll have to consider SPOKANE COUNTY PROPOSITION 1

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If you just read the text below the “Levy to Protect Fairchild Air Force Base” property tax, it’s easy to come away confused on what exactly the proposition is supposed to do. The clearest the text gets is saying that the property tax — 6.5 cents for every $1,000 in assessed value — would be used exclusively to protect Fairchild by mitigating current encroachments, paying related costs.” More specifically, it’s for a land purchase: Around $18 million raised to purchase and shut down the Aero, Campbell A, Campbell B, Lawson, Lone Pines, Mountain View and Sands mobile home parks, currently located in a crash zone around Fairchild Air Force Base. “You’re limited in terms of ballot language in terms of 75 words,” County Commissioner Al French says. “We could have listed all of the parks individually, but then we would have exceeded the 75-word limit.” The Air Force frowns upon dense residential developments located in crash zones, and the commissioners have worried it could imperil the future of the base. Despite intimations to the contrary, encroachment was not a major reason Fairchild lost out on the first round of decisions regarding which bases would host new refueling tankers. While the base lost a small number of total points because of encroachment in the initial narrowing-down process, the Air Force has clarified on multiple occasions that it was “not a key finding or a major consideration in the selection of preferred and reasonable alternatives.” But French argues that encroachment could play a much larger role during future rounds of base closures, where land use is a primary consideration. “In a [base closure] process, every single mark against you could be the difference where you stay open or not,” French says. “That’s the point I’m trying to make.”


If the initiative passes, French says the county has reserved $6.5 million from the levy to assist the 188 current residents in moving their mobile homes or finding new housing. Once the parks have been closed, the county plans to sell the property to the private sector for uses that won’t encroach upon Fairchild. While the county has won the support of Greater Spokane Inc. and the mayor of Airway Heights, the proposition didn’t get the endorsements from the group of nonprofits that hoped to construct new housing for the residents displaced by the closure of the parks. During the past legislative session, the group was not successful in obtaining the state dollars for the housing and has concerns about where residents will go if the parks shut down. — DANIEL WALTERS

WASHINGTON INITIATIVE 517

An initiative about initiatives? You guessed it: It’s the work of initiative guru Tim Eyman. Initiative 517, called the “Protect the Initiative Act,” would make “interfering with signature gathering” illegal. The language includes physical harassment like touching or shoving as well as yelling, blocking or “maintaining an intimidating presence” within 25 feet of a person gathering signatures or signing a petition, and says signature gatherers can operate on any public walkway or in any public building. The law also would mandate that any state or local initiative for which supporters gather enough valid signatures must make it on the ballot for a public vote, despite legal questions or challenges. (This has spawned an unlikely alliance between conservative Eyman and Envision Spokane, whose far-reaching Community Bill of Rights was blocked from the November ballot by a local judge.) I-517 also stipulates an extension of the time granted for signature gathering. Currently, proponents must turn in an initiative 10 months ahead of the next legislative session and can start gathering signatures once it’s approved by the Secretary of State. This would extend that to 16 months. Proponents like Eyman say the move will guarantee citizens’ right to petition their government, making their voices heard on issues lawmakers may oppose or refuse to take up. Opponents, who’ve raised $226,000 to supporters’ $1,500, are backed by retail and food industry groups and grocery stores. They argue the measure could infringe on free speech rights of those who’d like to voice opposition to a signature gatherer within 25 feet and would strip business owners of the right to regulate what happens in front of their doors. — HEIDI GROOVER

WASHINGTON INITIATIVE 522

Whether or not Washington becomes the first state to mandate labeling of genetically engineered foods, Initiative 522 will make state history. Supporters and opponents of I-522 have collectively raised more than $23.8 million, making this ballot measure one of the state’s most expensive initiative fights ever. Five deep-pocketed out-of-state corporations and an industry trade group are financing the No on 522 campaign. The No side has outraised labeling backers by a 3-to-1 margin, with upwards of $17 million in its coffers thanks to a recent $5 million boost from the Grocery Manufacturers Association. Biochem behemoths Monsanto and DuPont Pioneer have also poured huge sums into the fight, donating more than $4.8 million and $3.4 million, respectively. (Only three actual people have contributed to the No campaign. All are Washington residents.) The Yes on 522 campaign, on the other hand, boasts thousands of individual donors, the vast majority of whom are Washington residents. So far, they’ve given nearly $5.5 million. But about 75 percent of the Yes camp’s total cash on hand, roughly $3.8 million, comes from out-of-state supporters, including the California-based natural soap maker Dr. Bronner’s, which has contributed $1.7 million to the race. Although labeling proponents are losing the fundraising race, they’re winning the battle of public opinion. According to a September Elway Poll of 403 Washington voters, 43 percent surveyed said they “definitely” back the initiative, compared to just 21 percent who said they likely or definitely will vote against it. — DEANNA PAN

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NEWS | ELECTION 2013

Seventh District Standoff

Two Republicans square off in northeast Washington’s state Senate race BY DEANNA PAN

I

n November, voters in Washington’s sprawling 7th Legislative District will elect their next state senator: Will they choose the independent-minded, small-government, anti-tax, pro-business Republican? Or the other one? Incumbent state Sen. John Smith, who was selected in January to succeed retiring GOP veteran Sen. Bob Morton, is up against Brian Dansel, a 30-year-old Ferry County commissioner and former professional golfer. Like Smith, Dansel is a small-town conservative who’s fed up with the impasse in D.C. and politics as usual in Olympia. Unlike his opponent, Dansel hopes to convince 7th District voters the status quo is worth upending. “It’s a pretty clear choice,” he says. “The choice is between somebody who isn’t necessarily accepted by his own party — I’m not a ‘yes man’ for my party, or for lobbyists or special interests — compared to my opponent, who is.” The 7th District in Washington’s deeply conservative northeastern corner covers Stevens, Ferry and Pend Oreille counties and parts of Spokane and Okanogan counties. Dansel, a relative political newcomer who first ran for public office when he was 26, faces an uphill battle in reaching out to voters. His opponent’s pockets are lined with support from business and industry giants like Walmart and Avista Corp. So far, Dansel has been outraised by a 7-to-1 margin. In the August primary, Smith received nearly twice as many votes as Dansel, beating him in every county in the 7th by wide margins with exception of Ferry County, Dansel’s home turf, which the commissioner easily won. In the 7th, like other rural areas in Washington, unemployment and poverty rates are higher than the state average. Its natural resource-based economy is sluggish. Dansel thinks he’s the guy who can create jobs and spur the region to life. “The sum of the old guard in the Republican Party are not too keen on younger folk — that’s probably gonna get me shot there,” he says, chuckling. Dansel is a proponent of vocational training and investing in hydroelectricity. He’d like to outfit every community college in the 7th with teleconference technology, so people can testify on bills before the Legislature without making the cross-state drive. He’s also critical of the past Legislature’s drawn-out budget negotiations. Should he be elected, he says his first order of business would be ending senators’ per-diem pay if they can’t get a budget passed in time. “I feel like both sides of the aisle point fingers

at one another,” he says. “There’s not many genuine folks out there running for office, and it needs to be brought back to the people.” That’s a subtle jab at Smith, whom Dansel criticizes for having too many big-monied corporate backers. Smith doesn’t see it that way; he’s got the “job creators” on his side. Dansel also questions Smith’s business acumen. At one time, Smith operated a small cafe near the Stevens County Courthouse until went it under in 2009. He owed tens of thousands of dollars in unpaid state fees and taxes until this year. “We worked really hard for the next four years … in order to get that money back,” Smith explains, arguing that his ability to pay back his debts shows a “fair amount of skill.” Smith has also come under scrutiny after a Spokesman-Review story detailed his family’s connections to Our Place Fellowship, a Colville church whose congregants subscribe to a radical theology called “Christian Identity,” known for its anti-Semitic, white supremacist views. Smith says he doesn’t agree with the church’s racist ideology, unlike his grandfather, nor he was ever a member of its congregation. But his critics are quick to point out that his campaign has accepted at least $265 from the church’s founders, Dan and LaDona Henry. “The Henrys are longtime friends. They’re neighbors. They live a mile away,” says Smith. “There’s a lot of people who have donated to my campaign that I don’t particularly agree 100 percent on all sorts of things.” Smith, 40, a small farmer and Colville farmers market operator, makes a point not to attack his challenger. Instead, he touts his résumé as a global business consultant and the vice chair of two legislative committees. During his time in the Legislature, Smith spearheaded efforts to help ranchers recover from livestock losses after wolf attacks. He also sponsored a bill funding a Washington State University-run pilot program testing the feasibility and efficacy of heating rural schools with wood pellet stoves. To shore up the 7th District’s economy, he supports reviving the timber, manufacturing and tourism industries. “I can be effective as a voice and an advocate for the culture and values that are unique to the 7th District,” he continues. “I have the strong belief the best days are ahead of the 7th District … if we remember the principles of the American Dream.”  Visit Inlander.com to hear more from John Smith and Brian Dansel.


JOHN SMITH

HOME: Colville, Stevens County AGE: 40 JOB: Washington state senator; small, organic farmer; farmers market owner EDUCATION: Some college at Washington State University DOLLARS RAISED: $95,158 BIGGEST DONORS: Altria Client Services, Avista Corp., CalPortland Company, CVS Caremark, Echo Bay Minerals, Farmers Employees and Agents PAC, Premera Blue Cross, Walmart, Washington Chiropractic Trust PAC, Washington Restaurant Association PAC, Weyerhaeuser

BRIAN DANSEL

HOME: Republic, Ferry County AGE: 30 JOB: Ferry County Commissioner since 2011 EDUCATION: Associate degree from Walla Walla Community College DOLLARS RAISED: $13,819.13 BIGGEST DONORS: Washington Education Association; Evans Auto Rebuild; Bill McIrvin, owner of Diamond M Ranch

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10/8/13 10:35 AM


PHOTO ESSAY | HISTORY

Behind Closed Doors A LOCAL PHOTOGRAPHER’S JOURNEY INTO HARD-TO-GET-TO PLACES BY STEPHEN SCHLANGE

A

s I stood with running water at my feet in a darkened tunnel, I realized I was likely one of only a small group of people alive who had stood in this space. I was three stories below the Davenport Hotel ground floor in search of visual confirmation of the famed tunnel system beneath the streets of downtown Spokane. The project that would lead me into the less-glamorous-than-upstairsbut-equally-interesting bowels of the

22 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

Davenport Hotel began out of a selfish desire to satisfy my own curious nature. I haven’t lived in Spokane for long (7 years) so when I see an obviously old 10-story grain silo standing in the middle of a busy street (Division and Cataldo) or hear stories of underground tunnels, I want to know more and get inside to see what they’re really like. I began with just a few leads, places I was personally interested in

exploring, but as I began to research these spots the project turned into the proverbial snowball rolling down the hill. Each person I talked to and location I researched led to three more, and many of them seemed tied together by a shared history which turned the project into a fascinating peek into the backstory of Spokane. There were stories of a river flowing under downtown, fallout shelters, missile silos, brothels, Prohibition-era

bars, hidden stairways, ghosts and much more. In the end I settled on four locations that will be familiar to many people in many respects. My hope is that my photographs can reveal something new and both satisfy and pique your own curiosity. And about that tunnel system connecting downtown — it’s very real. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. Know of a place you’d like us to explore? Email editor@inlander.com.


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The tunnel under the Davenport Hotel has running water — a couple of inches deep at times — and opens up into a room with a 30-foot ceiling reaching back up toward the hotel. Here, Max Baron, chief engineer at the Davenport, explores the far end of the tunnel. The original safe from Louis Davenport’s office sits in the same place his office was, although it’s now surrounded by the valet parking garage under the hotel. 

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“Behind Closed Doors” continues next page >>

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 23


PHOTO ESSAY | HISTORY

u

On a hot summer’s day, the cool inside the Rockwood Vista Reservoir provides welcome relief down a short flight of stairs. Inside lies 2 1/2 acres of concrete pillars and pristine drinking water on the eastern edge of Spokane’s South Hill. No one was allowed within three steps of the water in order to avoid any contamination. The city has in the past hired a specialized diver who would be bleached before entering the water to perform maintanence. Pictured is city employee Eric Schafer performing a weekly chlorine residual test. When is a park not a park? When it doesn’t show up on Google Maps, and it’s covering an 11-million-gallon, drinking water tank. The Rockwood Vista Reservoir was built in 1948. u

“Behind Closed Doors” continues page 28 >>

24 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013


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To access the top of the Steam Plant, you have to climb a ladder more than 90 years old. Here, Bill Bancroft, facilities operations manager, leads the way up. FACING PAGE, MIDDLE: Bill Bancroft in front of the door leading to a tunnel system in downtown Spokane. Although there are smaller self-contained tunnel systems in the city, the tunnels originating from the Steam Plant used to heat downtown and are assumed to be the most extensive network. Access is guarded by an alarm and a locked door that even Bancroft isn’t allowed to open.

FACING PAGE, BOTTOM: The Steam Plant is said to be haunted by the ghost of a popular teacher who went missing one day while walking by the construction site in the early 1900s. Her body was never found, and it was presumed she either fell or was thrown into deep cement. Here, Bill Bancroft looks down into the shaft holding the coal elevator machinery.

“Behind Closed Doors” continues page 30 >>


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Bartender Lexi Alfonso blows dust off the bar in the basement of O’Doherty’s Irish Grille in downtown Spokane. Now relegated to a dimly lit storage area, the bar was remodeled in the 1980s when the room was used as a comedy club.

FACING PAGE: In the basement of O’Doherty’s Irish Grille lies a forgotten seal of the now defunct Brotherhood of Friends (BOF), who met there from 19401947. The BOF had thousands of members at its peak. Private clubs like the BOF were initially used to exploit a loophole in the Prohibition-era drinking laws. n

ON INLANDER.COM

See even more photos from Stephen Schlange’s journey into Spokane’s hard-to-get-to places.

30 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013


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EDITOR’S NOTE

and snowboarders BRING IT ON S kiers have been given Opening

NEWS & NOTES

17

the Inland Northwest in the coming months. We’ve got a full calendar of ski movies, ski swaps, winter parties and, of course, Snowlander Expo. Next week is the premiere of a local favorite, Warren Miller’s Ticket to Ride, slated for Oct. 25, the night before the first and biggest ski swap of the season, the Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol Ski Swap. Over here at the Inlander offices, we’re busy getting ready for the upcoming Snowlander Expo. This year, we’re stoked to announce the addition of the PowderKeg Brew Festival taking place at the Expo. Save the dates for this can’t-miss event — Friday and Saturday, Nov. 8 and 9. Stick around Saturday evening for the Spokane premiere of the Teton Gravity Research ski movie Way of Life. Area resorts are scheduling their Opening Days for a little more than six weeks from now, so it’s only a matter of time — and a little more snow — before we’re toasting our own Opening Day celebrations! Think snow!

E X P E R T A DV I C E 17

— JEN FORSYTH Snowlander Editor jen@snowlander.com

G E T T I N ’ R E A DY

M O U N TA I N PEOPLE

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Day golden tickets right here in the Northwest. Crystal Mountain opened Oct. 1 for a lucky 75 folks who wanted an early-season lift assist to inbounds hiking and skiing. Over at Stevens Pass, they opened their lift to the public for a special “Government De-Rail Session” rail jam on Oct. 5. A little closer to home, heavy rain in the valley translates to fresh blankets of snow in our area mountain ranges. And snow is the first, most important, ingredient when planning for Opening Day. Before making your way to your favorite ski resort for Opening Day, there are plenty of activities for winter enthusiasts planned all over

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OCTOBER 2013 SNOWLANDER 3


NEWS AND NOTES

Shotskis at the 2012 Snowlander Expo

CHRISTIAN WILSON PHOTO

SNOW AND BEER After a successful turnout of local snow lovers last year, the Snowlander Expo is back and looking to be even bigger the second go-around. The most notable change to the Inlander-organized event for 2013 is the introduction of the PowderKeg Brew Festival, running through the duration of the Expo. Nearly 20 local and regional breweries and cider makers will fill part of the Convention Center, offering some of the first chances to taste their new, seasonal wintertime creations. Local industry stalwarts like No-Li, Orlison, Iron Goat and many others from near and far plan to

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be there, along with a few Inland Northwest cideries, including Mead’s Twilight Ciderworks. Each of the breweries and cideries at PowderKeg will bring two selections, including a seasonal brew. Tasting packages offer the option to go for a smaller, 6 oz. tasting glass, or a full-size, 16 oz. pint glass, with packages ranging from $15-$25. Additional tasting tokens are available to purchase at the event. While the indoor beer garden area offers comfortable seating in a cozy, lodge-like setting, PowderKeg attendees also can roam the Expo floor, checking out vendors’ booths and shopping as they drink their beer and cider.

The new features planned for the 2013 Snowlander Expo aren’t limited to PowderKeg. Free winter safety clinics on avalanche survival and backcountry safety know-how are being presented by experts with Panhandle Backcountry. Part of the draw for many of last year’s Snowlander Expo attendees were the deals offered by the event’s vendors, with discounts billed as the best prices offered on new gear through the winter sports season. The same discounts and retailers return this year: Spokane Alpine Haus, Tri-State Outfitters and Wintersport, alongside newcomer the Ski Shack. Keeping with the one-stop-shop approach, the Snowlander Expo again hosts ski resorts from around the Inland Northwest and beyond, giving attendees the chance to buy season passes and get their pass photos taken. In addition, several major ski and snowboard factory reps are also on-site, offering product demos and answering questions. For some, the many chances to win free gear and prizes may be the biggest incentive to come to Snowlander this year. For those who still may need convincing, both 49 Degrees North and Red Mountain Resort are giving away free lift tickets (randomly distributed and on a limited basis) on both days to people just for walking through the door. — CHEY SCOTT Snowlander Expo and PowderKeg Brew Festival • Nov. 8 and 9, Fri from 4-9 pm, Sat from 10 am-6 pm • $7 event admission, PowederKeg tasting packages $15-$25 • Spokane Convention Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • snowlander.com/expo


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Just like that, Mt. Spokane’s ski area expansion ground to a halt. The plan was to cut KRISTIN WHITAKER 82 acres of forest from the 279 acres on the PHOTO backside of the mountain, promising a new chairlift and seven new runs for intermediate skiers. The idea of adding a chairlift to the north side of the mountain has been discussed since at least 1992. But the notion of expanding has also attracted a fervent opposition. The Save Mt. Spokane coalition, composed of groups like the Sierra Club and the Lands Council, worry that deforesting pieces of the mountain’s backside will not only remove old trees, but irrevocably fragment a sensitive ecosystem. The groups flooded the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission during the Environmental Impact Statement comment period for the project, but to no avail: The project was approved. So the group took a more unconventional tack and challenged the original 2011 classification of the planned expansion area. It worked. The Washington State Court of Appeals found that the commission should have carried out a separate impact study before changing the classification to “recreation.” “We think that whole area should have been classified natural forest. There’s old growth in there,” says Mike Petersen, executive director of the Lands Council. “They got ahead of themselves, in a rush to rubberstamp this ski-area proposal.” “I was surprised,” says Brad McQuarrie, Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park general manager. “The state has never done an [Environmental Impact Statement]. They’ve classified most all their parks — and they’ve never had an EIS.” Preconstruction on the project has already begun, and Mt. Spokane had already purchased a fixed-grip double chairlift. But now Mt. Spokane is waiting for yet another environmental review — which it is funding itself — before the most of the project can continue. “This process costs time and money for all involved,” McQuarrie wrote in a press release. “It’s a shame to be putting all this time and resource into more process instead of into making improvements in the park.” It’s going to take at least six to eight months for the report to get completed, but Mt. Spokane hopes to start construction by the 2014 ski season. But Petersen, meanwhile, believes the environmental review will be the project’s downfall. “We think it will delay it indefinitely,” Petersen says. “[The Department of Natural Resources] says this is a very special area, and you have to mitigate for that. You can’t mitigate for things like the largest old-growth stand in Spokane County.” — DANIEL WALTERS

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Watching these ski films will get you psyched for the real thing BY ELI FRANCOVICH

REGIONAL RESORTS

Season Pass Photos for Schweitzer, Mt. Spokane, Silver & 49º North

T

he ski-movie arms race continues. And powderheads couldn’t be happier. Each year we see a succession of bigger, crazier, riskier and just plain cooler videos. All moral and ethical considerations aside, it makes for some good watching and is sure to get you stoked for the season. So be sure to check out one, or all, of these upcoming films.

A scene from TGR’s Way of Life

TICKET TO RIDE

The father — or more aptly, grandfather — of modern ski/adventure movies, Warren Miller’s outdoor action empire continues. Ticket to Ride is the 64th installment in the franchise. Although the legendary director

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CRAFT BEER & CIDER FROM THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

has retired, his distinct style remains. The film takes viewers to the Alaskan Tordrillos, Iceland’s Troll Peninsula, the fjords of Greenland, the mountains of Montana and beyond. World-class athletes including Sean Pettit, Ted Ligety, Seth Wescott and Jess McMillan carve their way through jaw-dropping beauty. Ticket to Ride • Oct. 24 at 7 p.m. • $20 • Compton Union Building • Glenn Terrell Mall, Washington State University, Pullman • Oct. 25 at 6:30 and 9:30 pm • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • Oct. 26 at 7 pm • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • skinet.com/warrenmiller

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL

Hosted by Mountain Gear, this festival features selected films from November’s Banff Mountain Film Festival. Although not all the films are directly ski-related, they’re all designed to inspire and amaze the outdoor enthusiast. Because the film festival takes place just 10 days before the showing in Spokane, the exact lineup won’t be known

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until the day of. But if the trailer is any indication, there’s plenty to be excited about. Banff Mountain Film Festival • Nov. 15-17 • $15/single day $40/weekend • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • banffcentre.ca         

WAY OF LIFE

This Teton Gravity Research film is all about passion — the passion necessary to find original lines in Alaska, win an Olympic gold medal and ski harder and faster than ever before. Ultimately, it’s a passion that transcends language and nationality, linking extreme athletes all over the globe. At least that’s what they tell us. Shot on location in Jackson Hole and the Tetons, Austria, and the British Columbia backcountry, you’ll see plenty of skiing, helicopters, sick tricks, and, of course, passion. Way of Life • Nov. 8 at 8 pm • $10 • Panida Theater • 300 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • Nov. 11 at 6 pm • Spokane Convention Center, part of Snowlander Expo • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • tickets.tetongravity.com

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GEAR

FANTASTIC FOUR This quartet of versatile skis will help you have a good day in any conditions BY JEN FORSYTH

W

hen you ask area ski shop owners and employees what their standout ski is coming into this ski season, the answer is unanimous. They all answered with a ski that was somewhere between 98mm to 110mm underfoot. In an industry where simplicity is celebrated, ski manufacturers have seemed to answer with an array of skis that all seem to be similar in dimensions and construction — but are in fact all unique, especially to those who ride them. Here are four standouts that will be on the shelves this season at your local ski shops.

SALOMON STELLA

(101-104MM UNDERFOOT, DEPENDING ON LENGTH)

During a ski trip to Alta, I had the opportunity to test a pair of Salomon Stella skis. Utah was in an extended warm, dry period. I was a little hesitant, since the majority of the terrain I’d be skiing on would be hardpack, and the ski was measured at 103mm underfoot. As I cautiously made my way off the lift and immediately headed for a traverse, I wasn’t able to get a good feel for the ski. As I made my way under Mt. Baldy and continued with a 100-yard side step, I was thinking, “Wow, I hope I like these skis.” I was committed at that point. I made it to the “ski down” spot, caught my breath and made my first turn. I knew it was love right then — love at first turn. Continuing down through the crud, every movement was made with complete confidence from turn to turn. The real test for this all-mountain diva was going to be the transition from the crud to groomer hardpack. It all came down to pure carving. The easy turning and quickness made me feel like I was on a much narrower ski. The perks of this ski are the stability of having 103mm underfoot, a rockered tip and a gentle-rise tail, allowing for more edge contact, which means stability. After the first run, I knew these were the skis I’d be finishing my day on.

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ARMADA ARV TI

(97MM-99MM UNDERFOOT, DEPENDING ON LENGTH)

Armada is back at it again, taking the classic ARV and making it into a new allmountain masterpiece. Micah Genteman, owner of the Sports Creel in the Spokane Valley, explains,“They’ve beefed up the chassis with titanal (an aluminum alloy), added the new AR rocker profile and completed the project with a comp series base that altogether will bring the slopes to their knees.” Genteman skied the ARV Ti on a regular basis from mid-February though the end of the season at Mt. Bachelor, Mt. Spokane and Schweitzer.


IT’S FOR THE BIRDS Written and Directed by Joy Persoon

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LINE SICK DAY 110

The narrower version of this ski won Ski of the Year honors this season in Skiing Magazine. But locally, Genteman argues, the wider ski is a better choice. “Here in the Pacific Northwest, the 110mm scored incredibly high marks in all of the ‘rigorous’ preseason testing we put it through,” he continues, explaining why this is so: “A directional twin-tip, with a perfect blend of camber, rocker and taper, combined with Line’s legacy maple and aspen wood cores, make this an incredible ski for those off-road cruises, while still delivering a cleaving turn on the groomers and the skier-packed snow.” Genteman had about seven skiers in total, all of whom, as he explained, “are deeply varied skiers in age and ski style. It scored one of the highest scores of every ski we tested!” They skied this 110mm-waisted beast on everything from “high-speed groomers on Mt. Spokane hardpack, some deep, late-season goodness at Schweitzer and a mixed bag of about everything at Bachelor,” said Genteman.

SALOMON Q98

(94MM-98MM UNDERFOOT, DEPENDING ON LENGTH)

“You can’t beat the versatility of a ski that is 98mm underfoot,” says Rick Chatham of the Alpine Shop in Sandpoint. Chatham, part of the focus group for the wider version of this ski (the Q105, the Salomon Stella’s brother), adds that the difference between the Q105 the Q98 is the “step down sidewall” construction that “makes it easier to carve, with a softer tip and tail than comparable skis. This allows for more purchase on the snow, which gives you more grip on hardpack conditions.” Add the rocker tip with honeycomb construction, and this ski easily meets all-mountain challenges. Chatham tested these skis on a regular basis last season at Crystal Mountain and at the Northwest Demo event at Mt. Bachelor. 

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. . COMING 11 12 12 13 OCTOBER 2013 SNOWLANDER 9


MOUNTAIN PEOPLE

THANK YOU!

Thank you to the more than 500 volunteers at the 11th Annual Spokane River Clean-Up who picked up over 4 tons of trash, of which 810 pounds was recycled.

FROM POWDER TO POWDER Spokane’s John Stifter took his love of the slopes into print — and online BY ELI FRANCOVICH John Stifter says of skiiing: “It kind of gives you a reprieve from all the madness.”

Thanks To Our Sponsors:

FriendsOfTheFalls.org

A Special Thanks To: American OnSite, Emde Sports, Gonzaga University, Jensen Distributing, NoLi Brewery, Northwest Whitewater Association, Power City Electric, REI, Rings & Things, SFCC, Sierra Club Inner City Outings, Spokane Fly Fishers, Spokane Mountaineers, Spokane Regional Solid Waste System, Spokane Riverkeeper, Spokane River Forum, Spokane Transit Authority, The Lands Council, Thomas Hammer Coffee, Trout Unlimited, Veterans Conservation Corps, WA Department of Ecology, Waste Management

10 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2013

S

now or words? It’s hard for John Stifter, editor of Powder magazine and a Spokane native, to decide which has shaped his life more. “I think it was initially skiing, like that was the initial hook,” he says. “But [after time] I realized how much I enjoyed the creative process of media.” The Montana State graduate is well-versed in both. Stifter grew up hitting Schweitzer’s slopes. In high school he combined his passion for skiing and his creative muscles by making ski videos. “We just had so much fun, filming and building jumps and powder,” he says. That was in the winter of ’98/’99. After a short stint at college on

the East Coast, Stifter landed at Montana State University. While there, he applied for an internship at Powder, only to be rejected due to his lack of published writing. So he wrote for the local outdoors magazine. The next year he received a three-month internship at Powder headquarters in Southern California. “I just remember saying to myself, as I walked out of the office, this is not the last time I’m here,” he says. It wasn’t. Midway through his junior year in college he got a call from ESPN; they needed someone to help cover the X Games. “That was awesome,” he says. “That was my first big gig.” From there it was all downhill;


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soon he was a regular contributor to Powder; then in May 2004, there was a job opening for associate editor. Stifter applied and was hired. He’s been the magazine’s editor since April 2012. As editor, he says he’s been focusing on design, and the transition from a printcentric model to the digital model. “We are now invested more on the digital front than we ever have been,” he said. “Basically, you could say one of my goals is to bring the quality of the magazine to the web.” Stifter says Powder has focused more and more on avalanche education and safety. This stems, in part, from Stifter’s involvement in the February 2012 Stevens Pass avalanche that killed three experienced backcountry skiers and friends. That experience, he says, changed his outlook

on skiing. While he still loves it, he is painfully aware of the associated risks. “Losing good friends, and all of that, you realize how quickly it can go wrong,” he says. “This one thing that you’ve always held sacred suddenly turned toxic.” Despite that, he says he’s realizing a lifelong dream. His job connects him to the aspects of skiing that he’s always loved. It is, he says, a step away from ordinary-world worries. “It kind of gives you a reprieve from all the madness,” he says. “You get to hang with your family and your friends in this beautiful alpine environment.” As editor, he says he still gets to ski, even if it’s not as much as he used to. “The old adage is, if you’re not skiing 50 days a year as the Powder editor, you’re not doing your job.” 

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ski49n.com OCTOBER 2013 SNOWLANDER 11


EPIC SHOTS

A CLEAR VISION This family-owned Coeur d’Alene company makes action cameras in all the right ways BY JEFF RUTHERFORD Action footage captured on a Reel Camera.

W

hen the Baker family comes across a product they don’t quite like, they make a better version of it. At least that’s what they’ve done with their Coeur d’Alene-based company, Reel Cameras. Frustrated with products made by companies they now see as competitors, the Bakers — Caleb, Chad and their father Dan — set out to make a camera that was both technologically brilliant and easy to use. What started as a romantic ideal has turned into a reality. “The idea developed from using action cameras ourselves,” says Caleb Baker, vice president of market-

ing. “In using the existing competitor’s camera, we found the learning curve a little annoying and harder than we thought it should be.” The Bakers are all about action. The company was born from a desire to capture moments in their lives, and a hunger to create a product that allows others to effortlessly do the same. Their brand started back in 2011, with the company officially launching in June, and they’ve already seen success. Their camera, called HD Slayer, captures action whether you hold it in your hand, mount it to your board, or strap it to your chest.

Stay Connected, Wherever You Are Follow the Inlander and INHealth on Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for exclusive news, contests and more!

12 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2013


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GO TO  inlander.com/warrenmiller “It’s an action camera where tech meets easyto-use functionality,” says Caleb. But what about GoPro cameras? Caleb readily admits they have a monopoly on the action camera market, but not because of ownership of the technology. Reel Cameras do many of the same things as GoPros, and in fact have a number of completely unique features. Reel Cameras have separated buttons for easy usage, and a built-in LCD screen so you can see what you’re filming and play it back after you do. It’s the LCD screen that Caleb says often “sells itself.” The camera also offers interchangeable lenses so you can alter your field of view. With ski season closing in, products like those made by Reel Cameras will be in high demand, though Caleb says Reel’s reach goes beyond the winter sports world. They’ve seen their products used by hunters, fishers, mountain

bikers and wakeboarders. The entrepreneurial spirit clearly abounds in the Baker family. Their first sponsored outfit is Fourtrack Hunting, they’ve opened offices in Coeur d’Alene and they’re looking to grow. Caleb says he, his brother and father all have specific roles within the company, but explains that in the end, they all work as a family team of three. “We all take a pretty involved role in Reel Cameras,” he says. They’re local, they’re family and they make a sharp, competitive product. Describing their product as the “most user-friendly action camera on the market,” Caleb said something that’s a riff on the company’s slogan, but also seems to be a sort of creed for the Bakers: “Capture the moment, share it, and relive the experience.” 

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The Flying Goat The Glover Mansion/ Red Rock Catering Herbal Essence Huckleberry's Italia Trattoria Just American Desserts Masselow's Max at Mirabeau The Melting Pot Rock City Grill Saranac Public House Simply Gourmet Spencer's for Steaks & Chops Spokandy Sweet Dreams Bakery Taste of India

Epicurean Delight, the most fun black-tie event in Spokane features the most exquisite cuisine in the Northwest! www.epicureandelight.org or 509-232-4567 Proceeds from Epicurean Delight 2013 will be used to advance INBC’s life-saving mission with a portion of the funds designated to providing superior technologies and blood center education and training.

Patrols are non-profit organizations. Lookout Pass and Silver Mountain Volunteer Ski

OCTOBER 2013 SNOWLANDER 13


GETAWAY

HIGHER GROUND Terrain, snow quality and hospitality — Monashee has it all The epic snow at Monashee.

BOB LEGASA PHOTOS

O

nce again, the Pacific Northwest had been having a winter of epic proportion — December snowfall had set records at some resorts. With that type of accumulation, we knew our friends north of the border were getting pounded with deep, fresh powder. The crew from Freeride Media hit the road and headed to Cherryville, B.C., home to Monashee Powder Snowcats, to start filming for their upcoming TV shows. The crew consisted of Desiree Leipham, Tommy Frey, Devon Dufenhorst, Landon Gardner, Daryl Treadway and videographer Vance Shaw. After a seven-hour drive from Sandpoint, we were met by Monashee Powder owner Tom Morgan and his snowcat, which holds 12 guests. After loading all our gear in the cat — I mean

14 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2013

BY BOB LEGASA

a lot of gear, considering Devin has a large bag guns, Daryl and Landon, scoped for drops off just for his hair-care products — it was a short the rocky cliffs. 40-minute ride up to the lodge, just enough time As soon as that cat door swung open, we to have a couple of cold ones and the celebratory were on it, hot-lapping one powder run after shot of Jägermeister to kick the adventure into another under bluebird skies. We had the intergear. We were greeted at the Monashee lodge mittent break to watch Daryl and Landon “send by a spectacular sunset under clear, it” off anything with drop time — these crisp skies. This type of reception young guns were in heaven. made the wait through the night With the threat of snowfall coming Monashee Powder seem endless. in later that night, we charged hard all Snowcats We obviously did something day — sunny deep-powder opportunimonasheepowder.com ties don’t come that often. Back at the right; the skies held clear through the night, giving us a spectacular lodge, which holds 36 powder-obsessed view of the surrounding mountains. guests, everyone was greeted with ap“Pretty impressive” is an understatement. After petizers as we unwound, swapping stories with transceiver training, we loaded up the cat and the other guests before dinner, a first-class affair. headed for higher ground, where our two young This particular night was fresh British Columbia

RESOURCES


salmon, with a sauce that made your taste buds go into sensory overload. It was that good! Day Two, we awoke to an overnight accumulation of 8 inches of fresh snow from Ullr the snow god, and it was still coming down. Coupled with the continual pounding all day, it made for some magical skiing. With visibility somewhat limited due to the driving snowfall, our guide Ken Bibby brought us into some steep, nicely spaced trees. Everyone in our group was loving life at Monashee. The skiing got better and better as the day went on, eventually adding up to 15 inches in 24 hours. Not bad! On Day Three, we were teased with an incredible sunrise, which quickly turned to more snowfall. Apparently, Ullr thought the area needed a little freshening up. We ventured over to one of Monashee’s signature zones, the Burn, given that name after a forest fire rolled through that section of timber back in 2004. The Burn is loaded with all sorts of cool, photogenic features, and the area offers open, steep lines through the burned-out forest, making it an ideal way to cap off our adventure. Every time I visit Monashee, I’m in awe of the terrain, the quality of snow and the hospitality. This place is legit; whether you’re an intermediate or expert, Tom and Carolyn Morgan’s team knows how to serve it up first rate. If you’ve never been snowcat skiing, you need to do it least once in your lifetime. n

OCTOBER 2013 SNOWLANDER 15


WINTER EVENTS

PARTY IN A PENGUIN SUIT

C

elebrate the upcoming season in fashion at 49 Degrees North’s Snow Dance fundraiser gala. The annual black-tie event, now in its 15th year, raises money for the mountain’s Winter Sports Foundation and the Forty-Nine Alpine Ski Team (FAST). Proceeds will help the nonprofit organizations promote the sport of ski racing and the team’s young athletes. Both donation-funded groups work to encourage positive and healthy lifestyle choices for their members and young athletes, while providing training, education and additional outreach. The event includes silent and live auctions after dinner, a no-host bar and music by local group Men in the Making. In addition to all that entertainment, the ticket price also includes a tux rental so you and a date (or just you) can look good while supporting a cause. — KATELYN SMITH Snow Dance 2013 • Sat, Nov. 2 starting at 6 pm • $110/person or $135/couple (tux included) • Ages 21+ • Spokane Club • 1002 W. Riverside Ave. • RSVP to Mr. Tux by Oct. 26 • ski49.com • 9356649 x633

OCTOBER 49 DEGREES NORTH SKI SWAP Proceeds from the new and used gear sale help purchase first aid supplies and equipment and trains volunteers with 49 Degrees’ Ski Patrol. Oct. 19 from 9:30 am-3 pm. Item registration Oct. 18 from 6-8 pm and Oct. 19 from 8-9 am. $2 admission. Northeast Washington Fairgrounds, 317 W. Astor Ave., Colville, Wash. ski49.com MT. SPOKANE SKI PATROL SWAP After 49 years running, the Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol once again hosts its new and used winter sports gear sale from Oct. 25-27. Gear registration Friday from 3-8 pm, VIP Party at 8 pm ($50). Shop on Saturday from 9 am-5 pm, and Sunday from 9 am-noon. $5 admission. Spokane Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. skipatrolskiswap.com (535-0102) WARREN MILLER’S TICKET TO RIDE This winter features the newest installment of Miller’s legendary snowsport film series, featuring footage of the world’s best skiers and snowboarders in breathtaking settings. Oct. 25 at 6:30 pm and 9:30 pm. $20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. ticketswest.com The film also screens Oct. 26 at 7 pm at the Panida Theater in Sandpoint. (panida. org)

NOVEMBER WINTER SWAP 2013 This annual winter gear swap offers

16 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2013

thousands of new and used items sold by individuals and winter sports stores, and benefits the Lookout Pass and Silver Mountain volunteer ski patrols. Nov. 1-3. Friday gear registration from 3-8 pm, Saturday shopping from 9 am-3 pm, Sunday pickup from 9 am-noon. $5 admission. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way, Coeur d’Alene. winterswap.org MT. SPOKANE JOB FAIR Looking to work on the mountain this winter? Attend the Mt. Spokane job fair, which includes on-site interviews on Nov. 2. Mt Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr., Mead, Wash. mtspokane.com (238-2220) SNOW DANCE The 15th annual black-tie affair benefits the 49 Degrees North Winter Sports Foundation and the Forty-Nine Alpine Ski Team, FAST, and features live music, dancing and an auction. Nov. 2 from 6 pm-12:30 am. $110/single, $135/couple (includes tux rental). Ages 21+. The Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. ski49n. com SKI & SNOWBOARD WAXING BASICS REI’s in-house technician leads a class on how and why waxes work and allow you to have a great time on the slopes. Nov. 6 from 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/stores/Spokane (3289900) WAY OF LIFE Screening of Teton Gravity Research’s new winter sports movie. Nov. 8 at 8 pm.

$10. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. panida.org (208-263-9191)

DECEMBER

SNOWLANDER EXPO 2013 The annual two-day event features local vendors offering discounted prices on winter sports gear, season pass photos from local mountains, factory reps on site and more. Nov. 8-9, Fri from 4-9 pm, Sat from 10 am-6 pm. $5-$7. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlander.com/expo

SNOWSHOEING BASICS Find out what kind of gear you’ll need to get started in this winter activity and where to go for a good hike. Dec. 5 at 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/ stores/spokane (328-9900)

POWDERKEG INLANDER BREW FESTIVAL The first annual winter beer festival features Inland Northwest craft beer and cider makers, focusing on seasonal winter styles, and runs in conjunction with the Snowlander Expo. Nov. 8-9, Fri from 4-8 pm, Sat from 10 am-6 pm. $7 admission (includes entry to expo), $15-$20 sample packages available, Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlander.com/expo SARS SKI SWAP Take part in Schweitzer Alpine Racing School’s annual gear swap on Nov. 9 from 9 am-2 pm. $2/person, $5/family admission. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd., Sandpoint. sars.net (208-263-1081) ANNUAL TWINKIE ROAST Take part in the annual tradition at REI of roasting Twinkies in a “sacrifice” to ask the snow god Ullr to give us a good season. Pick up season passes and check out the offerings from the Spokane Nordic Ski Association. Nov. 10 from 11 am-5 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/ stores/Spokane (328-9900) BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL Screening of the touring film festival, featuring films on outdoor exploration and adventure, hosted by Mountain Gear. Nov. 15 and 17. Time and ticket prices TBA. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) CROSS OVER TO CROSS COUNTRY Skiers don’t have to wait until the lifts open to enjoy the early season snow —  hit the cross-country trails instead during introductory weekends from Nov. 16 to Dec. 8 (Sat and Sun from 9-11 am). $45 per person, including rental and instruction. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) SKI INSTRUCTOR CLINIC Aspiring instructors are invited to take part in the two-day clinic taught by professionals on Nov. 29-30. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208744-1301) TRI-CITIES SKI SWAP For all you snowbirds in southernwestern Washington, head to the gear and clothing swap from Nov. 29-Dec. 1, Fri from 5-9 pm, Sat from 9 am-5 pm, and Sun from 11 am-3 pm. Free admission. Holiday Inn at TRAC, 4525 Convention Pl. Pasco, Wash. theskiswap.com (509-522-1443) VILLAGE LIGHTING CEREMONY Welcome the holiday season with a visit from Santa, hot cider, cookies and Christmas carols, along with a craft bazaar featuring local artists selling handmade items. A toy drive benefiting Toys for Tots also takes place. Nov. 30. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-344-2675)

BIG WHITE LIGHT UP The annual kickoff of the holiday season starts when the village comes alive with lights as families bundle up to watch and enjoy hot chocolate and roasted chestnuts. Dec. 6 at 6:30 pm. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-765-3101) WSU SKI AND GEAR SWAP The 39th annual WSU gear swap includes vendors from all over the Northwest selling new and used items at discounted prices. Dec. 6-7, Fri from 6-9 pm and Sat from 9 am-noon. $1 admission. WSU Hollingbery Fieldhouse, Pullman. skiswap. wsu.edu (335-8732) TOUR OF LIGHTS As part of the mountain’s annual Christmas Light Up, new this year is a selfguided nighttime snowshoe hike through the forest to view lighted displays. Dec. 7 from 5-8 pm. Free, excludes snowshoe rental. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) SKIING & SNOWBOARDING BASICS New to the snow-sport world? Attend this informational session on picking out appropriate clothing and gear to stay warm and comfortable on the slopes, and find out what to expect once out on the mountain. Dec. 12 at 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/stores/Spokane (328-9900) SCHWEITZER COMMUNITY DAY Head up to the mountain and take advantage of $10 lift tickets — 100 percent of the proceeds will be donated to area nonprofits. Dec. 13. $10. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-255-3070) BIG REDS AT BIG WHITE The popular annual wine-tasting event returns in 2013, featuring wines from more than 30 local wineries in the Okanagan region, paired with appetizers from the mountain’s restaurants. Dec. 13-14 from 7-9 pm. $60/one night, $100/two nights. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-765-3101) NIGHT SKIING KICKOFF PARTY Bringing the first night skiing event of the season in with a bang, the mountain will be aglow in lights and everyone will get a chance to win some sweet swag. Dec. 20. Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr., Mead, Wash. mtspokane.com (238-2220) SCHWEITZER FOUNDERS DAY This year’s Founders Day is a big deal, marking 50 years since Schweitzer was founded. In celebration, all lift tickets are $19.63, and the 25-year time capsule will be opened. Dec. 14. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-2553070)

SANTAS SKI FREE The first 30 skiers and riders to the Village in full Santa or Mrs. Claus attire get free lift tickets. Then the whole group of Santas rides down the mountain for a group photo. Dec. 21 at 9 am. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-765-3101) FREERIDERS CAMP Children (ages 10 and older) are invited to ride with the pros and play in the terrain parks in daily camps held from Dec. 21-23. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) CHRISTMAS AT SILVER MOUNTAIN It you’re celebrating the holidays on the mountain, keep an eye out for the jolly old elf himself on the slopes. Dec 24-25. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-3442675) CHRISTMAS BUFFET Enjoy a traditional holiday feast on Dec. 25 from 11 am-2 pm. Lookout Pass, I-90, Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-7441301) CRUISE THE BLUES Head up to the mountain and ski all the intermediate “blue” (intermediate/ advanced skiers and riders) runs to win prizes on Dec. 28. Whitefish Mountain Resort, 3889 Big Mountain Rd., Whitefish, Mont. skiwhitefish.com (406-8622900) MOUNTAIN MUSIC FESTIVAL The annual series kicks off with a concert in the lodge and night skiing on the slope, with concerts and night-skiing to follow every Saturday. Dec. 28 through Feb. 22, Saturdays from 4-8 pm. Mission Ridge Ski & Board Resort, 7500 Mission Ridge Rd., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com (663-6543) SILVER STAR RAIL JAM The first rail jam of the season is held under the lights and features skiers and snowboarders performing jaw-dropping tricks as they compete for prizes. Dec. 28 from 6-8 pm. Price TBA. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) AVALANCHE AWARENESS COURSE Learn what the indicators of an avalanche are as well as survival and digging methods in this one-day introductory course on Dec. 29. $35. Whitewater Ski Resort, 601 Front St., Nelson, B.C. skiwhitewater. com (250-354-4944) NEW YEAR’S PARTY Celebrate and count down to the New Year with your family earlier in the evening with a special NYE dinner, or head to the dance party and countdown to midnight in Noah’s Canteen. Dec. 31. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-3442675) NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY There are parties for all ages, including a tubing party, “tween” party and a countdown with live music all night at Taps bar. Dec. 31. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) n

MORE EVENTS

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THE LAST RUN

EXPERT OPINIONS special advertising section

SKI-SWAP TIPS

An insider’s guide to getting what you want and making the most of your day BY JEN FORSYTH Step 1: Arrive early. JIM CAMPBELL ILLUSTRATION

I

f you’ve never been to a ski swap, you’re in for some real excitement. Here are some insider survival tips for making the most of your day. While some seasoned skiers and boarders may believe the best way to survive these annual events is not to go at all, other equally savvy folks disagree, saying this is a core component of the ski industry. And if you don’t buy any gear, it’s a way to support the fundraiser associated with it, and also to catch up with winter friends. First, don’t think you can roll in two hours after the door opens and think you’ll find exactly what you’re looking for. Veterans of the Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol Swap, the Inland Northwest’s biggest, suggest arriving no later than 5:30 am to start waiting in line — as a ski-swap newbie, you should know that all the good stuff goes within the first hour. Think of the time in line as tailgating, ski-industry style. Bring a tent, food, thermos, chair, sleeping bag and football for passing the time until the swap opens. You could probably make lots of friends by bringing a fully charged iPad with some of the latest ski movies loaded on it. Make friends with your neighbor — you never know, you may need a wingman once inside. You’ve waited, and they’re about to open the doors. Don’t forget why you’re at the swap. Are you buying skis? Boots? Outerwear? Prioritize what equipment is a must-buy, and go for those items first. Don’t lose focus. Personally, one retro onepiece and my attention deficit disorder kicks in, and I’m trying on ski suits from 30 years ago, possibly losing the deal of a lifetime on those new sticks I was hoping to buy. Instead, I have yet another retro-onesie for my costume box. Not a complete loss, but neon clothing is definitely not worth the early-morning effort. One ski-swap regular, who shall remain nameless, suggests using the “guarding” technique, grabbing everything off the wall you might want. Once the situation — and more important, the cash flow — has been assessed, you keep them, or put back what you want but can’t afford. The moral of the story? Come prepared. Bring food, hydration and appropriate footwear. Know your boot size, what length of ski would be best for your weight and ability, and the type of ski you want — powder, all-mountain, groomer or one to make into a Shotz Ski. This will help narrow down the “kid in a candy store” options, and also get you through the madness that some have likened to the midnight deals on Black Friday. n

Winter in the Inland Northwest is loaded with opportunity. There’s so many great activities and many things to prepare for as we move into the season of snow. It’s always helpful to have experts to help guide the way. The following opinions and short features from area businesses can help as you navigate your way to a great winter season.

gear Shopping for deals… by: Brian Ellsworth Well, ski season is just around the corner and I can say from firsthand experience that the bargain shoppers are out in force! Some of the savviest buyers know this is the time of year to get the best deals on equipment and clothing for the coming season. Whether it’s going to one of our local Ski Swaps or scouring the local Ski Shops for last year’s gear there are many ways to go about finding some great deals. Here are some things to consider if you’re in the market for some new gear and looking for a deal… • Many people think that the swap is the cheapest place to buy, however almost all “new” items you see at the swaps came from a local shop and could probably be purchased at that shop for less than it is being sold at the swap. • Don’t skimp on boots. Boots are the most important piece of the equation, and simply going for the cheapest pair you can find rarely turns out positive in the long run. • Always ask for a second opinion when buying at the swap. Help at the swap can range from excellent to questionable depending on who you talk to. Asking for a second opinion can keep you from buying outdated technology that the salesperson swore was current

CONTACT US ADDRESS 2925 S. Regal PHONE 509-534-4554

OCTOBER 2013 SNOWLANDER 17


EXPERT OPINIONS | special advertising section

gear Tuning in the Winter Season Winter is almost here and everyone is excited to see that snow fall. Start your winter season off right by doing one simple thing that will have huge rewards. You are probably thinking getting your body in shape, but I want to share something that will make your experience on the slopes much more enjoyable than hitting the gym or doing a diet. One of the best tips for skiers and snowboarders is to get their gear ready before they visit the slopes. This involves stone grinding the base, sharpening the edges, and waxing. While many think that waxing just makes skis and snowboards go faster, in truth, waxing aids in making turns and improves your overall equipment life. The stone grinding not only helps flatten the base, but puts in a base structure that will help your board or skis glide over the snows surface once the wax wears off. Ski and snowboard edges are also prone to dullness, scratches, and burrs that can really affect your performance. Edge maintenance is needed to properly grip the snow while you transverse the mountain.

Keeping your skis or snowboard waxed and tuned is a very simple item on your winter checklist that will make a huge difference. If you don’t know how to properly wax and tune your skis or snowboard you can drop your equipment off at one of the local ski and snowboard shops and for a small fee, have them do the work for you. Another option is learning yourself. With a little investment in tools and some training, you can easily tune and wax your own gear. Remember, proper maintenance and tuning increases your overall performance, gear life, and ensures that you enjoy the slopes all season long.

skiing

WINTER ISSUE SERIES

Shaping Up for the Season…

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by: Randy Richards When it comes to getting your body ready for the slopes, it sneaks up fast. Before you know it, you’ve completed your first run and your legs are burning. Experts agree on four areas of focus to get in shape for winter: Endurance, Stability, Balance and Flexibility. Exercise to build parts of your body doing the work, hips, thighs, knees and ankles. Lunges and squats can help get those legs in shape. Lateral lunges prepare the body for the quick movements common to skiing and boarding, they’re also good for strengthening knees. Balance comes from your core. Prepare with double crunches to work the abs and the back. Oblique twists can also be helpful. The most simple and over-looked exercise to keep you injury-free is stretching to keep muscles pliable and less injury prone. Stretch, when warm, as often as possible and exercise a couple of times a week. The only pain you’ll suffer that first day is the price of your lift ticket.

CONTACT US PHONE 1-208-772-0613 EMAIL cda@tri-state.com WEB www.t-state.com

18 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2013

CONTACT US 3311 Flowery Trail Road, Chewelah WA PHONE 509-935-6649 EMAIL ski49n@ski49n.com WEB www.ski49n.com

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OCTOBER 2013 SNOWLANDER 19


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Spokane’s Spooky Side Ghostly urban legends and eerie experiences in the Lilac City that’ll send chills up your spine BY CHEY SCOTT

S

pokane is full of places with dark and unsavory pasts. Behind the brick facades of 100-year-old downtown buildings that rose from the ground during the city’s formative boom years at the turn of the 20th century, these chilling remnants of the past can still be found. You just have to dig deep enough. On a recent crisp October night, around 50 Spokanites and a handful of curious visitors gather in a small back room of the historic Fox Theater. Bundled up in coats, scarves and gloves, they’re preparing for a downtown walking tour to see and hear stories about the supposedly, or potentially, “haunted” sites scattered among the city’s oldest blocks. Some have already guessed that the first stop on the tour is the very building they’re standing in. Purportedly, the Fox is one of several Spokane theaters to host a resident ghost, in this case named Otis. The Spokane Civic Theater, meanwhile, houses George the longtime ghost, and the Bing Crosby Theater is also said to keep a mischievous spirit or two in its wings. Like most other

The Thousand Steps memorial at the Greenwood Cemetery is one of Spokane’s allegedly haunted spots. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO theaters, all three leave “ghost lights” on at all times the theater otherwise would be dark. The evening’s volunteer tour guide, local actress Rebecca Cook, reads from a binder of notes, playfully telling the crowd, with raised eyebrows and voice inflections, that during the Fox’s complete restoration about six years ago, Otis was supposedly fond of messing with the construction workers by hiding tools and pulling other harmless poltergeist pranks. These stories aren’t unlike typically told tales of haunted spaces — doors opening and closing on their own, lights randomly flashing on and off. We always seem to latch onto unexplainable tales like these. Now, cable TV is host to a plethora of investigative-style paranormal shows, seeking to convince us that spirits of people and animals long gone still wander the places they once inhabited.

T

aking advantage of this otherworldly obsession, many cities are increasingly becoming hosts to ghost tours, similar to the guided walk that de-

parted from the Fox. Dubbed Spooky Spokane, the tour was the brainchild of Fox Theater board member Wendy Start after she stumbled across a little-known and -seen piece of Spokane’s intriguing past a few years ago. At the time, Start’s son was getting ready to head off to college and she had gone shopping to find some furnishings for him at Dania, which occupies a nearly 100-year-old, four-story building on West Riverside Avenue. There, a salesperson led Start around the store, including down to the building’s basement-level storage, where she was surprised to learn from the store employee that it had housed a speakeasy during the 1920s. There were hints of the space’s past activities — elaborate tin panels adorning the ceiling and a faded desert mural of cactuses covering the walls. “I was blown away by the space and never forgot it,” Start says. “I thought something should be done so more people could see it.” That’s when she began pulling up old Spokane Chronicle and Spokesman-Review archives, researching other ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 33


Fall Compost Fair & Leaf Festival Saturday, October 26, 2013 11 am-2 pm John A. Finch Arboretum Spokane County residents who complete the activities may take home a free compost bin. Limit one per household. Bins provided by the Spokane Regional Solid Waste System and the Washington State Department of Ecology. Please arrive no later than 1:30 pm and bring proof of residency.

For more information call the Recycling Information Line 625-6800 or go to www.solidwaste.org Partial funding provided by WA State Dept of Ecology.

34 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

CULTURE | GHOSTS “SPOKANE’S SPOOKY SIDE” CONTINUED... mysterious happenings and colorful places around the city that have been long since forgotten. Other than the forgotten speakeasy’s illicit past, it became even more fitting that Start include the Dania building as one of Spooky Spokane’s tour stops when she discovered the business’ employees — and even past occupants of the building — had long reported unexplainable situations happening there, especially since a big renovation project started earlier this year. Perhaps the construction work has recently disturbed the building’s ghostly residents, who have not only been seen but heard by Dania employees like Bethany Hardesty, who stands firm in her assertion that years ago she saw a man dressed in early 20th century period clothing walk through the store and mysteriously disappear. She and store manager Patty CoddO’Neill also report similar eerie accounts of hearing loud crashes and someone walking around the building’s top floor — currently unused and vacant — when no one else is around. Both women say they’ve also seen strangely bright flashes of light zip by in dark corners of the store. The weird stories don’t end there. After the store is locked up overnight, perfectly made beds are sometimes found rumpled the next day. “We’ll come in in the morning and it looks like people have been jumping on the bed or sleeping in them, and the pillows are all moved around,” Hardesty says. n

HAUNTED SPOKANE UNVEILS DARK SECRETS

M

eanwhile, Chet Caskey, a retired attorney, local author and self-proclaimed “ghostologist,” leads a different version of a walking ghost tour through downtown Spokane. Caskey also hosts chartered bus ghost tours around the area (book a tour at twodogcitytours.com), based on the stories and urban ghost legends recounted in his recently self-published book, Haunted Spokane: Ghosts & Dark Places in the Lilac City. For both book readers and participants in Caskey’s ghost tours — for which the older man dons a Victorian Era costume, complete with top hat and bowtie — maybe the most intriguing location featured in the book is a chapter on the infamous Thousand Steps of Greenwood Cemetery. According to Caskey’s research and past experience working as a historian for Spokane’s largest community cemeteries, the plot of land at the top of the stairs leading up from Government Way was to directly access a burial section reserved for members of Spokane’s Elks Lodge, founded in 1892. Without giving the story’s surprises away, Caskey’s theory is that the widely known hauntings of the steps and graves above them are by the unsettled spirits of founding and early Elks Lodge members, who became upset over the questionable decisions of their subsequent “benevolent brothers.” n


CULTURE | DIGEST

EXHIBIT LARRY BLACKWOOD 901 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 5 09. 227 . 7 638

A Night Of SATURDAY OCTOBER 19th @ 7:30PM

presents

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here’s something no shortage of spookiness in Larry Blackwood’s “Ghosts and Empties,” now on the wall at the Brickwall Photographic Gallery through Nov. 1. The show features black-and-white photos of an abandoned amusement park that are at once nostalgic, haunting and dreamlike. Also at Brickwall, you’ll find the painting-like photos of Jen Mitsuko. Brickwall Photographic Gallery • 530 W. Main Ave. • Exhibit runs through Nov. 1

The Musical

OCTOBER 23 & 24 | 7:30PM

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FRIDAY OCT 25TH | 6:30PM | 9:30PM Fri, Nov 1 • 7pm Sat, Nov 2 • 3pm & 7pm Fri, Nov 8 • 7pm Sat, Nov 9 • 3pm & 7pm Sun, Nov 10 • 3pm Tickets: Adults $12

PRESENTS

BOOK | In the future, armies of intensely trained, highly intelligent children will be used to fight off encroaching aliens that lurk in the far reaches of the galaxy. That’s what the future is like, anyway, in the classic 1985 sci-fi novel ENDER’S GAME by award-winning writer Orson Scott Card. The movie version of the book, starring Harrison Ford and Asa Butterfield, comes out Nov. 1, so there’s still time to read it before seeing the film. While there’s been some controversy surrounding the upcoming film release due to Card’s vocal opposition to the legalization of gay marriage, the book is worth the time. An entertaining read, with a carefully developed plot and characters, the novel also explores more complex topics.

GAME | When you’ve invested several hours in a videogame, it’s always good when it continues to pleasantly surprise, with an evenly paced story line and lots of challenging, yet not overly difficult, puzzles along the way. The indie developers at Drinkbox Studios did all that and more with their 2-D, action puzzle-platformer GUACAMELEE!, released for PC earlier this summer (it’s also available for PlayStation). With single and two-player co-op play options, Guacamelee! sends gamers, playing as brave luchadores, on a quest to save a kidnapped maiden while solving puzzles to gain important new skills for combat and maneuvering. Set in a small Mexican village, Guacamelee! uses elements of traditional folklore to shape its plot and inspire its vivid, colorful art style.

SERVICE | These days, you can never be too careful when it comes to protecting sensitive, personal information on the Internet. Security breaches of websites happen just about every day, but unless it’s a huge bank or corporation, we don’t always hear about it. Situations like this make it all the more important to not use the same usernames and passwords for multiple online accounts. That’s where a handy little service called LASTPASS comes in. The online password manager has subscribers create an account, using a secure, complex password that only you know — not even LastPass’ server does. Then as you log in to all your sites, LP prompts you to generate and save randomized, encrypted passwords. Install a LastPass web browser extension or the Android/ iOS app to access your passwords anywhere, anytime.

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OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 35


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CULTURE | CLASSICAL

American Idol alums (left to right) LaKisha Jones, Haley Scarnato and Matt Giraud are set to appear with the Spokane Symphony.

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Pop-sical

The Spokane Symphony will put its orchestral might behind the voices of former American Idol contestants

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BY E.J. IANNELLI

W

hen a trio of former American Idol contestants joins the Spokane Symphony this weekend for the season’s first SuperPops concert, there’s a natural temptation to view it as the coming together of two disparate elements. Middlebrow meets highbrow. Contemporary meets traditional. Sexy meets stuffy. Even the featured stars aren’t entirely immune to that kind of thinking. Matt Giraud, a top-five American Idol contestant from the

show’s eighth season, almost sounds defensive when describing how audiences and symphony musicians have responded to Symphony Idol. “Sometimes the Idols get a bad rap for being a bunch of divatype, riffing singers who are out of tune. And we’ve come in there with a very classy show,” he says. “We’re all very capable musicians. It’s not a hack job by any means. I think people have been pleasantly surprised.” If there is a hint of defensiveness in Giraud’s words, it’s understandable. He’s battling larger cultural forces here — forces that would have us assume that pop and classical are like oil and water, with one far more pleasurable to consume neat, but invariably falling beneath the other. Bringing the two genres together is often seen as a lastditch attempt to boost classical ticket sales, a pandering concession to changing times and deteriorating tastes. Yet Symphony Idol has shown that audiences don’t compartmentalize when it comes to musical talent in its own right. The Idol contestants’ orchestral performances of the Bee Gees disco hit “Stayin’ Alive” (with a beat-boxing interlude), the Whitney Houston ballad “I Will Always Love You” and Celine Dion’s “My Heart Will Go On” have managed to transcend taxonomies. The concert with the Maryland Symphony Orchestra was met with four standing ovations,

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Sarah Crecelius Mt. Spokane High School Science Teacher


and its run with the Phoenix Symphony in late September was well received. When Symphony Idol comes to Spokane, Giraud will once again take the stage alongside fellow ex-Idols Haley Scarnato and LaKisha Jones (both from season six). The three were handpicked by the concert’s organizers for their talent and showmanship, and they’ve been coalescing as a team ever since. “It’s been a blast,” he says. “We all have our own moments, and then we also do group songs together where we like to get the audience participation going. Both of them are super funny and they’re both professionals. We all like to goof off and laugh together, and that translates onstage. People can tell that we have good chemistry. In this business people sometime act like they’re friends onstage, but once the cameras are off they don’t even talk to each other. But we all are friends and try to help each other out.” That friendship might be more surprising here than elsewhere, since all three vocalists emerged from the ultra-competitive environment of American Idol. But Giraud says the rivalries quickly fall away when they aren’t faced with a panel of preening, scowling judges and “no one’s going home next week.” “I can enjoy it more, for sure,” Giraud says of Symphony Idol. “You can take a moment and talk to the audience or crack a couple jokes — things you can’t really do on Idol, where you have that minute-and-a-half to show that you’re better than everyone else. “But there’s also new pressure for me. Working with symphonies, there’s been a lot to learn about when to bow and when to point to the audience. Being from a piano-bar type thing, where I’m just pretty loose on stage, this is quite formal for me, so I have to speak clear-ly and slow-ly,” he says, emphasizing each syllable for effect. “But the music part comes naturally.”  Symphony Idol • Sat, Oct. 19 at 8 pm • Tickets $26-$62 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

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The Great Nacho Hunt

Trash Can Nachos at Spike’s Phillys and More. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

If you go out looking for nachos in Spokane, you’ll find a lot more than chips and cheese BY INLANDER STAFF

W

e didn’t want anything microwaved. We didn’t want anything served in a cardboard boat and drowned in self-pumped “cheese” from anywhere that also serves gasoline. We wanted to find nachos. Real nachos — however that might be defined. What we found is that pretty much everyone is serving nachos, and they are all very different. We’ve got pizza ingredients, potatoes used in place of chips and proportions so large as to require garbage can lids. We even let vegans into the mix. Here are the results of our hunt.

38 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

SPIKE’S PHILLYS AND MORE | 718 E. FRANCIS AVE.

Trash Can Nachos, $23.99 SERVES: 4 (in reality 6 or 7) KEY INGREDIENT: Cheez Whiz Cheez Whiz and Easy Cheese are not the same fake cheese products. Both are meant to go in your mouth, but Cheez Whiz comes in a jar and has a queso consistency, where Easy Cheese is squirted from an aerosol can directly onto the surface/orifice of preference. This is what Travis Bertholf wants people to understand when ordering Spike’s massive Trash Can Nachos. “People see Cheez Whiz on our menu and confuse it

with Easy Cheese,” says the front-of-the-house manager. “But it’s much better than that.” A staple on the classic Philly cheesesteak, it made sense for the establishment, famous for the sandwiches, to add the cheese to its nachos dish. True to its name, the pile of warm, salty deliciousness is served on a (clean) trash can lid. The tri-colored tortilla chips are not only topped with Cheez Whiz, there’s also real cheddar cheese, black olives, cilantro, black beans, tomatoes, seasoned beef, sausage, bacon, chicken, chili, sour cream, jalapeños, green onions, salsa and guacamole. According to kitchen manager Shaun Mazur, the item is one of the restaurant’s most popular since the place


first opened two years ago. He says he receives multiple orders for the platter during every shift he works. Spike’s does offer a considerably smaller plate of nachos called Spike’s Nachos that simply includes cheese, beef and veggies. — LAURA JOHNSON

HOP JACK’S | 9265 N. NEVADA ST.

Bleu Cheese Potato Chip Nachos, $9.95 SERVES: 2-4 KEY INGREDIENT: Potato chips, obviously Tortilla chip purists shouldn’t let the substitution of potatoes for corn be a reason to shy away from this twist on the bar-food staple. This indulgently rich and savory concoction is so damn good it could, and would, put many traditional tortilla varieties to shame. Starting with a plentiful base layer of Hop Jack’s housemade potato chips — the thick, crunchy kind that aren’t soaked in oil and salt — these nachos then get serious with a generous amount of tangy, sharp bleu cheese crumbles. The rest of the toppings don’t skimp, loading it up with plenty of black beans, corn, green onions, tomatoes and bacon crumbles. And you know how sometimes restaurants just dump all the toppings right in the middle of a heaping chip mountain, forcing you to ration out cheese and meat pieces for the naked, bottom-layer chips? Not here. Hop Jack’s takes care to make sure every square inch of exposed chip surface area is equally coated in melt-y cheese, bacon and veggies. While the copious amounts of bleu cheese could be a bit overpowering for some near the end, there is an option to sub in cheddar cheese, or add both. If you’re still not sold on the genius idea of using potato chips in nachos, Hop Jack’s offers a classic tortilla-chip version. — CHEY SCOTT

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Vegan Nachos, $6 SERVES: 1-2 KEY INGREDIENT: Thai-style peanut sauce As one of our readers put it, the reliable recipe for nacho success is cheese + _____ + chips = awesome! But the vegan nachos at Neato Burrito prove that recipe is not a rule, because replacing cheese with Thaistyle peanut sauce makes for a surprisGo to the new Inlander.com for ingly tasty and appropriately filling more nacho recommendations plate of nachos. The gently spicy sauce from our readers. mingles with potatoes, beans, salsa — try the popular corn salsa plus a dab of something spicier — and contrasts with the cool guacamole and shredded cabbage on top. The basic out-of-bag corn chips are the weak point, but do a perfectly fine job of the chip’s most important duty as a topping delivery system. The whole effect on the plate is something like a shattered burrito — and that’s a good thing, especially if you’re trying to share. Non-vegan nachos are also available, of course, but split a plate with a couple of omnivores some evening after a few drinks and see if they’re not won over. — LISA WAANANEN

MORE NACHOS

MINI DESSERTS German Chocolate Cake • Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie Crème Brûlée • Chocolate Mousse • Key Lime Pie • Cheesecake

MONTEREY CAFÉ | 9 N. WASHINGTON ST.

Beach Bake Nachos, $12 SERVES: 2-3 people KEY INGREDIENT: Mystery spicy sauce These are your classic nachos — the sort of multicolored tower of delectableness your mind might conjur when your stomach tells it to eat some nachos. Monterey, known for doing everything big, doesn’t skimp on proportions, starting off with a pile of crunchy Juanita’s tortilla chips, adding chicken or beef (go for the chicken), a secret spicy sauce and an appropriately absurd amount of cheese. Request jalapeños, onions and other peppers to spice things up even more, and they’ll gladly do it. The salsa and sour cream is served on the side, but if you’re as reckless with your nacho consumption as me, you’ll dump that stuff on top and let gravity do the rest of the work. This is the most standard of the nachos featured here, but Monterey does know how to get weird with its nachos. In addition to the Beach Bake, the downtown cafe/bar also has the Alabama Bake, which featured pulled pork, the Buffalo Bake, replete with buffalo chicken and blue cheese, and the Siciliy Bake, which takes pizza ingredients like pepperoni and marinara and tosses them atop chips. — MIKE BOOKEY

Baby Back Ribs

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OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 39


FOOD | OPENING

Ugly No More Borracho Tacos & Tequileria joins the nightlife explosion in the East Main neighborhood BY JEFF RUTHERFORD

A

s you zipped north on Division Street through downtown over the past few months, you may have noticed an evolution on the corner spot of Main Avenue. Ugly Betties closed its doors, demolition and reconstruction went down, and eventually a sign featuring a black-and-white skull showed up. The

skull marked the arrival of Spokane’s newest, and perhaps most unique, Mexican restaurant, Borracho Tacos & Tequileria. The man behind the business is Jeremy Tangen, former owner of the MarQuee Lounge, which closed up shop this past summer. “He saw a market that wasn’t being reached

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Borracho’s Garrett Wellsandt pours a fire roasted margarita. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO in Spokane and wanted to tap into that,” says general manager Garrett Wellsandt. Wellsandt admits they haven’t quite figured out their target clientele. Their market has been all across the board, he says. But they’re happy to have been so busy in the opening weeks of their new spot. Walking into the young restaurant, you’re taken by the sleek vibe that’s created by the exposed brick, hardwood tables and classic rock coming from the speakers. Borracho sprawls out over a lot of real estate, creating an open environment where you can mingle with your pals near the bar or grab a booth for a sit-down meal. “We want this to be somewhere you can get really good food and still have that bar feel,” says Wellsandt. “Just a fun place for some drinks and late night food.”

Borracho carries more than 70 tequilas, 12 infused with fresh pressed juice in-house. The margaritas are strong, and the spicy “street tacos,” at two bucks a pop, have an extra kick. The meat options range from pork to tongue; Tuesdays, you can grab one for a dollar. The nachos are piled high, all the tacos have an original touch, and the margs are made right. Borracho wants to be the place you stop, whether you want to gorge on Mexican grub or kick back for some late-night drinks. And don’t be put off by the tongue taco. It’s pretty damn tasty. 

“Riverfront Park Goat”

by Sister Paula Turnbull

November 9, 2013 Gala Dinner and Juried Auction at the Historic Davenport Hotel $100 per person includes complimentary wine and beautiful art catalogue

Preview auction artwork at the MAC

October 4 - November 8, 2013

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Scheduling a mammogram is one of the best things you can do for yourself.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and we’ve got you covered. One out of every eight women will develop breast cancer. But statistics show more women survive this diagnosis when it is detected and treated early. According to the American Cancer Society, mammograms remain one of the most effective methods for early detection. If you are 40 or older, or are considered to be at risk, Rockwood Health System encourages you to have a mammogram once a year – starting now. Schedule your mammogram at one of our four convenient locations. Rockwood Imaging Center Deaconess Hospital Breast Evaluation Center 400 E. Fifth Avenue • 509-342-3555 800 West Fifth Avenue • 509-473-7777  Valley Hospital Women’s Imaging Center Rockwood Breast Health Center RockwoodHealthSystem.com 12606 E. Mission Avenue • 509-473-5483 12410 East Sinto Avenue, Suite 105 • 509-342-3555 Appointments are on a first-come, first-served basis. A physician order is not required but the patient must provide a physician’s name when an appointment is made. If the patient does not have a physician, a list will be provided for the patient’s selection. All mammogram reports will be sent to the physician and follow-ups are the responsibility of the patient.

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 41 71952_DMC_Mammo_9_3x5_4c.indd 1

9/18/13 6:26 PM


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42 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

FOOD | SHUTDOWN

Evanson Handcrafted Distilling got one label approved by the federal government before the shutdown.

At a Standstill While the federal government is shut down, businesses that make alcohol have to wait BY LISA WAANANEN

L

ast weekend, Joel Evanson celebrated the grand opening of his North Spokane distillery, Evanson Handcrafted Distilling, after more than a year of wading through paperwork and waiting for government approval. But the full opening is hindered by another government holdup — Evanson makes whiskey and vodka (at both 80 and 100 proof), but because of the govern-


ment shutdown, only the 80-proof vodka is for sale. Before Evanson can sell a single bottle of the whiskey or the 100-proof vodka, the labels need to be approved by a federal agency called the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, commonly called the TTB — and, like most other federal agencies, it stopped operating on Oct. 1 when Congress failed to pass a crucial spending bill funding federal government operations. “We just have to wait,” Evanson says. The shutdown means craft breweries, wineries, cideries and distilleries can’t get labels approved for their seasonal releases. New businesses waiting for approval to open their doors are also stuck on hold. Paul Ziegman of Tinbender Craft Distillery reapplied several weeks ago for approval of the new downtown distillery, and now sees the overall wait time stretching out for months as the application languishes. “As far as I know, it’s just sitting on someone’s desk wherever they walked away from it,” Ziegman says. A shutdown notice at TTB.gov says online payment access is still available, but other functions are not and site information may not be up to date: “TTB will suspend all non-excepted TTB operations, and no personnel will be available to respond to any inquiries, including emails, telephone calls, facsimiles, or other communications.” With the recent boom in craft breweries and distilleries, the agency has already been struggling to keep up with the influx of applications. Before the process halted with the shutdown, the TTB reported an average of 38 days for label approval for distilled spirits. (Beer and wine were listed at 12 days and 25 days, respectively.) The process is already considered opaque and difficult to navigate for small business owners, and they got no notice about what to expect from the shutdown. Evanson is paying quarterly taxes for the first time and continuing to send in forms, uncertain of whether anyone is receiving them. “Hopefully there’s somebody there checking them,” he says, “but there probably isn’t.” 

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Benedict Cumberbatch shows some skill, but can’t save The Fifth Estate.

Unlikable Leaks The Fifth Estate makes it hard to root for Julian Assange BY ED SYMKUS

A

ny protagonist in any movie has got to have at least some little something that draws you to him. I mean, c’mon, even Hannibal Lecter exuded some charm when he wasn’t ripping the faces off of people. But that’s not the case with Julian Assange, the founder of the “anti-secrecy” website WikiLeaks. As played by Benedict Cumberbatch, Assange comes across as someone who’s passionate about his calling in life but is also a practitioner of questionable ethics, a man without even a hint of social graces and, to put it bluntly, a jerk. Seriously, do you really want to spend any time with this guy? The film begins with WikiLeaks’ massive 2010 leak of secret files and military records concerning U.S. activities in Afghanistan, then goes back to 2007 when the organization was just a one-man operation in Europe. There was soon to be another person working with Assange, a German computer expert named Daniel Berg (Daniel Brühl), who fell under Assange’s spell. Assange was the leader; Berg the willing follower. Assange was the

44 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

idea man; Berg did all of the grunt work. Berg was just a regular fellow; Assange was a mystery man living in his own bubble. WikiLeaks’ intent was to expose corruption in the world, including human rights violations, by offering anonymity to whistleblowers who would send information to the organization. That’s how wrongdoings in a Swiss bank and death squads in Kenya were made public. One of the film’s problems is how director Bill Condon (Gods and Monsters, the past two Twilight films) shows the way things work. The WikiLeaks system is explained via some dazzling visuals that are more distracting than useful. A similar situation THE FIFTH ESTATE occurs later when Condon Rated R throws in a couple of surreal Directed by Bill Condon fantasy scenes about certain Starring Benedict Cumberbatch, characters’ inner thoughts. Daniel Brühl, David Thewlis But they’re so jarring, they pull you out of the film. For some viewers, these problems might keep them interested in watching. The movie is repetitive and drag-

gy, constantly presenting Assange’s quiet rants concerning true commitment to causes and the sacrifice that goes along with it, or keeping up the folly of telling others of the “hundreds of volunteers” in the organization, when there are only two, or the ever-building rift between Assange and Berg when, for example, Berg suggests to his boss that they are journalists, which means they have to verify their sources. Assange, never willing to veer from his mission, including protecting those sources, doesn’t care about being professional. No matter what he’s putting up on his website, he’s convinced it’s “information the world needs to know.” While WikiLeaks involves only two people, the film is filled with lots of folks on different sides of different issues. David Thewlis plays Nick Davies, a reporter at the British daily The Guardian and an early supporter of getting Assange’s information in print, as long as names are redacted in order to keep the people safe. The U.S. State Department (Laura Linney and Stanley Tucci, wasted in brief roles) gets involved when Assange starts to make a name for himself in Europe. When the stakes reach new heights, as with the release of that Afghanistan information, some interesting turns take place, Assange growing paranoid over the idea that he’s being watched by the CIA. “They’re looking for us; they’ve got people everywhere!” he says in one of his very few excitable moments. But in the end, the film fizzles without ever catching fire. Even in the supposedly revelatory coda, Assange remains a total mystery, except for one thing: No one likes him. 


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS CARRIE

Chloe Grace Moretz revives Carrie White, a shy, lonely girl who craves love and attention from the very group that viscously bullies her. Her overly religious mom, portrayed by Julianne Moore, isn’t much help either, as her solution to Carrie’s woes is corporal punishment. When she’s invited to prom (yeah, we know how this is going to end) and is pushed too far, she goes on a telekinetic rampage with a body count in this retelling of Stephen King’s classic novel. (ER) Rated R

ESCAPE PLAN

Ray Breslin (Sylvester Stallone) breaks out of prisons for a living. But when his last job goes wrong and he is effectively buried in a high-tech security facility so far off the map his own team can’t find him, he knows he’s been set up. Recruiting fellow inmate Emil Rottmayer (Arnold Schwarzenegger) to make one last escape from the most fortified prison in the world might seem a little cheesy, but the big explosions and promises of punishment make up for it in this actionoozing flick. (ER) Rated R

THE FIFTH ESTATE

This film, about Julian Assange, the mysterious fellow who founded WikiLeaks, should have been an exciting and informative trip through the world of whistleblowing. Unfortunately, the whole affair is kinda flat, dull and repetitive, making sure to present Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) as a pretty darn unlikable fellow. He may be passionate about helping to right the world’s wrongs, but he’s so full of himself and lacking in social graces, he’s no one you want to spend time with, even if he stays up on the movie screen. WikiLeaks’ revelations about America’s dealings in Afghanistan shook things up. The movie about the organization doesn’t. (ES) Rated R

LINSANITY

In February 2012, a basketball player most casual fans had never heard of marched onto the floor of Madison Square Garden and began lighting up some of the NBA’s best defenders. Jer-

emy Lin became an overnight sensation, but as this documentary shows, he had a hell of a long trip getting there. The film’s scenes of Lin off the court are pretty flat and the religion gets laid on a tad too heavily, but the pure gold hoops montages are enough to make you stay in your seat. At Magic Lantern. (MB) Rated PG.

THE MACHINE WHICH MAKES EVERYTHING DISAPPEAR 

Directed by Tinatin Gurchiani, this documentary follows actors from ages 15-23 as they discuss growing up in the country of Georgia. Boys and girls who come from opposite ends of the spectrum tell personal stories and express a certain desire for fame. The result is a patchwork quilt of sorts, with individuals lamenting taking care of handicapped siblings, raging against mothers who abandon them, or pleading for a brother’s innocence, all painting a picture of a nation from a youth’s perspective. At Magic Lantern. Unrated (ER)

THE SUMMIT

In 2008, 11 of 31 climbers who were attempting to reach the summit of K2 — considered by many to be the most difficult mountain in the world to climb — died in a series of tragedies. The truth behind what happened over the course of two days on the mountain has been shrouded in mystery since then, but director Nick Ryan tries to piece together the story through interviews and recreations in this thriller of a docudrama. (MB) Rated R RETURNING

HANNAH ARENDT

Barbara Sukowa stars as Hannah Arendt, at one of the most controversial moments in her career, the introduction of the “Banality of Evil.” Arendt covers the Nazi Adolf Eichmann’s trial for the New Yorker, and her thoughts stir up extreme debate. Showing her as a woman of intense passions, as well as establishing both the personal and professional  fall out from her statements, Arendt humanized in this intense drama. At Magic Lantern (ER) Unrated

NOW PLAYING BLUE JASMINE

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the have-nots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by

Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. Another great film from director Paul Greengrass (United 93, the first two Bourne entries). (ES) Rated PG-13

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS TWO

Flint Lockwood (voice of Bill Hader,) the lovable inventor, has achieved his dreams and is now working for his idol, Chester V, creating things to benefit society. But when he learns that the food machine he thought he had destroyed is still up and running this time producing ...continued on next page

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FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

NOW PLAYING CARRIE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(100 345) 730 1000

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ESCAPE PLAN [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1215 330) 700 945

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MACHETE KILLS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1240 315) 705 940 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1230 325) 635 930 RUNNER RUNNER [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1250 PM) 720 PM GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1200 320) 715 935 950 GRAVITY [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(245 PM) 500 PM CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1205 255) 515 735

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CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE 2 IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.955 PM PRISONERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1220 PM) 415 PM 800 PM INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(105) 405 725 1005 RIDDICK [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(110 355) 640 925

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46 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(120 350) 630 920

FIFTH ESTATE (R) Fri. - Sun.(1220 320) 620 930 CARRIE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(100) 430 715 800 945 Sun.(100) 430 715 945 ESCAPE PLAN [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(120) 405 650 940 MACHETE KILLS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(110 355) 635 915 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(1215 325) 635 950 Sun.(1215 325) 635 800 GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(330) 630 700 900 930 GRAVITY [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1255 PM) 415 PM

scary humanoid food hybrids including melonheads, mosquitoasts,  and shrimpanzees he and his team, including love interest and weather girl Sam Sparks (voice of Anna Faris,) must get rid of the machine once and for all in this animated flick. PG (ER)

DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight Rises) stars in and makes his writing-directing feature debut as Jon, a nightclub hopper who likes and regularly scores with the ladies, but gets more satisfaction watching porn at home on his laptop. There aren’t too many sex-porn-addiction comedies out there, but this one kind of shines. A great supporting cast: Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore as possible love interests, Tony Danza and Glenne Headley as Jon’s parents, only make things better. (ES) Rated R

ENOUGH SAID

Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a divorcee, is facing the possibility of an empty nest, as her daughter goes off to college. As she bonds with similarly situated Albert (James Gandolfini) and the two click, it seems like the perfect romance. Eva also befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), whose only flaw is her tendency to rag on and on about her ex-husband. When this friend’s ex-husband turns out to be her new boyfriend, Eva suddenly finds herself looking at Albert through Marianne’s eyes. (ER) Rated R

GENERATION IRON

On the surface, there’s an icky feel to bodybuilding — the popping veins, the greasy spray tans, the Speedos, the obvious signs of steroids — but this documentary looks at the other side of the sport. We see the insane amount of hard work and discipline that goes into transforming your body from human to HeMan. It’s narrated by the exceptionally muscle-y Mickey Rourke, in case greasy Speedos weren’t selling it for you. At Magic Lantern. (MB) Rated PG-13

GRAVITY

PRISONERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1230 PM) 410 PM 750 PM

Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope and then all hell breaks loose when pieces of a destroyed satellite come their way. Thus begins a series of domino effect crises: Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life to make it to the station alive? Director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) uses crazy effects that dazzle, while also sometimes distracting from the story. (SR) Rated PG-13

INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1215 245) 515 940

INSIDIOUS CHAPTER 2

RUNNER RUNNER [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1245 PM) CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(115 PM 345 PM) 640 PM CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE 2 IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.925 PM RUSH [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1240 PM 350 PM) 645 PM

WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(130) 420 705 950

Big Screen: ESCAPE PLAN [CC,DV] (R)

Fri.700 PM

Big Screen: CARRIE [CC,DV] (R)

Fri.710 PM

Times For 10/18 - 10/20

The Lambert family returns in the sequel to the bone-chilling thriller aptly named Insidious: Chapter Two. Patrick Wilson stars as Josh Lambert, the reassuring father to the now healing family, attempting to erase the events of the past.  But as unusual things begin to once again happen in the household, Renai Lambert, played by Rose Byrne, begins to suspect that perhaps her husband’s reassurance is simply denial, and something has followed her hubby out of the spirit-world, (ER) Rated PG-13

MACHETE KILLS

This time out, forget about the socially conscious core that fueled the exploitation engine of the first film. Robert Rodriguez has gone for flat-out, no-message  action comedy that is so outrageously over-the-top violent, it’s impossible to object to any of it. Machete (Danny Trejo) is invited, no refusal allowed, by the president of the United States (Charlie Sheen — not kidding) to head on down to Mexico and pull off a job that no legitimate American agent could manage: Stop the insane cartel lord from shooting a missile at Washington, D.C. (MJ) Rated R

PRISONERS

The kidnapping-revenge genre gets a refreshing makeover when a child goes missing, Dad gets mad, and the cops don’t know what to do. It stars Hugh Jackman (the dad) and Jake Gyllenhaal (the detective). This goes places that Taken and Frantic never thought of going. A real nail-biter that’s violent and unpredictable. (ES) Rated R

ROMEO AND JULIET

It’s a timeless story that once again has come to grace movie screens with its show of teenage passion and angst. This go around, Hailee Steinfeld takes on Juliet who once again falls in love with her sworn enemy, Romeo, portrayed by Douglas Booth. The tragedy of a family feud going terribly, horribly wrong is characterized by fabulous costumes and a beautiful setting, but it may or may not be enough for those of us who saw the other seemingly endless movie portrayals of Shakespeare’s classic. (ER) Rated PG-13

RUNNER RUNNER

There’s not much to see here. Mostly it’s just Justin Timberlake sitting at computers for a bit — not even naked or anything — and later he is vaguely menaced by Ben Affleck… with words only, except for some hints of threats of being fed to mostly offscreen crocodiles. Timberlake is a student at Princeton, working on a masters degree in financial shenanigans — he was, we’re meant to understand, the sole guy on Wall

Street in 2008 who was actually honest in his work, and so he lost all his dough in the crash. Now, he tries to take down Affleck, who plays an online gambling mogul. (MJ) Rated R

RUSH

The action begins with a crucial race in 1976, before flashing back to the early years of the rivalry between Formula 1 race car drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda on the minor leagues of the European racing circuit. Director Ron Howard and screenwriter Peter Morgan — who collaborated on Frost/Nixon — effectively set up the initial parallel between the two men as children of privilege who rebel against the expectations of their families, before focusing on the clash of styles that differentiated them. (SR) Rated R. RETURNING

THE SPECTACULAR NOW

Sutter Keely is the most popular guy at his school. He’s funny, he parties, he has a hot girlfriend and he lives “in the moment,” that is until his girlfriend dumps him and he wakes up one morning on the lawn of “nice girl” Aimee’s house. Aimee (Shailene Woodley from The Descendants) is completely the opposite of Sutter: She has goals, she’s smart and a little shy and nerdy. In many ways, this plot seems like the typical “bad-boymeets-girl-next-door” coming-of-age story, but this film — from the writers of modern cult classic (500) Days of Summer — doesn’t take the harsh realities of youthful love and confusion about the future and tie it all up in a tidy little package. At Magic Lantern (CS) Rated R

WE’RE THE MILLERS

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time pot dealer who finds himself in major debt to his supplier (Ed Helms). He’s then forced to make a trip to Mexico to pick up some bud, and he believes he’ll keep a lower profile if he crosses the border with his family. Without one, he recruits a nerdy boy, a punk girl and a stripper (Jennifer Aniston — as a stripper!) to pose as his kin travelling in an RV. (JR) Rated R 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Gravity

96

Rush

75

Prisoners

74

Don Jon

59

Linsanity

51

Machete Kills

41

Runner Runner

37

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT


FILM | REVIEW

THE MAGIC LANTERN OCT 18TH - OCT 24TH

LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (132 MIN PG13) Fri/Sat: 3:45, Sun: 1:30, Tues-Thurs: 3:45

BLUE JASMINE (96 MIN PG 13)

Fri/Sat: 6:15, Sun: 4:00, Tues-Thurs: 6:15

THE SPECTACULAR NOW (100 MIN R) Fri/Sat: 8:15, Sun: 6:00

HANNAH ARENDT (113 MIN) Fri-Sun: 4:30, Tues-Weds: 5:30

GENERATION IRON (106 MIN PG 13) Fri/Sat: 8:30, Sun: 2:30, Mon-Thurs: 8:00

LINSANITY (90 MIN PG)

Fri/Sat: 2:45, 6:45, Sun: 12:45, 6:45 Mon: 8:30, Tues-Weds: 7:30, Thurs: 5:15

THE MACHINE WHICH MAKES EVERYTHING DISAPPEAR one night only! Thurs: 7:00 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $7 www.magiclanternspokane.com

WEEK OF OCTOBER 18th THRU OCTOBER 24th

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WEDNESDAYS

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ALL SHOWS ALL TIMES

Monsters University Fri 5:00, SatSun 12:00 5:00 Mon-Thurs 5:00

Jeremy Lin was, for a short time, the most famous basketball player on the planet.

Hoop Dream

CARRIE

R Daily (5:00) 7:10 9:20 Sat-Sun (12:30) (2:45)

ESCAPE PLAN

R Daily (4:30) 7:00 9:25 Sat-Sun (11:30) (2:00)

The Wolverine Fri 7:20, Sat-Sun 2:20 7:20, Mon-Thurs 7:20

Linsanity isn’t perfect, but it reminds us of one of basketball’s finest moments

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

PG-13 Daily (4:10) 6:15 6:50 9:35 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:35)

MACHETE KILLS

R Daily (3:50) 9;00 Sat-Sun (1:29)

GRAVITY

PG-13 Daily (3:10) 6:20 7:20 9:30 Sat-Sun (10:45) (2:00) In 2D Daily (5:15) Sat-Sun (1:00)

RUSH

R Daily (4:20) 7:00 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:40)

RUNNER RUNNER

R Daily (3:20) (5:30) 7:40 9:50 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:10)

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 PG Daily (3:00) (5:10) 7:15 9:15 Sat-Sun (10:50) (12:50)

BY MIKE BOOKEY

WE’RE THE MILLERS

F

ebruary of 2012 was one of the best Like most worthwhile sports movies, this is months to be a professional basketball fan. about an underdog. No college wanted Lin — an A little-known point guard who’d already all-state high schooler in California —because he been cut by two other teams in that strike-shortwas Asian, as everyone interviewed in the film, ened season marched onto the floor of Madison Lin included, tells us. But then Lin tells us that Square Garden and proceeded to thrill a nation was God’s way of telling him to go to Harvard. of sports fans. Jeremy Lin dropped 89 points in Not to say that God makes people racist to his first three games as a Knicks starter. He hit achieve His goals, but that logic is nevertheless a couple of game-winning shots. He became, in odd, and just one instance when a mention of the span of less than two weeks, the most famous Lin’s religious devotion, however admirable, athlete in America. slows the narrative of this gripping documentary. They called the fervor over this ChineseThe racial element, however, is unavoidAmerican guard “Linsanity,” and now there’s ably the crux of the Jeremy Lin story. When a documentary reminding us of a remarkable you watch the clips of him lighting it up in high moment in basketball, which was already fading school, then torching the Ivy League — while from the collective quick-to-forget racial slurs are yelled at him — and then LINSANITY memory of sports fans. Director Evan realize he was passed over by both big Rated PG Leong’s Linsanity is far from a perfect colleges and ignored in the NBA draft, Directed by Evan Leong sports documentary, but the dissecyou’re no longer wondering if it was At Magic Lantern tion we see of Lin’s first few weeks because he’s Asian. It’s a sad truth. ripping it up for the Knicks makes it Then the narrative flips. We hear well worth sitting through. There’s some clunky commentators argue that the madness over his narration from Daniel Dae Kim (from Lost and success for those two months in New York was Hawaii Five-0) and Lin himself speaks mostly because he was Asian, not in spite of that fact. It’s in cringe-worthily awkward clichés that would a fascinating paradox, and one that we’re forced derail most documentaries that don’t have an to ponder. But no matter where you come down amazing story at their root. on it, this is a hell of a basketball story. 

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OCT 17th - OCT 23rd

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48 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

TRIVIA

Starts at 7


Seasons of Love The Lion Oh My releases a new disc they wrote over the summer BY LAURA JOHNSON

T

he members of The Lion Oh My potentially killed dozens of brain cells last winter. Not due to booze or drugs, but the kerosene heater the band used to warm the abandoned church basement they practiced in. “We wondered why we got so many headaches,” says guitarist Chris Renz. “We’re not completely convinced we didn’t get CO poisoning.” In a way, the band’s music could be accused of having seasonal affective disorder. Their “old” selftitled album, as the band members refer to their debut December release, was written in that cold basement. But The Cold War, the new EP to be released at a party at the Bing Crosby Theater on Friday, was spawned over the

summer. “The old album had a different energy,” Renz explains. “It was a lot darker.” Things are sunnier now — they rent Noise Frog Studios, which made things simpler for recording purposes, as all of their equipment was on the premises. Here, they practice for two to three hours a few times a week, perfecting their swirling, ambient rock sound. “There’s no way we could get through our day jobs if we didn’t have this,” says lead singer David Arnold, who started TLOM two years ago. “My fiancée can always tell when I haven’t had band practice in a while because I get irritable.” Admittedly, these guys can’t get enough of each

The Lion Oh My

CHAD RAMSEY PHOTO

other. “We get the ‘Oh, are you guys all gay together?’ thing,” says Renz, who is married. “We’re all just best friends, we just have great chemistry,” Arnold continues. It’s a glorious Sunday afternoon, and the two are holed up at their cozy studio (a far cry from their first practice space) to talk about the new disc they created with drummer Sam Stoner and bassist Andy Bartholomew. Writing often happens organically when Stoner goes out for a cigarette break. Renz will be working on some melody, Bartholomew will be tinkering, and then Stoner will know it’s right. He comes in, sits down at his drums and a song is born. “Whatever happens, Sam can’t stop smoking; we won’t let him,” Renz says. It’s after the melody is complete that Arnold goes to work on his lyrics, sometimes rewriting them up to 10 times before he brings them to the group. “I love David’s songwriting,” Renz says, beaming in Arnold’s direction. “It’s ambiguous and poetic — something I don’t hear everywhere else.” ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | ROCK “SEASONS OF LOVE,” CONTINUED... “I call Chris the riff factory,” Arnold says, returning a compliment. “He just brings everything to the table that we need.” Arnold describes the new work as a major step forward; where with the first CD they were figuring out their sound as a group, this time around it was a refinement. He calls the end product progressive rock, a sound much fuller than one might expect from three instrumentalists and a singer. Take a listen to the disc, and it’s easy to pick out influences. Renz’s classical guitar background stands out with its virtuosic nature, while the title track talks of Arnold’s opinion of the current state of government affairs. TLOM’s plans are to stretch, to play in Seattle and Portland. But in Spokane, they’re already making waves. Just two weeks ago they opened for the Plain White T’s at the Knitting Factory; in August they were selected as finalists for a contest touting a chance to record a track with Linkin Park. “Out of thousands of band submissions, our band was top 10,” Arnold says. “To have a band that’s been so successful over the years select us, yeah, it felt good.” TLOM’s release party, which they’re calling The End of The World Show, will feature two sets from the act — one acoustic, the other plugged-in — as well as a Halloween costume contest and raffle. “Halloween is our favorite holiday,” Arnold says. “We love to dress up. We thought about dressing up as each other and playing each other’s instruments on stage.” “But people probably wouldn’t get it,” Renz says, rolling with the joke.  lauraj@inlander.com The Lion Oh My EP release party feat. Death By Pirates, LaVoy, Summer In Siberia, 5 Times Over • Fri, Oct. 18 at 7 pm • Bing Crosby Theater • $10 • All-ages • ticketswest.com

BATTLE OF THE BANDS

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50 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013


MUSIC | ROCK

were just conversations. Over the phone from his Hartford, Conn., recording studio, Wimbish says that the music he’s made over the past 25 years has largely been spawned from chats he’s had. Those simple connections with people became the backbone for his career. Perhaps the deepest, longest-lived conversation he continues to have is with his bandmates. They’re the New York

Living Colour: 25th anniversary of Vivid, with Vial 8 • Sat, Oct. 19 at 8:30 pm • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • $20 • All-ages • ticketweb.com • 244-3279

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Saturday Oct 19th JON WARREN & THE BILLY GOATS and TYLER AKER

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HAPPY TIME PRICES ALL NIGHT! Monday Oct 21st

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D

oug Wimbish talks a lot about talking. Or at least “conversations” — a word he uses to describe his relationship with his longtime bandmates in the Grammy Award-winning rock outfit, Living Colour. It’s a term he uses to talk about his work with Mick Jagger, with legendary hip-hop outfit the Sugarhill Gang, with Madonna, George Clinton, Depeche Mode. The music they made together — those

THE WEEKENDERS and XEROX MACHINE

FRI

BY LEAH SOTTILE

Friday Oct 18th

SAT

Living Colour made waves 25 years ago, and still plays with that same passion today

TYLER GILLIE

SUN

Talking Points

Thursday Oct 17th

KARAOKE

W/ LIVE WIRE

at Irv’s 9pm-2am

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at Irv’s 6pm-10pm

DANCE TILL DAWN

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at Irv’s 6pm-10pm

DANCE TILL DAWN

KARAOKE

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at Irv’s 9pm-2am

SAT. OCTOBER 26TH

Rockers Living Colour will play their debut album Vivid in its entirity Saturday.

City-based band that wrote and recorded the song “Cult of Personality” in 1988. The track would win the band a Grammy for “Best Hard Rock Performance” the following year, and found renewed life in Guitar Hero III and Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. Living Colour was hardly a one-hit wonder. The band released a handful of hard rock gems before splitting in 1995, and then went right back at it when they reassembled in 2000. The band has always had something special, Wimbish says. “We have four guys that get together and have a conversation, and the conversation leads to many different avenues, streams and valleys,” he says. “We nest on a particular vibe that becomes re-occurring.” Apart from synchronicity, what’s given Living Colour so much longevity is its reliance on making social commentary. But the band’s songs are also reflections of how they’ve viewed and experienced the world. “The songs that we’ve done come from our conversation, how we’ve lived, what we’ve experienced, and how we’ve collectively chose to put a documentation together,” Wimbish says. “We’re not waving a flag or anything like that.” Wimbish, who plays bass, says the band still gets funny looks, even after all this time. They’re an all-black hard rock band — and he says even rock ‘n’ roll has color barriers. “Rock was a sacred, guarded category,” he says. “And when Living Colour was able to crack it, those walls went right back up quickly.” But while their skin color came into play for them in a way that it didn’t with other rock bands in the ’80s and ’90s, Wimbish says they never stopped believing that their “conversation” was one people would want to hear. “We’ve managed to deal with that stuff and just get onstage and hit it.”  leahs@inlander.com

415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450 OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 51


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

AMERICANA THE AVETT BROTHERS

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 10/17

BEVErly’S, Robert Vaughn BuCEr’S, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen Trio BuCkhOrN INN, Texas Twister J ThE CENTEr, Red Fang, Helms Alee, Gaytheist, Witchburn ThE CEllAr, Isaac Walton COEur D’AlENE CASINO, PJ Destiny GIBlIANO BrOThErS, Dueling Pianos IrON hOrSE, The Jam Band JOhN’S AllEy, Jonathan Warren & The Billy Goats JONES rADIATOr, Tyler Gillie J lAGuNA CAFé, Just Plain Darin lEFTBANk WINE BAr, Nick Grow J luxE COFFEEhOuSE, Dirk Lind MOON TIME, Truck Mills NyNE, Joseph, Form of, Curran Long O’ShAy’S, Open mic rICO’S, Palouse Subterranean Blues Band SPlASh, Steve Denny ThE VAulT, DJ Seli ZOlA, Fus Bol

Friday, 10/18

BEVErly’S, Robert Vaughn J BING CrOSBy ThEATEr, The Lion Oh My EP Release (See story on page 49) feat. Death By Pirates, Lavoy, 5 Times Over, Summer in Siberia BOlO’S, Scorpius BOOMErS ClASSIC rOCk BAr & GrIll, Johnny Qlueless J BuCEr’S, Eric E. ThE CEllAr, Pat Coast Band ThE CENTEr, Soceity 1, The Maension COEur D’AlENE CASINO, Bill Bozly COlDWATEr CrEEk WINE BAr, Bridges Home ThE COuNTry CluB, Down South CurlEy’S, Phoenix FIrST STrEET BAr & GrIll, YESTERDAYSCAKE

52 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

A

s “Bring Your Love To Me,” an amazing song off the Avett Brothers’ brand-spankin’ new album Magpie and the Dandelion suggests, you should bring your love to this band. Long before Mumford & Sons hit the Top 40 charts with their banjo-infused songs, The Avett Brothers were relentlessly touring smaller venues for nearly a decade. It wasn’t until 2009’s Rick Rubin-produced I and Love and You that the nation started to take notice of the folk/country act, which includes brothers Seth and Scott Avett, bassist Bob Crawford and cellist Joe Kwon. When the group hit the Sandpoint Music Festival in August, it didn’t seem there would be another chance of seeing them locally again this year. Thankfully, a last-minute tour stop in Spokane was added last month. Bring your love to this band and they’ll fill your soul with thumping, strumming, honestly human songs that touch a depth you didn’t even know existed. — LAURA JOHNSON The Avett Brothers with Nicholas David • Sat, Oct. 19 at 8 pm • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • Starting at $34 • All-ages • ticketswest.com

EVENT AVETOBERFEST

T

wo days of excellent greasy pizza, tunes and booze. Is such a mind-blowing combination even possible? Yes — in the form of AVEtoberFest, happening at Pacific Avenue Pizza Friday and Saturday. The Winter War, Strange Mana and Tyler Aker play Friday night; Saturday features McDougall (pictured), Primal Shakes and Acousta Noir. Browne’s Addition hasn’t had a really big party since Elkfest in June, so this event is certain to liven up the roundabout scene. Proceeds from the event will go to charity. — LAURA JOHNSON AVEtoberFest • Fri and Sat, Oct. 18 and 19 at 7 pm • Pacific Avenue Pizza • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • $5 minimum to benefit charity • All-ages • 624-0236

FIZZIE MullIGANS, Aftermath ThE FlAME, DJ Wesone GIBlIANO BrOThErS, Dueling Pianos GrANDE rONDE CEllArS, Brongaene Griffin J ThE hOP!, Elektroween III IrV’S, DJ Prophesy JOhN’S AllEy, Industrial Revolution JONES rADIATOr, The Weekenders, Xerox Machine J kNITTING FACTOry, Passion Pit, The Joy Formidable J lAGuNA CAFé, Diane Copeland lEFTBANk WINE BAr, Carey Brazil luCky’S IrISh PuB, Likes Girls MAx AT MIrABEAu, Bobby Bremer Band MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAr, Dan Mills MIChAEl’S O.P., Shiner J NOrThErN QuEST CASINO, The Moody Blues NyNE, A Hairy Halloween feat. Nixon Rodeo, December in Red, Cross My Heart, DJ C-Mad

J PACIFIC AVENuE PIZZA, AVEtoberFest (See story above) feat. The Winter Wars, Strange Mana, Tyler Aker PEND D’OrEIllE WINEry, Ruff Shod SEASONS OF COEur D’AlENE, Kosh STuDIO k BAr & GrIll, Studio K Bar & Grill 50th Celebration feat. Big Hair Revolution TWElVE STrING BrEWING COMPANy, Eric Neuhasser ThE VIkING BAr AND GrIll, Fusbol ZOlA, Karma’s Circle

Saturday, 10/19

BABy BAr, Posole BEVErly’S, Robert Vaughn BOlO’S, Scorpius BOOMErS ClASSIC rOCk BAr & GrIll, Johnny Qlueless BuCEr’S, Eric E. J CArr’S COrNEr, Blackwater Prophet ThE CEllAr, Pat Coast Band J ThE CENTEr, Battle of the Bands

final round J ChAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston COEur D’AlENE CASINO, Bill Bozly COlDWATEr CrEEk WINE BAr, Brother Music ThE COuNTry CluB, Down South CurlEy’S, Phoenix J EMPIrE ThEATrE, The Fabulous Kingpins FEDOrA PuB AND GrIllE, Mike Morris FIrST STrEET BAr & GrIll, YESTERDAYSCAKE FIZZIE MullIGANS, Aftermath GIBlIANO BrOThErS, Dueling Pianos J ThE hOP!, Pimpsta, Loss Monstarz, Darez, DC Gesus, Jay Cope, Jaiiu, Deviace, Hounds of Hell, DJ 3-D J INB PErFOrMING ArTS CENTEr, The Avett Brothers (See story above), Nicholas David IrV’S, DJ Prophesy JOhN’S AllEy, Industrial Revolution JONES rADIATOr, Jonathan Warren &

The Billy Goats J kNITTING FACTOry, Living Colour (See story on page 51), Vial 8 lA rOSA CluB, Harvest Hoedown feat. Baregrass lEFTBANk WINE BAr, Tommy G. MAx AT MIrABEAu, Bobby Bremer Band MIChAEl’S O.P., Shiner NyNE, The Divine Jewels J PACIFIC AVENuE PIZZA, AVEtoberfest (See story above) feat. Primal Shakes, McDougall, Acousta Noir J ThE PhAT hOuSE, Left Over Soul rED lION hOTEl rIVEr INN, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve rEPuBlIC BrEWING COMPANy, Jesse Taylor SEASONS OF COEur D’AlENE, Dan Mills STuDIO k BAr & GrIll, Studio K Bar & Grill 50th Celebration feat. Big Hair Revolution ThE VIkING BAr AND GrIll, Bonfire Knights


THE WAVE, Likes Girls ZOLA, Karma’s Circle

Sunday, 10/20

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast Band COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Echo Elysium DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  THE HOP!, Monsters Scare You!, Victory Heights, Lion I Am, Measures, The Perservering Promist, Almost Home  MOOTSY’S, Love Inks with Lavoy and Hannah Reader ZOLA, Ron Greene

Monday, 10/21

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Open mic  CALYPSOS, Open mic CARR’S CORNER, Sea Giant  MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Joe Satriani with The Steve Morse Band MIKEY’S GYROS, Joe Pug, Vandaveer PJ’S BAR AND GRILL, Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck RICO’S, Open mic

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Tuesday, 10/22

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE CELLAR, Max Daniels FEDORA PUB AND GRILLE, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Electro Grave KELLY’S IRISH PUB, The Powell Brothers  KNITTING FACTORY, The Used, William Control, She Said Fire, The Nixon Rodeo  MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Greg Hodapp  RED ROOSTER COFFEE CO., Open mic RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJ Q THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Jordan Collins, AG/CP

Wednesday, 10/23 BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, The Freeway Revival Band  KNITTING FACTORY, Hank 3  LATAH BISTRO, Haley Lillemon LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dario Re  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Ron Criscione RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Kosh

SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic  SPOKANE ARENA, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis SUKI YAKI INN, One Man Train Wreck THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared ZOLA, The Bucket List

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JONES RADIATOR, 6 Foot Swing, Oct. 24 KNITTING FACTORY, David Nail, Oct. 24 CARR’S CORNER, Hip Hoppin’ for Animals feat. Tha Pharmacist, Ninja Black, Epik Henley, Seven Crown, Lei Majorz and more, Oct. 24 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Afrobeast, Industrial Revelation, LaVoy, Oct. 24 THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett soft opening with Federico Aubele, Oct. 25 JONES RADIATOR, Cursive Wires, Hannah Reeder, Oct. 25 THE CENTER, Into the Flood, Numbers, Entanglement, Oct. 25, MOOTSY’S, Jaeda + Half Zodiac and Keyser Soze, Oct. 25 CARR’S CORNER, Halloween Havok, Oct. 26 GRAIL, Night Of The Living Shred feat. Shred Corps, 13 Scars, Oct. 26 MOOTSY’S, Halloween Cover Show feat. The Misfits, Dislich, Bloody Gloves, Brothers Ov Midnite, Oct. 26 BABY BAR, Couches, Normal Babies, Oct. 27 KNITTING FACTORY, Okkervil River, Oct. 28 JONES RADIATOR, Jones Halloween Show feat. Cuss Jar, Oct. 31 ZOLA, Troubador, Oct. 31 THE SHOP, Guitarist Paul Abner, Oct. 31 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR, Halloween Jam feat. Mojave Wizard and Wicked Obsession, Oct. 31 JOHN’S ALLEY, Eclectic Approach, Oct. 31 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Eugene Jablonsky Jazz Trio, Nov. 1 JOHN’S ALLEY, Scott Pemberton Superband, Nov. 1 - 2 KNITTING FACTORY, Bite Night feat. DJs One and Q, Nov. 1 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, A Touch of Jazz, Nov. 1 ZOLA, The Fat Tones, Nov. 1-2 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Eric Neuhausser, Nov. 2 KNITTING FACTORY, Trapt, Nov. 2 LA ROSA CLUB, Angela Marie Project, Nov. 2 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR, American Wrecking Co. with MautaM, Morlok, Pro Abortion, Nov. 2 THE BARTLETT GRAND OPENING, Thursday lineup: Blouse, Psychic Rites, Dead Serious Lovers, Friday lineup: The Cave Singers, Radiation City, Kaylee Cole, Saturday lineup: Typhoon, Silver Torches, Le Wrens, Sunday lineup: Terrible Buttons, Mirror Mirror, Scott Ryan, Nov. 7 - 10

Country Bar

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Justi n Jur pener kova c at 9 pm

SATURDAY OCTOBER 26TH Truck Stop Betty 9pm

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Cover - pm at 8

Jello Shots

Drink Specials

Costume Party!

Prize Wheel Fr

i Night CASH PRIZE Sat Night

Apple Festival

Weekends sept 21 - oct 27 U-Pick Apples & Pumpkins, Live Music, Pony Rides, Face Painting, Trampoline Bungee JUMP, Corn Cannon, Pea Box, Breakfast, BBQ, Caramel Apples & Sweet Treats in Cafe, and Much More!

appleranch.com • 505-238-4709

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BELLTOWER • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 THE CENTER • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 CURLEY’S BAR & BISTRO • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Hauser • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROTHERS • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 315-8623 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 MOON TIME • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPLASH • 115 S. Second St., Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 53


MUSIC GRANDDAD’S CLOTHES

Continuing their fall world tour, Seattle’s beloved Macklemore and co-producer and Spokane native Ryan Lewis again return to our neck of the woods, this time gracing the biggest venue in town. They’ve saved us cash with “Thrift Shop,” had us dancing and raising our hands up for “Can’t Hold Us,” and pulled on heartstrings with “Same Love.” With lyrics that cover topics from fabulous fashion to the definition of love, Macklemore steals our hearts because his shows are fun, his beats are sick and he never fails to please the fans who have loyally listened since before the mega-fame hit. — EMERA L. RILEY Macklemore and Ryan Lewis • Wed, Oct. 23 at 8 pm • $32.50-$45 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • ticketswest.com • 325-7328

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54 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

MOVIE ALL RIGHT, ALL RIGHT, ALL RIGHT

THEATER HORROR ON STAGE

The Inlander’s Suds and Cinema: Dazed and Confused • Thu, Oct. 17 • Doors open at 6:30 pm, movie at 7:30 pm • $4

Carrie the Musical • Oct. 23 and 24 at 7:30 pm • $20-$25 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

The Inlander has been around for 20 years, and we’re celebrating this anniversary by screening a movie that came out in 1993, the year of our founding. That movie is Dazed and Confused. Critics have (probably) called it one of the most important films about teenage partying ever made. It launched the careers of people like Ben Affleck and Matthew McConaughey and made everyone wish they could go back and be 17 years old in 1976 Texas. We’ll be serving beer (just $3 a pint) from No-Li Brewhouse, which is also celebrating 20 years in business. You don’t have to come, but it’d be a lot cooler if you did. — MIKE BOOKEY

Maybe you’re a Stephen King fan, or maybe you just like musicals. Maybe the supernatural spirit of October has gotten to you and you want to keep it alive. Whatever the reason, we think you should go see Carrie the Musical. The stage adaptation of King’s famous novel telling the tale of a high school misfit and her unusual power was a 1988 Broadway flop, but it’s being revived by the newly-formed Lilac City Performing Arts as the troupe’s debut performance. The cast and production team is attempting to present the classic show with a new spin, so grab some friends and catch one of two shows. — KATELYN SMITH


Revelry Wine Dinner October 25th 6-10pm

THEATER MORE THAN THE RAVEN

A showcase of 4 selections from a premium Washington winery, paired with 5 culinary masterpieces from the culinary team at the Lincoln Center.

Edgar Allan Poe wrote some pretty messed-up stories. Translated into the modern day, he’s still as creepy and freaky as ever. The Lake City Playhouse is piggybacking off this with its upcoming fundraiser event This evening will include readings, live performances of Poe’s short stories, and adaptations of his works through dance. Get into the spirit of Halloween with this event that celebrates one of America’s greatest writers. — LAURA JOHNSON A Night of Edgar Allan Poe • Sat, Oct. 19 at 7:30 pm • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • $15 • lakecityplayhouse.org • 208-667-1323

VISUAL ARTS RIVER AS ART

Simply put, nature is the purest art form there is. Artist Gregg Schlanger has set out to communicate this and more through an ongoing, community-participation installation project at the Spokane Falls Community College Fine Arts Gallery, titled “Mapping the Spokane (River).” The exhibit wraps up this Friday with a concluding lecture by Schlanger, but we’re telling you about it now because the end result is definitely worth checking out. Starting in late September, community members were invited to submit photos, stories and water samples from locations along the river, with contributors noting on a large map where their photo/water/story is from. Aside from asking us to look deeper into what the river means to us, the exhibit seeks to address its cultural importance and the big issues of water quality and watershed preservation. — CHEY SCOTT Mapping the Spokane (River) • Runs through Fri, Oct 18; closing lecture at 11:30 am • Gallery hours Mon-Fri 8:30 am-3:30 pm • SFCC Fine Arts Gallery • 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr., Bldg. 6 • sfccfinearts.org • 533-3710

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

CELEBRATE THE NIGHT IN BLACK & WHITE Fundraiser gala benefiting the Boys & Girls Club of Kootenai County, featuring dinner, auction, dancing and live music. Casual cocktail attire suggested. Sat., Oct. 19, 5:30 pm. $75. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. 2nd Ave. northidahobgc.org (208-457-9089) GUARDIANS OF HOPE Annual breakfast benefiting Cancer Patient Care. Oct. 17 from 7:30-8:30 am. The Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. cancerpatientcare.org (456-0446) PEOPLE WHO CARE 11th annual fundraiser breakfast and luncheon benefiting Transitions for Women, serving women and children in the Inland Northwest. Oct. 23, breakfast at 7:30 am, lunch at noon. Free admission.

Red Lion Inn at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. help4women.org (328-6702) THE PUMPKIN BALL Annual black-tie gala benefiting the Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital and the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery, featuring dinner, auction and entertainment. Oct. 19 at 5:30 pm. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. $150. thepumpkinball.org (474-2819) SPOKANE BLIND BASEBALL BOWLA-THON Bowling fundraiser night benefiting Spokane Blind Baseball, with entry including 3 hours of unlimited bowling and shoe rental. Sat., Oct. 19, 5:30-8:30 pm. $8-$15. Lilac Lanes, 1112 E. Magnesium Rd. spokane.blindbaseball.org (263-3281)

For more information

509.327.8000 | thelincolncenterspokane.com Washington State Quilters - Spokane Chapter proudly presents its

35th Annual Quilt Show

A Cottage in the Country Sherry Thompson Featured Quilter

October 18 - 20, 2013 Merchant Mall • Enjoy 600 Quilts • Quilter’s Boutique Hoffman Quilt Exhibit • Master Quilter Demos

www.wsqspokane.org Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 404 N. Havana, Spokane Valley, WA $8.00 All 3 Days • Free Parking • Children under 11 free

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess TEASE FOR TWO

I’m dating a wonderful guy I’m totally in love with. He’s always looked up to his older brother, a very attractive guy who’s a real lady’s man. I’ve found myself behaving in some unsettling ways when we hang out with his brother, like fixing myself up beforehand like I’ve got a big date. I realized that I want his brother to want me. I get a very naughty feeling when he looks me up and down, and I love it. To be clear, I don’t want him in any real or threatAMY ALKON ening way, and I don’t want to jeopardize my relationship with my boyfriend. Perhaps I’m motivated by knowing that my boyfriend has never been envied by his brother, and now I get to make that happen. —Puzzled Like many good people, you’re inspired to do volunteer work to bolster the less fortunate, such as the boy who grew up deprived of being envied by his older brother. Interestingly, others who do charitable work, like Salvation Army Santas, somehow manage to accomplish it without first re-engineering their cleavage to graze their jawline. In addition to your push-up humanitarianism and the ensuing uplift for your ego (and possibly your boyfriend’s, too), another explanation for your behavior is that you aren’t just yourself; you’re also what two researchers call your “subselves.” It’s long been believed that we each have one consistent “self,” with stable preferences, leading us to make consistent choices from situation to situation. That actually isn’t the case. Psychologists Douglas Kenrick and Vladas Griskevicius, authors of “The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think,” find evidence for our having seven “subselves” driving our choices, each corresponding to a different evolutionary challenge our ancestors faced. These challenges include: 1. Evading physical harm. 2. Avoiding disease. 3. Making friends. 4. Gaining status. 5. Caring for family. 6. Attracting a mate. 7. Keeping that mate. Although we like to think of ourselves as driven by rational thought, environmental triggers can prime a particular subself to grab the controls. For example, seeing a scary movie or a crime report primes our harm-evading subself to take charge, amping up our loss aversion. (Good time to sell us a Rottweiler and the world’s first suburban moat.) And although you’re in a happy relationship, real or imagined potential mates on the horizon prime your mate attraction subself, which is the one leading you, whenever your boyfriend’s bro will be around, to dress for sliding into a booth at the diner like you’ll be sliding down a greased pole. The complicated truth is, if your boyfriend notices his brother’s eyeballs bouncing after you like puppies, you may be priming his mate-retention subself by reminding him that you have other options. To keep him from suspecting you’re interested in other options, prime your own mate-retention subself. Look at cute pictures of the two of you and run through reasons you’re grateful for him and for your relationship. This, in turn, should help you refrain from saving your sexiest looks and moves for when you two are hanging out with his brother: “Just gonna twerk my way to the bakery case, bend over in this short skirt, lick the glass, and see if the banana nut muffins speak to me.”

THE BLOCKED STALLION

I really like this guy from my college English class. We hang out a lot, eating together and playing pingpong, and when it was raining, we ducked into a building and talked till 2 a.m. No matter how much I flirt with him, including touching him, he never makes a move or touches me, beyond once fist-bumping with me for what seemed like a long time. Should I make a move on him? —Confused A man’s body language can tell a woman a lot about his intentions. A series of fist bumps, for example, suggests he wants to have a burping contest. You’ve done your part — flirting to let this guy know you’re interested — which was his cue to do his part and ask you out. There are four possible reasons he hasn’t: 1. He’s gay. 2. He’s got a girlfriend. 3. He’s just not interested. 4. He’s a huge wimp. Even if you suspect he’s a wimp who’s crushing on you, do you really want to reward this behavior by manning up and doing the asking? If a man can’t endure a possible 10 seconds of rejection, is he the man you want with you when danger rears its head? (You’ll be facing it head-on; he’ll be hiding behind a bush.) Look elsewhere for a boyfriend, and look to this guy for what he’s capable of providing: friendship. In fact, it seems he’s fast becoming one of your best girlfriends — although probably not the one to go to when you need to borrow a tampon. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch, improv or anything weird. Every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300) NO CLUE Audience-participation, murdermystery comedy improv show. Fridays at 8 pm through October. $7-$9. Blue Door Theater, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy. Fridays at 8 pm. Free. Ages 21+. Chan’s Red Dragon, 1406 W. Third Ave. (838-6688) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Allages. Saturdays, 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows every Sunday at 9 pm. Free. Goodtymes Bar & Grill, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070)

COMMUNITY

BLANKET DRIVE New and gently used blanket donations accepted, along with sleeping bags, hats, winter coats, scarves, gloves and other winter clothing items. Donations accepted Mon, Tues and Thu from 9 am-1 pm. Our Place Ministry, 1509 W. College Ave. ourplacespokane.org (326-7267) COLVILLE CORN MAZE Pumpkin patch, corn maze and more. Through Oct. 31. Mon-Thurs 4 pm to dusk, Fri 4-9 pm, Sat-Sun 11 am-9 pm. $5-$7. 73 Oakshott Rd. Colville. colvillecornmaze.com (684-6751) FRAUD PREVENTION WORKSHOP Workshop on identifying signs of scams and frauds, and resources to keep your finances safe. Oct. 17 from noon-1:30 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. stcu.org/workshops (208-619-4027) HALLOWEEN COSTUME SALE Annual fundraiser event featuring new and used Halloween costumes for sale. Oct. 17-18 from 9 am-3 pm. Free admission. Cataldo Catholic School, 455 W. 18th Ave. cataldo.org (624-8759) HARVEST FESTIVAL Annual community festival featuring live entertainment, food and more. Oct. 18 from 6-9 pm. $15-$25. Valley Christian School, 10212 E. Ninth Ave. valleychristianschool.org (924-9131) HAUNTED ZOMBIE HIKE 2nd annual fundraiser event benefiting the Riverside State Park Foundation, featuring a scary hike through woods filled with zombies. Through Oct. 26, Fri-Sat from 6:30-9:30 pm. $5, no Discover Pass required. Riverside State Park Equestrian Area, 3402 N. Aubrey L. White Pkwy. (465-5064) SPOKANE GHOST TOURS Walking tours of haunted areas throughout the downtown Spokane area. Saturdays through Nov. 29 at 8 pm. $10. Tours depart from Luxe Coffeehouse, 1017 W. First Ave. twodogcitytours.com SPOOKY SPOKANE Walking tours highlighting haunted areas and buildings in downtown Spokane. Through Oct. 25, Thu-Fri at 7 pm. $15. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. (624-1200) VALLEY MISSION HAUNTED POOL

The pool deck and locker rooms are converted into a haunted house. Oct. 18-19 and 25-26 from 7:30-10 pm. $3 or $2 with a can of food to donate. Valley Mission Pool, 11123 E. Mission Ave. spokanevalley.org (688-0300) AUTUMN HISTORIC HOMES TOUR Spokane Preservation Advocates’ fall tour features five historic homes in the Millwood neighborhood. Oct. 20 from noon-5 pm. $15. spokanepreservation. org (344-1065) TAKE ACTION AGAINST HATE AWARDS The Gonzaga Institute of Hate Studies presents the Eva Lassman award to Linda Pall, local civil rights activist, and to the nonprofit World Outside My Shoes. Oct. 22, dinner at 6:30 pm, awards at 7 pm. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. (313-3665) MEDICARE BENEFIT WORKSHOP Community workshop on choosing a Medicare plan and more. Oct. 22, 29, 31; Nov. 6, 7, 18, 26 and Dec. 3 at 1 pm, and Nov. 5 at 1:30 and 5:30 pm. Free. BellAnderson Financial, 12309 E. Mirabeau Pkwy. (993-1816) PREVENT IDENTITY THEFT Learn to protect your finances in a workshop hosted by STCU. Oct. 23 from 5:30-6:30 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook St. spokanelibrary.org (755-3980)

FILM

FROM SPOKANE WITH LOVE Premiere of a film about a local delegation from Spokane working in Iran to bridge the gap of stererotypes and cultural misinformation. Oct. 17 at 7 pm. $20, proceeds benefit PJALS. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. peacejustice.org (838-7870) GIRL RISING Screening of the documentary followed by a panel discussion with members of Global Washington on education issues affecting girls and women worldwide. Oct. 21 at 5:30 pm. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. globalwa.org (206-547-9332) *See Inlander. com for more screening location dates and times for this film. THE LOVING STORY Documentary on the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision legalizing interracial marriage, with free mocktails and a post-film discussion. Oct. 17 at 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga. edu/UMEC (313-5836) ONLY GOD FORGIVES Crime/thriller film screening. Oct. 23, 7 p.m Free University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu (208-885-7251) RIP A REMIX MANIFESTO Screening of the mash-up media film. Oct. 21, 7 pm. Free. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu (208-885-7251) SUDS & CINEMA Screening of “Dazed & Confused” as part of the Inlander’s film series, featuring beer from No-Li Brewhouse. Oct. 17 at 6:30 pm, movie starts at 7:30 pm. $4. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) WARREN MILLER’S TICKET TO RIDE Screening of the 64th annual winter sports film hosted by WSU’s Student Entertainment Board. Oct. 23 at 7 pm. $5/WSU students, $10/public. WSU Compton Union Bldg., 1500 NE Terrell Mall. (335-3503) WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL Screenings of environmental and nature films, proceeds benefit the Kaniksu Land Trust. Oct. 18-19 at 7 pm. $10-$12. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. kaniksu.org (208-263-9191)

FOOD

ARGENTINE WINE ADVENTURE Sample wines from the South American country. Oct. 18 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) ARTISAN TAMALES Cooking class with Chef Colomba of Café Carambola. Oct. 22 at 5:30 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. (208-457-8950) CHOCOLATE THERAPY Annual chocolate and wine dinner event, featuring a four-course meal with chocolate as a main ingredient. Oct. 17 from 6-10 pm. $32. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. (327-8000) CLASS FOR SERIOUS FOODIES Cooking class on new techniques for culinary creativity with Chef Adam Hegsted. Oct. 17 from 6-8 pm. $50. Orlando’s at SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. incaafterdark. scc.spokane.edu (533-8141) COOKING FOR A CAUSE Sample cuisine prepared by top chefs from the Inland Northwest, in a benefit for the Senior Action Network of Eastern Wash. Oct. 18 from 5:30-9 pm. $50 Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. mirabeauparkhotel.com (688-4607) KOREAN FOOD FESTIVAL AND SALE Featured dishes include Korean-style barbecue rice, spicy pork, potstickers, bean pancakes and more in a fundraiser for the local church. Oct. 19 from 11 am-2 pm. Spokane Hope Christian Reformed Church, 806 W. Knox Ave. (720-9646) SANDPOINT HARVEST WINE WALK Month-long event taking place around Sandpoint, featuring free tastings from local breweries, wineries and downtown restaurants, live music, activities and more. Runs through Nov. 2. For event schedule and more information visit dinearoundsandpoint.com SOUP FOR THE SOUL Participating restaurants are donating a portion of proceeds from sales of soup to supports Providence’s Arts in Healing program. Wednesdays from Oct. 2-30. For participating restaurants visit washington. providence.org/events TAMALE COOKING CLASS Hands-on cooking class teaching how to make pork tamales, salsa and more. Oct. 22 from 5:30-7:30 pm. $45. De Leon Foods, 102 E. Francis Ave. cookwithus. com (208-665-0282) TAPAS COOKING Learn to make three Spanish-style small plates including stuffed peppers, baked asparagus and more. Oct. 23 from 6-8 pm. $50. Orlando’s, SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. incaafterdark.scc.spokane.edu (533-8141) WINE TASTING Hedges Family Estate wine tasting on Oct. 18 from 3-6:30 pm, and tasting hosted by Watermill Winery & Blue Mountain Cider Co. on Oct. 19 from 2-4:30 pm. $10. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229)

MUSIC

MARTHA REDBONE ROOTS PROJECT Cultural music concert. Oct. 18 at 7:30 pm. $10-$20. WSU Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, Pullman Campus. ticketswest.com (328-7328) SWINGTOBERFEST Swing concerts, including performances by Solomon Douglas (Fri) and Glenn Crytzer (Sat), dance workshops, and more. Oct. 1820, times vary. Concerts $20-$35. Full weekend pass $165. German American


Hall, 25 W. Third. swingtoberfest.wix. com/swingtoberfest CELTIC MUSIC CONCERT Concert featuring Brongaene Griffin, Elizabeth Nicholson and Bob Soper. Oct. 19 at 7:30 pm. $10. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) NINE PINT COGGIES Scottish music concert. Oct. 19 at 7:30 pm. $15-$20. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St, Post Falls. (208-457-8950) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SuperPops Series: “Symphony Idol” feat. former American Idol finalists LaKisha Jones, Matt Giraud and Haley Scarnato. Oct. 19 at 8 pm. $26-$62. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) PALOUSE CHORAL SOCIETY “Encore!” fall concert. Oct. 20 at 4 pm. Pre-event wine and appetizers from 1-3 pm at the Dahmen Barn. Uniontown, Wash. palousechoralsociety.org SPOKANE STRING QUARTET 35th season opening concert “Counterculture.” Oct. 20 at 3 pm. $12-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. (624-1200) JOE SATRIANI Concert by the acclaimed rock guitarist, feat. the Steve Morse Band. Oct. 21 at 7:30 pm. $35$68. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. (624-1200) SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS Women’s chorus specializing in four-part, a capella harmony in a barbershop style. Group meets and practices on Tuesdays at 6:45 pm. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Rd. (218-4799)

SPORTS

BIKE FUNDAMENTALS 101 Clinic for first-time bike owners on basic storage, maintenance, riding tips and more. Tuesdays through Oct. 29 at 6 pm. $15$30. This Bike Life, 10220 N. Nevada St. thisbikelife.com (315-8430) BIKE FUNDAMENTALS 102 Clinic covering basic bike field repairs including flat tires, chain drops and more. Thursdays, Oct. 17-24 at 6 pm. $30. This Bike Life, 10220 N. Nevada St. thisbikelife. com (315-8430) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey game vs. Everett Silvertips, Oct. 18 at 7:05 pm. Also vs. the Victoria Royals, Oct. 19 at 7:05 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. (279-7000) WARRIOR CAMP MMA EVENT Mixed martial arts fight. Oct. 19 from 6-10 pm. $20. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. hubsportscenter.org (998-2993) “KANNIBAL COOK-OFF” ROLLER DERBY BOUT The Spokannibals take on Corvalis, Oregon’s Sicktown Derby Dames. Sat., Oct. 19 at 7 pm. $5-$10. Roller Valley Skate Center, 9415 E. Fourth. spokannibals.com (509-924-7655) MEET THE MOUNTAINEERS Informational presentation on the activities offered through the Spokane Mountaineers. Oct. 21 at 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. spokanemountaineers.org (270-8867)

THEATER

AX OF MURDER Performance of three one-act murder-mystery plays in a dinner theater format. Oct. 18-19, dinner at 6:30 pm, show at 7:30 pm $12-$25. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy. 211 off Hwy. 2, Newport. circlemoon.webs.com (208448-1294)

CARRIE THE MUSICAL Performance of the musical adaptation of the classic Stephen King novel, by Lilac City Performing Arts. Oct. 23-24 at 7:30 pm. $20-$25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (953-2979) DEATH BY CHOCOLATE A “whodunit” comedy performance. Oct. 18-27, FriSat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. libertylaketheatre.com (342-2055) ENTER FAIRY GODMOTHER A fairy godmother gives lesser-known folktales a magical twist. Through Oct. 20, show times vary. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia St. (328-4886) IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT Thriller/mystery drama performed by StageWest Community Theater. Through Oct. 27, Fri-Sat at 7 pm except Oct. 26 at 6 pm, preceded by dinner ($25). Oct. 27 at 3 pm. $10-$12. Emmanuel Lutheran Church, 6399 Elm St., Cheney. (235-2441) LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Musical comedy, directed by Troy Nickerson. Oct. 18-Nov. 3, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $16-$20 Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. ignitetheatre.org (795-0004) M.A.S.H Comedy based on the hit TV show. Through Oct. 20, Thurs-Fri at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $15. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye St. pullmancivictheater.org (509-332-8406) A NIGHT OF EDGAR ALLEN POE “From Page to Stage” theatrical interpretations performed by Lake City Playhouse. Oct. 19 at 8 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7638) REUNION WITH MURDER Murdermystery dinner theater performance. Oct. 25-26 at 6:30 pm. $25. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St., Metaline Falls. cuttertheatre.com (446-4108) SHERLOCK HOLMES Mystery/drama. Oct. 18-27, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $8-$10. Theater Arts for Children, 2114 N. Pines Rd., Ste. 3. (995-6718) THE WAKEFIELD MYSTERIES Modern adaptation of the medieval English mystery. Through Oct. 19, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $6-$8. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-3707)

VISUAL ARTS

COMIC ART INDIGENE A Native American comic art exhibit from the New Mexico Museum of Indian Art. Oct. 18Dec. 1. Exhibit reception and lecture Oct. 18 from 5-8 pm. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main St. (208-310-1231) ) HOWLING AT THE MOON Annual “night gallery” group show featuring work by the art co-op’s members. Oct. 18-Nov. 2, reception Oct. 18 from 5-9 pm. Free. Manic Moon Studios, 1625 N. Monroe St. (413-9101) LIFE ON THE LAKE Photography exhibit featuring images of scenes on and around Lake Pend d’Oreille. Oct. 18-Nov. 16. Artist reception Oct. 18. Free. Redtail Gallery, 518 Oak, Sandpoint. sandpointartsalliance.org (208-265-2787) MAGIC OF THE OBJECTS The work of Leslie W. LePere, featuring drawings, paintings, murals and more. Oct. 22Dec. 20. Artist reception and lecture Oct. 25 at 5 pm. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6611) MAPPING THE SPOKANE RIVER Gallery installation featuring photos, stories, samples of river water from com-

munity members and more. Through Oct. 18, closing cecture and reception Oct. 18 at 11:30 am. SFCC Fine Art Gallery, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org (533-3500) SPOKANE WATERCOLOR SOCIETY Annual show juried by nationallyknown artist Carl Purcell. Oct. 19-Nov. 30. Opening reception Oct. 19 from 5-7 pm. Free. William Grant Gallery & Framing, 820 W. Francis Ave. (484-3535)

WORDS

DAVE RAMSEY LIVE “The Legacy Journey” live presentation by the financial author and motivational speaker. Oct. 17 at 7 pm. $50-$70. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) AN EVENING WITH PAUL JEFFREY Presentation by the social justice photographer. Oct. 18 at 6 pm, presentation at 7 pm. Free. Manito United Methodist Church, 3220 S. Grand Blvd. (747-1878) LOCAL AUTHOR SATURDAY Readings, discussions and book signings by local authors James Austin, Maria Maggi, Janet Richards and Alan Weltzien. Oct. 19 starting at 4 pm. Free. BookPeople, 521 S. Main St, Moscow. (208-882-2669) CHRISTIAN PARENTI Presentation by the investigative journalist and author, on with proceeds benefiting KYRS Radio. Oct. 20 at 7 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. kyrs.org (747-3012) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM Performance poetry competition open to all, with audience judges scoring poems and poets. Oct. 20, sign-ups at 8:30 pm, starts at 9 pm. $5. The Lantern, 1004 S. Perry. spokanepoetryslam.org (315-9531) EMPIRE OF BONES BOOK LAUNCH Release party for the third book in the “Ashtown Burials” series by N.D. Wilson. Oct. 22, 5-7 pm. Free. BookPeople, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669) KATHLEEN FLENNIKEN The Washington state poet laureate reads from and discusses her work. Oct. 22 at 7 pm. Free and open to the public. WSU Museum of Art, Pullman. libarts.wsu.edu NIKI SIBLEY Presentation by the REI employee and ultramarathon runner. Oct. 23 at 7 pm. Free. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) GONZAGA VISITING WRITERS SERIES Presentation by award-winning poet Lisa Olstein. Oct. 23 at 7:30 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6681) NORTH IDAHO READS Author Erica Bauermeister will talk about her book “School of Essential Ingredients,” Oct. 23-25, times and locations of talks vary, Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library and other North Idaho libraries. cdalibrary. org (208-769-2315) PANEL OF POETS Area poet laureates Kathleen Flenniken, Diane Raptosh, Kenn Nesbitt and new Spokane poet laureate Thom Caraway discuss what poetry means in modern times in a panel format. Oct. 23 at 7 pm. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) POET TYEHIMBA JESS The award-winning slam poet reads his work and signs copies of his books. Oct. 23 at 7:30 pm. Free. University of Idaho Menard Law School, 709 Deakin Ave. uidaho.edu/ class/english (208-885-6259) 

MORE EVENTS

Visit Inlander.com for even more.

OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 57


NEW OWNERS • NEW LOOK

pm] am - 5:30 0 3 : 8 [ i. r Mon. - F (509) 444-7355 lander.com PHONE: BulletinBoard@In it Parkway E-MAIL: 1227 West Summ 1 : 20 IN PERSON Spokane, WA 99

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MEET THE RESCUERs EVENT BUYING Estate contents / household goods. See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

A Knight at the Auction

Silent & Live Auction Sat. Oct. 26th East Valley High School 15711 E Wellesley 6pm $5 at door Varsity Game Concession Stand,items Include: Front Row Graduation Tickets, WSU Football Tickets, Disneyland Tickets

October 26th AT 10AM - 5PM & October 27th AT 11AM - 4PM SPOKANIMAL 715 N. Crestline D Costume Contests D Wiener Dog Races D BRING YOUR PETS

Smokers Wanting to Quit Needed

The WSU Spokane Sleep Center needs smokers 22-40 willing to quit cold turkey. Earn up to $285. 509358-7756 for more info. IRB#13177

Meet Gay & Bi Locals

Send Messages FREE! 206-877-0877, Use Code 7973

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THESCOOPSPOKANE.COM 1

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58 58 INLANDER INLANDER OCTOBER OCTOBER 17, 17, 2013 2013

61. 1906 Massenet opera based on Greek myth 62. ____-retentive 63. Backstabber 66. Scorecard lineup 67. Jeans pioneer Strauss 68. “I’m not eating that!” 69. Poindexters 70. Original sin site 71. Green hue DOWN 1. One encountered in a close encounter 2. Drink with one’s pinkie up, say 3. Job title of 6-, 9-, 28- and 30-Down 4. Chums 5. “Sweet Child ____” (Guns N’ Roses hit) 6. Raymond Burr played him on TV

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32. Jeep or Land Rover, briefly 33. NBA or NFL position 35. No votes 37. ____ milk 38. Word that aptly can be made using three letters from “rowboat” 39. Shoemaker’s tool 40. It may be pulled 43. In a funk 44. Seminary subj. 45. Cavity filler’s org. 46. Shipwreck spot, maybe 49. ____ Park, home of the Pittsburgh Pirates 51. Battling 53. Thingamajig 55. Popeye’s Olive ____ 57. “Well, I declare!” 58. Second-rate 59. Blessed event?

5

15

23

ACROSS 1. ____ Today 4. Yankee Doodle’s ride 8. Two-finger keyboard shortcut in Windows 14. Was the right size 15. Mine, in Montreal 16. He quipped “Some of my plays peter out and some pan out” 17. Vote (for) 18. Daffy Duck has one 19. Works on a baseball glove again 20. Playful response to a good dig 22. Wrongs 23. MSNBC contributor Klein 25. One of the music industry’s Big Four 26. “Nanny ____” (2005 Emma Thompson movie) 27. Capital of Belarus 29. “____-haw!” 31. Wherewithal

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THIS WEEK’S ANSWERS ON PAGE 61

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“LAWYER”

7. ‘60s radical 8. Hussein : Obama :: ____ : Garfield 9. Calista Flockhart played her on TV 10. Theater companies 11. Country singer Yearwood

12. Actress Quinn of “Annie” 13. Myerson and Truman 21. Isn’t lacking 23. Birds that lay green eggs 24. 2002 A.L. Cy Young Award winner

Barry 28. Andy Griffith played him on TV 30. William Shatner played him on TV 34. Frat “T” 36. Wonder 40. Slang term for exercising one’s right to a 3-Down ... and a hint to this puzzle’s theme 41. Mild cheese 42. Name of SpongeBob SquarePants’ pet snail 43. Snorer’s victim 46. Airport security requirement 47. Grief 48. “Jeez ____!” 50. Old cash register key 52. Syndicated TV show whose name refers to the movie studio area in downtown Hollywood 54. Batik workers 56. It might be taken by a sailor 60. ____ Nordegren, ex-wife of Tiger Woods 64. Get along in years 65. “____ Carter III” (bestselling album of 2008)


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Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 59


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60 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Jeers

So You’re in Airway Heights It must be kismet. Late forties, casually business-like. You said my image was “fly,” that we might be a good match. What a lovely compliment-and what gorgeous gams you have under that flowing blonde crown. And, whoa! Brown eyes, too? My favorite combo. Truly, I like your style, and I agree--laughter (and dogs!) is life’s best medicine. Perhaps we could talk.

to get to know you, possibly go out on the town or kick back and game. Hope to hear from you, my email is Talnaus@gmail.com

You showed me that love is an action and not just words. I’m so sorry I wasn’t able to show you, as you did me. I failed at so many things but most of all, loving you as you did me. You came in and fathered my children as your own. You showed us how strong a family can be. You did what very few men are capable of. I appreciate you as a man, a friend, my loml and as a father. You tried your very best and in the end, I was the one who let you down. No matter where our lives lead us, my heart will always be with you. I hope you can forgive me for not being able to prove to you, my love for you. I hope that you find happiness in life. I know there is a special lady just waiting for a man as yourself, to cherish and love. If you do find her, plz just don’t forget about me. I’ll always love you, to heaven and back. My sadness can’t be heard but I’m wearing it on my sleeve. I miss you, I miss us. Farewell to you and many blessings.~ Miss Marci

wait for what the future has in store :) Remember, the best way to celebrate this day, is to remember nothing, have fun blacking out because you are finally LEGAL, but don’t worry, I’ll be there to help you recover in the morning...love you and Happy Birthday Kenz!

At The Bar You were more arrogantly confident than your mediocre physical appearance would suggest. But you made my heart skip a beat when you insulted my height (5’1”). You dazzled me with your smug assumption that I’m intellectually inferior to you because I’m female. Then, I secretly sizzled when you insulted my intelligence a second time (and a third time, and a fourth time) with your inane come-ons. I’ve just described 98% of the men in Spokane, have fun trying to figure out who I’m talking about! US Healthworks Spokane Valley To the medical assistant who helped me with my physical on September 24th. You; short beautiful Asian with dark hair. Me; tall with brown hair and blue eyes. I just want to let you know that you are gorgeous, and you have the cutest laugh. You made my whole visit enjoyable. From the moment you called me back from the waiting room, you were laughing despite of how busy it was, and you were incredibly laid back which made me a lot less nervous. I would love to see you again, maybe not at the docs office this time? Inland Imaging For Women Wednesday, 10:30 - 11:30ish am, 10-9-13. You were the very attractive and professional 40 something redhead opening the waiting room door for patients. I was the 50 something guy by window in black coat and good hair and glasses reading magazines while waiting for my silver haired, deaf mom. We exchanged glances both times you opened the door. I did not see a wedding ring on your finger and if you are single I would really like the opportunity to get to know you! Garland Cocktail Lounge I saw you on your first day of work, Just wanted to say that you are doing great. Sorry for fibbing to you on day 1. I hope you can forgive me but I hope I can make up for it with a little bit of Disney knowledge. I’ll see you around.

Pilgrims Coeur d’Alene It was last evening Saturday October 12, 2013 and I turned around from checking out at Pilgrims and you were in the next line ... long hair, kinda in the blond zone and the nicest smile ... and then I think you caught my eye again as you walked out to your car (white color). I was wearing a grayish plaid shirt and black cap. If you see this, you’ll know anyway. I hate being this shy and I feel like ... was it more than just a smile? And have a missed “the one” I’m looking for? Honestly, I’m half in despair over it. Well, I hope you see this ... and I hope you’re out there, somewhere, somehow.

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” 2nd Look Books You came in looking for Godspeed; by Baer.... Left with a black handkerchief in your right back pocket... I just *have* to know... Style.... Or code?

Cheers Babe I love you more than words could ever express. You are the most wonderful man a woman could ever ask for. Thank you so much for everything you do, I am so blessed to have spent the last three years with you and I look forward to each new day you are in my life. Good Samaritan Thank you to young Justen(sp?) from Liberty Lake who found my sons iphone and called us. You did the right thing and deserved the reward. Wish there were more like you! Stay on the right path. Good Karma coming your way. Congratz BabyMcnoodlebunz! I am so proud of you for working so hard at all your jobs!! Youre the best mom and Lover anyone could ever ask for and more! Im so proud of you and your new job you start today! Work hard and good things will follow! love you so much! xoxo Pepe My Last Goodbye Jason, 5 great and wonderful years we shared, together as one. You picked me up when I was down. You gave me strength to carry on, when I wanted to just quit. You showed me what real love was and how to love back. You are the most amazing person I’ve ever known.

Newly Constructed Centennial Trial Cheers! Cheers! Cheers! I wanted to give a BIG thanks to the add-on of the Centennial Trial that runs in front of Kendall Yards and under the Monroe St Bridge. I went running down there early Sunday morning and was overjoyed! The leaves changing and the steam running off the falls, I am so in love with Spokane! A Gracious Experience I cannot express the amount of overwhelming gratitude to the man that paid part of my bill at Rob’s Automotive on Argonne. We shared good conversation while waiting for our cars to be repaired and when I came back to pick up my car and pay my bill I was informed that a portion of my bill was paid by the man that I was chatting with earlier that morning. I have never been so surprised! I am a college student working full time and having had a recent surgery, times have been more than tough. This was the nicest and most gracious experience. I hope to one day be able to pay it forward. Thank you Stan.

Even After Hours To the Trader Joe’s staff October 10th who indulged this customer strolling through the front doors at 9:15pm, ignorant of 9:00 pm closing. Even though there were no other customers, the feel good TJ music was cranked up, the sample corner cleaned up, and the Trader Joe Elves had to move large restocking carts filling the isles so I could meander through with my red cart to shop, I remained clueless. Instead of a harsh “Lady, we’re closed”, I was greeted with smiles and “how are you today?” One register was open and the employee chatted in a friendly manner while ringing me up at 9:30. It was only when I asked about their hours, that I realized this register had been kept open to let me finish shopping. Further proof of Trader Joe’s awesomeness...it’s their staff that makes it so. Hello Batman Just to let you know the door to the Batcave is always open. Love you deeply. Your calls make my day complete and looking forward, with schoolgirl anticipation, to the next opportunity to gaze upon you. Batgirl My Love You make me smile, not just with my lips but with my heart and soul. I have found in you a sense of peace and belonging that I have always longed for, a partnership and love that I didn’t know existed in real life. It is with you that I share every aspect of this life, my good and my bad, it is only with you that I can truly let my guard down and be completely vulnerable without fear. Loving you has been, and continues to be a freeing experience. I have never felt so safe and loved, you make me strive to be a better woman by setting fire to my heart with every touch. I love you sweet man, thank you for making this journey

Happy Birthday Kenz! Cheers to my best friend, Makenzie who will celebrating her 21st birthday tomorrow! I can’t believe your birthday is already here, I know the anticipation has been killing you. I hope you have Sara L. is this week’s winner an amazing day and don’t of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! have too much fun without Send in your CHEERS so me because we both know I wish I could celebrate with you too can be enyou. I still can’t believe it was only tered to win 1 dozen recently we reconnected! You’re “Cheers” cupcakes at an amazing person inside and out, Celebrations Sweet and I know I’m not the only one Boutique. who appreciates everything you do for the people around you. I can’t

WINNER!!

To This Fallen Angel I last saw you 10/5. You a dark haired woman with an amazing smile and companion cube tattoo. I am a nice guy who is also a gamer. I would like a chance “I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


The new

PIZZABUrger IT’S HERE

Cheers

Cheers

Jeers

through life so beautiful. Dottie Moo

STA Bus Driver Each day I drop off my son to get on bus #27 to go to school. Each day the bus driver waves to me as I wait for my son to get safely on the bus. Today we were late and not going to make the bus. I was behind the bus and hoping to catch it further up the road when I noticed the bus driver stopped at my son’s usual stop when no one was waiting to get off or on. Props out to this driver for waiting for my son when he didn’t even know we were coming! Thank you so much.

is legalized abortion and taxation without representation. Granted these are controversial issues but are they moral and ethical? Grow up all you dupes popping the “red pills” of Matrix movie fame like they were your favorite color M&M’s. One day you’ll see that Conservatives are the only ones holding back the tide of liberal policies and agendums that will ultimately lead to another civil war in this country. Grow up! Shut off the television and put down your cell phone and try reading a book for once. The U.S. Bill of Rights entitles you to your opinions but it does not excuse ignorance nor stupidity.

Armed Forces Anthony, I admire your dedication to serve the country. Just think, some day we will all be free. I should have asked for your email, I lost my old contacts. I will miss you! Stay safe and return home, so we can talk some more. I will be here, and next time, the coffee is on me. Christina I Love You You’re going to make beautiful babies with spirits as beautiful as yours. I’m so excited to start a family with my lil brown princess. I love you. Our Journey It has been five years of friendship and three years of marriage since that fateful evening at The Blvd. Our meeting place is a parking lot now but the spark that was lit that night remains bright and continues to fuel the fire of our wonderful life. From pool playing and concerts to charity golf tournaments and dog parks, we continue on this journey together. I love you. Z Derrick I promised I would write a positive review a while back, and here it is. Every time I go into Pints Alehouse, I am apprehensive at first, nervous about trying new beverages, and you have proven me wrong time and time again. I cannot complain about that though, as you obviously have a passion for not only the very best beers of every kind I know of (and some I had never heard of). You remember your patrons, and offer honest, accurate and absolutely knock out service every time! I am truly impressed, keep it up! Manners To all the gentlemen on the 124 Express Bus. The bus was standing room only. Thank you all for acting like gentlemen and giving up your seats to others. It is so nice to see such thoughtful people. To the rest of the ridersthanks for making the ride as enjoyable as it could be under the sardine like conditions.

Jeers Not Pet Friendly A big thumbs down to north Spokane apartment complexes for their non-petfriendly attitude. My husband and I are responsible pet owners who love and treat our dog Maggie like one of the family. If we go, she goes along for the ride. We don’t lock her up inside while we go enjoy our lives. I understand that there are those unfortunate folks who own pets and “kinda like them” until they’re no longer puppies. This is not us! The South Hill -- tremendous apartment living options. Spokane Valley -also abundant upscale choices. The north side -- awful... unless you want to risk life, limb and/or property in some of the undesirable locations. And we need to live close to our north side jobs so we can do a Maggie welfare check at lunchtime. Check our references as pet owners! We’re not all bad.

Selfish Human Being B. You’ve used me for over a year to get what you want and then treated me like crap. I hate everything you represent and the pain that you’ve caused. Maybe all of that pot that you smoke has stripped you from all feelings of compassion toward others. You are a selfish, selfish human being and I know that karma will give you what you have coming. Gas Prices Jeers to Safeway gas stations. Have you noticed their signs? It appears their gas prices are generally about the same as all other stations, but read the fine print - Cash or Debit. Don’t pay with a credit card, they charge you an extra 10 cents a gallon. I won’t be going there again.

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when you become The Inlander’s friend, you get special treatment! chances to win free tickets exclusive deals • news alerts we’re also willing to twitter you... if that’s your thing.

Federal Budget Jeers to the Democratic Party and especially Harry Reid. Obstructionist is the kindest term I can come up with for Senate Democrats who held up the Federal budget and treated millions of Americans like undesirable rabble, just as juvenile punks do that care nothing for others - for it is all about them. Closing the WWII Memorial to men that lived through the horrific war and OUR National Parks just out of spite because you didn’t expect thinking individuals to stand up to your bullying behaviors is so infantile! Obamacare is the Law, as

A L T T A B P O N Y U S A B A R R I E I A M O F I T R E O I L S L I S P O P T A B U S E S O H S N A P M C P H E E I M E E Z R A M E A N S Y E E M I N S K Y S A N R C T U T E L E G A W L R A O Y S O A D A L E R B L U E A R W T A P N C I S L E T M Y Y M L Y O D O O D A D E Z E E N S Y M C R U M R A T A N A L A R I A N E U G H I V E L R R O S T E P E A N E D E D W E E B S LAWYER

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OCTOBER 17, 2013 INLANDER 61


Street Count

Mark Wilkins uses the bike lane on Howard and Second Avenue in downtown Spokane. JENNIFER DEBARROS PHOTO

How do you know if people are walking and biking more? You count BY LISA WAANANEN

T

he morning turns out to be chilly but clear, and by 8 am the sun is pouring down the length of Second Avenue. At the intersection of Second and Howard Street, a guy wearing sunglasses and a red beanie pedals out from the shadows into the sunlit intersection on a mountain bike. Bicyclist, male without helmet, northbound. A tall woman with straight brown hair and a matching parka pads by in sandals with a pink backpack slung over one shoulder. Pedestrian, female, southbound. A blonde woman in tailored jeans and heels briskly passes a man in a ball cap, who pauses in the crosswalk to watch her go by. Pedestrian, female, eastbound. Pedestrian, male, westbound. Mallory Atkinson observes from inside the cozy Taste Cafe, tallying the people who go by. It’s a morning that reminds everyone winter is returning, and customers stopping in for coffee chat with the barista about finding frost on the windshield. Atkinson sits at the window and makes a mark for each person who crosses the intersection on foot or on bike, many of them bundled up in hoods and jackets against the cold.

62 INLANDER OCTOBER 17, 2013

“Sometimes it’s been hard to tell whether they’re male or female,” she says. Later she will submit the tallies online, where they will be combined with tallies from hundreds of other volunteers to form this year’s data set for the Washington State Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project. Last year, the state of Washington estimated that about threequarters of bicyclists are men and about 85 percent wear helmets. About twice as many people were walking than biking. But the main purpose is to find out whether the state is making progress toward its goal of seeing people getting around by bike or on foot — and there’s no way to make measurable progress without measuring. So each year since 2008, volunteers have gone to designated intersections in cities across the state for two hours once a year to count the number of people walking and biking by. The date is always in late September or early October, when the weather isn’t extreme and schools are all in session. There are sensors and mechanical ways to count pedestrians — the City of Spokane has a camera set up for counts — but the state’s program

maintains that the quickest and most accurate way to collect this data is to send human eyes to observe. At Second and Howard, an older man with a black jacket zipped all the way up to his beard walks briskly with a lunch bag in hand. Pedestrian, male, eastbound. A group of high school girls with sagging backpacks and cups from Rocket Bakery shiver in leggings and flannels on their way to Lewis and Clark. Pedestrian, female, southbound. Times five. A skateboarder coasts through the intersection, pumping his hand to the music on his headphones like a challenge to the system. He’s the first “other” of the day. Atkinson tries to anticipate the direction people are headed — but she also writes in pencil. A man with a dark hood pulled over a dark-brimmed cap, hunched beneath a heavy pack, pauses after crossing the street. He turns east, the doubles back and heads north. At the end, the neat tallies on the page show no difference between the purposeful commuters and those who wander. So far the state’s reports show a slight increase in the number of bicyclists and pedestrians since the count started, but there’s no clear trend. Any given year, the weather could be terrible. Construction could change traffic patterns. Atkinson, who works in transportation planning, knows it will take more years of consistent counting to see meaningful trends. She points to the dedicated bike lanes on Howard Street with optimism. “I think you’ll be able to see some growth eventually,” she says. A few minutes after 9 am, Atkinson packs away her tally sheet and pencil. She and hundreds of other volunteers leave their posts at street corners around the state until it’s time for return for next year’s count. n


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Inlander 10/17/2013