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WHAT DO YOU THINK STATE LAWMAKERS NEED TO FOCUS ON DURING THIS YEAR’S LEGISLATIVE SESSION? JOHN FELT Simplifying all the bills that are coming out so the average person can understand them. Also I would say focusing on the homeless population; they need to find a program or angle that works and commit to it.

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A

s Mayor David Condon heads into his reelection year, now obviously having gone “all in” with his Girl Friday, Jan Quintrall, he has to know that the Scott Chesney affair of this past November isn’t going away. Announcing the firing, the mayor came across as genuinely perplexed, which in and of itself suggests an unsettling detachment. Most troubling, he apparently never asked Quintrall the two most obvious questions: 1. “Want to fire him, Jan? OK, but first explain to me how is it that he has almost unanimous support from the City Council, the Plan Commission, a half-dozen key developers and several neighborhoods?” 2. “Oh yes, and if, as you say, Planning staff morale is a huge problem, tell me how, in addition to all this constituent support, during his tenure we’ve cut permitting time in half?”

W

e know more about Quintrall than we did when this story first hit. I have seen her résumé — the very résumé that, according to Quintrall, even the mayor never asked to see. As she confirmed to the Inlander, Quintrall has a high school diploma, very limited college experience and no college degree. Her résumé is thin up until 1991, when she started working for the Colorado Springs Better Business Bureau. By 1996, she had moved up to director of marketing, then in 1998 it was on to Spokane. She came to the mayor’s attention through her successes in the Spokane BBB and at the Spokane Club. Once hired, she hit the ground running. A self-appointed art expert, she ordered murals in City Hall removed. She then set about transforming herself into a planning expert and shortly launched into a year of micromanagement, which involved “embedding” herself into the department. Last year ended with the Chesney firing. Along the way she became an engineering services expert, influencing the hiring of a marginally qualified director. Additionally, Quintrall never did complete a formal job application. So: no résumé, no job application… On what basis did the mayor hire Quintrall, a woman of little education and zero related experience? Beats me. Digging into all these goings-on is made all the more difficult because the Condon administration, over the past three years, has failed to produce a coherent organizational chart. And for the general public’s sake, you can find nothing online — what passes for our website is a civic embarrassment. For this column, I have relied on two public records requests. We learn that in early 2013, Quintrall gave

Chesney high marks. Here are two representative comments: “There are few individuals who you can count on as you can Scott.” Then, “Wow, I can honestly say that Scott is usually way ahead of most everyone else. He is always thinking into the future and looking for not just

solutions but big ideas.” About a year later, however, she was denouncing Chesney. She writes: “As a body, Planning has been in the crosshairs all year… ” (Apparently the Plan Commission, the City Council, key developers and several neighborhoods didn’t get the memo.) “When I moved back to the 3rd floor I have been working on shoring up and coaching Scott…” (“Coaching” Scott Chesney, who has years of planning experience in both the public and private sectors? How presumptuous! And it doesn’t end with Chesney, as Quintrall has also said that she tried to coach Mark Richard, himself a former two-term county commissioner. She likes that word: “coaching.”) “ …to get planning to perform at the level of excellence like the other departments in the division.” (Excellence in other departments? She moved code enforcement into Community and Neighborhood Services, a move most cities regard to be organizationally dysfunctional, because they know that planning should drive code and code should drive enforcement. By shoving enforcement into a separate division, we add to our number of separate silos, an outcome the mayor says he wants to avoid.)

A

s Quintrall’s objections to Chesney’s “team building” skills mounted, the record shows she became increasingly frantic. In one note she denounces Chesney for — get this — leaving his desk and having someone else take his phone call. Only “mayor gets that service,” her note indicates. Still, she continued to give Chesney “a high score in the outward facing portion of his job.” “Outward facing?” Here’s how I’d put it: Even though Scott was not at his desk, he apparently got results. And that’s where things stand in the River City castle as this election year swings into play. Stay tuned. n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Tending Our Garden BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

E

ven as a boy growing up among tenant farmers in the Italian countryside of the late 19th century, young Angelo Roncalli knew he would be giving his life to God. At the age of 8, he pledged himself to the Franciscan order. By 23, he was an ordained priest. Of course the world knows Roncalli as Pope John XXIII, who took the papacy at the age of 76 and was intended to be one of those caretaker popes who keeps the seat warm for a couple of years. Instead, he transformed the Roman Catholic Church and, for the first time, put a human face on the office. At the age of 14, young Angelo started keeping a diary — a habit he continued until his death in 1963. Those innermost thoughts were published as Journal of a Soul. I love that title — evocative, profound, beautiful — and it’s filled with the kind of wisdom that always captivated me growing up around Jesuits. My favorite: “We are not on earth as museum keepers, but to cultivate a flourishing garden of life and to prepare a glorious future.” In that sentiment, John XXIII stakes out a clear position in that age-old Christian split between striving to create heaven for all here on earth, or striving to win a place in heaven for yourself. John XXIII and Pope Francis both took the job at an advanced age after rising from humble circumstances. That’s in stark contrast to so many of those popes with noble bloodlines — many of whom were more into selling indulgences and launching crusades than caring for the poor. And Francis is also wading right into the hard work of making a difference. He brokered a deal to bring the United States and Cuba closer together. He’s calling out world leaders for despoiling God’s creation by doing nothing about climate change. And he’s taking on the Vatican’s version of gridlock by reforming the Holy See. All the while, he continues to refocus attention on the poor. (Watch him challenge America on that front when he is expected to visit New York City, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia in September.) In this time of individual greed trumping global good, the world needs a conscience. Pope Francis has embraced the challenge: “In society and the world in which we live, selfishness has increased more than love for others… men of good will must work… to ensure that love for others increases until it is equal and possibly exceeds love for oneself.” The world is looking for a new way forward. Like John XXIII, Pope Francis is sharing his soul — God’s voice, he would say — and, more and more, the world is listening. 

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COMMENT | HISTORY

Angela Davis, an internationally known professor and activist, is delivering a keynote address on WSU’s Pullman campus (in the CUB Senior Ballroom) on Jan. 22 at 7:30 pm. The event is free and open to the public.

Mothers and Leaders History often overlooks the women who powered the politics of the civil rights movement BY RACHEL DOLEZAL

T

hey didn’t have time for dreams, fame and fancy suits, but the black women of the ’50s and ’60s should be celebrated with much pomp and circumstance for starting, fueling and finishing the work of the civil rights movement. Later this month, we will welcome one of these civil rights icons, Dr. Angela Davis, to the Inland Northwest. These leading ladies behind the movement created organizations, energized committees, built volunteer networks and walked countless miles, while raising children

and working day jobs with pay as low as 15 cents per hour. We see black women and girls everywhere in photos and footage from the civil rights era, but we do not know their names or their stories. Events, tributes and films, such as Selma, which hits theaters this Friday, often showcase male leaders. We have no national holiday to ponder our mother leaders. History books have pushed the memory of black women to the margins, if their names are mentioned at all. As we anticipate celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on Jan. 19, let’s remember the women most responsible for creating change powerful enough to steer the course of our nation. Amidst the triple jeopardy of race,

class and gender oppression, these heroines inspired leadership and nurtured fresh vision. Rosa Parks might be one of the names we actually do hear about, but what we are often told is that she was just too weary to give up her seat that day in 1955. What we ought to know is that Parks carefully planned the day she refused to give up her seat, just 100 days after the murder of Emmett Till. She was an activist who worked for years campaigning against Jim Crow laws. She wasn’t too tired; she was intentional, strong and strategic. Jo Ann Robinson, who was focused for two years on planning a citywide bus boycott, issued a letter calling for the famous Montgomery Bus Boycott immediately after Rosa Parks was arrested. Black women arranged car pools and passed out thousands of flyers to spread the word. Even in the bitter cold of December and on to the next year, for a total of 381 consecutive days, women walked to work in protest. Fannie Lou Hamer learned of her voting rights at age 42. Excited, she registered to vote and was promptly kicked off the plantation where she had lived and worked for 18 years. Proving that life can begin in your 40s, Hamer began a political career working as a voting rights activist. She later ran for Congress and aspired to be president of the United States. Septima Poinsette Clark deserves infinite regard and adulation for effectively teaching 132 children of all ages in one classroom. Apparently a woman with infinite energy, Clark taught night classes for illiterate adults after her day job. On her weekends, she petitioned for school reform and acquired 10,000 signatures in a single day, which changed school policy in Charleston, South Carolina, to allow black principals in 1920. Let’s also remember that if it hadn’t been for Ida B. Wells drawing international attention to lynching in America, the impact of Mamie Till’s choice to let the world “see what they did to my baby” wouldn’t have ricocheted around the globe with such powerful force. The acquittal of Emmett Till’s killers sent international shock waves, and 100 days after his murder, Rosa Parks strategically refused to give up her seat. The civil rights movement was born from the tears of a grieving mother, the determination of an activist and the support of a cohort of organized women who refused to quit before the job was done. “There’s a Chinese saying, ‘Women hold up half the world,’” says Julian Bond, civil rights activist and historian. “In the case of the civil rights movement it’s probably three-quarters of the world.”  Rachel Dolezal, formerly of the Human Rights Education Institute in Coeur d’Alene, is president of NAACP Spokane and teaches courses in art, Africana history and culture at area universities.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

Reaction to the death of Idaho mother Veronica Rutledge, who was accidentally shot and killed by her 2-year-old son after he accessed a loaded gun in her purse while at a Hayden Walmart on Dec. 30.

KËLLY ZIMMERMAN: Leaving a loaded gun within reach of a child seems to be the opposite of “responsible gun ownership.” SARAH EDEN: A special “pocket” doesn’t make it childproof. If you like guns and want to “carry” get a holster you wear on yourself. Come on, a zipper is not so complicated. Obviously a 2-year-old can figure it out. If the toddler was raised around guns he wouldn’t be allowed to touch them at all. A 2-year-old is not of the physical or mental capacity to understand gun safety. CORY HARRINGTON: I can’t believe some of the things people are saying about this lady. Her poor family. Let them mourn the loss of their family member. Yes, this was an accident that may or may not have been prevented. It’s not our place to judge her. And for people asking why did she bring a gun in Walmart — why not? It’s her right. LEROY BYRD: All too true. Knowing proper gun safety and practicing it are two different things. I don’t consider the mother a horrible person for owning and carrying a firearm. I do consider her to be irresponsible for leaving it within reach and without a safety active. It was not the gun’s fault for this, nor was it the child’s. It was an awful, preventable mistake. JESSE ACOSTA: You have a little machine in your purse, riding next to your kid in a shopping cart. That little machine’s whole purpose is to end the life of whatever is on the opposite end of the barrel. A toddler is too young to comprehend those facts. Nobody should feel that comfortable because their purse has some special pocket. MONIQUE NEWMAN: It was a sad mistake. One that cost this mother her life. Drivers make mistakes on the road daily, mistakes that take lives; I don’t hear huge arguments about rights to get a driver’s license. My sympathies go out to this family. And I pray that rather than causing more debate about gun rights, it can be used as a lesson learned. WENDY HINSHAW: Judgmental monsters. It was a tragic accident. Can you imagine how this poor child is going to feel when he gets older?! And it’s only going to be worse when he Googles his mother’s name and all these hateful comments pop up. Get off your high horses and show some compassion. 

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Shorty’s Last Dance

A photo of Delbert Belton that police recovered from his cell phone.

Remembering Delbert “Shorty” Belton

H

e liked tall blondes. And short ones. And brunettes too. Before he died in August 2013, Delbert Belton, or “Shorty” as his friends called him, loved to dance. It didn’t matter with whom. On Saturday nights, he’d walk into his favorite spot, an old country bar in Mead called the Lariat Inn, no taller than 5 feet in jeans and cowboy boots, hand raised level to his forehead like a sea captain or a prospector. Mar Kloepfel, one of the cooks, called it his “Indian look” — surveying his surroundings, searching for treasure. Then, with a cheeky grin and a twinkle in his eye, he’d approach a single lady at her table, hold out the palm of one hand and point the other toward the dance floor. He may have been

BY DEANNA PAN 88 years old, but no woman ever turned him down. So it was a shock to those who knew him — particularly the Lariat’s Saturday night crowd — when the news unspooled that Belton had been left for dead at the Eagles Lodge parking lot, bleeding and barely conscious. Police found him in his dusty, green 1995 Ford Contour, hardly recognizable, wedged between the front seats with his head on the console, left leg tangled in a seat belt. Belton died the next morning at Sacred Heart Medical Center. His funeral was closed casket. As of press time, one of the suspects in Belton’s murder, 17-year-old Kenan Adams-Kinard, was expected to plead guilty later this week. AdamsKinard’s co-defendant, 17-year-old Demetrius Glenn,

was scheduled to go to trial on Monday. Police characterized Belton’s death as a strongarm robbery turned fatal. Belton, a World War II veteran, most likely fought back. The sad irony, his friends and family say, is that he was generous to a fault, a fact, they worried, that some of the ladies he knew took advantage of. He worked on his neighbors’ cars for free, and he once let a down-on-his-luck buddy move into his Hillyard home with him. On the afternoon of his beating, he was helping restore a friend’s son’s baby-blue 1965 Chevy pickup. That was the kind of guy Belton was — “just a peach,” his former brother-in-law Roger Day would say, “a peach of a guy.” ...continued on next page

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 13


NEWS | CRIME

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ne of 13 children, Belton was born in 1924 in Sunnyside, Washington, where his parents worked in the hop fields. Before his family moved to Spokane, he spent much of his childhood living in a cabin on a mountain top in Ford without indoor plumbing or electricity. As a young man, he joined the Army at the start of WWII and fought in the Battle of Okinawa. He was wounded overseas and returned home a different man. “Shell shocked,” his nephew Steve Belton remembers. He got a job at Kaiser Aluminum and worked his entire career there. Sometime after he got back from the Pacific, Belton fell in love with a woman, Myrtle Alice Day, and got married. Roger Day says his sister was a real “peach,” too. At the Lariat, they called her “Giggles” because of her beautiful and unusual laugh. For more than 20 years, she and Belton would have their morning coffee there. She took hers with cream; he added a pinch of

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Sweet’N Low. Years later, no one knew they got divorced because they never stopped dating. As his nephew Steve says, “he wasn’t willing to let her go.” They went to the movies together and watched wrestling on Sundays. In the evening, Belton would pick her up and take her out to eat at the Sportsman Cafe down the street from the Lariat until one night in 2008, when she suffered a massive heart attack in front of him at dinner. And Belton was devastated. “Stevie,” he used to tell his nephew, “I am just so incredibly lonely.” He didn’t know what to do.

W

hen a certain song plays at the Lariat — Wilson Pickett’s “Mustang Sally” or Johnny Cash’s “Orange Blossom Special” — his friend Angie Saunders will remember, “that’s Shorty’s song.” For a moment, she’ll look at the dance floor and wonder where he is. Belton spent his last Saturday at the Lariat.

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LEFT: Delbert Belton playing pool at the Lariat. COURTESY OF TED DENISON ABOVE: Belton and Myrtle COURTESY OF IAN DAY Another night, like any other, nursing a $2 Miller High Life Light and dancing with his friends. They called his signature move the “Shorty Shuffle.” It was all in the shoulders: Elbows out. Fists together. Dip to the right. Dip to the right. Dip to the left. Dip to the left. All the while, he’d tap his leather boots to whatever country-western band was playing. Belton was hard of hearing, but he didn’t miss a beat. After Myrtle died, Belton still went to the Lariat every morning for coffee and sat in the same chair in the back by the register. And on Saturdays, he’d come back around 8:30 to dance. But he still missed Myrtle. He staked out a plot in Greenwood Cemetery as close to hers as he could find. He carried her picture everywhere he went. When police bagged Belton’s wallet and photographed its contents for evidence, they found among the punch cards and scrap paper a black-and-white photo of “Belton, Myrtle A.” snipped from the obituary page in the newspaper. “She was a great woman,” he’d say. He’d call her the love of his life. And he’d say he couldn’t wait to see her again. He couldn’t wait to dance with her.  deannap@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST ON INLANDER.COM More Inlander news every day

PHOTO EYE PLUNGING INTO 2015

WHAT’S POPULAR?

In last week’s issue, we looked back at the biggest news and culture stories from 2014. But we wanted to find out which stories you were actually reading — at least online. So we examined our our analytics data and tabulated the past year’s 10 most clicked-on Internet articles. From ZOMBIES TO BIGFOOT, Dr. Who to Adam Morrison, “Date Grape Koolaid” to Dawn of the Donut, the most popular stories in 2014 were certainly an interesting mix. Check them all out at Inlander. com. (DEANNA PAN)

THERE WILL BE NOISE YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The long tradition of kicking off the new year with a bracing ice bath continued this year at Sanders Beach in Coeur d’Alene. At noon on Jan. 1, a crowd of hundreds rushed into the 40-degree water for the “Polar Bear Plunge.” Most of them rushed out just as rapidly, huddling around a bonfire or slipping back into warm clothes.

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The first SPOKANE CITY COUNCIL meeting of the year was uncharacteristically dramatic, with an exasperated Council President Ben Stuckart gaveling the meeting to a close early and storming out during the public comment period for a controversial initiative related to how Spokane police handle suspected undocumented immigrants. At issue was a proposed ballot initiative from Spokane resident Jackie Murray, which was supported by a group called Respect Washington, that would reverse a city policy that prohibits city employees, including police, from inquiring about someone’s immigration status. After an unruly public comment period, the council took no action on the initiative, which will be vetted by the city before supporters can start gathering signatures to get the measure on the November ballot. (JAKE THOMAS)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Ante Up Coeur d’Alene Public Schools will ask voters for a $15 million levy; plus, cracking down on jailhouse snitches TEXTBOOKS AND OPERATIONS

Christa Hazel, board chair for COEUR D’ALENE PUBLIC SCHOOLS, walked into the board meeting Monday night expecting to approve a supplemental levy without an increase in funding. But by the end, Hazel and the board voted to present the voters with a $15 million dollar levy — an increase of more than $2.2 million over current funding levels. The facts, Hazel says, are what changed her mind. “I had a teacher last night in tears,” Hazel said Tuesday morning. “She’s in tears because she has an art class with no budget for supplies.” Just to have materials, Hazel says, the students have to run fundraisers. Some textbooks had become so tattered that students weren’t allowed to take them home, and others — pushing 15 years old — have become vastly out of date with current curricula. The levy would include funding for more materials, new textbooks and lower class sizes. Like in Washington, Idaho schools have increasingly been forced to use levies to fund basic educational needs. But unlike Washington, Idaho doesn’t have a court deci-

sion legally requiring its lawmakers to fund education at higher levels. Trustee Tom Hearn’s motion to increase the levy amount even higher to pay for district-wide full-day kindergarten was rejected by the rest of the board. But in the end, every trustee but Terri Seymour — who wanted to keep the levy at its current level — agreed to ask voters in March for $15 million. That’s a little over a $160 annual property tax increase for people with $150,000 houses. A school levy requires a lower margin of victory than a bond used for construction projects, but in tax-averse North Idaho, selling a tax increase is tricky. “It’s always a challenge,” Hazel says. “But I think it’s a worthwhile challenge.” — DANIEL WALTERS

UNRELIABLE TESTIMONY

Inspired by a 2009 wrongful conviction case involving three Spokane Valley men, two Washington state lawmakers are planning to introduce companion legislation next session intended to keep criminal INFORMANT TESTIMONY out of court. Sen. Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley, and Rep. Marcus Riccelli, D-Spokane, have been working on their bipartisan bills with Duane Statler, the father of Paul Statler, who, along with two of his friends, was convicted in 2009 of robbing a couple of drug dealers. The only evidence against men was testimony from a jailhouse informant, who testified in exchange for a lighter sentence. In 2010, the Inlander examined the case and discovered evidence that the informant and his friend had pinned the crimes on someone else to protect themselves and the people who were actually involved. After spending four years behind bars, the three men’s charges were finally dismissed in July 2013.

Padden and Riccelli’s bills would conform Washington state law with higher federal standards regarding the use of informant and accomplice testimony in criminal proceedings. “The folks lost four years of their life,” Riccelli says. “The bottom line is one of the leading causes of wrongful conviction in our country is the issue of informant testimony, and our founding principles are based on a judicial system that will treat people fairly.” — DEANNA PAN

DOWN ON DRONES

In a new report, oversight inspectors found U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION drone border patrols overly costly and minimally effective, issuing a recommendation to abandon $443 million in new spending on the program. Border officials challenged those findings, saying inspectors did not recognize numerous achievements. Homeland Security inspectors released their critical report last month, citing high maintenance costs, low flight hours and dubious benefits. Inspectors found the Border Protection’s drone fleet costs close to $12,255 per hour of flight time, and contributed to less than 2 percent of apprehensions. Most of the drone flights patrol the southern border, but officials have confirmed a drone crew out of Grand Forks, North Dakota, does patrol as far west as northeast Washington since 2008. In a news release, Border officials argue drones assisted with the seizure of thousands of pounds of marijuana and cocaine in addition to hundreds of illegal weapons. Inspectors estimated the drone program cost $62.5 million in 2013, concluding another $443 million in proposed spending could be put to “better use.” — JACOB JONES

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tiny, one-way section of Wall Street in downtown Spokane has set two groups on a potential collision course: In one lane, public transit and its touted Central City Line; in the other, a national retailer that business interests hope to lure to the area. Downtown Spokane Partnership, a nonprofit that advocates on the behalf of downtown businesses, is courting the prospective retailer. (Sources won’t name the company publicly.) To seal the deal, DSP is pushing the city to hand over 17 feet of the public right of way on Wall to the prospective business. The Spokane Transit Authority, meanwhile, is eyeing the street as a key part of its future Central City Line route. E. Susan Meyer, CEO of the Spokane Transit Authority, says the bus serving the line will look and function much like a streetcar and will traverse a 3-mile route from Browne’s Addition through downtown, up to Gonzaga University and over to Spokane Community College. That intersection on Wall, she says, is an important part of that route, which has been in the works since 2009, and if it were to become unavailable to buses, it would make planning the route more difficult. “What we don’t want to do is just eliminate Wall Street as an option for the Central City Line in any way,” says Meyer. Jan Quintrall, director of the city’s Business and Developer


An mystery national retailer is eyeing the the Northwest corner of Wall and Main for a new location. JACOB H. FRIES PHOTO Services division, wouldn’t say who the potential retailer is, but noted that it’s “high profile.” She says that a business can apply to have the city vacate the right of way, which is ultimately approved by City Council. Meyer says the 17 feet of space being requested for the prospective owner would still allow enough room for the bus serving the route to get through, and that DSP has been receptive to the concerns of the STA. In the past, DSP, which did not respond to several requests for comment, has had plans for parts of Wall Street that haven’t always aligned with the STA’s goals. Spokane City Councilman Jon Snyder says that late last year, DSP President Mark Richard came before the city’s planning and development committee with an idea to shut down Wall Street to all vehicles in order to attract more pedestrian traffic. “That’s kind of a non-starter, as far as I’m concerned,” says Snyder of his reaction. He says that downtown businesses rely on the street for delivery trucks. Snyder also wants to make sure that Wall Street is open to bus traffic, saying that “good bus service and good transit is so crucial to keeping downtown on an upward swing.” Business groups have clashed with the STA before, accusing the Plaza of being a magnet for loitering and unsavory activity that hurts the economic vitality of downtown. Over the summer, DSP, Greater Spokane Inc. and Visit Spokane all raised concerns about a proposed redesign of the STA Plaza. The trio of groups called for removing any non-transit-related features such as retail or meeting spaces. They also called for shrinking the interior of the plaza to deter loitering. In response to their concerns, the STA board voted in December to revise its plan for the Plaza. Meyer says that the DSP is a significant stakeholder, and the STA wants to work with them. “If we can accomplish some of what they want to accomplish and have the line open, that would be great,” she says. “But it will require negotiation.” n

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 19 CdaCasino_010815_12V_GG_NEW.jpg


2015

LAWS &

Civil rights, gas taxes, medical schools and much more: What’s facing lawmakers in Olympia and Boise as they head back to work OLYMPIA

A LITTLE MORE MONEY, A LOT MORE PROBLEMS Washington state lawmakers make predictions for the upcoming legislative session BY DEANNA PAN

T

he session hasn’t even started and backroom budget talks have already begun. During this session, opening on Monday, lawmakers will be tasked with negotiating a multibillion-dollar, two-year balanced budget. If history is any indication, it certainly won’t be easy. In 2013, lawmakers spent six months — including two special sessions — in Olympia, debating the details of the most recent operating budget. They finally passed a spending plan two days before their deadline, averting a government shutdown in the process.

20 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

This year, lawmakers face an even more challenging budget cycle — one that House budget writer Rep. Ross Hunter, DMedina, has deRep. Kevin Parker scribed as “worse than we’ve seen in many decades.” Washington is expected to collect an additional $2.9 billion in revenue in the next two years, an 8 percent increase in economic growth, but that won’t be enough to cover all of the

state’s competing expenses. According to an analysis by the Washington Budget and Policy Center, resources will fall $4.5 billion Rep. Marcus Riccelli short. House Democrats and Gov. Jay Inslee have floated new tax policy proposals in order to raise more revenue. Republicans, as expected, aren’t supportive. “We are still coming out of the

recession,” says Rep. Kevin Parker, R-Spokane. “The No. 1 rule is you do not raise taxes during a recession or the aftermath of recovery.” “For too long we’ve been saying ‘do more with less’ and what we have been doing is less with less,” says Rep. Marcus Riccelli, D-Spokane. “What we need to do is pass a budget that reflects our values as a state… and not on the backs of our most needy.” Prepare for another long and difficult legislative session. As they cobble together a budget compromise, here are the big issues lawmakers will be talking about:


DISORDER EDUCATION

Once again, public education will top legislators’ list of priorities this year. In the 2012 McCleary case, the state Supreme Court ruled that Washington is failing its constitutional duty to amply fund basic education and ordered the state to fully fund it by 2018. Lawmakers made their first down payment on the McCleary decision in the most recent budget cycle, allocating almost $1 billion in additional funding to K-12 schools. But many education advocates felt that wasn’t enough, and so did the state Supreme Court. Dissatisfied with the legislature’s progress, justices held lawmakers in contempt this fall. According to the Budget and Policy Center, the legislature needs to invest $1.7 billion in the 2015-17 biennium in order to meet its deadline. “It’s clear that we have a constitutional and moral obligation to fully fund basic education, and this is the legislative session where we need to deliver on that obliga-

MENTAL HEALTH

Washington’s well-publicized shortage of public mental health beds has triggered two major lawsuits that the legislature will be forced to reckon with: In August, the state Supreme Court ruled that the practice of “boarding” mental health patients in emergency rooms when state hospital beds aren’t available is unconstitutional. A second suit, filed in September, is challenging the time it takes the Department of Social and Health Services to conduct mental health evaluations of jail inmates. Complying with the court’s ruling will cost the state $58 million. Inslee’s budget proposal would increase mental health treatment capacity by funding 145 new

tion,” says Sen. Andy Billig, D-Spokane. “I think the legislature will come to agreement on the full funding of education, and that means we will find the bipartisan approach to new revenue.” Compounding the state’s budget woes is the voter-approved, class-size-reduction Initiative 1351. The ballot measure passed by a narrow margin in November without any funding mechanism attached. The state Office of Financial Management estimates that the cost to fully fund the initiative will total about $2 billion over the next biennium. Billig’s colleague, Sen. Michael Baumgartner, R-Spokane, says he’d like to see that initiative sent back to the voters this year, but with a two-penny sales tax increase included. Although changing or repealing the initiative would require a significant two-thirds vote in the legislature, Baumgartner doubts lawmakers will enact the measure.

“At the end of the day, that class size initiative — there’s no funding for it, so it’s hard for me to see how it will be implemented,” he says. Local lawmakers are also committed to laying the groundwork for Washington State University to establish a medical school in Spokane next session. Baumgartner and Riccelli are planning to introduce bipartisan bills to overturn a 1917 state statute giving the University of Washington a monopoly on medical education in the state. Once that law is changed, WSU will need $2.5 million from the state to pay for its medical school’s accreditation — a drop in the budget’s $30-plus-billion bucket. “We need more primary care physicians,” Riccelli says. “There’s a huge economic development [benefit] to moving forward with this medical school, whether it be biomedical research or just ancillary jobs created.”

beds to prevent boarding and 35 new beds to reduce jail wait times for mental health evaluations. Parker says he would like to see a “more equity-based number of beds on the east side of the state.” Meanwhile, Riccelli is working on new legislation aimed at improving law enforcement interaction with people who threaten or attempt suicide. His legislation was drafted in response to the shooting death of Sheena Henderson at Rockwood Cancer Treatment Center last July: Henderson, 30, was shot and killed at work by her estranged husband, Chris Henderson, before he turned the gun on himself. Two months earlier, he had been detained by police and

transported to the emergency room after making suicidal threats with a gun. Riccelli has been working with Henderson’s father on the bill since August. Riccelli’s proposal would require law enforcement officers responding to reports of threatened or attempted suicide to take people into custody and deliver them to the emergency room if the officer believes they are a credible threat. Otherwise, under Riccelli’s bill, the officer must report the incident to a designated mental health professional who can determine whether an involuntary detention is needed.

MED SCHOOL WSU is seeking $2.5 million from the state to pay for its medical school’s accreditation.

RULING This summer, the state Supreme Court ruled that “boarding” mental health patients in ERs is unconstitutional.

CONTINUES ON NEXT PAGE

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TRANSPORTATION

Amidst all of these budget pressures, what are the chances Spokane will see its long-awaited North-South Freeway funded and extended to I-90? Sadly, not good. Although a transportation package is in the works, “the odds are probably more likely than not that one does not come forward this year,” says Parker. “If we see one, my thought is we’ll see one pared down.” Baumgartner is more optimistic. “I think there’s a chance,” he says. “The maintenance budget is going to dry up essentially next year. There’s going to be a more pressing need to reform the transportation system so that we get more value than we have now.” One of Inslee’s tax proposals includes a cap-andtrade program, designed to curb greenhouse gas emissions by taxing the state’s largest industrial polluters. The carbon tax revenue, Inslee said, would fund a $12 billion transportation package over 12 years. That plan allocates $432 million for the North-South Freeway, about half of what’s needed to build the connection to I-90. “That’s just not good enough,” Baumgartner says. “I’m adamant that nothing will pass unless it has full funding.”

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22 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

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The governor’s tax proposals are guaranteed to inspire the greatest debate at the statehouse next session. In December, rolling back an earlier campaign promise not to raise taxes, Inslee announced his 2015-17 spending plan, which includes implementing new taxes on carbon emissions, capital gains and cigarettes, in addition to closing $282 million in tax-break loopholes. Altogether, his plan would increase state spending by $5 billion over the next two years, to $39 billion. While Inslee’s tax proposals may sail through the House, his plan will meet fierce opposition in the anti-tax, Republican-controlled Senate, where lawmakers argue that the state’s 8 percent revenue growth should be enough to work with. The most straightforward solution to Washington’s budget problem, Baumgartner says, “would just be to grow spending across the board [almost] 10 percent.” “There’s always a persistent drumbeat in Olympia: there’s not enough money; there’s not enough money,” says Baumgartner. “If you have 10 percent more money and you have trouble balancing your budget, you have a spending problem, not a budget problem.” Despite the slight uptick in economic growth, the state’s tax resources are still below pre-recession levels, says Rep. Timm Ormsby, D-Spokane. “That’s just making up from the precipitous fall in revenue from the Great Recession,” says Ormsby of the state’s forecasted revenue growth. “When you compare that to caseload growth, inflation and population, we are basically back to where we were well before McCleary, 1351, the mental health lawsuits and initiatives to increase early learning opportunities and services for the elderly and infirm.”  deannap@inlander.com


BOISE

THE STATE OF ONE-PARTY RULE The issues on the legislature’s radar this year — civil rights legislation, Obamacare, transportation funding and control of federal lands — could further expose intraparty rifts and reveal how strong (or not) support is for Butch Otter BY JAKE THOMAS

WILL IDAHO ‘ADD THE WORDS’?

In Idaho, same-sex couples can marry (as a result of a court decision that Gov. Butch Otter hopes the U.S. Supreme Court will reconsider). Regardless, it’s still completely legal to be fired or denied housing because of your sexual orientation or gender identity — unless you live in one of the state’s eight cities that ban such discrimination. Since 2007, a group of dedicated activists in Idaho have been trying to convince lawmakers to add the words “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the Idaho Human Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination in educational, housing and workplace settings. Although the legislation has never received so much as a hearing in past Gov. Butch Otter years, Cindy Gross, chair of the Add the Words, Idaho! campaign, thinks this is the year it will have the critical mass needed to become law. “There is absolutely no reason for them not to hold a hearing and pass it this year,” says Gross. She points to several public statements from influential Idaho Republicans suggesting that the legislation has a shot this year. The Idaho Statesman reported remarks from the House assistant majority leader saying that the legislation will receive a hearing. Otter has said publicly that he will sign the bill if it reaches his desk. And former Republican Gov. Phil Batt, the author of the Idaho Human Rights Act, has also called for an Add the Words bill to become law. Sen. Grant Burgoyne, a Boise Democrat and co-sponsor of the legislation, says that although he expects the legislation to eventually pass someday, he is a bit more cautious in his short-term forecast. He says that he’s not aware of any Republican who has stepped forward as a co-sponsor, and he’s not sure it has the momentum it

needs to reach the governor’s desk. Gross says that adding these protections to Idaho’s Human Rights Act are especially important now because newly married gay couples could draw more attention and discrimination. “We need to make it clear from the highest levels [of government] that [gay people] can go to work and not get fired because they have a wedding ring on,” she says. David Adler, a Boise State University political scientist, says that conservative lawmakers have come to realize that the measure is fundamentally about equality. He adds that if the legislation becomes law it will likely be accompanied by a bill providing for some exceptions to preserve religious freedom. “One would hope that it would be really narrow so as to not gut the [Add the Words] legislation,” he says.

EMBRACE OBAMACARE?

In November, a task force assembled by Gov. Otter made the same recommendation to state lawmakers for the third time: Take the money the federal government is offering and expand health care coverage to low-income Idahoans. For the third time, the Idaho Legislature might ignore that recommendation. The money would come from the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) that’s meant to expand Medicaid, the federal government’s low-income health insurance program for people who are too poor to buy private insurance on the state health care exchange. Although 28 other states (some under Republican governors) have accepted the funding and a recent study from the Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy found that taking the money would save the state $173 million over the next 10 years, it’s still not clear if Obamacare is still too politically toxic in Idaho for lawmakers to take the deal. “Up here in Northern Idaho, I gotta say we’re opposed to it,” says Republican Rep. Eric Redman, R-Athol,

who adds there is concern that the state will end up being saddled with the cost in the long run. Sen. Dan Schmidt, a Moscow Democrat who sits on the Senate’s Health and Welfare Committee, says he’s been pointing out to Republicans that the state ends up paying for the health care of uninsured people anyway through a special state fund, and it makes more fiscal sense just to expand Medicaid. He suspects that his Republican colleagues are at least considering it. Adler says that local chambers of commerce are also lobbying in favor of the expansion as a way to reduce local taxes, which pay for the health care of the indigent. He says that lawmakers might wait to see if Congress changes the Affordable Care Act first, but he at least expects a serious conversation among lawmakers to occur, adding, “I don’t think that there’s a guarantee that it will pass by any means.”

MODERNIZE TRANSPORTATION?

Idaho’s roads and bridges are in bad shape. It’s widely known that this is a problem, and it will likely come up in the legislative session. But no one’s sure where the money to fix them is going to come from when the mood in Boise hasn’t been favorable to raising taxes or fees. Gov. Otter is interested in the issue and formed a task force on modernizing transportation funding in the state, which found that transportation infrastructure is shortchanged by $262 million annually. “The current transportation revenue structure will not meet Idaho’s pressing or long-term transportation funding needs,” reads a report from the task force. Much of the state’s transportation funding comes from vehicle registration fees as well as a 25-cent-per-gallon gas tax, which hasn’t been raised since 1996. The task force report suggests raising these taxes and fees, but some lawmakers still aren’t sold. “As I’ve traveled around and talked to people, I find few people who say,

‘Yeah, I’d sure like to raise the gas tax,’” says Sen. Steve Vick, R-Dalton Gardens. There’s been some talk of shuffling funds to transportation infrastructure, he says, but that could also be problematic. “It’s the annual conundrum,” says Adler, who adds that lawmakers are usually optimistic at the beginning of the session that critical needs will be funded. However, this optimism collides with the reality of limited money.

TAKE BACK FEDERAL LANDS?

In the upcoming session, Idaho lawmakers will continue to pursue their goal of wresting control over large swaths of land in the state from the federal government. Proponents of the idea argue that states are better equipped to manage these lands, and extracting resources from them would bolster state finances. The idea is catching on in Western states where the federal government manages large portions of land. Idaho, where a Congressional Research Service study says 62 percent of the land is under the purview of the federal government, is no exception. A University of Idaho study released late last year threw cold water on this idea, finding that if the state took over management of federally owned lands, it could lose up to $111 million a year in increased costs associated with recreation facilities, wildlife protection and other expenses. Proponents of the idea are unfazed by the study’s conclusions. “I think it’s a pretty biased study,” says Redman, who mentions a study conducted by a trio of Utah universities that came to opposite conclusions. Idaho lawmakers passed a resolution in support of taking federal lands in 2013, and lawmakers like Rep. Ron Mendive, R-Coeur d’Alene, expect the momentum to continue. It would ultimately require congressional action for the dream to become reality, which Adler says is “not in the cards.” 

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 23


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Knowing the Unknowable Jennifer LaRue continues to push the boundaries of the local arts scene BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

P

Artist, writer and curator Jennifer LaRue has been shaping the region’s cultural landscape for four decades. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

utting Sigmund Freud in a pink garter set on the cover of her latest collaborative project was not her idea, but Jennifer LaRue can totally relate. “Repression is the most evil thing,” she says, noting that art allows people a unique opportunity to delve into complex things. Difficult things. Even ugly things like the sort of domestic violence, depression and abusive relationships that LaRue has experienced and then relayed to audiences over the years. “If we see, we cause change,” says LaRue, a well-known arts critic and journalist, curator and visual artist who’s been influential in the region’s cultural fabric for four decades. ...continued on next page

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 25


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

The debut issue of Terra Obscura, a new arts and literature journal that LaRue collaborated on.

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In 1983, an 18-year-old LaRue (née Salmi) relocated to Spokane from Hollywood with her larger-than-life actor father, Albert Salmi, and socialite mother. Art and writing enabled her to survive her mother’s furtive but vehement abuse, says LaRue, who came to embrace Spokane’s punk scene. Her first publishing effort was The Town Noose: Art-Opinion-Poetry in 1985 with Jeff Duty, a prominent member of the punk scene who was featured in the 2011 documentary SpokAnarchy!. In 1990 her parents were found dead of a murder-suicide (her father was the gunman) in their Spokane home. But her son’s birth and a small inheritance were cathartic for LaRue, who channeled her creative energies to benefit others. In 1994, she helped curate the first Raw Space exhibition, exiting once the city got involved. In 1994, she created Galaxy Gallery on the third floor of Auntie’s Bookstore with classroom space for kids, especially at-risk populations. In the late ’90s, she was a building program assistant for HUBS, District 81’s arts-based after-school enrichment program. In 2005, after years of strong feature writing, she created the Valley Verve artist profile series, which she still spearheads for the SpokesmanReview. In 2012, a story about an attack on a Spokane woman inspired LaRue to create FeFi — Feminine empowerment and Feminine intuition — a piece of jewelry that’s pointy enough to serve as a weapon. Although LaRue recently exhibited her paintings, words are her preferred medium. “Writing is my art,” she says. Now comes her latest creative endeavor: Terra Obscura, a new arts and literary magazine produced by LaRue, Roch Fautch, Jesse Swanson and Jared Lollar. They have published the first edition, and LaRue’s optimistic about its potential to create change.

“We’ll just keep moving forward,” she says. “[The magazine’s] main purpose is to undermine everyday things we take for granted,” says Lollar, a Whitworth University philosophy and theology graduate who spent four months on layout with Swanson in their shared basement apartment. Fautch, an artist who also specializes in custom concrete sculpture out of his Magicraftsman Studio, clarifies: “The combined stated interest is to feature more surreal and thought-provoking art and ‘absurdist prose,’” Fautch adds. “The four of us were those kids in school who were always in the back of the class causing trouble.” The first edition was 20 pages, which they hope to triple in the March issue, says Lollar. Although he’s headed to Africa via the Peace Corps, he’ll continue contributing, again teaming with Swanson to create custom advertising — which covers production costs — for places like Neato Burrito. The magazine (available at terraobscura.org) is mostly art, ranging from raw and gritty, like Ryan Babcock’s sexually graphic painting, to satirical, to surrealist like Fautch’s Dali-esque work. Writing includes free-verse poetry and LaRue’s introductions to the artists. Many of the artists featured in the magazine — Fautch, Babcock, Darrell Wilcox, Haley Wadddington — were featured in this summer’s “Art Invasion: Not From Here” exhibit at Missoula, Montana’s ZooTown Fringe Festival, a show that LaRue put together to allow edgier Spokane artists to show work their hometown galleries usually won’t put on the walls. LaRue’s role for both the ZooTown exhibit and the magazine was mostly curatorial. While she admits to being a micromanager, she prefers the title “muse.” “Make change,” she admonishes. “Don’t be a sheep.” n


CULTURE | DIGEST

Blood Alcohol Consequences

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

BY JACOB JONES

ALBUM | If the new Decemberists album was just Colin Meloy singing dictionary entries or a concept record about great horned owl mating rituals, I’d hardly be surprised. This Portland band is just weird enough to pull something like that. But their latest offering, WHAT A TERRIBLE WORLD, WHAT A BEAUTIFUL WORLD (out Jan. 20), is hardly so audacious. From the singles they’ve released so far, it’s more of a return to the genre-mixing of The Crane Wife than the power folk of 2011’s smash record The King is Dead. Check out the video for “Make You Better,” which features Nick Offerman as a Scandinavian talk show host.

S

ome hangovers never really go away. Days later, fear and shame still swim in the stomachs of 13 people now summoned to Spokane County District Courtroom No. 6. Many shift in their seats nervously. Eyes well up. As others returned to work on Jan. 2, these gathered few must face the bright, new year with dread. The courtroom sits silent. Everyone rises as Judge Donna Wilson takes the bench for the first DUI docket of 2015. “So everyone had a good New Year’s, huh?” the judge says. Working down the docket, the judge calls through the names. Jasmine, 19, faces charges she rammed her Audi station wagon into an electrical box before getting the

DISTILLED A SHOT OF LIFE

vehicle stuck up on some boulders (blood alcohol content, .147). Susan, 52, was caught driving 48 miles per hour along Interstate 90 with her headlights off (BAC, .086, just over the legal limit). “You could have been killed,” the judge tells them. Brad, 48, steps forward in a blue polo shirt and glasses. His attorney stands next to him, hair trim, suit sharp. Authorities say officers stopped Brad just after 11 on New Year’s Eve, speeding and drifting out of his lane. He explains he is heading to pick up his children, but fails a field sobriety test and refuses a breathalyzer. The prosecutor reads through the file. He has a previous BUI charge, boating under the influence. And he’s a local firefighter.

BY MIKE BOOKEY

“What?” Judge Wilson exclaims, adding, “How old are the kids?” Brad stands with his hands clasped at his waist. He says he has twin 12-year-old boys and a 5-year-old daughter. His attorney addresses the court a short while later, adding with sad irony: “[My client] is not just a firefighter. He drives the engine.” “Awesome,” the judge responds, turning to Brad. “You know better.” Wilson orders him released, but he must undergo eight random urine tests a month at $20 a pop. She continues down the docket. Brendan, 32, got picked up at 3:15 am on Jan. 1. His movements were “slow and labored” (BAC, .102). JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION Logan was found asleep in his truck with a loaded Glock pistol nearby (BAC, .144). “Law enforcement was overwhelmed by the smell of alcohol inside the vehicle,” the prosecutor adds. “The arrest decision was extremely easy.” Wilson releases them all after scheduling future court hearings. She warns them they must not use any drugs or alcohol: “You’re going to be clean as the driven snow.” They all shuffle out of the courtroom, their first appearance over, but a sickness churning still, the ache of regret and the weight of consequences to come. After the hearing, one defense attorney heads toward the exit as a colleague passes by. “You get some new clients from the New Year?” she asks. “You betcha.” 

HISTORY FARMING IN CDA The local food movement has a lot of people farming in their backyards, but rarely do they know about what sort of food was cultivated in the area back when folks had to grow their own sustenance. The Inland Northwest Food Network is providing some historical grounding for fledgling farmers and the generally curious alike with a presentation about the history of farming in Coeur d’Alene (Tuesday, Jan. 13, at 5:30 pm at the University of Idaho Extension in Coeur d’Alene). You’ll learn about the hunter-gatherer practices of the region’s Native Americans as well as how miners and Jesuit missionaries planted the area’s first crops. It’s a chance to put some history in your own garden.

TELEVISION | I couldn’t get into PARENTHOOD when it debuted in 2010. I think it was Craig T. Nelson. The dude is always Coach to me, ya know? But I stuck with it, first out of marital obligation and then out of true fandom. The sixth and final season returns from its hiatus on Thursday, Jan. 8 (10 pm, NBC) and sees the big, talented cast at its best, with a web of story lines that manage to convey real-life problems like unplanned pregnancy and heart attacks with a sincerity so often absent from network dramas. It’s clear there’s going to be some sadness in the final few episodes; I suggest you binge your way to the present and weep along with me. PODCAST | The premise is positively obnoxious: two guys watch Grown Ups 2, which they acknowledge is awful, every week for a year and then talk about it. But New Zealanders Guy Montgomery and Tim Batt own the obnoxiousness, which is why the show is titled THE WORST IDEA OF ALL TIME. The guys are nearing their oneyear goal and you can hear their sanity dwindling with every episode. Somehow, the nonsensical bantering about the inane movie doesn’t get as old as it should — especially when they talk about their love for Jon Lovitz — but you’re left really feeling for that pair. What a burden to bear. 

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CULTURE | COMEDY

Doug Benson is still getting high — now he just does it on the Internet with famous people.

High Laughter 25

$

ON STAGE: JAN 16TH - FEB 8TH, 2015

Doug Benson readies himself for a whole new year of comedy shows and podcasts BY LAURA JOHNSON

F

or a funnyman who started in stand-up, Doug Benson’s podcasts Doug Loves Movies and Getting Doug With High have put the former Last Comic Standing contestant on the comedy map — especially with the NPR-listening and stoner set. But he’s still telling jokes. This weekend, the 50-year-old blazes through the Knitting Factory with a new routine, differing from his recent Netflix comedy release Doug Dynasty. We emailed him some questions and here’s what he had to say.

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INLANDER: You’re usually the person conducting interviews on your shows; how do you like being on the other end? BENSON: I’m not crazy about it, to be honest. We’ll see how you do, but I tend to get the same questions over and over again, so it’s not much fun for me. But I want people to come to my shows, and I haven’t been to Spokane in a couple years, so let’s do this. Doug, you love movies (I’m the first to figure this out, I know). Which movies, out in theaters, are you excited about right now? Great first question! Although I guess the question about how I like being asked questions was the first one. Anyway, I’m not too crazy about this crop of Christmas releases. My favorite movies of 2014 came out earlier in the year, like Whiplash, Nightcrawler, 22 Jump Street, John Wick, Guardians of the Galaxy. I already have a favorite movie of 2015. I got to see Kingsman: The Secret Service a bit early — it doesn’t come out until February. But if you love spy movies and think the James Bond series has become too serious, check this one out. Your podcast Getting Doug with High is hilarious. How did you come up with the idea to film it? How did you go about the legal aspects of it? The dude in charge of the Video Podcast Network, a new venture that produces shows for YouTube, asked me if I’d like to do a show for the network. I said that yes I would, if it

would be a show about me getting high with my friends. And he said “OK!” Next thing I knew, it was actually happening. [Marijuana] is pretty much legal in California, especially if you have a medical marijuana card. I should bring the show to Washington state sometime, because it’s completely legal there now, as you know. Have you had to convince guests to come on the show, or is everyone pretty open to it? It’s tough to get people to do it. While we’ve had some amazing guests, lots of folks have said no because they don’t want their families to see it, or their employer if they work for Disney or something like that, and some people are just afraid of losing control on a live, unedited show. But I’ll have repeat guests if I have to. On to your other podcast Doug Loves Movies, how did you come up with the Leonard Maltin game? It’s something I used to play with my comedian friends Sarah Silverman and Brian Posehn. And yeah, it’s not easy. The game is devised so that anyone who doesn’t have a firm knowledge of movie trivia can still win by making another player guess. But it’s pretty exciting when someone gets a correct answer. In 2014, you released the comedy album Gateway Doug 2: Forced Fun. Will this soon be a trilogy? I’ve picked out a title for this year’s album, but all I can tell you is it will not have a “3” in the title. What continues to excite you about your job? I never know what’s gonna happen. Every time I walk out on stage, it can be a great show or a terrible show. That’s exciting. And let’s face it; most of my shows are great.  lauraj@inlander.com Doug Benson • Fri, Jan. 9, at 9 pm • $20 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279


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A

Sharing

IS

Caring

From shopping to cooking and cleanup, firefighters’ shared meals represent tradition and teamwork BY CARRIE SCOZZARO 30 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

Driver and paramedic Kasey Austin slices meat for sandwiches at Spokane Fire Station No. 2.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

t Coeur d’Alene’s Fire Station No. 1, there are 21 reasons shared meals matter. That’s the number of staff, in shifts of varying duration, whose livelihoods depend on teamwork created — or at least enhanced — by sitting down and eating together. And they graciously allowed us into their kitchens recently. “It’s just unique to this job, part of the bond of the service,“ says Don Bates, who serves on the red shift at Station No. 1. “The better bond we can have here, the more we can trust each other when we’re actually in a dangerous situation.” Lieutenant Dave Kovac, whom we met through IAFF Local 29, the union for Spokane firefighters, agrees. “It’s a teambuilding thing.” Kovac took us to Spokane’s Station No. 2 on North Foothills Drive for a “typical” noon lunch with B shift. Except that fire station schedules — sleeping, eating, training — get rearranged when calls come in, so noontime is always flexing. Even while grocery shopping, firefighters have to be ready to roll, which is why you see teams and their rigs at the market. While most stores accommodate such emergencies (typically, putting the food cart into the walk-in), what happens to meals in progress? “Sometimes they’re salvageable, sometimes they’re not,” says Coeur d’Alene firefighter Keith Benz, who on the day we visit is planning chicken tortilla soup, pulled pork and cornbread. The Coeur d’Alene crew’s living quarters — rec room, bedrooms, dining area, kitchen — are above the garage; the pole for dropping quickly to the rigs is just steps away from the kitchen. The stove’s shut-off valve is nearby. Mishaps occur, however. Coeur d’Alene Capt. Greg Rod says that 12 years ago, a pot of soup stock boiled out while the crew was training, automatically triggering alarms and a tongue-in-cheek assistance offer from central dispatch. He figures he’ll be ribbed about it until he retires. “It’s always nice if you can finish cooking. It’s even better if you can finish it and eat it,” says Spokane’s Kasey Austin. It’s not unusual, he adds, to call out cooking instructions to whoever isn’t on the call as you fly out the door. Sure enough, Austin’s “sous-chefs,” as he calls them, Jason Keen and Josh Sampson, step in to make lunch — smoked beef with barbecue sauce, green salad and Sampson’s flavorful pasta salad — as Austin departs. The smell of cooking meat lures people to the table. Fortunately, no call interrupts the feast. “Hot and lots,” quips Spokane’s Dean Carr. No kidding, says Rod. “Think about proportions and double that.” “Here you have to really think about budget,” says Benz. That’s because there are no free rides at our region’s firehouses. The city of Coeur d’Alene deducts $7 per shift for meals, while in Spokane Station No. 2, firefighters kick in $20 to $25 per month for


Spokane firefighters gather for a group lunch at Station No. 2. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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Firefighter Jason Keen slices a tomato for a salad. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO food staples like coffee, sugar, cooking oil (as well as newspaper and cable), then $8 per shift more for meals. Each station develops systems for shopping, food storage, even cleanup. Coeur d’Alene has one refrigerator and food locker per shift, while Spokane is more communal. A quick look inside either station’s fridge reveals condiments, spicy sauces, plenty of dairy, freezers full of meat. If someone hunts or fishes, they might donate a portion for a house meal. The same goes for cooking equipment above and beyond what the station provides. “I suspect those pans are older than I am,” says Kovac, nodding toward a row of cast-iron cookware. At both houses, personal lockers might include treats or something for particular diets, like vegan or Paleo. But outside of health reasons, bringing your own food is frowned upon, as is complaining about what’s served. LETTERS “If you don’t like the Send comments to cooking, then you’re going to be editor@inlander.com. cooking,” says Spokane’s Shane Skipworth. Coeur d’Alene firefighter Greg Thaxton, known for his chili verde, agrees: “There’s seven of us here, and no one wants to be the whiner or complainer.” He mentions a former colleague who didn’t like a particular ingredient, and thus got that ingredient served to him in every meal. “Things are a lot more health conscious,” says Keen, the station’s unofficial wellness coordinator and a Coeur d’Alene Ironman athlete. Fitness, of course, is required of all firefighters and both stations have a small workout room. Some traditions die hard, however. Floaters (hamburgers in gravy) still prevail in some Spokane firehouses, says Kovac. Pie and ice cream is a solid tradition for celebrating promotions, etc. The tradition of eating together, Kovac says, actually comes from when firefighters lived at the station. “It’s the one thing we do that’s constant,” he says. “Our trucks change, our uniforms change,” says Austin, “but not food.” n

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FOOD | BEER

Area 51 Taphouse product manager Bill Matthew pours a stout from River City Brewing. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Beers Aplenty

Area 51 Taphouse gives the Northside’s Onion a whole new vibe BY DAN NAILEN

K

en Belisle is giddy showing off the Area 51 Taphouse, the dramatic reimagining of the old lounge at The Onion’s Northside location. He runs his hand along the new bar, where one portion is cooled to 42 degrees to keep a sitting beer cold,

just a few inches from where another invisible strip stays heated so customers can lean their elbows in comfort. He points out the steel ornamentation throughout, created by an ad hoc welding shop that was on site for nearly two months.

The most dramatic new decoration, though, is a massive chalkboard overhead listing the 101 beverages available — via 51 taps and 50 bottles and cans — plus some Happy Hour food options. “It’s a state-of-the-art tap system,” says Belisle, coowner of the two Onion locations for 14 years. “It took three months to build it. The beer room downstairs is insane. We have a forklift to move the beers. There’s never any oxygen in the lines; when you blow a keg, there’s a valve that shuts it off. It’s just so cool, I feel like Scotty in the engine room!” Forty-five of the taps will rotate beers drawn heavily from the Northwest (plus a few domestics like Bud), while the others will flow with wine and cider. And one will be dedicated to A-51 Root Bourbon, a nitro-pushed elixir from Belisle’s own home recipe that he concocted from an 1880s-era drink once thought to cure malaria. “It’s Maker’s Mark ENTRÉE bourbon, but it’s got Get the scoop on the local root, some Cocchi food scene with our Entrée Americano, a booze newsletter. Visit Inlander. that’s hard to find,” com/newsletter to sign up. Belisle says of the 80-proof spirit, adding that he plans to make an absinthe mint julep for the nitro tap as well. Fun seems to be a major motivating factor for Belisle, who notes the addition of Area 51 “fires up the staff, and it fires me up, too. We’re just having a ball.” He anticipates redesigning the downtown Onion in the next few years as well. n Area 51 Taphouse at The Onion • 7522 N. Division • Open Sun-Thu, 11 am-11 pm; Fri-Sat, 11 am-midnight • theonion.biz/area-51 • 482-6100

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Apples on Tap ANTHONY’S Whiskey Barrel’s Cider House gives Pullman a place to get to know hard cider BY JO MILLER

A

t Whiskey Barrel Cider Company, owners Trent Maier and Brian Augdahl like to keep it simple. A plain, blackand-white aesthetic defines their logo, a stick figure illustrates their labels and the hard cider is made from nothing but filtered juice and yeast that’s fermented for about three months. “I have a pretty minimalist approach to the cidermaking process,” says Maier, who started the company in Pullman with his friend Augdahl in 2012. “I don’t add any chemicals and don’t have a lot of stabilizers. I work with the fruit we get and let it do its own thing as much as possible.” Maier notes two schools of thought on cidermaking: a newer model, which Whiskey Barrel exemplifies, where cidermakers use apples that are easy to get, and the older approach. “The old-school thought process more closely resembles more traditional winemaking, where they use traditional cider apples,” says Maier. Those traditional apples are a bitter variety that’s hard to come by, so he sources apples grown mostly in Washington in varieties commonly found in grocery stores. At the Cider House — their tap room that opened almost a year and a half ago — you’ll find a lineup of about eight ciders ($3.71 to $5.56 per pint) made from blends of sweet and sour apples such as Golden Delicious, Bala and Braeburn. Granny Smith apples are featured in the tart-tasting Granny Cider, while the Whiskey Barrel Cider is aged in Rogue whiskey barrels. A seasonal cider flavored with cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves is currently on tap for winter, and there’s a non-alcoholic fresh cider that’s tasty either hot or cold. You can down your cider along with something from what Maier calls their “little-bitbeyond-an-appetizer menu,” which features salads ($4-$7), hummus plates ($5-$7) and pita pizzas ($3-$6) with a variety of bread, meat and veggie options. Outside of the Cider House, bottles of Whiskey Barrel can be found at Dissmore’s IGA, the Moscow Rosauers and Moscow Food Co-op. Soon — Maier estimates around March — cans of their cider will hit store shelves all around Eastern Washington and North Idaho as they move away from bottling by hand to a larger-scale production of 16-ounce cans.  The Cider House • 588 SE Bishop Blvd., Pullman • Open Sun-Wed, 3-9 pm; Thu, 3-10 pm; Fri-Sat, noon-10 pm • whiskeybarrelcider.com • 339-6102

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David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King, Jr.

Selma captures the behind-the-scenes work needed to change the world BY SCOTT RENSHAW

W

hen we first see Martin Luther King, Jr. Conference and other allies to secure voting rights for (David Oyelowo) in director Ava DuVernay’s Southern blacks, whose in-name-only legal franchise was riveting drama Selma, it’s in a context where regularly thwarted by onerous state and local regulations. we’re already used to seeing him: He’s delivering a As they plot their strategy on the ground — focusing speech. It’s October 1964, and King is about to receive on Alabama, under the control of proudly racist Gov. the Nobel Peace Prize, but he’s not yet on a stage in that George Wallace (Tim Roth), and planning peaceful first scene; he’s rehearsing that speech in a mirror. One of protest marches from Selma to Montgomery — King also the greatest orators in American history is doing the thing begins meeting with President Lyndon Johnson (Tom that we don’t always think about when we think about Wilkinson), hoping to find an ally but instead encounterthe greatest at anything in history: He’s practicing, doing the ing a president with other legislative priorities. unseen work that’s essential before anything Those conversations between King amazing can happen. and Johnson form a vital center of Selma, SELMA Selma could have been just an inspirationbut they’re not the only places where the Rated PG-13 al drama about a pivotal historical moment, film wrestles with the best methods for Directed by Ava DuVernay and it could have been just a hagiographic achieving social change, and the timing for Starring David Oyelowo, Tom employing specific methods. In one crucial portrait of King’s efforts at promoting civil Wilkinson, Carmen Ejogo rights. But DuVernay and her team are inscene, King explains to local activists why a terested in doing something much less comspecific method of confrontation worked in mon, something that echoes the similar success of 2012’s Birmingham, where aggressive Commissioner of Public Lincoln. They’ve chosen a single, crucial philosophical Safety “Bull” Connor ran the show, yet was not similarly battle and shown us all the struggle, negotiation, strategiz- appropriate in a different place. Later, when King chooses ing, self-doubt, mistakes and intelligence that went into to turn away from a confrontation on the Edmund Petwinning it. It inspires not with a tale of victory, but with tus Bridge — where marchers had earlier faced a violent an instruction manual for how to get there. response from law enforcement — King’s colleagues argue The narrative focuses on the efforts in 1965 by King, over whether they missed an important opportunity. his colleagues in the Southern Christian Leadership Turbulent events do indeed play a significant role in Selma

34 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

— DuVernay does not shy away from the beatings and other attacks the police inflict on protesters — yet the film is ultimately more concerned with the decisions that led to those events, and their ripple effect on later decisions. It’s also a fairly powerful portrait of King himself, precisely because it takes him down from the pedestal. Oyelowo’s performance isn’t merely an uncanny impersonation of specific cadences, but a look at someone determined yet flawed — we see him confronted by his wife, Coretta (Carmen Ejogo), over his extramarital affairs — and who understands his significance as the public face of the civil rights movement, especially when he makes a choice that may have been a mistake. Oyelowo’s complex, layered performance helps make up for the less effective casting in a couple of other significant roles, particularly Roth’s generally miscalculated decision to make Wallace a smug villain. Fortunately, Selma is too densely thoughtful the rest of the time to suffer much from that oversimplification. Given recent racially charged incidents and protests in America, it was perhaps inevitable that Selma would be freighted with contemporary significance — which seems both somewhat unfair and deeply appropriate. DuVernay’s film is too effective on its own dramatic terms to be reduced simply to an allegory for Where We Are Today, yet it’s also tremendously encouraging for anyone who wonders if there’s any hope for change. The film’s tag line proclaims that “one dream can change the world,” but that may actually do Selma a disservice. With every moment that shows King fine-tuning his speeches and sermons, it reminds us that having a dream is only a start. Somewhere along the way, even the most eloquent dreamers have to roll up their sleeves, and figure out the best way to do the work. 


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON

Clark Terry made his mark on the jazz world as one of the genre’s most skilled trumpeters and later went into teaching music. When he began to lose his sight from illness, he became closer with one of his students, Justin Kauflin, a blind piano prodigy. This documentary follows the two over the course of four years and Terry’s health struggles continue and Kauflin’s star rises — the two remaining close friends along the way. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

INHERENT VICE

Thomas Pynchon’s epic novel is finally coming to the big screen, thanks to the talented directorial hand of Paul Thomas Anderson. Set in 1970, the story features Joaquin Phoenix as Larry “Doc” Sportello, a private detective high on just about everything whose girlfriend goes missing. Soon, he finds himself involved with powerful L.A. real estate moguls and a bunch of criminals. (MB) Rated R

SELMA

Selma could have been just an inspirational drama about a pivotal historical moment, and it could have been just a portrait of King’s efforts at promoting civil rights. But director Ava DuVernay and her team are interested in doing something much less common, something that echoes the similar success of 2012’s Lincoln. They’ve chosen a single crucial philosophical battle, and shown us all the struggle, negotiation, strategizing, self-doubt, mistakes and intelligence that went into winning it. (SR) Rated PG-13

THE

ROYAL

IGHT MOVIE N

TENENBAUMS

AT

RATED R

TAKEN 3

You might have forgotten after one too many holiday screenings of Love Actually, but Liam Neeson is quite the ass-kicker, never more so than in the role of ex-spy Bryan Mills. In the first two editions of what we can only hope will end as just a trilogy, Mills saved his daughter Kim and ex-wife Lenore. In Taken 3, Lenore has been murdered, Bryan’s been framed, and he has to open a can on the real killers to clear his name — and save his daughter again. (DN) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING ANNIE

The original Broadway version of Annie came out in 1977. And while the story told four decades later could use some updating, the newest film version of the beloved orphan leaves much to be desired. The pieces are all here — Jamie Foxx in the Will Stacks (aka Daddy Warbucks) role, Cameron Diaz as Miss Hannigan and the cheeky Quvenzhané Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) as Annie. (LJ) PG

Margaret Keane (Amy Adams) to let him take credit for her big eye-filled work. Art critics scoffed, but the art eventually became hugely popular. Decades later, the truth would emerge, shocking fans. This film is sure to have some strangeness; it’s directed by Tim Burton after all. But expect shades of Ed Wood, rather than Big Fish. (LJ) Rated PG-13

ANTARTICA: A YEAR ON ICE

Boy genius Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter) spends his time illegally hustling in robot fights until his brother shows him his college science lab where his buddies are making astounding inventions under the tutelage of professor Robert Callaghan (James Cromwell). But after tragedy strikes, Hiro accidentally activates Tadashi’s project — a marshmallow-puffy medical robot named Baymax (Scott Adsit). (SS) Rated PG

After a decade of filming, Anthony Powell has completed his awardwinning international documentary, Antarctica: A Year on Ice. The visual phenomenon offers viewers an immersion into a full year in the life of people who choose to live in one of Earth’s most isolated regions characterized by harsh climates and awe-inspiring displays of nature. At Magic Lantern (KG) Rated PG

THE BABADOOK

Australian writer/director Jennifer Kent makes a stunningly assured feature filmmaking debut with this unnerving thriller about a single mom, Amelia, who’s exhausted due to the sleeplessness of near-7-year-old Samuel, who fears monsters that he believes to be hiding in closets and under the bed. Things escalate when Mister Babadook, an ominous children’s pop-up book, mysteriously appears in Samuel’s bedroom and warns against a dark and evil creature who cannot be gotten rid of once he’s been allowed into one’s home. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

BIG EYES

Back in the 1950s, Walter Keane (Christoph Waltz) convinced his wife

BIG HERO 6

BIRDMAN

After good work in lots of small supporting roles over the past couple of decades, Michael Keaton gets back to work as a former franchise movie star now trying to make a comeback on the Broadway stage, but finding obstacles everywhere, many of them in his own head. He’s accompanied by a great cast, including Naomi Watts and Emma Stone, but the most sparks fly in Keaton’s scenes with a Method-mad actor played by Edward Norton. (ES) Rated R

CITIZENFOUR

An intimate look at Edward Snowden’s life in the days just before his spooky treasure trove of NSA secrets went public thanks to Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, the latter of whom di...continued on next page

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THE BABADOOK (93 MIN)

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MY OLD LADY (111 MIN)

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KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON (82 MIN) *Opening!

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CITIZENFOUR (111 MIN) *Oscar Nominee!

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FORCE MAJEURE (117 MIN) *Oscar Nominee! Fri/Sat: 3:45 Sun: 1:00 Tue-Thu: 2:30

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FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING rected this film. Citizenfour takes place almost exclusively in Snowden’s Hong Kong hotel room. The details laid out, though, are enough to keep you riveted and make you wonder why this story isn’t still dominating the news cycle. At Magic Lantern (MS) Rated R

EXODUS

Here, Ridley Scott has turned to the story of Moses (Christian Bale) and Rhamses (Joel Edgerton), raised as brothers in the palace of Egypt’s pharaoh, until Moses learns that he was actually born of the Hebrews who serve as Egypt’s slaves and becomes their leader in their fight for freedom. The effects are impressive and on a grand scale, but the performances and chopped-up story undermine those efforts. (SR) Rated PG-13

FORCE MAJEURE

A sly satire of masculinity as well as an engaging family drama, Force Majeure follows a Swedish family that travels to the (gorgeously shot) French Alps for a ski vacation that is brutally disrupted by an avalanche that turns a relaxing lunch into a disaster — particularly for family patriarch Tomas. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated R

THE GAMBLER

Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) leads an improbable double-life as a college English professor and gambler. In an effort to pay off accumulating debt, Bennett borrows money from a gangster (Kenneth Williams) and places his own life on the line as collateral. (KG) Rated R

GONE GIRL

David Fincher (Fight Club, The Social Network) gets his paws on the novel by Gillian Flynn (who also wrote the script) and comes up with one of the twisting-est, turning-est and most unsettling movies of the year. Ben Affleck is the once-happy husband whose once-happy wife, Rosamund Pike, up and vanishes on the morning of their fifth anniversary, with lots of clues and a few secrets pointing directly at him as the perpetrator. (ES) Rated R In Partnership With

Thank you for listening to KPBX, KSFC & KPBZ over the last 35 years!

THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES

Peter Jackson’s conclusion to The Hobbit is a perfect tie-in to the beginning of The Lord of the Rings. This one picks up right where the previous one ended, with a fiery attack by the dragon Smaug, reintroduces all of the main characters, kills off quite a few of them, and leaves us with a feeling of complete satisfaction. Epic filmmaking by a master. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE HOMESMAN

SpokanePublicRadio.org

Listen the week of Jan. 20 for Where We’ve Been,

Where We Are, & Where We’re Going

36 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

Tommy Lee Jones, Hilary Swank and Meryl Streep star in this film that offers a glimpse into the challenges faced in the early American West. When three women become mentally unstable due to their trying pioneer lifestyles, the hardened Mary Bee Cuddy — played by Swank— sets out to deliver them to safety in Iowa. (KG) Rated R

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

Birdman

89

Citizenfour

88

The Babadook

87

Interstellar

76

Into the Woods

70

The Homesman

68

Unbroken DON’T MISS IT

60 WORTH $10

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY, PART 1

Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), reluctant heroine of District 12, has been snatched from the arena where impoverished teenagers play out a tothe-death bloodsport for the amusement of their overlords of the decadent Capitol. In that arena, she accidentally inspired a nation of downtrodden serfs in the future North American nation of Panem to begin tentatively to rise up. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE IMITATION GAME

During World War II, the Germans used a machine called an Enigma that created what were thought to be unbreakable codes for top-secret military communications. British mathematician Alan Turing, played here by Benedict Cumberbatch, was hired by Allied forces to decipher the machine’s codes and help win the war. (MB) Rated PG-13

INTERSTELLAR

Coop (Matthew McConaughey) is a lonely would-be adventurer in a world that, like ours, has lost its taste for space exploration and is teetering on the edge of environmental collapse. Mathematician Brand (Michael Caine) and his scientist daughter Amelia (Anne Hathaway) have discovered a wormhole out near Saturn that could hold the key to humanity’s salvation: a new planet to call home on the other side. (MJ) Rated PG-13

INTO THE WOODS

The song-filled new telling of familiar Grimm fairy tales is a terrific piece of work, with wonderful performances, outstanding production design and snappy writing. But this film, based on the Broadway musical, is also extremely dark, featuring themes of deception, greed, infertility, and even a taste of lasciviousness, and should be of some concern for parents who are thinking of bringing their kids. (ES) Rated PG

MY OLD LADY

Kevin Kline is Mathias Gold, a 57-yearold New Yorker with no family, no money and no prospects who arrives in France to take ownership of an apartment left to him by his estranged father. There, Mathias finds an elderly British woman named Mathilde Girard

WATCH IT AT HOME

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(Maggie Smith) living in the place, the result of an odd bit of French property law called a viager. Accordingly, not only must Mathias wait until Mathilde’s death to take ownership of the place, he also has to continue his father’s payments to her until her demise. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated PG-13

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Inspired by Jane Wilde Hawking’s memoir about her life with former husband Stephen Hawking, the brilliant theoretical physicist (A Brief History of Time) diagnosed with motor neuron disease at age 21, the film’s heart beats with a romantic optimism, even when each of them finds new soulmates and their union ends. (SD) Rated PG-13

UNBROKEN

Angelina Jolie’s adaptation of Laura Hillenbrand’s tells the story of Louis Zamperini (Jack O’Connell), a bombardier during World War II who, as a young man, was a medal-winning athlete at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Ultimately, the story takes us to the hardships Zamperini endures during the war: stranded for more than a month on a raft at sea after his plane goes down only to be captured by the Japanese and imprisoned. (SR) Rated PG-13

WILD

Reese Witherspoon stars as Cheryl Strayed, the woman who walked the length of the Pacific Crest Trail and lived to write a hit book (upon which this film is based) about it. Directed by Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild follows Strayed as she deals with her mother’s death and her crippling addiction issues by heading into the wilderness alone. (MB) Rated R

THE WOMAN IN BLACK 2: ANGEL OF DEATH

A nominee for the Most Foreboding Film Title Ever award, this sequel to the 2012 horror flick that starred Daniel Radcliffe takes us to World War II London, where bombs are raining down on the city. A schoolteacher evacuates her class to a house in the countryside, but soon stuff starts to get weird and deadly when an otherworldly force possesses the kids. (MB) Rated PG-13 


FILM | REVIEW

MOVIE TIMES on

Tommy Lee Jones directs and stars with Hilary Swank in The Homesman.

Tough Living

Tommy Lee Jones’ The Homesman is a Western loaded with historical realities

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INTO THE WOODS

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WOMAN IN BLACK 2: ANGEL OF DEATH

BY MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN WEEK OF JANUARY 9TH THRU JANUARY 15th

T

ommy Lee Jones’ second movie as a dineighbor — something she depicts as a practical rector is no conventional Western. Look business arrangement, but she is rebuffed for no further than the direction traveled by being “bossy and too plain.” Yet when the local the film’s characters — west to east — for confirchurch folk charitably decide to send their three mation. The Homesman is a story about the human crazy women back east to be cared for amid the toll of our nation’s westward expansion, about comparative civilization of Iowa, Mary Bee is the the frontier that cruelly consumed only person who volunteers to the hopes and sanity of some settlers THE HOMESMAN take the women on this compaswhile at the same time providing sionate but dangerous journey. Rated R freedom and prosperity to others. With the three madwomen Directed by Tommy Lee Jones The American frontier welcomed (Grace Gummer, Miranda Otto Starring Tommy Lee Jones, Hilary those looking for opportunities and and Sonja Richter) shackled to Swank, Grace Gummer fresh starts, but not all the pioneers the walls of a makeshift paddy At Magic Lantern who hitched their wagons to a Westwagon, Mary Bee seizes on ern star prospered, though theirs are opportunity when she encounnot the stories generally celebrated in myth and ters scoundrel George Briggs (Jones) stuck in a movies. The Homesman literally reverses course to life-threatening position, and exacts from him a peek at the abandoned ruins of lives lost to the promise to help escort the women in exchange frontier, the human potential plowed over like for saving his life. The two make awkward comlast year’s crop. panions, and for a while their progress is a bit The American frontier could be especially like that of Katharine Hepburn and Humphrey hard on women, and it’s this predicament that Bogart in The African Queen as the odd-couple confronts a loose community of Nebraska settlers pairing of their characters makes for barbed as The Homesman opens. Three wives have lost conversation. The focus of the film is on these their minds amid the harsh conditions, and we two, and their human cargo grows less individuare shown enough of their plight to grasp their ated and more of a mad Greek chorus or team of pain. One woman loses three babies in rapid sucmythological sirens calling their sister Mary Bee cession to diphtheria, another tosses her newborn to crash on their rocky shores. Still, Briggs and down an outhouse commode and the third is Cuddy are unforgettable characters. tortured by her husband’s insensitivity and the Swank puts her angular toughness to good ghost of her dead mother. use, while Jones delivers one of the best crazyMeanwhile, we are also introduced to Mary old-coot performances of his career. The HomesBee Cuddy (Hilary Swank), a hard-working man gives us a West devoid of gunslingers, heroes frontierswoman who lives on her own and and hearth vs. hunt dynamics, and instead shows farms her own land. In an early scene, she us people trying to get through their days alive proposes matrimony to an unmarried male and sane. 

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JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 37


Old World Resonance

Chateau Rive hosts many events, but the next two months are all about the music BY LAURA JOHNSON

N

ew Year’s Eve remnants litter the cavernous underground space. White cushions and leftover beer bottles are heaped onto Costco-size carts and confetti coats the concrete floor. Yet Wayne Larson, promoter and artistic director for Chateau Rive, assures that the multipurpose space — made elegant with chandeliers hung between thick support beams — is prepared to kick off the venue’s winter concert series this weekend. His team is used to quick turnover, he says. Over the course of a year, the rustic, stone-lined basement of the historic Flour Mill is booked for weddings, nonprofit events and private parties, like the recent NYE extravaganza. “Those events pay the bills so I can play, bringing in the acts I want to,” Larson, 55, says with a laugh. Since Larson came aboard about a year and a half ago, Chateau Rive has hosted nearly 30 musical acts in

38 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

its 250-capacity space, including a sold-out Della Mae show and a performance from the Steep Canyon Rangers, just after they played Seattle with Steve Martin. Yet according to Larson, the concert side of the business is still a work in progress. Promotion has transpired mostly through word of mouth; people still don’t realize live music is happening there. The all-ages venue, with a mid-size capacity, offers a more intimate experience than the Knitting Factory but is larger than the Bartlett or Big Dipper. What the owners say is distinctive about the space is its sound. When Chateau Rive co-owner Vince Bozzi first leased the space in 2012, he was uncertain how the venue would work musically. “We wondered if we needed to install wall buffers,” recalls Bozzi. “But the sound soared without adding anything.”

The acoustics carry so well, an artist barely has to plug into a PA system to be heard. When an audience applauds, it’s like a thunderclap is rolling through the echo chamber. For the next two months, Larson has booked artists the NPR-listening type would approve of, heavy on local and national acts that specialize in Americana, bluegrass and instrumental guitar. Larson has promoted music and arts events in the area since 1996, watching the Spokane music scene ebb and flow. He says he’s proud of what a nontraditional music venue can add to the current trajectory. “I like the idea of clubs and organizations and theaters working together to grow the music scene,” Larson says. “For years and years, people have wanted a cool music scene and now we have that. It just might look different than what other cities may have.” 


CHATEAU RIVE UPCOMING EVENTS JAN. 9: DAVID LINDLEY This 70-year-old has worked with classic artists like Jackson Browne, Curtis Mayfield and Dolly Parton. His solo set still moves guitar aficionados in all the right ways. JAN. 15: KORBY LENKER AND MARSHALL MCLEAN Twin Falls, Idaho, native Korby Lenker adds his pop-folk sound to popular local musician Marshall McLean’s Americana leanings. JAN. 23: NICOLE LEWIS BAND Local artist Nicole Lewis’ distinct pop-country vibe has sent her in the direction of Nashville, where she recorded demos last year. She’s built up a following around town performing at wineries and higherend establishments. FEB. 6: ADRIAN LEGG Adrian Legg plays a hybrid guitar that’s part acoustic and part electric, allowing his ambient jazz music to shine. Adding to the excitement, the 66-year-old Englishman will most likely perform without shoes. FEB. 7: PETER RIVERA ALBUM RELEASE PARTY A local transplant — by way of Detroit, where he sang and played drums for the rock act Rare Earth — Peter Rivera has a brand-new album to share (see our review on page 40). Currently, it’s his only Spokane show scheduled this year. FEB. 12: WYLIE & THE WILD WEST Not enough musicians can yodel. But Wylie Gustafson (known for lending his yodel to the Yahoo! commercials) and his crew definitely do. The group is a boot-stompin’ good ol’ country time.

Local singer-songwriter Nicole Lewis performs at Chateau Rive Jan. 23. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

C H AT E A U RIVE is located at 621 W. Mallon Ave. See TicketsWest.com for all ticket information.

FEB. 20: NEW WEST GUITAR GROUP This act proves guitar trios don’t have to put you to sleep. Using acoustic and electric guitars to play instrumental originals and covers, the Los Angeles-based group seamlessly combines the old with the new. FEB. 26: DELLA MAE After selling out their show last year, the bluegrass group, which features local fiddler Kimber Ludiker, hits the venue once more. The performance should be a celebration of life. n

...continued on next page

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | REVIEWS

f

d

b

e

a

c

New Year, New Local Tunes Several area acts have fresh full-length albums you should check out BY LAURA JOHNSON AND DAN NAILEN

THE HOLY BROKE (a)

Do It Yourself Under his moniker the Holy Broke, singersongwriter Kent Ueland (formerly of Terrible Buttons) pens memorable prose. He’s not just singing about the typical love and loss, but rather is self-deprecating (“I Ain’t Proud”) and in search of his conscience (“Pretty Girls Weren’t Made For Talkin’”). There’s even an upbeat tune about suicide. Ueland’s guitar and gravelly, affected voice are highly sufficient here, but the lyrics carry the weight. The album release party is Jan. 24 at the Bartlett. (LJ)

FLANNEL MATH ANIMAL (b)

40 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

Steve the Dog Pop this in and 45 minutes full of instrumental math rock/acid jazz will just fly by, each track bleeding into the next. This intricate music is calculated to such methodical perfection it somehow feels like a big-ass jam session. Drummer Brad Spracklin and Nick Palmieri, on guitar and Moog, are clearly smitten with arithmetic (“Sobbing Mathematically” and “Mathaholik”) but still manage to pack miles of soul into their sound. The Spokane band’s release party is Jan. 16 at Hamilton Studio. (LJ)

PETER RIVERA

(c) It Is What It Is Peter Rivera has still got that rock ‘n’ roll feeling down. The original lead singer and drummer of Motown’s Rare Earth, who relocated to Spokane, has recorded a freespirited disc chock-full of heartfelt, crisp, swingin’ tracks. These are songs about dancing, romance and living fully, but also about the state of politics in this country. Chateau Rive hosts the album release party Feb. 7. (LJ)

HEAVY SEVENTEEN

(d) Title TBD Heavy Seventeen might call their latest the Drunk Sessions, but Basement Tapes is more apt, given the sessions in drummer Cody Brooks’ subterranean lair. The results? An appealing lo-fi blur of power-pop tunes and surfy guitar lines. The band, featuring members of Myth Ship and the Camaros, posted the songs on their ReverbNation page a few weeks ago and plan on making it a free Bandcamp download. (DN)

THE COLOURFLIES

(e) Kid Tested, Mother Approved The Post Falls band goes big, stuffing 23 songs onto Kid Tested, Mother Approved, split into sections called “Songs for the Playground” and “Songs for Timeout.” They probably could have picked the dozen best to make for a stronger set overall, but their youthful exuberance comes through loud and clear in the guitar-centric tunes and lyrics to songs like “Clarissa Joan Hart” and “Nickelodean.” The album was released last month. (DN)

BULLETS OR BALLOONS (f)

Lifestyle Toxins This is a rugged collection of ever-shifting time signatures, shouted vocals, and instrumental math-rock sure to please Rush fans, along with fans of some of the trio’s self-identified influences like the Minutemen and At the Drive-In. The winning instrumental interplay between guitarist/vocalist Chris Henderson, bassist Aaron Anderberg and drummer Cory Mason is the one constant. The band’s release party is Feb. 7 at the Big Dipper. (DN) n


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7:00pm | $6

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HAYDEN 7719 Government Way, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83835 (208) 762-8888

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NERD NIGHT with Nehemiah and Happy Time Prices all day. MONDAY JAN 12TH

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HAYDEN 7719 Government Way Coeur d’Alene, ID 83835 (208) 762-8888

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

FOLK BEN MILLER BAND

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/08

M

en with long beards playing banjos and washboards — the esthetic seems overdone these days. But the Ben Miller Band, out of Joplin, Missouri, is anything but a Mumford & Sons copycat trio. On the band’s recent release, Any Way, Shape Or Form, songs progress from mudstomp folk to country, rock ’n’ roll and even silly, shout-back-and-forth numbers — not one song sounds the same. The group also employs rustic instruments like electric spoons and a homemade one-string bass. Sung through a favored microphone made from a landline telephone, Miller’s vocals often sound distorted and distant. The raucous outfit is never afraid to blaze their own path. — LAURA JOHNSON Ben Miller Band • Sun, Jan. 11, at 7 pm • $10/$13 day of • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • Also playing Republic Brewing Co. on Mon, Jan. 12

EVENT THE ROUND 4

T

he idea behind The Round is brilliant in its simplicity — throw a bunch of artists from different fields and backgrounds on stage together and see what happens. At best, the audience gets a kinetic reaction from creative folks inspired by each other’s work to make something new and awesome on the fly. At worst, it might be a train wreck, albeit a colorful one. Chances are the mix of artists taking part in Spokane’s fourth edition of the Seattle-formed original will deliver something closer to magical than messy. Musicians Erik Walters (Silver Torches), Eliza Johnson and Marshall MacLean (pictured) will provide the soundtrack for featured poet Lauren Gilmore and visual artist Chris Dreyer. — DAN NAILEN

J The Big DippeR, One Shot: Singer Songwriter J BuCeR’S CoffeehouSe puB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BuCkhoRn inn, Spokane River Band ChineSe gARDenS (534-8491), Big Hair Revolution CoeuR D’Alene CASino, PJ Destiny J The hop!, Incantation, Funerus, Rutah, Xingaia, In Defiance J lAgunA CAfé, Just Plain Darin lefTBAnk Wine BAR, Evan Michael J luxe CoffeehouSe, Particlehead Moon TiMe (208-667-2331), Monarch Mountain Band o’ShAy’S, Open mic RoADhouSe CounTRy RoCk BAR, Luke Jaxon The Viking BAR AnD gRill, Matthew Winters ZolA, The Phil Lamb Band

Friday, 01/09

J The BARTleTT, Mama Doll BeVeRly’S, Robert Vaughn J The Big DippeR, Raised in a Barn BigfooT puB, Scorpius Bolo’S, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve J BuCeR’S CoffeehouSe puB, American Forrest, Andru Gomez The CellAR, Kosh & the Jazz Cats J ChATeAu RiVe (795-2030), An Evening with David Lindley (See story on page 38) CoeuR D’Alene CASino, Shiner CuRley’S, Phoenix fiZZie MulligAnS, Uppercut gRAnDe RonDe CellARS, Maxie Ray Mills J The hop!, Demon Assasin, Kid Ace, Hali Vaye iRon hoRSe BAR, The Rub lefTBAnk Wine BAR, Dan Conrad The MeMBeRS lounge (703-7115), DJ Selone and DJ Eaze

42 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

The Round 4 • Sat, Jan. 10, at 7:30 pm • $8 • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174 neCTAR TASTing RooM, Just Plain Darin noRTheRn QueST CASino, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred J noRTheRn QueST CASino, [SOLD-OUT] Sammy Kershaw, Aaron Tippin and Darryl Worley nyne, DJ C-Mad The pAloMino CluB, Bubba Sparxxx penD D’oReille WineRy, Bare Grass RoADhouSe CounTRy RoCk BAR, Last Chance Band The Viking BAR AnD gRill, Marco Polo Collective ZolA, The Cronkites

Saturday, 01/10

315 MARTiniS AnD TApAS, Truck Mills J The BARTleTT, The Round No. 4 feat. Silver Rotches, Marshall McLean, Eliza Johnson, Lauren Gilmore (poet), Chris Dreyer (artist) (See story above)

BeVeRly’S, Robert Vaughn J The Big DippeR, Uncommon Evolution BigfooT puB, Scorpius Bolo’S, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve J BuCeR’S CoffeehouSe puB, Dan Maher The CellAR, Kosh & the Jazz Cats J ChApS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston CoeuR D’Alene CASino, Shiner CoeuR D’Alene CellARS (208-6642336), Eric Neuhausser CuRley’S, Phoenix fiZZie MulligAnS, Uppercut J The hop!, No Bragging Rights, The Greenery, Faus, Straight To Our Enemies, The Wake of Giants iRon hoRSe BAR, The Rub J John’S Alley, Jon Wight Benefit Concert feat. the Magic Mirrors, Bart Budwig JoneS RADiAToR, The Oracle’s

Kitchen The lARiAT (466-9918), Widow’s Creek neCTAR TASTing RooM, Kori Eagle noRTheRn QueST CASino, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred, DJ Patrick nyne, DJ the Devine Jewels penD D’oReille WineRy, Mike & Shanna RoADhouSe CounTRy RoCk BAR, Last Chance Band The Shop, Dave McRae The Viking BAR AnD gRill, Ishkov Band ZolA, The Cronkites

J kniTTing fACToRy, Randy Rogers Band, Stoney Larue J noRThWeST MuSeuM of ARTS & CulTuRe, Mike Ross

Sunday, 01/11

Tuesday, 01/13

J The Big DippeR, Ben Miller Band, Crow Moses (See story above) The CellAR, Pat Coast CoeuR D’Alene CASino, Kosh DAley’S CheAp ShoTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church

Monday, 01/12

J CAlypSoS (208-665-0591), Open Mic eiChARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills J RepuBliC BReWing Co., Ben Miller Band J RiCo’S (332-6566), Open Mic unDeRgRounD 15, Open Showcase ZolA, Nate Ostrander Trio 315 MARTiniS AnD TApAS, The Rub J The BARTleTT, Open Mic CRAfTeD TAp houSe + kiTChen (208-292-4813), Kosh feDoRA puB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills


Coming Up ...

 THE HOP!, Elektro Grave JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 01/14  CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Casey CRUISERS (624-1495), Kosh EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard GARLAND AVENUE DRINKERY (3155327), Open Mic with DJ Scratch n Smith GENO’S (368-9087), Open Mic with T&T JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and

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Friends THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LITZ’S (327-7092), Nick Grow LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Bodhi Drip ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Spokane Dan and the Blues Blazers SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic ZOLA, The Bossame

CHATEAU RIVE, Korby Lenker and Marshall McLean, Jan. 15 JOHN’S ALLEY, Cody Canada and Jason Boland, Jan. 15 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Stepbrothers, Jan. 16 THE BIG DIPPER, Anna Copley Benefit Show feat. GS3, Jan. 16 HAMILTON STUDIO, Flannel Math Animal CD Release Party, Jan. 16, KNITTING FACTORY, Invasive, Beyond Today, Thirty Three, Marry the Mistress, Jimmy Nuge, Jan. 16 NASHVILLE NORTH, Jeremy McComb, Jan. 16-17 JOHN’S ALLEY, Village, Jan. 16 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Cloud Person, Jan. 16 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Marshall McLean Band, Jan. 17 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Outcold Concert Series feat. Thirion X, Seven Cycles, Death By Pirates, the Broken Thumbs, Beyond Today, Driven In Waves, THUNDERHOUND, Jan. 17 THE BIG DIPPER, Razing Venus, Jan. 17 KNITTING FACTORY, Hell’s Belles, 3LP, Jan. 17 UNDERGROUND 15, Raised By Wolves, Cold Blooded, Dark White Light, Jan. 17 THE HOP!, Dalima, Jan. 18 ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio, NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Rain – A Tribute to the Beatles, Jan. 19

JOHN’S ALLEY, Jelly Bread, Jan. 22 THE BIG DIPPER, Haunted Summer, Jan. 23 CHATEAU RIVE, Nicole Lewis Band, Jan. 23 KNITTING FACTORY, RL Grime, Lunice, Tommy Kruise, Jan. 23 THE PALOMINO CLUB, Nixon Rodeo, Free the Jester, Elephant Gun Riot, the Broken Thumbs, Jan. 24 THE BARTLETT, The Holy Broke album release party feat. Planes on Paper, Matt Arthur, Jan. 24 THE BIG DIPPER, Powerman 5000, Jan. 25 THE BARTLETT, Beacon, Jan. 25 THE HOP!, The Toasters, the Camorra, the Ragtag Romantics, Collateral Damage, Jan. 26

NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Aaron Lewis, Jan. 29 SPOKANE ARENA, Eric Church with Halestorm, Jan. 29. KNITTING FACTORY, Trigger Hippy, Jan. 29 THE HOP!, Skull Fist, Knight of Tears, Jan. 30 THE BARTLETT, Mimicking Birds, Jan. 31 KNITTING FACTORY, G Love & Special Sauce with Matt Costa, Jan. 31 JONES RADIATOR, So Pitted, Loomer, 66Beat, Phlegm Fatale, Jan. 31 SWAXX, Crooked I, Wildcard, Illest Uminati, Demon Assassin, Serious MAK, DJ JT Washington, Jan. 31

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MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 624-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO CLUB • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 43


FILM COEN BROTHERS TIMES TWO

Few creative teams have earned the sort of following amassed by Ethan and Joel Coen, the real-life brothers who, chances are, created at least one of your favorite movies. To pay tribute to the duo, Spokane Public Radio’s Movies 101 show is bringing Raising Arizona and O Brother, Where Art Thou? — an excellent sampling of the Coens’ creative range — to the Bing Crosby Theater for a fundraiser benefiting Friends of the Bing and SPR. Movies 101 hosts Nathan Weinbender, Dan Webster and Mary Pat Treuthart will be on hand to impart some extra Coen knowledge. — MIKE BOOKEY SPR Goes to the Movies with the Coen Brothers • Sun, Jan. 11, at 1 pm • $15 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com

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Submit event info at Inlander.com/getlisted or email details to getlisted@inlander.com.

44 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

THEATER IT’S A CHALLENGE

FILM MAKE IT QUICK

The Last Five Years • Jan. 9-25; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $17-$25 • The Modern Theater • 1320 E. Garden Ave., CdA • themoderntheater.org • 208-676-7529

ReelSpokane Winter 2015 • Sat, Jan. 10, at 7:30 pm • $8 • Magic Lantern Theatre • 25 W. Main • reelspokane.org • 720-8839

Cathy is a “Shiksa Goddess” attempting to make it on Broadway when she meets Jamie, a hotshot Jewish writer. Instantly sparks fly, as they often do in musicals. The difference with the love/breakup story in Jason Robert Brown’s off-Broadway hit The Last Five Years is its narrative structure. Cathy’s account starts at the end of their marriage, moving backward throughout the show, while Jamie’s moves chronologically. Experience this musical in the flesh at Coeur d’Alene’s Modern Theater before the movie version hits the big screen in February. — LAURA JOHNSON

ReelSpokane is a homegrown film celebration, gathering filmmakers and film lovers alike to screen and discuss shorts created over the past year that somehow touch on Spokane, whether that means being filmed in the Lilac City, created for a local film festival, or shot as a student film in an area school. Run by Vexing Media and the Spokane Film Project, the Winter 2015 edition includes nearly 20 short films, ranging from satire to music videos, family dramas to insightful documentaries — all of them under 10 minutes. — DAN NAILEN


PRESENTS

COMMUNITY NOT FOR SALE

Approximately 27 million men, women and children are still enslaved throughout the world, including on U.S. soil. For his first mass of 2015, marking the Catholic church’s World Day of Peace, Pope Francis urged all cultures and religions to work together to ensure all can live freely. To support ending this atrocious exploitation, join with the local community for a candlelight vigil and powerful art display for Lutheran Community Services Northwest’s annual awareness campaign, which this year features theater, dance and visual art elements from Partners Through Art. — CHEY SCOTT

RESTAURANT WEEK

Human Trafficking Candlelight Vigil • Sun, Jan. 11, from 3-4 pm; art walkthrough at 2:30 pm • Free • River Park Square • 808 W. Main • lcsnw.org • 343-5091

Brought To You By

OUTDOORS GET OUT IN THE SNOW

For some, the idea of skiing is tackling a few bunny slopes and maybe a blue square run — if you’re feeling particularly brave that day — and shortly thereafter retiring to the main lodge for soup and cocoa. From pro skiers to cabin dwellers, the Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s second annual Winterfest brings together all talent levels to celebrate snow, sunshine and skiing. Participants can choose from one or all of the events lined up for the day, including snowshoe treks, donut dashes, backcountry skiing and a cider trail ski-out to the Nova Hut. — KIANNA GARDNER Spokane Nordic Winterfest 2015 • Sun, Jan. 11; events begin at 7 am • Most events free/others $5 • Mt. Spokane State Park • 29500 N. Mount Spokane Park Dr. • spokanenordic.org

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

FRIENDS OF SCOTCHMAN PEAKS GALA The local environmental nonprofit celebrates 10 years, looking back at and toward the future of its advocacy, stewardship and education. Event includes food, live and silent auction items and more. Jan. 9, 5:30-9 pm. $40. Tango Cafe, 414 Church St, Sandpoint. scotchmanpeaks.org (208-290-1281)

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) CHOOSE TO LOSE A live comedyimprov show, using audience

suggestions. Fridays in January, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) 2015 COMEDY JAM Live show featuring local comedians Steven Johnson, Jared Munson, Phillip Kopczynski and Steven Tye. Jan. 14, 8 pm. $8/$10. Big Dipper, 171 S. Washington St. bigdipperevents.com HOMEGROWN COMEDY A local comedy open mic series. Best comedians from the series are to be featured in the “March Madness Comedy Showcase.” Jan. 17 and 24 and Feb. 21, at 10:30 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404)

Showcasing the Region’s Culinary Talent 90+ Restaurants 10 Days 3 Courses Pre Set Price

February 20 - March 1, 2015 Pick up the official guide in the February 19th issue of the Inlander InlanderRestaurantWeek.com

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 45


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess You’ve Got BAil

AMY ALKON

I am not attracted to “nice guys.” I’m in my early 30s, and I don’t think I have low self-esteem. I don’t like to be mistreated, either. In fact, I want somebody loving and faithful, but I find the guys I “should” be dating predictable and boring. (So cliché, I know.) I seem to end up dating guys who cheat on me and have problems with the law. Is there such a thing as a good man who’s also a bad boy? —Longing

When you date a “bad boy,” there are always adjustments to be made, like getting adjusted to how he’s sleeping with three of your friends. It’s easy to go unrealistic in looking for love. On the gooier side of romantic unrealism are the people determined to find their “soulmate.” (No such perfect partner actually exists — just somebody they’re compatible with in essential ways.) You, on the other hand, seem to be drawn to a guy who’s had a cellmate. Women very often go for bad boys out of low self-esteem, but you insist this isn’t your problem. If not, maybe you aren’t ready for a relationship and are going for guys who’ll crash and burn what you have together before you get itchy to get out. But it seems more likely that you’re an excitement junkie, turning to bad boys because they’re reliable providers of it — the obvious downside being that they steal not only your heart but also your wall clock, which they sell to buy cigarettes. Most people will tell you they like excitement, but chances are you have a strong aversion to the dull and routine and a craving for excitement and variety — to the point where your comfort zone is more the end of the bungee cord than the end of the couch. If you do feel this way, you’re likely a high scorer in a personality trait that researcher Marvin Zuckerman deemed “sensation seeking,” which involves a lust for novel, complex, and intense sensations and experiences and a willingness to take physical and social risks to get them. Sensation seeking appears to have a strong biological basis. So if this is part of your makeup, it’s not like you can just decide to take up with the nearest accountant (that is, one who isn’t embezzling from the mob). What you can do is look for good guys who have some of the positive qualities bad boys do, like confidence, charisma, creativity, spontaneity, and a wicked sense of humor. They won’t be easy to find, but consider that every bad boy you’re with sets you back from getting together with a good guy who also meets your need for speed. To keep yourself from taking any further dips in the felon pool, figure out alternative ways to get your excitement needs met (skydiving, tsunami-surfing, regular shortcuts through dark alleys?). This should free you up to meet the sort of guy who figures he’s justified in using the carpool lane because he’s pulling you behind his car on Rollerblades, not because he’s got a couple of bank tellers tied up in the trunk.

MAN OF SQUEAL

My brother has had a crush on this woman for a long time, but somehow the timing never worked out for them to date. A few months ago, I ran into her at a party. One thing led to another, and we ended up hooking up. Now my brother and this woman are finally giving it a go. He and I really don’t have secrets from each other, so this is weighing on me, and I feel like I should tell him. —Need To Disclose Having sex with a woman isn’t like the moon landing. There’s really no need to put the word out about who got there first. In general, when you lay a piece of information on someone, it should benefit them in some way. In this case, it would be one thing if you had important supplemental information to disclose, such as “sex with this woman is best followed up with a penicillin nightcap.” But the disclosure you’re looking to make simply self-serves a purpose — for you to get a load off your chest by immediately transferring it to your brother’s. What’s done cannot be undone, and though some men can shrug off the sex their girlfriend had with some guy before they were dating, not all can, and it’s especially hard when “some guy” is one they’ll be seeing at every family gathering for the next 70-some years. Sure, as the saying goes, “information wants to be free.” But as with a Great Dane in heat, that doesn’t mean you should just open the gate and let it out…so it can make sweet feverish love to everything in the neighborhood, starting with the neighbor’s Mini Cooper. n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

46 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMMUNITY

SULLIVAN ROAD PROJECT MEETING Learn and ask questions about the City of Spokane Valley’s project to resurface Sullivan Road between Sprague and Mission in summer/fall of 2015. Jan. 8, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Valley Assembly of God, 15618 E. Broadway Ave. (720-5411) POKÉMON TCG CITY CHAMPIONSHIPS Pokémon Trading Card Game players, supporters and fans the region are invited to attend the 2014/2015 Pokémon City Championships. At Uncle’s Spokane Valley on Jan. 10 and the downtown store on Jan. 11. Free/ spectators, $5/competitors. Uncle’s Games, 404 W. Main and 14700 E. Indiana. (456-4607) HARMONY YOGA OPEN HOUSE Open house at both Harmony Yoga locations: Jan. 10, at 1717 W. Sixth Ave; and Jan. 11 at 707 N. Cedar, both days from 9 am6:30 pm. Sample Yoga classes; view schedule online. Free. harmonyoga.com (747-4430) ANTI-HUMAN TRAFFICKING VIGIL Lutheran Community Services NW hosts its annual vigil to bring awareness to this continued human rights violation. Jan. 11, 3-4 pm. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. tinyurl. com/ohu4zvu (343-5091) DAY OF DIALOGUE SCC and EWU’s Africana Studies program team up to present a community discussion, resource fair and a keynote address, “We Can’t Breathe: How Racial Oppression is Choking the Justice out of Law Enforcement,” at 8:30 am. Jan. 14, 7:30 am-noon. Free and open to the public. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene. (533-7185) BLACK LIVES MATTER A public “teach-in” workshop and discussion on public safety and criminal justice, featuring panelists Mary Lou Johnson (Smart Justice Spokane); Dr. Scott Finnie (EWU); Krista Benson (Women’s Gender & Sexuality studies PhD candidate); and Rachel Dolezal (Spokane NAACP Pres.), also members of EWU’s Black Student Union. Jan. 16, 11 am-1 pm. Free. EWU Cheney, Patterson Hall, Rm. 126. (359-2898)

FILM

BIRDMAN A black comedy about an actor (Michael Keaton) as he struggles to mount a Broadway play. Jan. 8-11; times vary. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) REELSPOKANE In its fifth year, ReelSpokane showcases locally-made films, at a public screening. Jan. 10, 7:309 pm. $8. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. reelspokane.org (209-2383) SPR GOES TO THE MOVIES The Movies 101 crew hosts a screening and discussion of Coen Brothers films, including “Raising Arizona” and “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” Jan. 11, 1 pm. $12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com TOTALLY TUBULAR TUESDAYS The Garland’s classic old-school movie series, every Tuesday at 7 pm. See website for schedule of upcoming featured films. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) CHINESE MOVIE NIGHT: CZ 12 The University of Idaho Confucius Institute shows a film about a mercenary team sent to recover several lost artifacts

from the Old Summer Palace, the bronze heads of the 12 Chinese Zodiac animals, looted by foreigners in the 1800s. Jan. 14, 7 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127) THE HOMESMAN Three women driven mad by pioneer life are to be transported across the country by covered wagon. Rated R. Jan. 15-18, times vary. $3- $6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St, Moscow. (208-882-4127) GLEN CAMPBELL: I’LL BE ME Riverview Retirement Community hosts a premiere of the award-winning film, telling the story of the country legend’s battle with Alzheimer’s disease. Jan. 17 at 7 pm, Jan. 18 at 3 pm. $12.50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bit.ly/1GeMsTt

FOOD & DRINK

CALIFORNIA DREAMING A class exploring wines from some of California’s best wine-growing regions: Sonoma, Central Coast, Santa Barbara, Carneros, Lodi and Napa Valley. Jan. 9, 7 pm. $20, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket. com (343-2253) NO-LI BREWHOUSE TOURS See what goes on behind the scenes and how NoLi’s beer is made. Fridays at 4:30 pm. Free. No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent Ave. nolibrewhouse.com (242-2739) THAI-ING TO COOK Learn to make authentic red and green curry pastes and use them to create two classic dishes. Jan. 9, 6-8 pm. $59. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) VINO WINE TASTING Friday, Jan. 9 highlights selections from Vino’s Wine of the Month Club, from 3-7:30 pm. Tastings include cheese and crackers. Jan. 9. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229) BUTTERFLY, BRUNOISE AND CHIFFONADE This Knife Skills 101 class will help increase confidence as you wield your most important kitchen tool. Jan. 14, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) WINTER BEER FESTIVAL Second annual winter beer fest, offering sample size tastings of 40+ winter brews from local and regional breweries, plus a special food menu, live music and a heated, (all-ages) outdoor tent. $15/tasting glass and 5 tokens; free admission. Lantern Tap House, 1004 S. Perry St. tinyurl.com/ mcrdjct (315-9531) VINO WINE TASTING Sample varietals from Efeste Winery. Tastings include cheese and crackers. Jan. 16, 3-6:30 pm. $15. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229) THE WILD BUNCH Sample some rare wines from grapes that are famous in their growing region, but rarely make it to American store shelves. Includes two white, five red and a dessert wine. Jan. 16, 7 pm. $20, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT Class on how to make savory and sweet bites just in time for Superbowl parties. Jan. 17, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) INVEG MONTHLY COMMUNITY POTLUCK Bring a plant-based (no animal products or honey) dish to share

along with an ingredient list, the recipe and your own plates and utensils. Third Sunday of the month, from 5-7 pm. Donations accepted. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. inveg.org (542-7829)

MUSIC

OPEN MIC TALENT NIGHT The library’s debut event for its new Millennial Meetups program, focusing on people in their 20s and 30s. Sign-ups begin at 5:45. Share a song, poem, writing, stand-up routine, etc. Jan. 8, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208769-2315) AMERICAN PRIMITIVE GUITAR MUSIC Concert featuring performances by Glenn Jones, RC Johnstone and Ryan Leaf. Jan. 10, 8 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. tinyurl.com/ mz7dama (227-7404) HANDEL’S “MESSIAH” Program includes selections from Handel’s “Messiah,” sung by a choir of local church singers and soloists Heather Parker, Ann Benson, Jadd Davis and Steve Mortier. Also featured are Alice Hostetter, organ and Paul Brueggemeier, conducting. Jan. 10. Free. Central Lutheran Church, 512 S. Bernard St. (624-9233) SHAPE NOTE A-CAPPELLA GROUP The local singing group meets monthly on the second Sunday, from 1:30-4 pm. Good Samaritan Society, 17121 E. Eighth Ave. (924-9480) SPOKANE SYMPHONY WITH A SPLASH Pre-concert happy hour from 5-6:45 pm with a live local band, followed by a concert by the Symphony Orchestra at 7 pm. Jan. 16, 5-8 pm. $25. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony. org (624-1200) CELLOBRATION SPOKANE Hear Schubert’s monumental quintet performed by Jeff Lastrapes, John Marshall, and the Spokane String Quartet. Concert ends with 50 cellos on stage to perform a variety of music for cello ensemble. Jan. 17, 7:30 pm. Free; donations accepted. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu (359-2898) INLAND NW BLUEGRASS MUSIC ASSOCIATION SHOWCASE Live music performed by local and regional bluegrass and related acoustic bands. $5/members; $7/non-members; free/ ages 12 and under. Concerts held monthly on the third Saturday, from 7-9 pm. Trent Elementary School, 3303 N. Pines Rd. spokanebluegrass.org (509484-4668) KPBX KIDS’ CONCERT: SIXTEEN STRINGS Four members of the violin family take the spotlight with Sixteen Strings, featuring local string musicians. Jan. 17, 1 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater. com (227-7404) MET LIVE: LEHÁR’S THE MERRY WIDOW The great Renée Fleming stars as the beguiling femme fatale who captivates all Paris in Lehár’s enchanting operetta, seen in a new staging by Broadway virtuoso director and choreographer Susan Stroman. Live simulcast approx. 3 hrs. Jan. 17, 9:55 am. $15-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main, Moscow. kenworthy.org/Met (208-882-4127)


SPOKANE STRING QUARTET: OLD VIENNA, NEW VIENNA A concert program featuring pieces by Mozart, Webern and Schubert, with guest cellists Jeffrey Noel Lastrapes and John Marshall. Jan. 18, 3-6:30 pm. $12-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanestringquartet. org (624-1200)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SKIJORING BASICS Ski-jor-ing is a winter sport in which a person wearing skis is drawn over snow by one or more dogs. Learn about the sport, equipment, local opportunities and what it takes to get started. Jan. 8, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) SPOKANE BRAVES HOCKEY Hockey matches; kids are free with each paid adult. $5/adults; $4/seniors and students with ID. Includes a beer garden, chuck-a-puck and music. Games on Jan. 9, 11, 16, 24-25 and Feb. 1 and 6. Eagles Ice-A-Rena, 6321 N. Addison St. spokanebraves.com (489-9295) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey match vs. the Portland Winterhawks. Jan. 9, 7:05 pm. $10-$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey match vs. the Kamloops Blazers. Jan. 10, 7:05 pm. $10-$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun from 4:30-7 pm and Wed from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. wccc.myspokane.net (448-5694) SPOKANE NORDIC WINTERFEST Join the Spokane Nordic Ski Association for a celebration of skiing, snow and (hopefully) sunshine for all ages and ski abilities. Sno-park and Discover Pass pass required, day passes available. Jan. 11, 9 am-4 pm. Free; or $5/clinics. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic. org/winterfest SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4:30 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (535-0803) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780) SNOWSHOEING A presentation about types of snowshoes and what clothing to wear, also including photos of ideal snowshoeing locations in the Spokane area. Jan. 13, 6:30 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary. org (444-5385) MAP & COMPASS NAVIGATION BASICS CLASS Learn basic navigation skills using a map and compass to find your way. Jan. 14, 6-8:30 pm. $30-$50. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) OUTDOOR EMERGENCY BASICS Learn how to be prepared to help yourself and others in remote, wilderness settings, for one day or an extended trip. Jan. 15, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) WRANGLER BUSHWACKER INVITATIONAL Bull riding competition. Jan. 16 and 17 at 8 pm. $10-$75. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000)

THEATER

THE LAST FIVE YEARS The points of view of a relationship between a writer and an actress played out in this contemporary song-cycle musical. Jan. 9-25, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $17-$25. The Modern Theater Coeur d’Alene, 1320 E. Garden Ave. themoderntheater.org (208-667-1323) CALL MR. ROBESON: A LIFE WITH SONGS A play chronicling actor, singer and civil rights activist Paul Robeson’s life, highlighting how his radical activism caused him to be disowned and disremembered, even by the leaders and descendants of the civil rights movement. Jan. 16, 7 pm. $40-$50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS Comedy farce, directed by Patrick Treadway. Jan. 16-Feb. 8; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $18-$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) SERVICEMAN’S CANTEEN Youth actors present a live “radio” show based on the Bob Hope USO shows of World War II. Jan. 16-17, at 7 pm, Jan. 18 at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave, Newport. pendorielleplayers.org (477-9900) THE SUNSET LIMITED A play involving two characters designated “Black” and “White.” Offstage, just before the play begins, Black saves White from throwing himself in front of a train. Jan. 16-25; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org (838-9727) TEARS OF JOY PUPPET THEATER: RAVEN STORIES An all-new production from the Portland-based theater, based on the Native American lore of the Raven, who uses wits and cunning to get what he wants. Jan. 17, 2 pm. $10/kids, $15/adults. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950)

VISUAL ARTS

COUCH POTATO A viewer-participant art installation featuring art videos and films beginning from the ‘60’s and ‘70’s, to contemporary artists working today. Jan. 6-Feb. 6, open Mon-Fri, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. Some films may not be suitable for all audiences. Free and open to the public. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org/ gallery (533-3710) SOCIAL SKETCH Spend a night drawing, sketching, collaborating and socializing with other creatives at Spokane’s 1st #socialsketch. Bring your art supplies; all are welcome. Jan. 8, 7-10 pm. Free. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. thebartlettspokane.com HEART AND SOUL An exhibit of oil paintings by Randi Evans, who raised and bred Arabian horses for years. Reception Jan. 11, from 1-3 pm. Exhibit runs Jan. 8-31; winter hours Thur-Sun, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown. artisanbarn.org (509-229-3414) IDAHO WATERCOLOR SOCIETY An annual juried competition for its members throughout the state. Paintings exhibited are from the North Region of IWS that were shown in Boise, alongside a few works from the Palouse Watercolor Society. Through Jan. 30; reception Jan. 8 from 5-7 pm.

Gallery open Mon-Fri, 8 am-5 pm. Free admission. Third Street Gallery, City Hall, 206 E. Third St, Moscow. ci.moscow.id.us/art (208-883-7036) HAROLD BALAZS: OLD & NEW A collection of the longtime, renowned Northwest artist’s work, including twodozen newly created works alongside past favorites. Jan. 9-Feb. 7, reception Jan. 9 at 5 pm and artist talk Jan. 10 at 11 am. Gallery open Tues-Sat, from 11 am-6 pm. Free admission. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave., CdA. theartspiritgallery. com (208-765-6006)

WORDS

BLURT & BLATHER An all-ages open mic series, on the second and fourth Thursday of the month. Open to poetry, stories and other spoken word performances. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. facebook. com/blurtnblather AUTHOR WAYNE MANIS As a team leader of an FBI SWAT Team, Manis shares stories from 28 years in the FBI in his book “The Street Agent.” Jan. 9, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) AUTHOR JANENE LOUCKS The Spokane writer reads from and signs copies of the first book of her debut trilogy, “Two Minutes.” Jan. 10, 7 pm. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) AUTHOR J.M. KERBS The local author’s new series, “Deep Montreal” follows a 16-year-old orphan who finds herself surrounded by a mismatched crew aboard a ship. Jan. 10, 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) THE WORDWRIGHT’S WORKSHOP A writing and performance poetry workshop presented by Spokane Poetry Slam. This month, Isaac Grambo leads the second half of a two-part workshop centered on writing for social change. No experience is required. Jan. 10, 4:30-6 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. spokanepoetryslam.org (838-0206) THE CLARK DOLL EXPERIMENT Lecture by scholar Amy Nunez, examining “How Race/Ethnicity and Gender Influence the Perceptions of Pursuing College in Washington State.” Jan. 13, noon. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth St. (359-6200) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) AUTHOR JAMES BARFOOT Book signing and presentation by the author of “Tribalize Now - The Practice of Belonging.” Jan. 15, 7-9 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (230-5035)

ETC.

MOOSE ON THE MOVE Learn about the history, biology and ecology of moose in North America, and what’s going on with moose in our region. Jan. 10, 2 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org (444-5385) NORTHWEST BRIDAL FESTIVAL A wedding industry vendor trade show. Jan. 10-11, Sat from 10 am-5 pm, Sun from 11 am-4 pm. $10/good all weekend. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. bridalfest.com n

JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 47 SpokaneSymphony_010815_8V_GG.tif


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Spokane Green Leaf on Country Homes Boulevard sold $1,452,252 of marijuana, making it the fifth-highest grossing retailer in the state. Farmer J’s of Spokane Valley sold $1,249,227 of marijuana, making it the second-highest grossing grower in the state.

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59. Many a classical sculpture 60. “Time ____ the essence!” 61. La ____ Tar Pits 62. “The best ____ to come!” 63. “I told Bigfoot not to come, Yeti showed up anyway,” e.g. 64. Lose it DOWN 1. PBS science series 2. Pitcher-turned-sportscaster Hershiser 3. Junkyard material 4. Loft material 5. Cluster 6. Traveler’s stop 7. Queen ____ (Jay Z’s wife, in tabloids) 8. Food brand whose name refers to its short cooking time 9. Strip

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28. Jeweler’s eyepiece 29. “I’m all ____” 30. Declined 32. Place to relax 35. Event with a 16-pound ball 37. Ruling 39. Frequent form request: Abbr. 40. “Twelfth Night” duke who says “If music be the food of love, play on” 42. Email folder heading 43. 1997 film “____ Gold” 44. Doghouse infestation 45. Shows gratitude to a prostitute? 50. Attack 51. Hawaii’s Mauna ____ 52. The sculpture “Kryptos” sits outside its hdqrs. 55. Words after follow or blow 56. “Pat the Bunny” and “The Velveteen Rabbit,” e.g.?

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27. Music to a masseur’s ears 30. Most reliable 31. Befuddled 32. Vegetable stand purchase with high sugar content 33. Elizabeth of “La Bamba” 34. Field of many nonprofits 36. Bikini feature in a 1960 hit 38. Nobel Peace Center site 41. “Sorta” suffix 43. Discomfort 44. Workout target 45. “Not ____ know of” 46. They may appear over icons 47. Tex who created Bugs Bunny 48. Where Alcoholics Anonymous was founded 49. Snorkeling site 53. Crate & Barrel rival THIS 54. “Hurry!” W A NSWE EEK’S 56. In I SAW RS ON 57. Tempe sch. YOUS 58. Baby docs

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52 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

WorldMarket Christmas Eve. We talked at the store about TEA”s for my daughter-in-law, You had on a dark blue jacket, I think its called a Pete/ old style. You had your reading glasses in your hair, 5/6”ish tall, and your hair lte brn shoulder length and I told you I lived up north, Your smile and charm was to me over the top, You are very pretty, I have never been so rattled, thank you for the feeling. You where with a gal wearing a red top and she was driving a silver SUV. Hope We find each other, Contact me.

did now though! You: dark hair, beard, tan skin, green winter coat. Me: brown haired girl with various pattern dresses. Would love to know your story. It seems that you love junk and picking and so do I. Maybe we will run into each other again at the Outlet or you can e-mail me at thriftstorecutie27@ yahoo.com. Tell me what kind of dress I was wearing (one of the week’s it was pretty loud and hard to miss), so I know it’s you.-The Girl In The Pattern Dresses

hero of mine. And all I could ever want is for you is to be happy. So... yeah. I just want you to know that, and to say thank you. Happy New Year, my dear friend.

To The Tall, Handsome Bank Teller On Francis I have noticed you for months, and am drawn to you every time I enter the bank. Our brief conversations are often silly, but always stay with me. My interest in you is not fleeting or merely polite. If you are seeing this, you might know my name. Take a chance: get in touch and let’s get to know one another. I am interested yet hold no expectations. If you’re happily taken, but enjoy talking, let’s just talk again. I find you to be fascinating, and appreciate the value of pure friendship in this city between two strangers who can share their experiences of the world with respect and curiosity. Do respond if you’re reading, if only to tell me you’d prefer to let it go. It’d make me happy to know you saw this.

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo. com” — not “j.smith@ comcast.net.”

Frisky Women Have you noticed the new fad body stockings the ladies are wearing, even in this cold weather? They look like a body stocking, and they leave absolutely nothing to the imagination. You can see every fold, right down to the !!. I’m not sure whether to be appalled or to be thrilled. It’s great for my libido, but not so good for some of the younger set. It’s about where it is appropriate and where it is not. The unfortunate fact of the matter is that the ladies wearing them do it wherever they feel like it. They certainly aren’t hiding anything and obviously don’t want to. It’s a bit like legal indecent exposure. If a guy were to wear the equivalent on the street, right down to a phallic enclosure that didn’t hide his hoohah, he’d be arrested. Then there are the ugly women with nice bodies wearing them. I saw one the other day whose face looked like it had been run over by an ugly truck, but she had a nice figure. Almost made me barf until I realized she was what is defined as a brown bagger. Brown baggers need love too, I guess. hahahahaha

Goodwill Hunting I saw you twice at the Goodwill Outlet at the end of December. Once was on a Saturday and once was a Friday the following week (the day after Christmas, in fact). I thought you were cute and we kind of looked at each other both times, but we both never said anything. I kept wanting to, but then never did. The second time, I think you recognized me, but I wasn’t for sure; I was with some relatives and never got around to saying “hey.” I wish I

TO C O N N E C T

Cd’A Casino Andy...I met you at CDA Casino at the Zeus machine on NY Eve. You were there with your nephew. I never got to finish my beer you bought me. Can we get another sometime.

Cheers North Side Double Eagle Pawn Dustin you rock! Thanks for working a deal so I was able to get gaming remote/movies my son wanted for Christmas. Being a single mom money is tight so it’s appreciated. You said “tell your friends” and since I don’t have that many, I figured I’d tell Spokane how awesome you are. PS- don’t ever look in a girls purse...it’s a trap! Let’s Go For A Ride Your friendship has saved me and given me the hope I needed. The laughs we have shared have been my cure for rabies. You have stayed while others have run away. The new year looks so promising with you as my best friend. Let’s go for a ride in the time machine, “you don’t know what we can find. Why don’t you come with me little girl on a magic carpet ride”

Dear Friend I’ve sat next to you in class for two years, and we have grown together as great friends in that time. And then we lost contact, as time will do. I have always wanted to tell you how I have felt for you, but I always feared harming or losing our friendship. That, and you have always been in relationships at the time with great individuals, which means I have no right to intervene with how I feel. But I will lose my mind if I don’t say something. And so, with the new year on the horizon, I just wanted to turn some stones over that have been previously unturned. I care for you deeply, and am so happy that, for whatever it’s worth, you have been a part of my life for these last few years. And a happier aspect of it, at that. You are beautiful, smart, funny, talented, and a personal

My Love! Hello once again my my love, thank you for yet another year filled with laughter, joy and friendship. I thank God each night for bringing you into our lives and blessing us with the love and kindness you show. I believe in us and in the future we are building together as a family. I look forward, with child-like glee, to the day we leave this place behind. Devon and I can’t wait to get to Mississippi, I can only imagine the adventures our family will enjoy together. Happy new years darling, we love you dearly! Forever yours, Jessica and Devon Sweetest Teller Courtney, you are always so sweet and it is so difficult to leave the bank! I always enjoy taking to you thank you for always being so pleasant! Good Samaritan With A BoxCutter When I drove out of my carport New Year’s Eve morning, I was unaware that a large piece of carpet was frozen on my tire. By the time I reached Barnard St., the carpet was totally wrapped around my tire and axel. Several people stopped to marvel at my situation, but you appeared with a box-cutter and spent 20 minutes cutting the carpet free. When I thanked you for your kindness and your willingness to help a lady in distress, you said, “Well, what goes around comes around, right?” I certainly hope it does for you, young man. You are not only a good Samaritan, you are my hero. Thank you again, and may you be blessed with the same good-will you showed to me. The I Saw You Section Cheers to the Inlander for keeping up on the “I Saw You” section. It is my favorite section and I

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


Cheers

Cheers

Jeers

read it religiously every week. I read The Inlander back to front because I can’t wait until the end for the “I Saw You’s.” They are that good. I always hope to be “seen” myself but it has never happened. Still, it makes me smile seeing other people connect or the possibility of a connection. Here’s “looking at you,” Inlander!

Ian’s Dad Needs A Haircut K-eight, you left Sports Clips 2 months or so ago. I called and was told you are gone. Hope you and Audrey had a great Christmas. I’m looking like a hippie.

population in the United States each evening is comprised of veterans, (likely conservatively minded, since they joined the military in the first place). Another significant and fluctuating percentage of the nation’s homeless are non-functioning addicts of prescription drugs. Neither the FDA nor the U.S. military are liberal organizations, yet they have the largest effect on increased homelessness in the U.S. to date. As to your reference to the violent nature of homeless people, I urge you to do a quick google search on statistics of violence here in Spokane. Turns out, more homeless people were attacked or killed in recent years than were people-with-homes attacked by the homeless. For that matter, more people reported being attacked of threatened by police in this city last year than reported being threatened or attacked by homeless people. You make some good points in your jeer, but your ignorant assumption that all societal problems are caused by one ill-defined group or another (Liberals!!) does absolutely nothing to help find long term solutions for our community, nor does it prevent panhandling at freeway off-ramps. I must add, that as a woman of mixed ethnic background growing up in Spokane, I truly envy you your experience of a liberal “feel good” political agenda in this city. You must have lived a very fortunate life and should at least be grateful for that, even if you do have to look at a bunch of dirty beggars during your commute.

Auto Nation “Cheers” To The Guys at Auto Nation Spokane Valley: Thank you for making the process of buying my first car effortless. You were so laid back, honest, helpful, and caring that it took the pressure off. You really went the extra mile to make sure I loved the car before buying it and made me feel comfortable. I will always remember it and I, along with my parents, were super happy with your quality service. -The Girl W/The Black Mazda 3. 29 years ago, in Tesera You walked in to our class a little later than the rest of us. I’m glad I was sitting down, or I would have passed out. You stole my heart that day. You inscribed your name on it when you kissed me in the closet. You and I were meant to be together forever. I love you. Now come over and kiss me when you read this. PT Cruiser Rescued! Thanks to the amazing, young couple who pushed my green PT Cruiser out of the snow-filled ditch on the corner of Casper and Hangman Valley Rd last Sunday afternoon! Normally my car’s great in the snow but the combination of trying to make a tight left turn onto the Casper hill, a car coming down the hill, all that falling snow and poor visibility backing up landed me really, really stuck in the ditch! Your kindness and fast footwork is profoundly appreciated!

Jeers Wrecks We got a little snow over the weekend, and a few car crashes too. That means it’s time once again for many local news reporters to declare, “Snow and icy roads caused x number of crashes!” Please people… while the weather is a contributing factor, the drivers are causing the wrecks! Rotten Thief To the waste of life that stole my adorable vintage red sled off my front porch, I am so happy that I could provide that for you to cut and take from its post. It wasn’t valuable, so it is incredibly pathetic that you felt the need to steal mine instead of going to an antique store, like a civilized human, and buying one for $20. I hope karma slaps you incredibly hard in your face. RE: Liberalism, Homelessness Perhaps you are correct in assuming that a liberally minded person is more likely to give spare change to the homeless than is his conservative counterpart. You are absolutely correct to assume that this effort does little to fix the problem of homelessness nationally or locally, based on statistical evidence. Your assumption that homeless people are mostly liberal, however, or that liberalism leads to homelessness or panhandling, is grossly under-researched. In point of fact, while over 50% of U.S. tax dollars are designated for military spending each year, (55% of overall tax dollars have been alotted toward the military in the 2015 national budget, while another 6% will be spent on veteran’s affairs), a fluctuating 20%-35% of the homeless

’S THIS WEEK! ANSWERS HARDY

Hit and Run To whomever hit my

dad on the side of Geiger Blvd and Medical Lake exit as he was walking to the store, you left him for dead with 5 broken ribs, his left femur broke in 4 places, left ankle broke in 2 places and a small fracture above his left eye. He lay there on the side of the road for almost 2 hours before a trucker spotted him and went for help. Thank you to that trucker, but to the person who did this I hope you never sleep well again, I hope your licence was worth almost taking away a persons life! If anyone saw anything please come forward the accident took place 1-4-15 around 11:30pm

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JANUARY 8, 2015 INLANDER 53


CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT: Shayla Bengtson and a man who identified himself only as Filthy White Boy wait for New Year’s Eve fireworks; the Fresh Start warming shelter in Coeur d’Alene; and Scott Parker, the shelter’s manager.

Each Other, and This Place A couple hopes to put things back together after separation from each other and themselves BY JAKE THOMAS

T

he shelter smells of hot wings and pizza — a special dinner for New Year’s Eve — and there are green-and-white bottles of non-alcoholic champagne waiting to be cracked open. The Fresh Start warming shelter in Coeur d’Alene is full tonight: People huddle on mats, lean against walls and wedge into corners. Others are stretched out on three black couches watching the Western Tombstone on TV. The back door is constantly swinging open as a procession of smokers cycle in and out, hoping for a glimpse of the fireworks by the lake. Even here, cold and sober, there is a New Year’s buzz, the end of something, the resolution to be better. Sitting on a bedroll together, Lacey Thompson and Ryan Peppers are hoping, not unlike people all over the world, that when the clock strikes midnight they can finally make a break with their pasts. The two are

54 INLANDER JANUARY 8, 2015

regulars here. Peppers is 35, wears a flannel shirt and has a black beard. Soft-spoken, he lets Thompson, five years his junior, do most of the talking. She has short bobbed hair and wears an orange cardigan. On her left hand is a black glove. On her right hand is the word “mine” scrawled in black marker. “She’s mine,” says Peppers softly as the two gaze at each other. “I wrote ‘mine’ on her because she’s mine.” Thompson and Peppers met while working at a local brewery in 2006. She was the new waitress. He was the new cook. They fell in love and had a son. But they all would soon be separated. Their son was taken by the state, and the couple would be split up by periodic prison sentences. Addicted to prescription drugs, Thompson did a couple of stints in prison, including four years for coun-

JAKE THOMAS PHOTOS

terfeiting money to pay for her habit. She lost ties to the community she grew up in, avoiding everyone she knew there, including Peppers, who did a stretch behind bars himself. In 2013, having struck up a correspondence with Peppers, Thompson rode the Greyhound from Boise to Coeur d’Alene. “I was coming to my hometown as a stranger,” she says. She was nervous, worried that Peppers had given up on her and wouldn’t be there when her bus pulled in. Uncertainty melted into joy as Thompson saw Peppers standing in the parking lot in Coeur d’Alene, waiting for her. “I love her,” he says. “I’d find her wherever she was.” After being reunited, they didn’t leave each other’s sight, not even to go to the bathroom. Although happy and reunited, they’ve spent the past two years reintroducing themselves to one another and figuring out who they want to be. “We were really not ourselves,” says Peppers. “It changes you,” says Thompson of her time in prison. “And you have to deal with who you were and who you are now.” The past year was a year of agreeing who they want to be. They did some work over the summer painting houses and doing carpentry. But the two are still recovering from years of abusing Oxycontin. This year, they hope, will be different. This year, says Thompson, will be “a year of putting everything back together.” n jaket@inlander.com


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