Page 1

VOL. 5 ISSUE 37

ST. JOHN’S, NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR — FRIDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-20, 2007

WWW.THEINDEPENDENT.CA —

$1.50 HOME DELIVERY (HST included); $2.00 RETAIL (HST included)

Building bust-ups Capital city business owners cry foul over property inspections; take legal action CLARE-MARIE GOSSE

F

ollowing a recent article in The Independent about a local restaurant owner who had problems with city building inspectors, more property owners have stepped forward with similar complaints, backed by legal suits. Alleged unfair treatment by city officials, inconsistencies in building inspections, personal vendettas, and double standards are all issues that have been raised. John Franklin, owner of the building that houses The Last Drop and Gypsy Tea Room on Water Street, says his troubles are “like nothing I’ve ever experienced in my whole life.” He claims the city’s building department is run by one extended “family” that hires from within. None of the inspectors are independent, and filing a complaint is futile, Franklin claims. Two weeks ago, The Independent published an article about Alfred Hynes, who sold his successful, high-end downtown restaurant Aqua to open a historically themed venue on Water Street west called The Patriot. Hynes said he had to abandon the venture after work originally cleared by one city inspector was later deemed unsuitable by another, costing him hundreds of thousands of dollars. Franklin cites similar problems. He’s trying to renovate the two top floors of his building at 193195 Water St. into a small hotel, but says issues with the city have stalled his progress. “I could wallpaper (my whole building) with the complaints I have,” he says. “In my case it’s

Ray Bursey, owner of The Stage Head restaurant in Quidi Vidi, a fishing village in the east end St. John’s.

half a million dollars, so I’m mega-pissed off.” Franklin’s problem involves a small strip of land at the back of his property which he purchased from the city a few years ago. He needs full use of that land to construct a fire escape from his top floors — a code requirement — but the city has stepped forward to say he can’t do anything with the land because his neighbours have access rights to it. Franklin says that’s a vague, unsubstantiated tactic to halt the development, claiming the city has a personal vendetta against him. As a result, he has taken legal action.

Franklin says building inspectors choose to interpret code standards in different ways for different people. He says he has seen examples of similar work given the all-clear in one building, but refused in his. “The one word you will hear constantly from everybody — everybody you speak to — is ‘inconsistency’ between inspectors. The inspector will come in, he’ll look at your building, he’ll look at the code, (and) he’ll interpret it one way depending on whether he likes you or not.” Mayor Andy Wells strongly disagrees. While he admits it can be tough to carry out ren-

QUOTE OF THE WEEK “I play the bouzouki, not the bazooka.” — Billy Sutton of The Fables on his performance in Afghanistan

BUSINESS 15

Has Danny written off upper Churchill redress? LIFE 21 Liberal Leader Gerry Reid.

Paul Daly/The Independent

Getting their act together Alleged Liberal disarray threatens democracy: professor IVAN MORGAN

A

Memorial University political scientist says the overwhelming lead of the Danny Williams Conservatives is not good for democracy, and it’s time for opposition parties to step up to the plate Michael Temelini says the Tory government’s 76 per cent approval rating doesn’t mean they need all 48 seats in the provincial legislature. He says the Liberal party has to get its act together and its message straight in order to protect democracy in the province. “I don’t think it is good for democracy if we don’t have an opposition,” Temelini tells The Independent. He says he’s reluctant to say any-

thing negative about the opposition parties — the NDP or Liberals — because neither party needs any more bad publicity. “The sad fact is this province needs a strong opposition and these guys have got to get organized.” Recent Liberal party missteps — including cancelling a Gerry Reid speaking engagement with the Corner Brook Board of Trade — are fuelling rumours that the party is in free-fall. “It makes me wonder who’s running the Liberal party,” says Temelini. Reid says rumours of his party being in trouble, along with whispers of possible poor health, amount to negative spin from the other side. “Everything is great, I haven’t felt healthier in the last 15 years,” Reid says. See “Enough,” page 6

Bernice Morgan gets under the skin in latest novel STYLE 25

Warm woolies for crisp fall weather SPORTS 33

Terry Ryan to play with First Nations reserve Scrunchins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Paper Trail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Woody’s Wheels . . . . . . . . . . 29 Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Don Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Paul Daly/The Independent

ovation work to code on old, downtown heritage buildings, he says the city has to protect the interests of the general public. “I’m sure we know, the department knows developers who play by the rules and can be trusted, and maybe where you’ve established a track record consistently and people know you’re going to follow the rules … I don’t know whether there’s more leniency or not. But with a guy like Franklin … you have to watch what he’s doing because he does not respect the rules.” See “Up to code,” page 6

Newfie nourishment Taste of home whets appetite upalong By Daniel MacEachern For The Independent FORT MCMURRAY, ALTA.

T

he Newfoundland tri-colour hangs from the balcony of a first-floor apartment while two of the tenants sit on the deck, smoking. Richard Drover, 21, and A.J. Matthews, 22, both of Baie Verte, have only been living in the apartment in downtown Fort McMurray for a week, but a flag from their home province was a necessity. “We were looking for the newer one,” admits Drover, “but this is the only one they had.” “They,” in this case, wasn’t so much a store as it was an entrepreneur selling flags out of his van in the Wal-Mart parking lot. But roadside merchants aren’t the only ones looking to make money off home-sick Newfoundlanders, who can buy art, browse books by Newfoundland authors in the “Of Local Interest” section at the local Coles bookstore, or catch one of eight shows by Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers at the local college this fall. The most common sign of the Newfoundland diaspora in Fort McMurray may be the rear-window tribute: for $100, you can get a map or a flag of Newfoundland emblazoned on your truck. The major grocery stores carry a selection of foods from Eastern Canada — including made-inNewfoundland items like Purity

products and Rock favourites like canned Spaghettios — often in their own section. At Garden Market IGA in Thickwood, a residential neighbourhood in Fort McMurray, a provincial flag hangs over the Newfoundland selection. A sign in the customer service department lets shoppers know they can buy “cod ear jewelry” — earrings made from cod fins — supplied by a woman from Gander. Corey Whiteway, 27, who moved here nine years ago from the Northern Peninsula, puts Purity’s Assorted Creams, a package of Snowballs and a can of meatballs and gravy in his cart. The Jam Jams are sold out. He says it’s important to find the foods that remind him of home. “Hard bread, gravy browning … you can’t find none of that nowheres else. It’s all I lives on,” Whiteway tells The Independent. Yasser Assaf, the IGA store manager, says the store constantly receives requests for items from Newfoundland, and does what it can to fulfil them. His main constraint, he says, is whether the food will survive the trip; he receives a lot of requests for vacuum-packed salt beef, but he can’t bring it in. “I can bring it in by the pail, and sell it to them by the piece, but I cannot get it vacuum-packed. It won’t last the trip from the East to here.” See “Not quite home-sick,” page 6


2 • INDEPENDENTNEWS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

‘Is there a better way?’

Randy Simms says citizens’ coalition should be struck to review fixed-date election

W

e are expecting Premier Danny Williams to hand in the resignation of his government on Monday morning. If he runs true to form he will pay a visit to Government House for a quick meeting with Lieutenant-Governor Ed Roberts, usually at around 10 a.m., and will emerge to jump aboard his RV for the three-week campaign for re-election. Unlike any other time in our history we already know when the election is going to happen. We have known for some time that Tuesday, Oct. 9 is polling day. As I have discussed in this column before, having a fixed election date is both a good and a bad thing. Good because it takes the decision

RANDY SIMMS

Page 2 talk out of the hands of one person and eliminates a perceived advantage in trying to garner votes. In past elections the premier of the province has tried to gauge the timing of an election around good polling results. A fixed-election date ends that perception. Bad because it takes the timing of elections and expands it by months. All of this pre-election elec-

tioneering may negatively impact potential voters. Even before the writ is dropped some people are saying they are sick of it. There are other problems with the fixed-election date as well. This week the premier called a byelection for the district of Baie Verte. He called the byelection to comply with our provincial election rules. When Paul Shelley left his MHA job to seek greener pastures in the private sector he inadvertently triggered the need for a byelection call. According to the elections act the byelection had to be called within 60 days of the resignation. So the premier had no choice. Obviously this byelection will not really happen. It will now form part of the general election on Oct. 9. That makes sense, but some things here just don’t add up. In the last year of this government’s mandate we had five byelections. They all cost thousands of dollars and we put people in the House of Assembly for as little as six months. As of Monday, they are out of office again. The nomination process for the political parties has been ongoing for months with campaign after campaign being run off just to identify candidates. While political operatives from all parties consider

it a good idea to start a campaign early, having potential candidates in place for up to a year before the actual vote takes a little getting used to and leaves people in permanent election mode. It’s great for talk shows and for the editorial writers, but is it good for our democracy? Are we turning off voters? When this upcoming election is over I think the new government should set up a special citizens’ committee to review the fixed-election date process and bring back suggestions designed to make it more effective. I would recommend to the new government that a group of 12 to 20 people be brought together to review the current act and gather impressions from voters on how the thing went. This is the first time we have experienced a fixeddate election and it’s obvious to everyone that the process needs a little tweaking. A lot of questions could be answered. When is the right time to cut the need for a byelection? How far in front of the general election should parties be putting candidates in place? How should parties and candidates handle pre-election spending? See “Winners,” page 3


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTNEWS • 3

SCRUNCHINS A weekly collection of Newfoundlandia Scrunchins begins this week with an update on Gene Simmons Family Jewels and plans to film an episode of the hit reality series right here in Newfoundland. The Independent reported back in January that Family Jewels might be headed to Whitbourne, hometown of Shannon Tweed, the actress and former Playmate who’s probably best known as the live-in partner of KISS bassist and rock God Gene Simmons. “We love the idea of going there, we’re very interested. We love the idea of going to Shannon’s hometown,” Adam Reid, the show’s executive producer, said in January. In an exclusive interview published this week with Georgia Straight, a Vancouver-based arts publication, Simmons revealed he “can’t stand hunting.” When asked if he was bringing his reality series to Newfoundland to bring attention on the seal hunt, he replied, “I’m not allowed to say.” Simmons then added, “The idea that anybody would call that a sport is delusional.” Last year, as Georgia Straight pointed out, singer Paul McCartney drew worldwide attention when he and his then-loving wife, Heather Mills, arrived on the ice floes to protest the seal hunt, which led to a debate on the Larry King Show with the two pitted against Premier Danny Williams. The Georgia Straight article went on to say that some Newfoundland residents “make a few extra bucks by clubbing harbour seals to death so they can sell their white pelts.” Simmons, however, claimed that such activity could only be considered a “sport” if the animal has a gun and can shoot back. “When one guy has got a bat and the other one has got a popcorn fart, that’s a slaughter,” Simmons claimed. When The Independent talked to Tweed she only seemed interested in visiting her hometown near Dildo. Simmons, who, by the by, has claimed to have had sexual relations with approximately 4,800 women in his life, wants to turn a trip to the Rock into a statement on sealing. He better watch his Family Jewels when he’s here … WHITE LIES Life magazine published a fascinating book recently, 100 Photographs That Changed the World. Some of the pictures are iconic — a portrait of Cuba’s Che Guevara, the first flight in 1903 of Orville and Wilbur Flight’s plane, the Flyer, near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, The Beatles arrival in America in 1964, Hitler walking with his Nazi death troops in the 1940s, and the conquest of Mount Everest in 1953. A 1969 photograph of the East Coast seal hunt is also included, a shot of a sealer in the act of clubbing a white coat while a mother seal looks on. According to a short piece that accompanies the photo, the picture led many consumers to stop buying fur, and some countries to banning seal-fur imports from Canada. “An unintended consequence: certain indigenous peoples, hurt by the fallout in a longtime livelihood, sold oil-drilling rights to

petroleum companies in order to survive, leading to wanton environmental degradation in Canada.” The indigenous people Life was talking about must be us Newfoundlanders. The “wanton environmental degredation” could be the codfish collapse, I suppose, but then the seals ate the guts out of them … BAD BOY Now to a recent Globe and Mail article, Rowdymen of the Rock, about Joel Thomas Hynes, the writer, and Ron Hynes, the musician, famous Newfoundland men who also happen to be related. Ron, 56, from Ferryland, is the uncle of 31-year-old Joel, from Calvert. Ron and Joel are second-born, arriving on the scene to “preoccupied” parents, and both have fought their share of demons. “They’ve both had addictions and ended up in detox and they’ve both turned aspects of their darker experiences into award-winning art.” The Independent’s own Noreen Golfman is also quoted in the Globe story, describing young Joel as “the thinking man’s bad boy.” Noreen herself, a scrappy columnist if ever there was one, could be the thinking man’s bad girl … LAMBS OF GOD Danny Williams had a good week, what with the release of his long-awaited Energy Plan and the securing of a five per cent equity stake in the White Rose expansion. In the most recent edition of Maclean’s magazine, columnist Colin Campbell praises the premier’s tenacity to go up against Big Oil. His popularity is also through the roof. With a provincial election set for Oct. 9, the Maclean’s article says Danny’s rivals look like lambs before the slaughter. Opponents in Ottawa can grumble and call him names, but at home, says Stephen Tomblin, a political science professor with Memorial, “He’s a God.” Not a rock god though, despite his campaign singalong at the St. John’s Board of Trade luncheon earlier this week. The song, We know what we’re fighting for, was written by Darrell Power, formerly of Great Big Sea. Reads the chorus: We know what we’re fighting for; we believe in what we’re fighting for; we love what we’re fighting for; Newfoundland and Labrador.” Pass the seal club … WINTER LIMO Back to the Energy Plan for a moment, a special lock-up was held in St. John’s earlier this week to give the local media a chance to look over the report and pose any technical questions before its official release (similar to what happens on budget day). Of course, it’s always a hoot when a dozen or so members of the local media are locked in the same room for any length of time. Said Craig Westcott of the 93-page report, entitled Focusing our Energy, “I don’t know if I have the energy to get through this.” CBC Radio’s David Cochrane asked a pubic relations official in the room whether the premier plans to get rid of the “big Yukon,” which he tagged “the winter limo.” Cochrane also commented on how the Energy Plan, which was promised by the Tories four years ago, is

Winners’ complacency From page 2 Right now candidates who have spent their own money before the writ is dropped still have to report that expenditure as part of their overall election campaign, but they are not allowed to raise money until the election is actually called. Is that a consistent system or is it too easily abused? I would encourage the new government to even allow this citizens’ committee to look at how we make our vote count in this province. Right now we use a “first-pastthe-post” format. The one with the most votes wins, which is fine, but it sees candidate after candidate taking office with less than a majority of the vote in their district.

Should this process be changed to more effectively represent the wishes of the people? Most of the world’s democracies no longer ascribe to our system of representation. Winning 30 per cent of the vote should not necessarily give you a seat. Is there a better way? A citizens’ committee appointed by the new government to look at all of these issues would be a big step forward for our electoral process, but the only people who can make such a thing a reality is the winner in the upcoming election. Winners have no motivation to change a system that works for them. Sad but true. Randy Simms is host of VOCM’s Open Line radio program. rsimms@nf.sympatico.ca

Author and actor Joel Thomas Hynes with his uncle, singer-songwriter Ron Hynes, in Joel’s St. John’s home.

worth the wait. “It’s like the new Harry Potter book,” he said. “I wouldn’t go that far,” said ClareMarie Gosse of The Independent. I wouldn’t either … REFINERY ROW The Energy Plan also mentioned the province’s only refinery, at Come by Chance, as an example of “a successful secondary processing petroleum facility.” And so it is, but you wouldn’t have said that in the 1970s when the business went under. In fact, at the time it was the

biggest bankruptcy in Canadian history. The refinery was mothballed for years until it was sold for a buck. Times certainly do change … TEA FOR TWO Linda Goodyear, the Liberal candidate in the district of Conception Bay EastBell Island, is leaving pamphlets in mailboxes that say she’s “back for my cup of tea …” Open up the pamphlet and there’s a teabag stapled below the words, “Here’s one on me!” How cute is that? I don’t know if she’ll be a “stronger voice” or not but, the cup of tea could be a welcome one …

Paul Daly/The Inependent

IDOL WORSHIP Finally this week, The Independent’s own Brian Callahan appeared this week, ever so briefly, on Canadian Idol. Brian may have lost the Media Idol crown to a radio personality from Halifax, but he’s still the Karaoke King in these parts. Word has it Miss Universe Canada, Inga Skaya, is scheduled to be Screeched-in at Christian’s bar on George Street in St. John’s on Monday, Sept. 24. Maybe Brian will sing her something nice …. ryan.cleary@theindependent.ca


4 • INDEPENDENTNEWS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

More turbot wars?

Historic quotas in jeopardy? By Ivan Morgan The Independent

By Ivan Morgan The Independent

P

A

five-year international plan to rebuild turbot stocks on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland has been scuttled by Spanish and Portuguese overfishing, say representatives of the Canadian fishing industry. With drastic cuts to the turbot quota in the pipeline, industry is calling on the European Union fleet to carry the bulk of the cut, as “they are responsible for the problem.” The industry rumour is that Spain, where federal Fisheries Minister Loyola Hearn and Fisheries ambassador Loyola Sullivan are attending a Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) conference this week, still have boats fishing off Canadian waters, even though they met their quota two months ago. “There seems to be emerging consensus from the various fleets that are fishing that stock (turbot), that the (NAFO) scientific council’s analysis may not be accurate,” Fisheries Council of Canada president Patrick McGuinness tells The Independent from his Ottawa office. Scientists with NAFO believe the stock has declined, he says, and their recovery program is not progressing, “and that’s mainly attributable to overfishing of quotas by the European Union fleet — Spain and Portugal.” In order to get “back on track” he says, the scientists claim quotas should be reduced dramatically. The other side of this problem, says McGuinness, is the fleets fishing turbot

everyone’s best interest to have “some form of roadmap” to guide them if, at a particular meeting, no decision can be made. McGuinness says in the event no consensus is reached, there should be a provision stipulating that the status quo prevails. “It is certainly not in the current one, and we would hope that it would be in the future one.” He says there is a school of thought that argues a two-thirds vote, being harder to achieve, may better protect the status quo, which is currently only protected if there is no vote. The fact it is harder to achieve will make people shy away, thus preserving the status quo, says McGuinness. He says his organization’s position is a new convention should try to give as much guidance as possible with respect to what may occur in the future. “Anybody can sit there and take a very extreme view,” he says. “Having seen that there is a possible extreme view here, let’s build into the convention something that has a safeguard against it.” A spokesperson for federal Fisheries Minister Loyola Hearn e-mailed a response to The Independent’s request for a comment from Hearn on this issue. “As you know, we will be negotiating various issues at NAFO at the end of this month and therefore wide discussion about our positions in the public domain is not appropriate. The minister has recently been unequivocal, however, in the media regarding Canada’s jurisdiction within the 200mile limit.” ivan.morgan@theindependent.ca

Federal Fisheries Minister Loyola Hearn and Elena Espinosa, Spain’s Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, shake hands at the conclusion of the signing ceremony for the fisheries cooperation memorandum of understanding in Madrid on Sept. 6. Pool photo

“have found significant increases in what they call their catch per unit of effort.” “I am not confident in the turbot science,” says Bruce Chapman, executive director of the Groundfish Enterprise Allocation Council from his Manotick, Ont., office. He says NAFO has set a “multi-year” total allowable catch (TAC) designed to ward off a decline in turbot stocks forecast by science. However, he says, information his organization has suggests some foreign fleets have been “catching more than their quota.” “The stocks would be a whole lot better off now, according to the science models, had that overfishing not taken place,” says Chapman. NAFO has allotted decreasing quotas on the stock for the past several years, dropping from 20,000 tonnes in 2004, to

19,000 tonnes in 2005, 18,500 tonnes in 2006 and 16,000 tonnes this year. The scientific advice coming out of a June meeting of the NAFO scientific council recommends a drop or a reduction in the catch, which effectively means a drop in the TAC. The problem, says McGuinness, is science does not factor industry data into their findings. If there is to be a drop, says Chapman, then the people who pay the price of that drop should be the people who weren’t respecting the quotas. “I would expect that there are others, like Canada, who have turbot quotas, who have respected their quotas — the Russians and the Japanese — who would also not be happy with the idea of paying the price for someone else’s overfishing.” ivan.morgan@theindependent.ca

roposed changes to NAFO voting rules that raise the level of consensus to a two-thirds vote from the existing 50 per cent plus one offer no protection for Canada’s traditional quota shares, industry officials say. They also fear that a failure to reach consensus would result in so-called quota keys — the proportion of overall offshore fish quotas assigned to Canada — being erased. Under the current formula, the quota keys are not protected, and the head of the national fisheries council is calling for provisions in the proposed new voting rules to fix this “oversight.” For example, as NAFO (Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization) rules stand, if a simple majority consensus is not reached on the division of yellowtail flounder, Canada’s 94 per cent quota could be erased. “That’s an extreme view,” Fisheries Council of Canada president Patrick McGuinness tells The Independent from Ottawa. Under proposed NAFO reforms, the 50 per cent plus one consensus is to be replaced by a two-thirds vote. As the quota keys would be in just as much jeopardy in the new voting regime, McGuinness says NAFO, which oversees fishing outside Canada’s 200-mile limit, has a chance to correct this. He says this is something his organization would like to see addressed, “now that people are talking about extremes.” With the opportunity to develop a new NAFO convention, he says it is in

‘Where we came from’

Schools need more NL programming; minister, critic agree

By Mandy Cook The Independent

W

ho was Newfoundland’s first prime minister? When did Sir Wilfred Grenfell begin dispensing medicine on the Labrador coast? How do you split and salt a codfish? Anyone? Anyone? Answers to these questions should be automatic for the province’s school children, but judging by the amount of Newfoundland and Labrador history being taught in the curriculum, the number of kids who know is probably slim to none. Sean Noah, president of the Newfoundland and Labrador Teachers’ Association, is satisfied with the amount of the province’s culture and history being taught in school, but Education Minister Joan Burke and Liberal education critic Roland Butler say it’s not enough. Noah says Atlantic Edge, a Grade 5

INDEPENDENTCONTACTS

Ryan Cleary, Editor-In-Chief ryan.cleary@theindependent.ca, Ext.29

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 5891, Stn.C, St. John’s, Newfoundland & Labrador, A1C 5X4

NEWSROOM Stephanie Porter, Managing Editor stephanie.porter@theindependent.ca, Ext.28 Ivan Morgan, Senior Writer ivan.morgan@theindependent.ca, Ext.34 Mandy Cook, Reporter mandy.cook@theindependent.ca, Ext.26

PHONE 709-726-4639 FAX 709-726-8499 Canada Post Agreement # 40871083

history course, and Voyage to Discovery: A History of Newfoundland and Labrador, a Grade 8 course, are the only two Newfoundland history courses being taught. He does, however, say there are heritage “parallels” throughout the curriculum, including a number of fairs, the most popular being a heritage fair that draws thousands of students a year. In 2006, 6,500 students in grades one to eight participated in the event. Projects are judged and winners go on to compete at the national level. Another event entitled Newfoundland and Labrador Day is held at some schools where traditional meals are cooked and local residents give presentations about the province’s background. Noah says works by Newfoundland and Labrador authors such as Harold Horwood, Tom Cahill, Helen Porter and poet E. J. Pratt are used in language arts classes. Visiting music groups like

Paul Daly, Picture Editor paul.daly@theindependent.ca, Ext.30 Nicholas Langor, Photographer nicholas.langor@theindependent.ca PRODUCTION John Andrews, Production Manager john.andrews@theindependent.ca, Ext.61 Sarah Hansen, Graphic Designer sarah.hansen@theindependent.ca, Ext.27

“Some of the kids come home and they’re a bit frustrated with (Newfoundland politics). A lot of them don’t even know who the premier is or who the lieutenantgovernor is.” Roland Butler Shanneyganock and Night Kitchen also perform at schools and discuss their music, songs and instruments. Children are also encouraged to interview family members who are war veterans, in light of Remembrance Day ceremonies. Burke says she is not happy with the amount of local history being taught in schools, and notes government is piloting a new high school history course in five schools this year. “It will focus on where we came from, where we are now and where we’re going as a province. It’s also meant to help facilitate discussion and debate with the students,” she says. Burke says Newfoundland and Labrador’s cultural heritage and history needs to “permeate” throughout the entire school program. To that end, the province has invested almost $10 million in the cultural curriculum over the past three years, with new music courses already introduced for kindergarten through Grade 6. The program, which is being piloted in grades seven to nine, focuses on traditional music, as well as Innu, Mi’kmaq and Irish dancing. Sixty-eight works by Newfoundland and Labrador authors are in the approval process for student book reviews, two of which are Ann and Seamus by Kevin Major and There Are No Polar Bears Here by Catherine Simpson. Profile posters of lesserknown people who have contributed to our province — nurse Myra Bennett and author Elizabeth Goudie, to name two — are also in production. In addition, an art program has sent Newfoundland and Labrador artists to 127 schools between April 2006 and May 2007. Butler agrees with Burke. He says he’d like to see more modern-day history added to the books, particularly focusing on the political and democratic system in which he operates. “Some of the kids come home and they’re a bit frustrated with (Newfoundland politics),” he says. “A lot of them don’t even know who the premier is or who the lieutenant-governor is. They have those questions but there isn’t a followup down the road.” mandy.cook@theindependent.ca

ADVERTISING Sandra Charters, Advertising Director sandra.charters@theindependent.ca, Ext.25 Cass Halliday, Account Executive cass.halliday@theindependent.ca, Ext.57 CIRCULATION David Tizzard, Circulation Director dave.tizzard@theindependent.ca, 22 Karl DeHart, Circulation Manager karl.dehart@theindependent.ca, Ext.60

Kayla Joy, Circulation Coordinator kayla.joy@theindependent.ca, Ext.21 Rose Genge, Office Manager rose.genge@theindependent.ca, Ext.33


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTNEWS • 5

WHITE ROSE STAKE

Premier Danny Williams announced Sept. 12 he had a verbal agreement with Husky Oil to secure a five per cent stake for the province in an expansion of the White Rose oilfield. Williams made the announcement during a St. John’s Board of Trade luncheon in St. John’s. Husky plans to begin extracting 24 million barrels of oil from the field by 2010. It is the first of three expansions that could yield 214 million barrels in total. Paul Daly/The Independent

Nuclear no-go By Brian Callahan The Independent

T

he Williams government has no interest in a nuclear power plant for Newfoundland and Labrador, but is all for exporting the province’s lucrative uranium deposits. “No role is foreseen for nuclear generation in the province,” according to government’s new energy plan, released Sept. 11. “Even if provincial legislation prohibiting nuclear generation were not in place, more cost-effective and flexible hydro alternatives are already available to us and are well understood.” Indeed, Sect. 3 (f) of the provincial Electrical Power Control Act, amended in 1994, is brief and clear: “Planning for future power supply of the province shall not include nuclear power.”

There are seven nuclear power plants in Canada, and many others “under consideration” around the world, the document states. But if there is an eighth, it’s clear it won’t be in Newfoundland or Labrador any time soon. “This does not diminish the value of the province’s uranium deposits for export,” the energy plan says. “Nuclear generation is enjoying a renaissance and can be more attractive than fossil fuel generation in many markets. New plants … are driving ongoing demand for uranium ore.” The Independent requested an interview with Natural Resources Minister Kathy Dunderdale to ask why the province would not consider the nuclear option, but received an e-mail response from her spokeswoman. “The minister says the province has

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES

BENEFITS AND PENSIONS FINANCIAL ANALYST DUTIES The successful applicant will report to the Manager of Benefits and Pensions and perform responsible professional work in the administration of the Memorial University Pension Plan, group insurance benefits, and other employee benefit programs. Primary duties include performing analysis and reconciliation of benefits and pensions accounts; preparing annual pension plan financial statements and liaising with external auditors; monitoring of pension fund investments and performance; preparing monthly remittances to insurance carriers, monthly re-balancing of investment portfolio, preparing health and dental plan accounting statements, calculation of pension adjustment amounts; preparation of commuted values using calculation software; compiling and reconciling actuarial valuation data for the pension plan and post employment benefits program; conducting analytical research within the public and private sectors on pension and benefit matters to identify and monitor trends; assisting in formulating policies and regulations pertaining to pension and benefit matters; reviewing existing policies, procedures and plan provisions of the Memorial University Pension Plan and various group insurance plans (i.e. life, accidental death and dismemberment, long term disability, health and dental) and recommending modifications; overseeing the work of Benefits Officers engaged in day-to-day benefit and pension administration; and performing other related duties as required. QUALIFICATIONS Considerable experience (3-5 years) in benefit and pension administration work; graduation with a degree from a four-year college or university with major course work in business administration with a concentration in accounting/finance; experience with the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP, completion of relevant courses in the area of investments; familiarity with legislation governing employee pension and benefit plans; strong analytical and research skills; or any equivalent combination of experience and training. Experience with spreadsheet analysis and competency in the use of computer software including Microsoft Office required. Attainment of the Certified Employee Benefit Specialist designation would be an asset.

more than enough clean, renewable lower-cost energy resources to meet the province’s own needs and to export the surplus from these long into the future without nuclear energy. “Therefore she is not interested in doing an interview on nuclear energy.” There are five nuclear power plants in Ontario, one in Quebec and one in New Brunswick. According to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), such plants have been operating in Canada since the early 1970s. “With regulation by the CNSC and its predecessor, the Atomic Energy Control Board, there has never been a significant accident resulting from the operations of any of Canada’s nuclear power plants,” the CNSC states. brian.callahan@theindependent.ca

Veterans pavilion in for expansion

A

$3-million extension to the Caribou Memorial Veterans Pavilion in St. John’s should be ready for occupancy by the spring of 2008, a health official says. The existing 45-year-old pavilion is part of the Dr. L. A. Miller Centre, the former General Hospital on Forest Road, which also houses Southcott Hall, home of the Centre for Nursing Studies. But Eastern Health’s Keith Bowden says there was a need to make more room for veterans residing at the pavilion. Bowden, director of infrastructure support, says the bed count will actually only increase by four at the 14-bed dementia unit, but he says the extension will eliminate rooms with three

occupants. “The real benefit will be that the triples will disappear,” Bowden tells The Independent. There are about 56 “plus or minus” residents at the veterans unit now, he said, noting the original pavilion was built in 1962, with a “major upgrade” in 1993. The money for the extension is coming from the federal Department of Veterans Affairs. The Miller Centre, originally called Forest Road or Quidi Vidi Hospital, was a military hospital built in 1851. In the 1880s it became the General Hospital and in 1978 was renamed the Dr. Leonard A. Miller Centre. brian.callahan@theindependent.ca

SALARY $37,872 on a scale of $37,872-$53,107

other related duties, as required. Attendance at or participation in appropriate national and international meetings may be required.

CLOSING DATE September 21, 2007

THE CANDIDATE The ideal candidate will have experience working in an adult learning environment and a vision for the development of programs to assist students EITHER through thorough experience (5-10 years) and completion of an undergraduate degree in a health related discipline OR considerable experience (3-5 years) and the completion of a Masters degree in a health related discipline; or an equivalent combination of experience and training. Knowledge of the social and cultural pressures and environment faced by mature students is required. Strong listening, communication and analytical skills, as well as an ability to inspire confidence and aid students to develop self understanding, is also required. Knowledge of the university’s academic policies and regulations would be an asset.

COMPETITION NO. HRS-007-07-15

FACULTY OF MEDICINE

STUDENT WELLNESS CONSULTANT – FACULTY OF MEDICINE STUDENT AFFAIRS THE OPPORTUNITY In keeping with the 2020 vision of the Faculty of Medicine you will improve the quality of undergraduate medical student life and in so doing help improve the quality of health care in Newfoundland and Labrador. Working as part of the team in Student Affairs Office, you will help Faculty of Medicine students become professionals who demonstrate a commitment to physician health and sustainable practice; conduct research, develop and implement programs on physician wellness for undergraduate medical students and potentially postgraduate students to promote personal health and well being; develop programs to ensure student’s professionalism in the field; provide assistance to students in distress; advise students, conduct confidential interviews designed to cover all aspects of problems including personal, financial, vocational, academic and school related; suggest courses of action; refer students to appropriate health professionals where and when required as you may be the first person a student will see when in distress; liaise with faculty, staff and students in the Faculty of Medicine to develop strategies to improve student’s well being, including participating on related committees; raise awareness and educate students on the importance of physician health and wellness; build relationships with various internal and community groups; participate on education, awards and promotions committees as an ex-officio member; liaise with University wide providers for Student Affairs and Services, including, when appropriate, participation on Counselling Centre and Student Affairs and Services committees; and perform

SALARY Commensurate with qualifications and experience CLOSING DATE September 21, 2007 COMPETITION NO. MED-071-07-37 To apply for this position, fully complete an APPLICATION FOR NON ACADEMIC EMPLOYMENT and attach a current resume, addressed to: Director of Human Resources Memorial University of Newfoundland St. John’s, NL A1C 5S7 For further information concerning this opportunity, or to obtain a copy of the application form, please visit us on the web at: www.mun.ca/humanres/; or contact the Recruitment Office, Department of Human Resources, Room A4039, Arts and Administration Building, Elizabeth Avenue, phone (709) 737-7403, fax (709) 7372700, or email recruitment@mun.ca. If applying by email, please state the competition number in the subject line. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Memorial University is committed to employment equity and encourages applications from qualified women and men, visible minorities, aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities.

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Memorial University is committed to employment equity and encourages applications from qualified women and men, visible minorities, aboriginal peoples, and persons with disabilities.

www.mun.ca


6 • INDEPENDENTNEWS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

Up to code From page 1 Another downtown property owner who has taken recent legal action against the city is Steve Campbell, owner of the Water Street building that houses The Zone bar and Hava Java. Earlier this year, The Zone was forced to close after city inspectors decided its fire alarm system wasn’t up to code, despite the fact it had been cleared every year for the past 23 and was originally set up under the direction of the city. Campbell says The Zone’s manager was asked to submit an installation plan for a new system. When that was done, he says, the city changed its mind and said it wanted to deal with the owner. Campbell says the city pulled the bar’s licence, forcing The Zone to close. Infuriated, Campbell began legal

action in what he calls “an open and shut case” in small claims court for his lost rent. The matter has yet to be decided, and the city has since allowed The Zone to re-open even though the new alarm system has yet to be installed, Campbell says. “Once I win my case, (The Zone’s manager) is going to take them to court and say ‘you know what boys? You cost me $20,000, $30,000 of business and I had to put in this system I didn’t have to put in.’ “They are sons of bitches and it’s a bit of ‘we’ve got the stranglehold on you and we will go over the line.’” Ray Bursey, a 76-year-old property owner whose family has run a business in Quidi Vidi for decades, says he feels he has been “blackballed” by the city. His issues are not with building inspectors but with work carried out without his permission on land the city

“They are sons of bitches and it’s a bit of ‘we’ve got the stranglehold on you and we will go over the line.’” Steve Campbell expropriated from him. He says he had to permanently close down his waterfront restaurant, The Stage Head, last April because a poorly constructed city sewage lifting station overflowed several times washing

raw waste across his restaurant’s parking lot. As well, the underground pipes fitted beneath the lot to drain water from newer houses on the hill overlooking his property are undersized and an excess of flooding has carried away large chunks of the concrete wharf edge, making the area hazardous. He recently had an independent engineer’s report drawn up to assess the damage and he, too, has filed legal action against the city. He estimates his losses to be in excess of $3 million. “One of the very first things the insurance people said to me was, ‘you better go out of town if you’re going to have any (assessment) work done by engineers. “I think it’s a vendetta of some kind with me down in Quidi Vidi … there’s been a lot of things going on to try to get that property away from me.”

Not quite homesick yet From page 1 For grocery stores, stocking Newfoundland nourishment isn’t just innovative marketing, but it’s necessary to attract and keep loyal customers. But it wasn’t always this way. Donna Gallinger, owner of Belleza Hair and Tanning Salon, came to Fort McMurray “30-odd” years ago from Rocky Harbour. She says there were very few Newfoundland products in local stores at the time. But slowly, she says, selection improved. “As more and more Newfoundlanders came to Fort McMurray (the stores) brought in more,” she says. And not just more food, but also more workers. Several of Gallinger’s employees are from Newfoundland. When Jeremy Dawe came from St. John’s this past summer, his arrival was advertised on a portable sign off one of Fort McMurray’s busiest boulevards. Gallinger says the sign sparked new clients coming into the shop to ask if Jeremy had arrived yet, even though they didn’t know him. Dawe landed his job through a friendof-a-friend-of-the-daughter-of-the-owner connection, and since his arrival has been cutting a lot of hair. “A lot of people came here requesting me,” Dawe says, attributing the interest as much to him being one of the few male hairstylists in town. He doesn’t shop in the Newfoundland grocery sections very much, saying he’s “not much of a cook,” but admits craving fish and brewis. Dawe is not quite home sick yet, either, having gone out with his co-workers one Saturday night to the Fort McMurray Newfoundlanders Club to celebrate a colleague’s certification. That co-worker, Natasha Blundon of Canning’s Cove, estimates 90 per cent of her clientele are Newfoundlanders. “I really like it here in Fort McMurray,” Blundon says. “I don’t know why everyone hates it. It’s all newfies. Everyone’s friendly.” There’s only one thing she misses that she can’t find in any shops, she says: “The ocean.” daniel.maceachern@shaw.ca

Enough of the negativity From page 1 “It sort of bothers me that they are getting into this crap,” he says. “I have been listening to it for a month now through the rumour mill.” He says he will not run a negative campaign. “I have always run what I call an above-board campaign, and you can ask anyone in my district in the last three elections,” says Reid. “I’ve never said a negative remark about my opponent. And when people try to bait me into doing that, I just refuse to do it.” Temelini says the Liberals have to develop clear policy or risk confusing the public. He says they look disorganized “and that’s not a good thing.” The Tory energy plan announcements, says Temelini, seem to have caught the Liberals off guard. “I don’t think they really know how to respond to the government’s energy policy.” He says the Liberals have cornered themselves in a “right-of-centre position,” which he says does not make sense. Temelini notes some of the most vocal Liberal candidates are people from the Clyde Wells-era like Simon Lono, who has written op-ed pieces against offshore oil royalties and ownership. “He essentially, from a political point of view, sounds like a Conservative. In a sense it confuses the public. You have a government that is embracing this kind of centre-left position, in terms of resource ownership, and you’ve got the Liberals coming from where? Where are they coming from?” He says the Liberals are sending out a “strange message” with a conservativesounding candidate like Lono and a leftof-centre leader like Reid. “They’ve got to get their messaging straight, and focused, otherwise this campaign is going to be a mess for them,” says Temelini. ivan.morgan@theindependent.ca


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTNEWS • 7

MUN business professor Alex Faseruk.

Paul Daly/The Independent

Q and A

Local experts tackle Hebron questions; premier yet to answer Liberals By Ivan Morgan The Independent

O

pposition Liberal Leader Gerry Reid released an open letter to Premier Danny Williams Aug. 30 listing 13 questions related to the Hebron memorandum of understanding (MOU). The Independent submitted the same questions to the premier, but his office says he will not respond through the media. Williams, according to his spokeswoman, will answer directly to Reid. The Independent then contacted local experts to get their take on what the answers to these questions might be. 1. Why is your government refusing to release the MOU? Only the premier can answer this question. 2. Why did you agree to freeze the royalty rate paid by the oil companies at one per cent until payout? MUN business professor Alex Faseruk says all negotiations on finance are about “let’s make a deal,” and the province may have offered this one per cent rate as a “loss leader” to get a concession elsewhere. “You have to look at the totality of the package,” Faseruk tells The Independent. “Because one number, taken in isolation, usually doesn’t give the entire picture.” 3. How much money has been left on the table by compromising on the royalty regime and allowing a one per cent payment until payout? Faseruk says the question may be misleading, but “we won’t know until we see the deal.” “There could be potentially nothing left on the table and we actually might have got more than they were prepared to give,” he says. 4. What will the province lose in royalties if the price of oil, after payout has been reached, is less than $50 a barrel? “This may be more a case of the province not making as much money with cheap oil than losing money,” says Faseruk. He says the province, in light of the upper Churchill contract, is more concerned with getting a deal based on rising prices than falling prices. “And let’s face it, if you are going

to negotiate for upside potential, then you have to be able to risk a downside loss.” 5. When will the project reach payout? Memorial University economist Wade Locke offers some simple “back-of-the-envelope” calculations. In “simple terms,” based on projected production of 170,000 barrels a day — 62 million barrels a year — at a price of $57.90 a barrel (oil topped $80 a barrel on Sept. 12) factoring in a 20 per cent discount for refining Hebron’s heavy oil, makes the average cost $46 a barrel. At 62 million barrels a year, times $46.32, makes $2.9 billion a year in revenue. That means the project will earn $5.7 billion after two years. The overall cost of the project, Locke says, could be around $5 billion over 25 years. “Even with these small numbers they’ll hit simple payout within two years from the looks of it,” says Locke. He cautions that actual payout may take a little longer to reach. He says there is a risk associated with low oil prices, but that risk would only extend a delay of payout a year or two. 6. How much will government have to invest in up-front costs related to the 4.9 per cent equity position? Locke says he assumes the province’s investment will be 4.9 per cent of projected costs, which he says are $3 billion up to production and $5 billion for the 25-year life of the project — five per cent of that $3 billion would be in the $150 million to $200 million range “which is conceivably what the province will have to invest before revenue starts to flow.” 7. How long will it take for government to recover its up-front investment? See Question 6. 8. What risks has the province been exposed to related to liabilities such as environmental cleanups or cost overruns because of the equity position? “One would normally think that if you are in an equity position you take responsibility for the costs and get a stake in the revenue,” says Memorial University professor Doug May.

He says the “devil is in the details” regarding environmental regulations and the agreement made with the oil consortium. Geological, engineering, political, and environmental risks are reflected in the level of equity taken in the project — take on a certain amount of risk, expect a bigger return. The province’s partners — the oil companies — know the risks and require a higher rate of return to shoulder them, says May. The province is taking on a certain amount of risk, he says, but the expectation is that the return will cover the risk. The following four questions are answered at the end of question 13. 9. Apart from the gravity-based structure (GBS, which is captive to this province and will be built at Bull Arm), what percentage of other fabrication work will be completed in this province? 10. How much of the FEED (front-end engineering and design) and other detailed engineering work will be completed in this province? 11. How large will the GBS be in comparison to Hibernia? 12. How much of the topsides work will be completed in this province and where? 13. How much work will Marystown get? May says the province should follow the Danish and Norwegian example. There is a “learning curve” in the offshore oil industry, he says. “In other words, experience counts,” says May. The province is further along on that learning curve than the last time, he says, but there may be some things better built elsewhere, as we still don’t have the experience. That being said, he says if the province “wants to get in the game” then “we may be willing to trade off things in order to get that experience,” spending more to build things here, and recouping that loss in future projects. May says it’s fair to expect that more will be done inside the province this time than last, as we have more experience. The more we do something, says May, the better we get at it. “Welcome to life.” ivan.morgan@theindependent.ca


8 • INDEPENDENTNEWS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

Earth to Danny A

ll eight planets did indeed align around Danny’s head this week when he handed down the Energy Plan, but then that’s to be expected when the premier is at the centre of our solar system. Danny is the Rock Star around which we revolve, while poor old Gerry Reid captains a Liberal mission hopelessly lost in space. Lorraine Michael is more like Pluto — which was demoted last year from a full-fledged planet — making her a Dwarf NDP Political Planet. Auditor General John Noseworthy is Uranus (emphasis on the last four letters), at least in the eyes of the MHAs whose spending he won’t let up on. Loyola Hearn is seen as King Neptune by the foreign fishing nations like Spain and Portugal that he caters to, while John Efford, with his visions of becoming premier, is in the midst of a loony eclipse. The future of our little universe was front and centre this week at the Johnson GEO Centre on Signal Hill, where the planets dangled from the ceiling. Only the sun was missing from the indoor sky, which is why Danny’s head fit in so nicely. A scale model of the sun isn’t included in the space display, I was informed at the interpretation office, because it would have to be as big as all of Signal Hill itself, and the planets reduced to the size of golf balls. And so Danny sat as our shining star,

RYAN CLEARY

Fighting Newfoundlander with Kathy Dunderdale, the golf ball in charge of the Department of Natural Resources, orbiting by his side like a much smaller ministerial moon, floating and nodding in the warmth of Danny’s rays. CBC Radio shock jock Craig Westcott — who gave it to the premier for freezing the Hebron project, only to give it to him again for thawing it out — got a little too close to the sun with his line of nitpicking and was almost burnt to a crisp. “I can’t win with you, buddy,” the premier told Westcott, who was silenced quick enough by the sudden flare of the sun. Big Oil was represented to the premier’s right by the ExxonMobil Oil and Gas Gallery, which posed relevant questions like “Where do oil and gas come from?” I have had my own questions about where the profits begin and end, but they were apparently answered eons ago by the Big Oil Bangs Us Theory. Just beyond the Oil and Gas Gallery was a poster telling the story of The Titanic, pride of the White Star Line. (It’s hoped our energy story has a happier ending.) The media may appear to be giving

Danny a hard time, but then we are. It’s easy to poke at the premier, especially when it’s good sport and he’s so sensitive, but there’s more to it than that. Balance has been lost in our legislative universe, with little or no opposition force to ensure the premier’s head doesn’t suddenly super nova and end the good life as we know it. Someone has to keep him in check. Democracy isn’t served by a House of Assembly full of yes men and women astronauts, known by the Danny stickers on their helmet visors, taking one decent step forward for themselves and a giant leap for their master. The Energy Plan is the be all and end all, but only on the planet the Tories live on. The plan has a guaranteed life span of exactly 29 days from Sept. 11, the day it was announced, until Oct. 9, election day. It’s almost certain to live another four years, of course — the length of a second Danny mandate — but the life expectancy isn’t guaranteed for a single breath beyond 2011. The Energy Plan is more of a sweeping policy platform, Conservative rules of thumb to go by, and an attractive book, courtesy of taxpayers, for Tory candidates to cart around during the election (pages 30 to 48 are coloured pink, white and green). The 10 per cent equity stake in future offshore oil developments, for example, is but a mere “principle” of ownership

and will only be implemented “where it fits with the strategic long-term directions of the province.” The very next day after the Energy Plan was released, Dannysun announced he had negotiated a five per cent equity stake in the White Rose agreement — exactly half of the equity stake outlined in the Energy Plan. And how exactly does our little bit of Hebron and White Rose equity (keep in mind we only have a Memorandum of Hope yet in terms of Hebron, and nothing in writing on White Rose) compare with other countries around the world? As you would have it, a chart was included in the Energy Plan that lists 57 countries with a five per cent or greater government equity stake in oil and gas projects. Canada, which itself has an 8.5 per cent cut in Hibernia, registered on the chart, while Newfoundland and Labrador did not. Isn’t that always the way? At 60 per cent, Nigeria was No. 1 in terms of equity, followed by Oman, Abu Dhabi and Venezuela. Norway, the country we look up to in terms of offshore oil development, registered at about 22 per cent equity, the same as Papua New Guinea and Saudi Arabia. If we didn’t settle for a 4.9 per cent stake, it sure seems like it. Clean electricity from the lower Churchill appears to be the way to go. The earliest date for the power to be on

stream is 2015, which won’t be soon enough to replace the Holyrood Harmful Emissions Generating Station, ranked Canada’s 42nd worst polluter. The entire Energy Plan is structured around a 2041 timeline, the year the upper Churchill contract expires. Does that mean Danny intends to see the ridiculously lopsided contract through to the end? It was only last year that two Memorial University professors wrote a report on the shady circumstances surrounding the contract signing in the late ’60s. Quebec made an estimated $19 billion in net revenue through to the end of 2006 from the upper Churchill, compared to $1 billion for us. It’s not like Danny to lay down and die. Others may have tried and failed to undo the upper Churchill deal, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. God knows what would happen if La Belle Province looked directly into our Dannysun. Danny’s war with Ottawa isn’t likely to end any time soon either, not in the absence of an agreement on inter-provincial transmission access. So much of our energy future remains up in the air. Personally, I’m waiting for Danny’s Fishery Plan. Maybe, just maybe, it will be ready by the end of his next mandate. Anything’s possible with a star to wish upon. ryan.cleary@theindependent.ca

YOUR VOICE ‘Still life around the Bay’ Dear editor, It’s true though, there’s still life around the Bay (Bobcats and the Bay, Aug. 31 edition, by Ryan Cleary). It’ll warm your heart to know that the Northern Peninsula’s four shrimp plants will all get a full season this year and there are thousands of shrimp offshore for the 65-footers. Up here around St. Anthony we don’t have the tourism as bad as you folks, not that there’s much wrong with it. There’s plenty of moonshine on the go

John Efford

and accordions when you look for them in the right places. The youngsters are poaching codfish too big for them to carry off the rocks on the back of the land — lucky buggers protected by the young offenders act (not that I advocate poaching, mind you). I’d say their parents threaten the belt, but enjoy the feed. Not too much young blood on the go all the same, but there’s just enough. Keep the faith. Aaron Beswick, St. Anthony

Paul Daly/The Independent

‘Everybody’s fault but Johnny’s’ Dear editor, Unbelievable! I read an article in the Aug. 31 edition of The Independent (‘I’d love to be premier’, by Brian Callahan) that quoted John Efford as saying just that. And I bet you thought that newfie jokes were history. No sir, not while little Johnny is around. Let’s have a look at why he’s not running this October: his basement is flooded; he’s the legal guardian to a senior citizen; and, of course, the cursed diabetes (which stopped him from travelling on government business, but did not stop him from travelling to Florida). These are obviously three good reasons why every Newfoundlander should get down on his/her knees and pray that Danny never … has to experience the 18th hole at The Wilds flooding; will never have to worry about his cat; and, of course, the dastardly flu. Now, with all those “huge” problems to contend with, I wonder how Johnny would ever cope with filling in the potholes on the Avondale access road. I’m happy to see a lot of John’s rela-

tives are alive and well. I see by the article they are all asking him to run again. Johnny talks about the “responsibilities” of the premier and the minister of Health with regard to the breast cancer and radiology issues. Let’s talk about his “responsibilities” when he was the regional minister. Funny how Johnny does not like to wear that on his sleeve. Notice how the Atlantic Accord fiasco was everybody’s fault but Johnny’s? That bad old Paul Martin and Ralph Goodale did him in. Poor little Johnny, he forgets that the people of Newfoundland have never forgotten the mismanagement of Joey Smallwood’s leadership as premier. Joey has been gone from politics since 1972 (35 years). Now let’s do the math. Hmm, if it takes that long for the voters to forget Johnny’s reign as regional minister then he would be at least 88 years old when he would never consider running for election in provincial politics again. Whew! For a while there I was worried. Don Lester, Conception Bay South

‘Great time to be a Newfoundlander’ Dear editor, Nothing is more important for the well-being and future of our province than the present and future availability to our people to meet our resource opportunities. Since 1949 big business and central governments have acted as our authorities in the development of our resources. Our local governments have fostered this, for the most part, by jumping to their demands and signing giveaway agreements. The 4.9 per cent equity obtained by our present government from the oil companies involved in the Hebron project may not look that significant, but the ramifications down the road of all the spinoff business that this new deal will create are. More importantly, this new non-giveaway agreement sets a precedent, the raising of the bar, for all future deals of local governments with big business. No more giveaways. This deal is not a future panacea for us in this province, but it is a most important step in the changing of our attitude and having the guts to stand up to the world and tell them who we are and who we’re going to be. The next

Premier Danny Williams

major step in the right direction for the province will be when we act with the same strength of character toward the federal government. Thank you Danny Williams, it is a great time to be a Newfoundlander. Recently, when I have been in the woods or on the coastal high lands I’ve heard a song from the wind in the pines and the

Paul Daly/The Independent

crash of sea on the cliffs. It said to me “be true to thine own self, be true to thine own self.” Be true, Newfoundland, like we have always been, like we were bred to be, like our forefathers were. In truth we will find who we are and in that place there’s none better than we! Phil Earle, Carbonear

Independent Catholic schools alive and growing’ AN INDEPENDENT VOICE FOR NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR

P.O. Box 5891, Stn.C, St. John’s, Newfoundland & Labrador, A1C 5X4 Ph: 709-726-4639 • Fax: 709-726-8499 www.theindependent.ca • editorial@theindependent.ca

The Independent is published by Independent News Ltd. in St. John’s. It is an independent newspaper covering the news, issues and current affairs that affect the people of Newfoundland & Labrador.

PUBLISHER Brian Dobbin EDITOR IN CHIEF Ryan Cleary MANAGING EDITOR Stephanie Porter PICTURE EDITOR Paul Daly PRODUCTION MANAGER John Andrews ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Sandra Charters SALES MANAGER Gillian Fisher CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Dave Tizzard

sales@theindependent.ca • production@theindependent.ca • circulation@theindependent.ca All material in The Independent is copyrighted and the property of The Independent or the writers and photographers who produced the material. Any use or reproduction of this material without permission is prohibited under the Canadian Copyright Act. • © 2007 The Independent • Canada Post Agreement # 40871083

The Independent welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be 300 words in length or less and include full name, mailing address and daytime contact numbers. Letters may be edited for length, content and legal considerations. Send your letters in care of The Independent, P.O. Box 5891, Station C, St. John’s, NL, A1C 5X4 or e-mail us at editorial@theindependent.ca

Dear editor, When God is halted at one door, it is believed, He opens another. In 1998 a constitutional amendment was enacted which, in effect, obliterated Newfoundland and Labrador’s cherished denominational school system. Through referendum, Newfoundlanders chose to give up yet again an enshrined, effective and stable school structure at the prompting of then-premier Brian Tobin, who alleged that it was “inefficient,” in need of “reform” and that we should focus on the best student education “we can afford to give them.” Out of every dark cloud, nevertheless, there emerges a silver lining. Friends, I write with good news. Independent Catholic schools in Newfoundland have arrived and are growing. There is one established in Corner Brook (Immaculate Heart of Mary — Immaculate Heart of Mary

Order assisted), St. Alban’s (Holy Cross Community School — locally based) and St. John’s (St. Bonaventure’s College — Jesuits). Consistent with the distinguished international reputation of Catholic academia, those schools have as a central mission scholastic preeminence and expertise/leadership development supported by a Catholic Christian vantage point. The parents, founders and patrons who recently initiated the schools on the island do so because they require those students educated to a most particular standard, one which they feel suitable. Whether denominational education was taken away or given away is a matter that the courts (and quite possibly the United Nations in this instance) should look into and decide. Comparably, every Canadian western province and Ontario maintain the highly sought-after Catholic education at

varying funding levels, and Quebec still funds it after all — upon requests and conditions. In fact, if anything the national trend has been one toward funding reversal in favour of Catholic schools (i.e. from unfunded to partially/fully funded). Why then, has Newfoundland rigidly and questionably slammed the door shut and why have some Catholic parents not answered that call? Maybe by the time the government realizes its myopic blunder, the Catholic population will have relocated themselves off the island, leaving the former province (erstwhile country) of Newfoundland a heard-about archive drawer somewhere in, oh … say a tiny Prince Edward Island museum. It is time the government rectified the situation immediately. Jerry Lewis, St. John’s


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTNEWS • 9

One toke over the line? T

he main problem is it is still illegal, one of those stupid holdovers from earlier times. This is not a column about legalizing marijuana per se — I’ve written a yaffle of those. This is a column about the consequences of this silly façade. When I was a kid, booze was the problem drug — as it still is. I had friends whose Dads were loaded a lot. That often caused problems, as it does today. But nobody’s Dad blew off a spliff every day. Take it from me. There is nothing nosier than a little boy. We would have known, and we would have gaffed their stash. If we could pour water into the rum to replace the stuff we had siphoned off, we could have mixed oregano with Dad’s weed. But we didn’t because there was none. But I know lots of fathers who smoke dope every day now. Every day. Sometimes two or three times a day. And whether they like to read it or not, that is substance abuse and

IVAN MORGAN

Rant & Reason

they have a problem. I smoke dope — occasionally — and I know that when you are stoned you don’t think you have a problem. In fact, if you are like me the last thing you want is a problem. And that is a problem too. When I was in high school I knew stoners, the lads who smoked every day. They were funny and cool because they didn’t seem to care about anything and they had a unique take on the world. They’re not so funny when they are in their mid-40s. It is odd. While I know so many folk who can’t seem to get through the day straight, there doesn’t seem to be much public awareness on the issue — not like there is for alcohol.

Maybe that is because of the nature of the drug. Rare is the creature who becomes abusive, dangerous or violent on marijuana. Quiet is the norm for the perpetually buzzed. Quiet, zoned out and maybe a little paranoid. They don’t stink, stagger or stutter. Most “chronics” are way past the giggly stage, too. Hardly home-wrecking. Just home, wrecked. Why does this not get more public attention? Because it is illegal? Or is it because alcohol abuse is also a problem for those around the abuser, whereas the chronic is just permanently zonked, and usually so peaceable there is no problem? I don’t know, I’m asking. I try to get a medical checkup regularly — about once every 10 years – and during the last one my doctor asked me the usual questions about exercise, diet, and such. Do I drink? Sure, a couple of beers and a wee dram of Scotch on weekends and bank holidays. Any drug use? . . . I like the scattered draw.

Do I know where it comes from? Who grows it? Do I know if it is sprayed with something? Do I know the slightest thing about this thing I burn and inhale? His point, as my physician, was if I wasn’t swearing off — his first recommendation — I should at least try for an organic source. It had never occurred to me before. As an illegal substance, I was just glad to get it. I was smoking stuff I bought from people who I wouldn’t buy a sandwich from. He was right. He changed the way I looked at this stuff. I know people who wash their fruit before they eat it, buy only “organic” products, wouldn’t be caught dead eating fast food; people who run for miles and generally flagellate themselves in the modern fashion hoping for longevity, who will smoke any weed they are offered. Weed sprayed with God-knows-what concoction of pesticide, insecticide or whatever. Why? Because they like the occa-

sional buzz and it is still — inexplicably — illegal. What are the health implications of smoking dope every day for decades? What about the psychological implications? Is anyone looking at this? Anyone care? Kids pick up on the subtlest of signals — does it affect the family? Do people do it because they think they’re cool? That would add a particularly pathetic dimension to the phenomenon. I don’t want to come off as selfrighteous. If I wanted to drink and smoke dope all day, and gamble my paycheque away, I would — and you could shag off. That’s the great thing about being an adult. It is also the total bitch of being an adult. There are a lot of people out there smoking this stuff every single day of their lives — m-m-my generation. Is this a problem that no one knows or cares about? ivan.morgan@theindependent.ca

YOUR VOICE ‘Newfoundland and Labrador’s story’ Dear editor, The idea of developing a book about the Second World War in these parts, based on the memories of people who lived through it, is hardly new; the late John Cardoulis, a U.S. Army veteran with strong Newfoundland ties, did it extremely well in his two-volume Friendly Invasion project dealing principally with the presence here of U.S. military personnel (perhaps more than 100,000) during and after the war. However, even as the large majority, Americans weren’t the only warriors on the block: Canadians and British were prominent too. And while an article in The Telegram (Oral history project seeks participants, Aug. 11 edition) seems to reference exclusively St. John’s, the capital was by no means the only community involved. For example, although 80 lower Battery householders may have been displaced to make way for the Army (not Navy, as I recall) dock, many more — both alive and dead — were evicted from the paths of contractors’ bulldozers for the building of U.S. bases at Placentia and at Stephenville. Additionally, it should be pointed out that these bases, and others at Goose Bay and Gander, were each much larger than Pepperrell — said to be the only U.S. Air Force base in the world without its own “strip.” Keep in mind as well that there were literally dozens of smaller locations — from air warning sites to coastal artillery to coast guard stations — around the Newfoundland and Labrador coasts. Pepperrell, in east end St. John’s, was the overall U.S. administrative headquarters, but the other major installations were fully-fledged, typically multi-national operational bases directly engaged in the conflict — homes over time to an array of bombers, fighters, aerial tankers, and in the case of Argentia/Fort McAndrew, warships of every kind, and sub-hunting aircraft. One other aspect that should not be overlooked: Ship Harbour, just over the hill from Placentia, is the long, and shamefully-neglected village in whose environs Churchill and Roosevelt met secretly in 1941 to plan the Allied war effort, devise the lendlease plan by which supposedly neutral United States poured $50 billion into it, and laid the foundation for the United Nations. It demands greater recognition on that account. This is all Newfoundland and Labrador’s story, and who knows — perhaps the last opportunity to get it all and get it right. William R. Callahan, St. John’s

Town has the best troutin’

‘Rest in well-earned peace’

Dear editor, I was recently part of an electro fishing crew composed of members of the Natural History Society and the North Avalon ACAP (Atlantic Coastal Action Program) doing an annual survey of rivers in St. John’s and Mount Pearl. I never fail to be impressed by the numbers of brown trout and the exceptional productivity of our rivers. Although scientific studies have shown that the best brown trout fishing in the whole country is in St. John’s and Mount Pearl waters, nothing is made of this fact. Unlike the situation 26 years ago when city authorities helped environmental groups restore much of our area rivers, St. John’s at present shows no leadership or interest in enhancing or conserving its rivers. For example, in 1987 the federal government Environmental Protection Service did an exhaustive study of water quality in Queen’s Brook, a former trout stream presently draining into Rennies River by the Memorial Stadium, and in their 1988 report identified Queen’s Brook as “a source

Dear editor, One of the many significant contributions made to this community by the late Dr. Doug Eaton was in the area of aquatics. From his base at Memorial, in the 1950s and ’60s in particular, he provided leadership and inspiration in promoting and expanding the swimming, water safety and lifesaving skills training and leadership programs provided by organizations such as the Red Cross and Royal Lifesaving Societies, of which he was a very enthusiastic and influential senior member. With the opening of the physical education building of the new campus at Memorial University in St. John’s, competitive and recreational swimming, lifesaving and water safety received special emphasis, under his direction and tutelage. Those of us who were privileged to have received such training and mentorship from him, mourn his passing with much regret, but also with many fond memories of a very personable, helpful and empathetic teacher and coach.

I never fail to be impressed by the numbers of brown trout and the exceptional productivity of our rivers. of contaminants, especially oil and raw domestic sewage,” illegal under the Fisheries Act. From its present stink it’s unlikely the brook has changed. Also, new storm sewers are primitively allowed to drain directly into the river, contrary to DFO guidelines. For example, storm runoff from the new Loblaws parking lot drains oil and filth directly into Rennies River, just upstream from Quidi Vidi Lake, technically illegal, but this is just fine with city authorities. If, in general, there was better appreciation of this wonderful resource it might be possible to reverse the present degradation of our rivers. R. John Gibson, St. John’s

Those of us who were privileged to have received such training and mentorship from him, mourn his passing with much regret, but also with many fond memories of a very personable, helpful and empathetic teacher and coach. To his wife Eleanor and family, I am sure that I speak for the whole aquatic community in expressing sincere condolences. Rest in well-earned peace, Doug! Bob LeMessurier, Governor, The Lifesaving Society


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

10 • INDEPENDENTNEWS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTNEWS • 11

IN CAMERA

The massive upper Churchill power lines which transmit hydroelectric power to Quebec.

The Holyrood generating station on the shores of Conception Bay.

Paul Daly/The Independent

Paul Daly/The Independent

The Hibernia offshore oil production platform on the Grand Banks.

The sun sets behind power-generating windmill turbines at a wind farm near the eastern German town of Dessau.

Fabrizio Bensch/REUTERS

A helicopter hovers over the Hibernia platform as emergency personnel look on.

Ned Pratt photo

A crude oil pipe at the Come By Chance refinery.

Greg Locke/Reuters

Paul Daly/The Independent

A bundle of energy options By Clare-Marie Gosse For The Independent

T

he province’s newly released energy plan has arrived appropriately sandwiched between two major new offshore oil deals: an agreement in principle of an expansion of the White Rose oilfield, and a memorandum of understanding with the Hebron consortium. White Rose includes a provincial equity stake of five per cent, while Hebron gives the province a 4.9 per cent equity. The projects are expected to generate about $6 billion and $16 billion respectively. The following is a breakdown of some of the key initiatives and information outlined in the province’s new energy plan. Warehouse inventory • 2.75 billion barrels of offshore oil

have already been discovered; six billion barrels are estimated as being undiscovered. • 10 trillion cubic feet of offshore gas has already been discovered; 60 trillion cubic feet remains undiscovered. • 6,700 megawatts of hydroelectricity has already been developed, while 6,000 megawatts remain undeveloped. • 51 megawatts of wind power have been developed and 5,000 megawatts remain undeveloped • Other potential energy resources in the province include wave and tidal energy, wood, peat, and methane from landfills, as well as solar energy. • As of December 2006, offshore oil projects generated $18 billion in revenue: the oil companies have made $10 billion; the rest of Canada has made $6 billion; and Newfoundland and Labrador has made $2 billion.

• As of December 2006, the upper Churchill has generated over $20 billion in revenue: Quebec has made $19 billion; Newfoundland and Labrador has made $1 billion. • The 5,428 megawatt upper Churchill development is the third largest hydroelectric generating station in North America and the second largest underground power station in the world. • Across the globe, Nigeria, Oman, Abu Dhabi and Venezuela own the highest percentages of their country’s oil equity (60 per cent). Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States are at the bottom of the scale, essentially owning zero. • The petroleum sector employs approximately 4,000 people in Newfoundland and Labrador. Oil and gas: As part of the energy plan, the

province intends to enforce a policy to obtain 10 per cent equity in all future oil and gas projects, with the actual purchase costs open to negotiation. For the first time, the government has laid out a royalty regime for any future gas projects which will see a super royalty program kick in after project cost recovery, allowing the province to charge a rate of up to 50 per cent on profits. The first proposed gas project will be open to flexible royalty negotiations, however, in an effort to encourage industry to get the ball rolling. In line with the new gas royalty regime, the province plans to establish a similar royalty regime for future oil projects. In the energy plan, the province also outlines its intention to continue pursuing the federal government’s 8.5 per cent equity in Hibernia, which has generated more than four times the

amount for which it was originally purchased. The province plans to invest $20 million through its energy corporation over the next three years to purchase existing seismic (oil exploration) data and to acquire new exploration results, as well as pursuing refining, petrochemical and other secondary processing opportunities. The province plans to invest $5 million over the next two years in onshore petroleum exploration in western Newfoundland. Electricity: The province plans to lead the development of the 2,800-megawatt lower Churchill project and in the process co-ordinate all new hydro and wind developments. The new project is slated to come on stream in 2015, assuming all goes as planned.

The province still intends to explore economic opportunities for the upper Churchill development up until the 2041 expiration of the financially lopsided contract, and as part of the lower Churchill, it intends to build a transmission link between Labrador and the island. The link is expected to cost at least $2 billion and the province is hoping for financial assistance from the federal government as part of its greenhouse gas emission reduction initiatives. The province plans to either replace the Holyrood station (which generates 540 megawatts) with lower Churchill electricity or, failing that, install scrubbers and precipitators to help clean it up, as well as explore other energy-efficient methods such as wind. Although the province has yet to receive permission to transport electricity across the country, it plans to work with Ottawa and industry to establish a national, interprovincial electricity transmission system

from east to west. Wind: The province has already awarded two contracts for the supply of 51 megawatts of wind generation and is actively exploring further development opportunities. A new hydrogen demonstration pilot project will be tested in Ramea, an island off the south coast of Newfoundland. As part of the project, excess wind power will be stored as chemical energy in the form of hydrogen; when conditions are calm, an engine will convert the hydrogen back to electricity, ensuring sufficient renewable power can be generated at any time. Environmental: The province plans to eliminate 1.3 million tonnes of annual greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants from Holyrood, recently pegged the 42nd worst polluter in Canada. Government says that should ensure 98

per cent of all electricity generated in the province comes from renewable sources. The province also plans to release an updated climate change action plan by 2008 and establish a partnership to develop a fiveyear energy conservation and efficiency plan. Economy: The province intends to enforce the recommendations of its skills task force which released a report in May 2007 examining current and future labour requirements; it will also invest $5 million to grow and create further energy innovation. All large-scale energy project components will be required to include plans to address employment equity for women, and the province plans to ensure energy resources are used to promote economic development, particularly in rural areas and Labrador. claremariegosse@hotmail.com


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

12 • INDEPENDENTNEWS

Shop owner shares risk with local craftspeople I

rene Hurley of Spanish Room argues. on the Burin Peninsula knows Buying outright is good for busithe value of buying local. nesses like hers, Hurley says. Hurley has operated Cashel’s Cove “I predict my needs in January Crafts for over 24 years and says and February and buy for my next Newfoundlanders and Labradorians season,” she tells The Independent. need to bear some of the responsi- That “buy-in-advance” commitment bility to ensure there is always a ensures she will have a supply of supply of locally made, hand-craft- goods for her busy seasons. ed goods. Hurley says the “Some people “tourist season” claim with pride that goes beyond what they buy local, but people might think. “I operate a yearjust sitting in your “I operate a yearround business. home and shopping round business. online isn’t actually Owning a craft Owning a craft store store requires more buying local, it just means you never left than just having a requires more than your home,” Hurley busy July and Augsays. ust,” she explains. just having a busy Buying local isn’t According to Huralways about shopley, fall has now July and August.” ping in your combecome her busiest munity either, she season. Irene Hurley says. “A lot of local “We need to people buy for famexpand that thinking ily members who and realize the importance of buy- are away, and they buy early for ing not only from local businesses, Christmas to give them time to mail but also buying products that are packages away,” she says. made in the province by artists who Another large part of her business take pride in their craft,” she says. are the ex-patriots who seek her out Hurley’s stock is 98 per cent when they come home, and then Newfoundland and Labrador-made. keep placing online orders. There The other two per cent comes from are still people out there who want other Atlantic Canadian craftsmen those traditional knit sweaters and and women. Hurley says she is cau- trigger mitts, she says. tious which trade shows she attends, Hurley has an interesting supply making sure she knows in advance of goods in her store. where the artists are from. She also She has jewelry crafted from says she buys her stock outright; everything from beach glass to there is no consignment in her store. fluorspar. She has duffle dolls, wall “I share the risk with the creator,” hangings, hook mats and an assortshe says, adding that such purchas- ment of pottery. ing habits encourage those in the For Hurley, displaying such a business to keep producing. wide variety of goods brings a sense No artist wants their resources of pride. “What you see here is a tied up, Hurley says. reflection of our culture,” she says. “They need time and money to “Buying something in a store like buy more raw materials and create mine will help keep our place their goods so they can supply defined in this world by making stores like mine,” she explains. sure we have an active community Hurley, an artist herself, says time is of craftspeople and artists that will an undervalued element in most keep filling the demand by turning hand-crafted goods. out high-quality goods that are gen“If I can sell a hand-crafted salt uinely valued.” and pepper cap for $22, then you know whoever knitted that isn’t get- To learn more about Cashel’s Cove ting the full value of their hard work Crafts visit http://www.cashelscovand effort,” she says. Quality crafts- ecrafts.com/ manship should be as valued as any pamelamichpardy@yahoo.com skilled mechanic’s work is, she


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

A sampling of crafts from around Newfoundland and Labrador.

INDEPENDENTNEWS • 13


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

14 • INDEPENDENTNEWS

Nightriders, taxes and The Bastard

I

t’s been a summer of noise and disruption in the part of the east end of St. John’s where I live. For some reason not at all clear to me the area was descended on by a horde of motorcycle riders, some of whom diverted themselves by adjusting their mufflers to make their exhausts louder and then speeding up and down King’s Bridge Road and along Empire Avenue late into the night. Repeated calls to the Constabulary proved futile. The speeding went on for weeks. A Telegram columnist inexplicably termed the cursed uproar the bikers made “sound,” and seemed to welcome it. All it did for this resident was to add more ruckus to the din of incessant tractor-trailer traffic heading to and fro along King’s Bridge Road. This once fairly quiet avenue has been turned into a major highway by city council and trucking firms like Oceanex. On top of all this we had the construction racket from the Dominion superstore on Quidi Vidi Lake, impertinently named “Dominion Memorial” by Loblaw, and

other weird industrial noise from the

PATRICK O’FLAHERTY A Skeptic’s Diary harbour area. St. John’s is getting much noisier — and I think smellier — every year. It’s almost as bad as stinkier parts of Dublin. To add to these sources of noise pollution, news arrived that a man from Ontario has been installing a weathervane-like piece of performance art on the Battery that will make “whale-like sounds,” at low or high pitch, depending on wave action in The Narrows. The performance, I daresay, will be put on for us in the middle of the night as well as daytime. I’m all in favour of artistic freedom, but I wonder if he wouldn’t be better advised to take his gear to his own province and rig up some appropriate sounds for the enjoyment of the population there. There’s

enough of a hubbub here already, and I for one don’t want to hear the grunts of whales mixed in with it. ••• I note that all hands are lining up to stake a claim for the oil money that’s supposedly going to fatten government revenues for a decade or so. May I add my three cents’ worth to the ongoing discussion? First, among the main tasks of government, it seems to me, are these: to keep taxes down and, where taxes are high, to lower them. We have a very high provincial income tax in Newfoundland. I believe the effect of it is to discourage initiative and work. Rather than spending the surplus money we’ll be getting on dubious (or even at times praiseworthy) schemes for economic and social improvement, or handing it over to the “free-enterprise” types in subsidies, the province might consider taking advantage of the new revenue to hold the line, at least, on taxes and if possible bring them down to something below the crucifying level we now

have. I should add that the level of municipal taxation is also the responsibility, in part, of the politicians in Confederation Building. As the St. John’s Board of Trade has stated, the increases in the property tax rate over the past few years in St. John’s are not sustainable. The board is to be congratulated for speaking out on this. I’ve urged in this column and elsewhere that the province should set a maximum yearly rate of increase for all municipalities. I think two per cent would be about right. A third point. I realize public-sector unions are now in a strong bargaining position, and good luck to them. But their leaders and other groups in similarly powerful associations have to realize that the more they get from the public purse, the less there will be to pass out to the unorganized, to pensioners, the old and infirm, the down and out. We can’t count on unions to bargain for these people. The government has

to protect them.

••• I was somewhat taken aback to see, in a recent issue of The Independent, that the mystery of the authorship of The Bastard has been solved. The poem, signed “E.A.,” appeared in The Evening Telegram in 1949. Ostensibly written in praise of the governor of the day, Gordon Macdonald, prior to his departure, the poem was an acrostic: the first letters of each line spelled out the two words. Now we hear that Grace Sparkes, Robert Furlong, and John Higgins wrote it. So Grace Sparkes told historian Paul O’Neill before she died. I’ve no reason to doubt Mr. O’Neill’s word, but I wonder if the secret wouldn’t have been out long ago if three authors had been in on it. Grace Sparkes was a great storyteller and humorist; this may have been one of her final tall stories. I’d say the authorship of The Bastard is still unknown. Patrick O’Flaherty is a writer in St. John’s.

Opportunities Deputy Sheriff I

Permanent & Temporary Call-in Position(s) in each located noted below Sheriff’s Office, Department of Justice, Supreme and Provincial Courts: Happy Valley-Goose Bay (2 permanent, 1 temporary call-in), Wabush (1 temporary, 1 temporary call-in), Clarenville (2 permanent) Grand Bank (2 permanent) Harbour Grace (2 permanent) Grand Falls (1 temporary call-in) Gander (2 permanent 1 temporary call-in) St. John’s (6 temporary call-in)

Daily News, 1912

Applications are now being accepted from individuals interested in attending a Sheriff’s Officer Training/Orientation program. The nine-week paid program consisting of classroom and on-the-job training is being offered in St. John’s by the Office of the High Sheriff, Department of Justice. The program will prepare candidates for employment in various locations within the Province as Deputy Sheriff I. Course content will provide candidates the knowledge skills and values necessar y to work in a Court Security/Prisoner Escort setting. Upon successful completion of the Sheriff’s Officer training/orientation program, candidates will be employed with the Office of the High Sheriff on either a permanent or temporar y call-in basis as required. Applicants must be 19 years of age and under 65 years of age; eligible to work in Canada on a permanent basis; graduation from high school, post-secondar y education in the criminology/criminal justice field would be considered an asset; have a general knowledge of the Justice system as it applies to the various levels of court; be eligible to obtain or have a valid Class 4 driver’s licence. Deputies’ work includes providing prisoner escort and court security duties where a positive attitude, initiative and discretion/tact are valued attributes. Applicants must have well developed oral and written communication; problem solving, leadership, time management skills and be able to work within a team environment. These skills would normally be obtained through successful completion of police or correctional-related training program. Persons with considerable years of related experience or a combination of post-secondar y education and related experience will also be considered. Successful applicants must meet entrance standards in aptitude testing, physical fitness, visual acuity and medical examinations. Deputy Sheriffs are uniformed positions within the judicial system and successful candidates must be able to maintain a high standard of physical fitness, dress deportment and attendance as well as enjoy working as a member of a team supporting others in their role as Deputy Sheriff. Candidates must be capable of demonstrating their availability to respond to on-call work on a consistent basis; shift work may be required. Candidates must clearly demonstrate in their resume that they meet all of the above qualifications. Failure to do so may result in a candidate being screened out. Positions within the Department of Justice are considered “Positions of Trust” and as such successful candidates will be subject to a background check through police/court banks and other sources and may include polygraph testing. A separate resume must be submitted clearly identifying location of interest and Competition Number. Individuals who have submitted resumes to the Public Ser vice Commission (PSC) after May 4th, 2007, must resubmit their application/resumes stating the competition number. SALARY:

$38,456 - $42,751per annum (GS-32) - $21.13 - $23.49 per hour

COMPETITION #: Happy Valley-Goose Bay (2 permanent, 1 temporar y call-in) – J.C.DSI.07.087 - P Wabush (1 temporar y, 1 temporar y call-in), J.C.DSI(t).07.088 - P Clarenville (2 permanent) – J.C.DSI(p).07.089 - P Grand Bank (2 permanent) – J.C.DSI(p).07.090 - P Harbour Grace (2 permanent) – J.C.DSI(p).07.091 - P Grand Falls (1 temporar y call-in) – J.C.DSI(t).07.092 - P Gander (2 permanent 1 temporar y call-in) – J.C.DSI.07.093 - P St. John’s (6 temporar y call-in) – J.C.DSI(t).07.094 - P CLOSING DATE:

September 24, 2007

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS: Applications should be for warded to: Mail:

Fax: E-mail:

Recruitment Centre Public Ser vice Commission P. O. Box 8700, 4th Floor West Block Confederation Building St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 709-729-6737 pscjusticeresumes@gov.nl.ca

* In order to ensure your application/resume is processed appropriately, the job competition number MUST be indicated. * Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date, either by e-mail, postal mail or fax. (If faxing, DO NOT send a duplicate copy). Late applications with acceptable explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position, call (709) 729-1024 or refer to the following website: http://www.justice.gov.nl.ca/just/LAWCOURT/sheriff.htm 2007 09 11

AROUND THE WORLD Kim Lee, the first Chinaman in Newfoundland, came by the Pretonian this morning after a two-year sojourn abroad. He spent seventeen months where he was born at China with his mother and two sisters, and seven months at London. Kim looks smart after his trip and feels glad to be at St. John’s once more. — The Evening Chronicle, St. John’s, September 2, 1911 AROUND THE BAY The shooting season opened in Western Bay yesterday amidst showers of rain, but nothing daunts a good gunner. Over the partridge haunts could be seen scores of rifles, but alas a few of our crack shots came home with empty bags. One gunner, however, succeeded in bagging eleven, which was considered good work for such a wet day. — The Free Press, St. John’s, September 26, 1916 YEARS PAST It is generally cheapest in the end to get the best – because it lasts so much longer and looks so much better. This applies to the Protestant and Douay editions of the Holy Bible now being canvassed for in Newfoundland. Both editions are richly illustrated; the Douay Bible has “explanatory notes,” “from the Holy Fathers,” the Protestant, a dictionary, concordance, references and besides, each contain family

Record and Album. — The Courier, St. John’s, September 22, 1877 EDITORIAL STAND An editor is a man who is liable to grammatical blunders, tooth-aches, typographical errors, and lapses of memory; and usually he has ninety-thousand people watching to catch him tripping. He is a man of sorrow, acquainted with grief and poverty, and frequently liable to go ragged and dry for a very long period. And yet the woods are full of people who want to be editors. — The Twillingate Sun, September 13, 1884 LETTER TO THE EDITOR Dear Sir – This problem of education that is facing the people of the surrounding communities today is something that should be considered. It appears to be the first beginning of centralization, to get the children to move first, then the parents will follow. How many people raising a family today, some in their twenties, some in the thirties and forties and even some like myself in their sixties would want to sacrifice what they worked a lifetime for and move to some other place where they would not have half as much. Well Sir, I can only speak for myself, but my anchor is down and I’ll never leave Bay L’Argent, not even as long as I can see one more home with a light in the window by night. Signed, Citizen — Burin Peninsula Post, September 2, 1970 QUOTE OF THE WEEK We beg to remind all persons who feel desirous of securing for themselves before leaving this world, that Mr. Alexander Norris, at St. John’s has got some very find Tombstones on sale – they can be had with or without lettering, very low. — The Carbonear Sentinel, September 10, 1844


INDEPENDENTBUSINESS

FRIDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-20, 2007 — PAGE 15

Entering the powerhouse of the Churchill Falls generating station in Labrador.

Paul Daly/The Independent

2041

Does Tory energy plan write off upper Churchill redress? By Clare-Marie Gosse For The Independent

A

ccording to the province’s minister of Natural Resources, government hasn’t abandoned the idea of possibly recouping revenues from the infamous upper Churchill project. The unfavourable contract expires in 2041, and despite recent comments by Premier Danny Williams such as, “Our plan is looking out to 2041 when the upper Churchill comes back on” and “In 2041 we will repatriate the upper Churchill and take back what is rightfully ours,” minister Kathy Dunderdale says the province is still “very vigilant around that piece” (present tense).

“We’re going to continue to explore our opportunities for the upper Churchill to make a greater economic contribution to the province,” she tells The Independent. As part of the whirlwind surrounding the recently released energy plan and the recent Hebron and White Rose expansion agreements, a great emphasis has been placed on the fact the province now has lucrative financial deals to carry it through to 2041. Coincidentally, Hebron, which is slated to kick off in 2015, is expected to run until 2040 (25 years). The lower Churchill is also expected to get off the ground in 2015. With all the past roadblocks former premiers have faced trying

to overturn the upper Churchill deal – which according to the recent energy plan has generated $19 billion for Quebec and just $1 billion for Newfoundland and Labrador — it would perhaps be understandable if the province were to abandon pursuing recompense once and for all. At least the opposition leaders seem to think so. “I know that every premier since Smallwood challenged that deal and it didn’t work,” says Liberal leader Gerry Reid, “so if they spend untold thousands, hundreds of thousands to do it again I just don’t see the point.” NDP leader Lorraine Michael says the only way she sees anything happening with the deal is if

the federal government gets involved — and she doesn’t think that’s likely. “There’s no way the federal government is going to support us against Quebec,” she says. “I don’t think there is anything else to do but to say this is it.” Although Williams has been unwilling to commit to any specific strategy when it comes to potentially reopening the upper Churchill contract, he did say in a 2005 interview with The Independent that he wasn’t prepared to let the issue fall away. He stressed if Hydro-Quebec gets involved in the future lower Churchill development, then the upper Churchill would have to become part of the negotiating

process. Several past premiers have attempted to poke holes in the deal, most notably Brian Peckford, who took the matter to court unsuccessfully, twice, during his tenure. Some new information came to light in late 2005, however, when two Memorial University professors published a paper about the original signing of the deal. It stated the company in charge of the project was held in a do-or-die situation: either an agreement was signed on HydroQuebec’s terms, or the company and the development of the project would fold. In the paper, coauthors James Feehan and Mel See “A solid road map,” page 19

Tipping – is it supposed to be just about service?

B

ack in April, a reader sent along an e-mail asking me to write something on tips and tipping. I made a mental note at the time, but unfortunately never did get around to the topic (no tip for me!). Then, this week the same woman came up to me at a Habitat for Humanity building site with a friendly reminder; this time I remembered. “Tips” is one of those words that “means something”; an acronym for a broader statement. I’ve always believed it stood for “This implies perfect service.” Yet, I can’t recall where I learned this. Some say the letters mean “To ensure prompt service” or “Thanks, I had perfect service.” Whatever the letters mean, the word “tips” is clearly a customer or patron’s way of accentuating a simple thank you to a front-line service provider who, in the estimation of the customer, did an

AL ANTLE

Your Finances outstanding job or went above and beyond. The level of thanks and its accentuation is measured by both the recipient and the benefactor in cold, hard cash. Most of us tip at bars, restaurants or other eating establishments, but as the service sector opens up more and more, and with more significant numbers of services becoming “normal,” knowing how much to tip, and who to tip, presents a challenge to many. Often we’re torn between how much, whether we should tip at all if the service has been less than stellar, and whether or not we should tip based on the total bill or on the amount before

tax. I’ve done a little research on this and as a result can definitely say that at restaurants and bars, it’s appropriate to tip 15 per cent of the pre-tax bill amount. That’s assuming the service you received was good. If your wait staff were great or outstanding you can offer a little more, but only if you feel strongly motivated to do so. You might want to discreetly ask if staff share tips before doing this. If tips are shared, your few extra bucks, or at least a part of them, might actually go into the pocket of someone who waited another table. Calculating the tip amount can also present a challenge sometimes, particularly if you’re a little mathematically challenged. I’ve found by using the harmonized sales tax total, and then adding just a little, you’re pretty close to paying exactly the recommended 15

per cent. You need to be a little cautious, though. In some establishments, the tip is calculated into the bill by the time you receive it. So, if you’ve failed to check line by line, you end up paying a double tip. When tips are billed directly, it’s not unusual for the rate to be between 15 and 18 per cent. If you’re a guest at a hotel function, for example, your hosts will typically pay a gratuity directly as part of the hotel’s invoice to them, be it a wedding, conference, or catered meal. And what about who to tip? Regrettably, in the service sector, frontline staff are often modestly paid. Therefore, cash from tips is a vital part of their income. Most of these people are supporting families, paying their way through college, or they have other expenses which make tips quite important to their financial survival. Remember this, and don’t forget to give

the person who cuts your hair a tip, likewise the cab driver, bellhop, delivery person or paper carrier. Who takes better care of you than the chambermaid if you’re away from home and staying at a hotel? Don’t forget “fast food” places and coffee shops, too. I’m told that tips in these outlets are rare and, even when extended, are often only pennies. One single mom on my caseload who works at a coffee shop tells me she gets about $5.50 in tips if she works an eight-hour shift. While we might feel justified in withholding a tip if we feel service is poor, in many instances it’s not a good idea. There may be many reasons, none of which are the fault of the individual with whom you’ve dealt with. Your meal arriving cold or undercooked may have more to do with See “Beyond bad,” page 19


16 • INDEPENDENTBUSINESS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

Opportunities Student Educational Assessments – Program Development Specialist

Regional Manager – Marine Services

Commissioning Specialist (Technical Services Inspector)

Temporary

Permanent

Temporary to March 31, 2008

Student Support Services Division, Department of Education 3rd Floor, West Block, Confederation Building, St. John’s, NL

One (1) permanent position of Regional Manager, Marine Services, Department of Transportation and Works located at Lewisporte.

One (1) temporary position of Commissioning Specialist with the Building Design and Construction Division of the Department of Transportation and Works located at St. John’s, NL.

DUTIES: The successful candidate would ensure the development and implementation of a standardized service delivery model for student educational assessments; establish guidelines for educational assessment practices; review and evaluate current practices related to student educational assessments; provide consultation to the school districts in the implementation of the service delivery model; provide professional development to all personnel involved in student educational assessments; consult and support training in the use of appropriate testing materials; in consultation with Information Technology personnel, develop an electronic database for managing student educational assessments; review and recommend more equitable management of services; monitor status of the implementation process and ensure that student data to inform programming are reviewed and revised as needed. QUALIFICATIONS: This position requires a Doctoral Degree in Educational Psychology, Psychology, or other related fields supplemented by a minimum of five years teaching experience. The successful candidate must have experience in policy, planning and program development; training and proficiency in managing electronic databases. Knowledge and experience in assessment is essential. Candidates must demonstrate initiative, independence and creativity, together with strong oral and written communication, facilitation, presentation and organization skills. A commitment to quality service is essential. SALARY:

GS 42 salary scale or in accordance with the NLTA Collective AgreementSecondment considered COMPETITION #: E.C.PDS(t).07.08.144-I CLOSING DATE: September 24, 2007

DUTIES: This is a responsible administrative position accountable for the planning, administration, crewing, and financial monitoring / budgeting of six (6) ferry services operated by the Provincial Government, as well as provision of ferry services by private sector operators under contract to the Department. Individual will provide management and direction to Masters of vessels; liaise with contractors, ferry committees and the general public to ensure a high level of service is maintained; develops policy and prepares reports and statistical information, and drafts correspondence; duties are performed with minimal direction and a high degree of independence. QUALIFICATIONS: This position requires extensive knowledge and experience in the Marine Industry. The incumbent is expected to exercise considerable independence and initiative and must possess effective organizational, analytical, problem solving, interpersonal and oral/written communication, management/supervisory skills as well as the ability to work in a dynamic, service-oriented environment. Successful completion of a Degree in Commerce or Business Administration, or an equivalent combination of related experience and training. SALARY: $57,059 - $74,177 (HL-23) COMPETITION #: TW.C.RMMS.(p).07.08.165- P CLOSING DATE: September 25, 2007.

Applications, quoting competition number, should be forwarded to: Mail:

Mail:

Fax: E-Mail:

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission 4th Floor, West Block Confederation Building P.O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 (709) 729-6737 pscsocialresumes@gov.nl.ca

For additional information on this position, please call (709) 729-2354. Applications must be received before the close of business on September 24, 2007 – either by e-mail, mail or fax. Late applications with explanation may be considered. Candidates must clearly demonstrate in their applications that they meet the above qualifications; only those applicants who demonstrate such qualifications will be considered for further assessment.

Nutrition Consultant

Temporary Health Promotion & Wellness Division, Department of Health & Community Services West Block, Confederation Building, St. John’s, NL DUTIES: This is a challenging, responsible and professional position involved in policy development, analysis and the provision of advice and assistance on policy/program issues in health promotion and wellness. More specifically, this position has a health promotion focus with particular emphasis on nutrition initiatives/strategies. This position is accountable for nutrition policy and programs in interdepartmental and federal/provincial/territorial levels. It also functions as a member of an interdisciplinary team and works in close collaboration with health and community stakeholders. The focus is on planning, development, modification and evaluation of nutrition policies and programs for application in the health and community services system. The goal of this position is to enhance, enable and optimize population health throughout the stages of human development and to influence strategic direction of departmental policies relative to nutrition issues. QUALIFICATIONS: The position requires extensive knowledge of the Newfoundland and Labrador Health and Community Services system at both the planning and operational levels. Candidates must have extensive knowledge of nutrition, the principles of health promotion, program planning, and program evaluation. Strong oral and written communication, presentation, facilitation, organizational and analytical skills are essential. The ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships in a team context is crucial. The required knowledge and skills for this position would normally be acquired through a Bachelor’s Degree in the Food and Nutrition field, supplemented by a Master’s Degree in Food and Nutrition or Education or related field, and registration with the Newfoundland Dietetic Association. SALARY:

HL-21 ($51,546.00- $67,010.00 per annum) COMPETITION #: H.C.NCI(t).07.08.138-I CLOSING DATE: September 24, 2007

Fax: E-Mail:

Fax: E-Mail:

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission 4th Floor, West Block Confederation Building P.O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 (709) 729-6737 pscsocialresumes@gov.nl.ca

For additional information on this position, please call (709) 729-3940. Applications must be received before the close of business on September 24, 2007 – either by e-mail, mail or fax. Late applications with explanation may be considered. Candidates must clearly demonstrate in their applications that they meet the above qualifications; only those applicants who demonstrate such qualifications will be considered for further assessment.

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission P.O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NL AlB 4J6 (709) 729-6737 psctwresumes@gov.nl.ca

Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date – either by mail, fax or e-mail. Late applications with explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position call (709) 535-2218.

Wildlife Biologist II

Seasonal Parks and Natural Areas Division, Department of Environment and Conservation, based out of LaManche Provincial Park, NL. DUTIES: The primary duties of this professional position are to perform the management, monitoring, administrative, enforcement, and public relations duties associated with managing and operating Wilderness and Ecological Reserves as assigned. The primary management area for this position is Witless Bay Ecological Reserve and the secondary area is Baccalieu Island Ecological Reserve. The incumbent initiates, conducts, and supervises research, resource inventories and assessments by designing studies, undertaking information and data collection and field investigations for the purpose of developing appropriate management guidelines and policies; enforces the Wilderness and Ecological Reserves Act, Seabird Ecological Reserve Regulations and other Divisional policies and guidelines; implements Reserve Management Plans; manages the commercial tour boat permit system and policy in cooperation with the Natural Areas Planner; makes recommendations for mitigation measures to minimize environmental impacts; develops partnerships with other agencies, researchers, non-governmental groups, etc. to plan and implement studies; reviews scientific research proposals and provides recommendations; attends Seabird Ecological Reserve Advisory Committee meetings; represents department on committees; prepares reports and may supervise temporary staff. A valid driver’s license, frequent travel and flexibility to work evenings and weekends is required. QUALIFICATIONS: Knowledge of conservation biology/ecology, scientific research and monitoring methodology, the scientific framework of the Wilderness and Ecological Reserves Program, field techniques and computer applications is required. Candidates must demonstrate strong oral, written, organizational and analytical skills as well as the ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships and work independently. Minimum requirements include a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology or Environmental Science with a knowledge of seabird biology, marine ecosystems, and conservation biology. Candidates must also demonstrate familiarity with the reserves program, the Wilderness and Ecological Reserves Act and the Seabird Ecological Reserve Regulations. Work/Field experience in a seabird colony is required. SALARY:

GS-35 ($42,533.40 - $ 47,447.40 per annum) COMPETITION #: EC.C.WBII(s).07.0205-P CLOSING DATE: September 25, 2007. Applications must be submitted to: Mail:

Applications, quoting competition number, should be forwarded via mail, fax or email: Mail:

QUALIFICATIONS: Successful completion of a trades, technician or technologist program; extensive (10 years or more) experience in the construction industry ; experience in project quality control and close out procedures, preferably in the architectural, mechanical, electrical and with building systems; candidates should possess a professional technologist designation.

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS:

TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT: The candidate will be expected to work the public service year with annual leave based on years of teaching service. Applications, quoting competition number, should be forwarded via mail, fax or email:

DUTIES: Plans, arranges and performs the commissioning of public buildings, under government’s building capital works program, including the audit of all commissioning materials, including manuals, shop drawings, design reports and training, to ensure compliance with construction documents, design expectations and departmental standards and practices; participates with post occupancy evaluation team to identify opportunities for design and construction quality improvements; develops departmental standards, practices and techniques to record, measure and test, and to record field performance of design criteria for building systems; liaises with building operators, architects, engineers, manufacturers and suppliers related to building design and construction projects; supervises technical and clerical personnel, as directed; supervises and directs external consults engaged to be part of the facility commissioning team; reviews specifications and other documents involved in the commissioning process; performs research into new and innovative testing technologies for performance verification of building systems

Fax: Email:

Staffing Specialist – Resource Sector Public Service Commission 4th Floor, West Block Confederation Building St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 (709) 729-6737 pscresourcesresumes@gov.nl.ca

For additional information on this position, please call Ms. Sian French, Manager, Natural Areas Program (709) 6354533. This competition is also open to employees of the Public Service including those on lay-off status, as specified by the applicable collective agreement or the Personnel Administration Procedures, but does not apply to students. Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date either by email, fax or mail. Late applications with explanation may be considered.

SALARY: GS-34 ($41,059.20 - $45,718.40) COMPETITION #: TW.C.CS.(t).07.08.170-P CLOSING DATE: September 25, 2007. Applications, quoting competition number, should be forwarded to: Mail:

Fax: E-Mail:

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission P.O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NL AlB 4J6 (709) 729-6737 psctwresumes@gov.nl.ca

Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date – either by mail, fax or e-mail. Late applications with explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position call (709) 729-0570.

Heavy Equipment Technician

One (1) seasonal position of Heavy Equipment Technician, with Western Transportation Division of the Department of Transportation and Works located at Tompkins/Port Aux Basques. DUTIES: This position provides skilled journeyperson level work with the diagnosing of problems related to light and heavy equipment as well as advanced work in a variety of other trades associated with the repair of vehicles and related equipment carried out in the region. Equipment includes trucks, loaders, snow plows, snow blowers, graders and air powered equipment. Work involves repairing, rebuilding and fabricating parts and components of light and heavy vehicles, vehicle systems and related equipment. The Heavy Equipment Technician performs emergency road services, makes field repairs and performs other related duties as required. QUALIFICATIONS: Candidates must be a certified journeyperson Heavy Equipment Technician, certified journeyperson Truck and Transport Mechanic or a certified journeyperson Automotive Technician with experience in the repair of heavy equipment and heavy trucks (certification issued by the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador and/or interprovincial certification). Possession of a valid driver’s license is required. Experience in the various trades associated with repair of vehicles and equipment, and courses in welding, machinist, autobody repairer, automotive repairer and automotive mechanic trades are definite assets. Experience in electric welding and acetylene cutting would also be an asset. SALARY: $17.44 – 19.28 (40 HOUR WEEK) MS 26 COMPETITION #: TW.C.HET.(s).07.08.171-P CLOSING DATE: September 25, 2007. INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS: Applications should be forwarded to: Mail:

Fax: Email:

Mr. David McAllister Regional Administrator Dept. of Works, Services & Transportation 74 Old Bonne Bay Road Deer Lake, NL A8A 1X9 (709) 635-2285 mcallisterd@gov.nl.ca

Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date - either by mail or fax. Late applications with explanation may be considered. A separate application must be submitted for each competition. For additional information on this position call 709-6354139.


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTBUSINESS • 17

Opportunities Manager of Outdoor Product Development

Temporary until March 31, 2008 (under review) Strategic Tourism Product Development Division, Department of Tourism, Culture and Recreation Confederation Building, St. John’s, NL DUTIES: This position is accountable for the overall policy, planning, development, coordination and control of Tourism related opportunities, public and private, associated with outdoor tourism activities including both non-consumptive and consumptive experiences of the Province. Reporting to the Director of Strategic Tourism Product Development, the manager will be responsible to improve the quality, quantity, utilization and return on investment/resource use from the outdoor product which may be developed for commercial use; plan, develop and implement a coordinated program to ensure the Government departments involved provide an environment in which commercial enterprises involved can prosper; develop a base of resource material for reference, seminars, manuals, etc. for presentation to operators that will make their product competitive on a national and international level; oversee the activities of the Outdoor Product Development Officers in order to develop the base of related resources to match the market demand. All assessments and recommendations will be reviewed by the manager to ensure operating standards are met; performs related duties as required. The incumbent will develop and maintain a high profile for the Department of Tourism, Culture and Recreation, having a lead role in the development of the outdoor product segment of the Tourism Industry. QUALIFICATIONS: The successful candidate must have training and experience in policy, planning and program development; three to five years experience in a supervisory or management position in the tourism industry or related sector is required. Strong leadership, oral and written communication, analytical and management skills are essential. The incumbent is expected to exercise a professional image at all times. The above combination of knowledge and abilities would normally be acquired through a Degree in Outdoor Recreation, Natural Resource Management, Tourism, Commerce, Geography or related fields. A valid Drivers license is required.

Heavy Equipment Technician

Six (6) permanent, Two (2) seasonal positions of Heavy Equipment Technician, with the Avalon Transportation Division of the Department of Transportation and Works located at Bay Roberts, Trepassey, White Hills, Heart’s Content. DUTIES: This position provides skilled journeyperson level work with the diagnosing of problems related to light and heavy equipment as well as advanced work in a variety of other trades associated with the repair of vehicles and related equipment carried out in the region. Equipment includes trucks, loaders, snow plows, snow blowers, graders and air powered equipment. Work involves repairing, rebuilding and fabricating parts and components of light and heavy vehicles, vehicle systems and related equipment. The Heavy Equipment Technician performs emergency road services, makes field repairs and performs other related duties as required. QUALIFICATIONS: Candidates must be a certified journeyperson Heavy Equipment Technician, certified journeyperson Truck and Transport Mechanic or a certified journeyperson Automotive Technician with experience in the repair of heavy equipment and heavy trucks (certification issued by the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador and/or interprovincial certification). Possession of a valid driver’s license is required. Experience in the various trades associated with repair of vehicles and equipment, and courses in welding, machinist, autobody repairer, automotive repairer and automotive mechanic trades are definite assets. Experience in electric welding and acetylene cutting would also be an asset. SALARY:

$17.44 – 19.28 (40 HOUR WEEK) MS 26

COMPETITION #:

TW.C.HET.(p).07.08.173-P (Bay Robert Garage) TW.C.HET.(s).07.08.174-P (Trepassey) TW.C.HET.(p).07.08.175-P (White Hills Garage) TW.C.HET.(s).07.08.176-P (Heart’s Content)

CLOSING DATE:

September 25, 2007.

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS:

Director of Maintenance and Engineering

Permanent One (1) permanent position of Director of Maintenance and Engineering with the Marine Branch of the Department of Transportation and Works, located at Lewisporte, St. John’s. DUTIES: The Director of Maintenance and Engineering is one of three senior Management positions reporting to the Assistant Deputy Minister. The position is responsible for the overall inspections within the Maintenance & Engineering Division, including providing technical support related to vessel refits and the development and implementation of a comprehensive vessel maintenance program, maintaining of all applicable budgets, recruitment of sub-technical, professional and non-professional staff, and ensuring the Department’s fleet of eleven vessels are maintained in accordance with Canadian ferry standards. QUALIFICATIONS: This position requires extensive knowledge and experience in Marine. The incumbent is expected to exercise considerable independence and initiative and must possess effective organizational, analytical, problem solving, interpersonal and oral/written communication, management/supervisory skills as well as the ability to work in a dynamic, service oriented environment. These qualifications would normally be acquired through extensive experience in maintaining a fleet of Marine Vessels and be the holder of a First Class Marine Engineering Certificate from a recognized university/college or Naval Engineering Institute. Candidates must be eligible for registration in PEG-NL as an engineering trainee. SALARY: $65,342 - $89,945 (HL-28) COMPETITION #: TW.C.DME.(p).07.08.172-P CLOSING DATE: September 25, 2007. INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS: Applications SHOULD BE FORWARDED TO: Mail:

Applications SHOULD BE FORWARDED TO: SALARY:

HL 20 ($49,204.00- $63,965.00 per annum) COMPETITION #: TCR.C.MOPD(t).07.0133 CLOSING DATE: September 25, , 2007

Mail:

Applications, quoting competition number, should be forwarded via mail, fax or email: Fax: Mail:

Fax: E-Mail:

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission 4th Floor, West Block Confederation Building P.O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 (709) 729-6737 pscresourcesresumes@gov.nl.ca

Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date - either by mail or fax. Late applications with explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position call (709) 729-2383.

This competition is also open to employees of the Public Service including those on lay-off status, as specified by the applicable collective agreement or the Personnel Administration Procedures, but does not apply to students. Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date either by email, fax or mail. Late applications with explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position, please call (709) 729-1708.

Heavy Equipment Technician – 1st Year Apprentice Apprenticeship Contract Four (4) temporary Apprenticeship Contracts position of Apprentice Heavy Equipment Technician with the Eastern Transportation Division of the Department of Transportation and Works located at Eastport, Lethbridge, Grand Bank, Bellevue. DUTIES: This position will provide assistance to the Journey Person Heavy Equipment Technician associated with repairs to light and heavy equipment carried out in a Transportation Garage. Work involves designing, re-designing, repairing, rebuilding and fabricating parts and components of light and heavy vehicles, its systems and related equipment under supervision of a Journey Person to learn the operations in a mechanical facility and apply skills to the repair of Department equipment. QUALIFICATIONS: Successful candidate must have completed advanced level apprenticeship training at a recognized institution, and have less than 1800 hours towards Journeyperson Certification. Experience in various other trades associated with the repair of vehicles and equipment; and experience in mechanical repairs, welding and machinists work would be an asset. SALARY:

$25,392.64 - First Year [%MS-26 ($17.44- $19.28)]

COMPETITION #: TW.C.AHET.(t).07.08.166-P TW.C.AHET.(t).07.08.167-P TW.C.AHET.(t).07.08.168-P TW.C.AHET.(t).07.08.169-P CLOSING DATE:

(Eastport) (Lethbridge) (Grand Bank) (Bellevue)

September 25, 2007.

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS:

Statistician II

Fax: Email:

Ms. Jennette Reader Regional Administrator Dept. of Transportation & Works 3 Duffitt Place Clarenville, NF A5A 1E9 (709) 466-3927 readerj@gov.nl.ca

Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date - either by mail or fax. Late applications with explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position call 709-4664121.

Fax: E-Mail:

Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date - either by mail, email or fax. Late applications with explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position call 709-7293278.

Director of Budgeting

Temporary to March 31st, 2008

Permanent

Newfoundland and Labrador Statistics Agency, Economics and Statistics Branch, Department of Finance, Confederation Building, St. John’s.

Budgeting Division, Department of Finance, Confederation Building, St. John’s

DUTIES: The incumbent is responsible for statistical data analysis and web development related to historical Census records including Census of Canada records for 1911 to 1951 and Census of Newfoundland records for 1911, 1921, 1935 and 1945 as part of a national research infrastructure initiative; responsible for ensuring data adheres to statistical principles of data quality, significance and confidentiality as appropriate; assists in implementing detailed computerized research algorithms and manual verification procedures; monitors results and recommends optimal improvements based on analysis of outcomes; develops various on-line and other research and user response tools; prepares written reports and delivers PowerPoint presentations of statistical results as required; uses the latest software including SPSS, Microsoft Excel, IBM DB2, as well as Microsoft SQL Server, ASP, and other related software to achieve these goals. QUALIFICATIONS: Knowledge and practical experience in mathematical and statistical techniques, and developing and writing computer routines and programs based upon such techniques. Proficiency in data organization, manipulation and database development. Required skills will have been demonstrated by a background in both mathematical and statistical analysis, as well as considerable experience in related scientific computer programming. University graduation and work experience in Mathematics, Statistics or related field as well as an extensive knowledge of computer programming is essential. Knowledge and interest in 20th Century Canadian History would be an asset. Candidate will be required to have strong writing skills and a proven ability to communicate effectively in a team environment. Minimum of 2 years experience or an equivalent combination of education and training will be considered. Successful applicant must pass an Enhanced Security Check.

DUTIES: The Director of Budget Division for Government plans, develops and prepares the provincial expenditure budget and government’s consolidated accrual budget results and supporting statements; controls, monitors and reports on expenditures, provides professional financial management advisory and related services to the Treasury Board. Provides analysis and recommendations to Cabinet on all submissions having financial implications, including proposed capital and investment initiatives, new programs, etc; ensures compliance with the provisions of the Financial Administration Act regarding Special Warrants, Supply Bill, and Interim Supply. QUALIFICATIONS: Considerable responsibility and related experience at a senior level in financial management combined with a Professional Accounting Designation and/or a Master=s Degree in Business Administration or a related discipline or any equivalent combination of experience and training. Candidates must possess strong analytical and managerial abilities, oral and written communication skills and the ability to establish and maintain effective working relations in an environment of strict deadlines. Candidates must also have the ability to work well under pressure. A sound understanding of Government programs and operations of the financial position of the province and knowledge of government’s accounting policies and public sector accounting standards would be an asset. SALARY: $68,522.00 - $89,078.00 (HL-30) COMPETITION #: FIN.C.DOB(p).07/08.089-P CLOSING DATE: September 26th, 2007 Applications, quoting Competition No., should be submitted to: Mail:

SALARY: $42,533.40 - $47,447.40 (GS 35) COMPETITION #: FIN.NLSA.C.SII(t).07/08.088-P CLOSING DATE: September 26th, 2007 Applications, quoting Competition No., should be submitted to: Mail:

Applications SHOULD BE FORWARDED TO: Mail:

Mr. Gary Kendell Regional Administrator Dept. of Transportation & Works P.O. Box 21301 St. John’s, NL A1A 5G6 (709) 729-0219

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission 4th Floor, West Block, Confederation Bldg. P.O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 (709) 729-6737 psctwresumes@gov.nl.ca

Fax: E-Mail:

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission 4th Floor, West Block Confederation Building P. O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 (709) 729-6737 pscecresumes@gov.nl.ca

Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date - late applications with explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position, please call Terry Quinlan (709) 729-0756. September 11 , 2007

Fax: E-Mail:

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission 4th Floor, West Block Confederation Building P. O. Box 8700 St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 (709) 729-6737 pscecresumes@gov.nl.ca

Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date - late applications with explanation may be considered. For additional information on this position, please call (709) 729-4581. September 11, 2007


18 • INDEPENDENTBUSINESS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

Opportunities Financial Collections Officer

Financial Collections Officer/Accountant (Temporary – 1 Position)

(Temporary – 4 Positions)

Location: Fines Administration Division, Department of Justice, Atlantic Place, St. John’s, NL

Location: Fines Administration Division, Department of Justice, Atlantic Place, St. John’s, NL

DUTIES: This is specialized collections work for the Department of Justice in the collection of fines imposed by judges and through summary offence tickets. The incumbent performs financial assessments, negotiates repayment agreements, provides financial counseling to clients, monitors accounts for compliance with repayment agreements, court ordered extensions of time to pay, court imposed payment orders, conducts asset searches, utilizes various collections options as provided for in the Judgement Enforcement Act, maintains records in FAST database, uses various computer applications, performs various accounting functions which include account reconciliations and the preparation of financial reports, and performs other duties as required. A good understanding of the judicial system, judge’s dispositions, the origin and nature of fines is desirable. Work is performed with considerable initiative and judgement.

DUTIES: This is specialized collections work for the Department of Justice in the collection of fines imposed by judges and through summary offence tickets. The incumbent performs financial assessments, negotiates repayment agreements, provides financial counseling to clients, monitors accounts for compliance with repayment agreements, court ordered extensions of time to pay, court imposed payment orders, conducts asset searches, utilizes various collections options as provided for in the Judgement Enforcement Act, maintains records in FAST database, uses various computer applications and performs other duties as required. A good understanding of the judicial system, judge’s dispositions, the origin and nature of fines is desirable. Work is performed with considerable initiative and judgement.

QUALIFICATIONS: Extensive experience in collections including legal and security requirements, financial statement analysis, negotiations, financial counseling, skip-tracing, bankruptcy and account management; accounting experience which includes reconciling accounts and preparation of financial reports; excellent oral and written communication skills, strong organizational, analytical, accounting and business skills and computer applications; the ability to exercise sound judgement and tact under challenging circumstances; work independently and as a team member, able to manage a large case load. The incumbent must be experienced in working with the Judgement Enforcement Act, Bankruptcy legislation and possess an understanding of the Privacy Act. The required knowledge and skills would normally have been acquired through direct lending and collection work, performing accounting functions and through graduation from a recognized university or college with a degree in Business, Commerce or related discipline. Equivalencies will be considered. Candidates must clearly demonstrate in their resume that they meet all of the above qualifications. Failure to do so may result in a candidate being screened out. Positions within the Department of Justice are considered “Positions of Trust” and as such successful candidates will be subject to a background check through police/court banks and other sources. SALARY: $35,908.60 - $39, 894.40 per annum (GS-30) COMPETITION #: J.C.FCO/A(t).07.083 - P CLOSING DATE: September 24, 2007

QUALIFICATIONS: Extensive experience in collections including legal and security requirements, financial statement analysis, negotiations, financial counseling, skip-tracing, bankruptcy and account management; excellent oral and written communication skills, strong organizational, analytical, accounting and business skills; experience in accounting and computer applications; the ability to exercise sound judgement and tact under challenging circumstances; work independently and as a team member, able to manage a large case load. The incumbent must be experienced in working with the Judgement Enforcement Act, Bankruptcy legislation and possess an understanding of the Privacy Act. The required knowledge and skills would normally have been acquired through direct lending and collection work and through graduation from a recognized university or college with a degree in Business, Commerce or related discipline. Equivalencies will be considered. Candidates must clearly demonstrate in their resume that they meet all of the above qualifications. Failure to do so may result in a candidate being screened out. Positions within the Department of Justice are considered “Positions of Trust” and as such successful candidates will be subject to a background check through police/court banks and other sources. SALARY: $35,908.60 - $39,894.40 per annum (GS-30) COMPETITION #: J.C.FCO(t).07.082 - P CLOSING DATE: September 24, 2007 INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS: Applications should be forwarded to: Mail:

INFORMATION FOR APPLICANTS: Applications should be forwarded to: Mail:

Fax: E-mail:

Fax: E-mail:

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission P. O. Box 8700, 4th Floor West Block Confederation Building St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 709-729-6737 pscjusticeresumes@gov.nl.ca

Recruitment Centre Public Service Commission P. O. Box 8700, 4th Floor, West Block Confederation Building St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6 709-729-6737 pscjusticeresumes@gov.nl.ca

* In order to ensure your application/resume is processed appropriately, the job competition number MUST be indicated. * Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date, either by e-mail, postal mail or fax. (If faxing, DO NOT send a duplicate copy). Late applications with acceptable explanation may be considered. * For additional information on this position, call (709) 729-1144.

* In order to ensure your application/resume is processed appropriately, the job competition number MUST be indicated. * Applications should be received before the close of business on the closing date, either by e-mail, postal mail or fax. (If faxing, DO NOT send a duplicate copy). Late applications with acceptable explanation may be considered. * For additional information on this position, call (709) 729-1144.

2007 09 10

2007 09 10

Tenders

Request for Proposals DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND COMMUNITY SERVICES

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INVITATION TO TENDER

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION & WORKS INVITATION TO TENDER

Tenders will be received up to the dates and times indicated below for the following project:

Tenders will be received up to the dates and times indicated below for the following project:

TELE-CARE SERVICES

A/PROJECT # 100001003 – Roof replacement & repairs, St. Peter’s School, Black Tickle, Labrador, NL. PURCHASE PRICE: $22.80 CLOSING DATE: SEPTEMBER 27, 2007 @ 3:00 PM

A/PROJECT # 101-07 PMB – Site preparation work and salt storage facility foundation installation, Maintenance Depot, Lewisporte, NL. PURCHASE PRICE: $22.80 CLOSING DATE: SEPTEMBER 27, 2007 @ 12:00 NOON

The Department of Health and Community Services is seeking proposals from interested potential service providers to assist in Government in selection of a service provider to manage and operate the Newfoundland and Labrador Health Line.

B/PROJECT # 102-07PHM – Clearing of various sections of right-of-way on R422 Cormack Road and R421 Hampden Road, NL. PURCHASE PRICE: $22.80 CLOSING DATE: SEPTEMBER 27, 2007 @ 12:00 NOON

The proposal submission deadline is 4:00 pm (Newfoundland time) on Tuesday, October 9, 2007.

B/PROJECT # 400350008 – Roof replacement & repairs, St. John’s Bosco, St. John’s, NL. PURCHASE PRICE: $22.80 CLOSING DATE: SEPTEMBER 26, 2007 @ 3:00 PM C/PROJECT #200057003 – Masonry repairs, St. Peters Academy, Benoit’s Cove, NL. PURCHASE PRICE: $22.80 CLOSING DATE: SEPTEMBER 26, 2007 @ 3:00 PM Upon receipt of the purchase price indicated above, (NON REFUNDABLE, HST INCLUDED) plans and specifications may be obtained from Tendering and Contracts, Ground Floor, East Block, Confederation Building, P.O. Box 8700, St. John’s, NL, A1B 4J6, Ph# 709-729-3786, Fax# 709-729-6729, and viewed at the offices of the Newfoundland and Labrador Construction Association. Tenders addressed to the Deputy Minister of Transportation and Works must be delivered to Tendering and Contacts at the address above and be submitted on forms and in sealed enveloped provided, clearly marked as to the contents. Tenders will be opened immediately after the tender closing time. The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender. Hon. Joan Burke Minister Dept. of Education

Upon receipt of the purchase price indicated above, (NON REFUNDABLE, HST INCLUDED) plans and specifications may be obtained from Tendering and Contracts, Ground Floor, East Block, Confederation Building, P.O. Box 8700, St. John’s, NL, A1B 4J6, Ph# 709-729-3786, Fax# 709-729-6729, and viewed at the offices of the Newfoundland and Labrador Construction Association. Tenders addressed to the Deputy Minister of Transportation and Works must be delivered to Tendering and Contacts at the address above and be submitted on forms and in sealed enveloped provided, clearly marked as to the contents. Tenders will be opened immediately after the tender closing time. The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender. Hon. John Hickey Minister Transportation & Works DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION & WORKS INVITATION TO TENDER

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INVITATION TO TENDER

Tenders will be received up to the dates and times indicated below for the following project:

Tenders will be received up to the dates and times indicated below for the following project:

PROJECT # 103-07PHR – Upgrading R500, Trans Labrador Highway from Goose Bay towards Churchill Falls, from km 33.5 to km 48.5 for approx. 15 km, NL. PURCHASE PRICE: $22.80 CLOSING DATE: OCTOBER 1, 2007 @ 12:00 NOON

PROJECT # 200931001 – CP# 1 – Site prepatory work, new K-12 school, L’Anse au Loop, NL PURCHASE PRICE: $22.80 CLOSING DATE: OCTOBER 1, 2007 @ 3:00 PM Upon receipt of the purchase price indicated above, (NON REFUNDABLE, HST INCLUDED) plans and specifications may be obtained from Tendering and Contracts, Ground Floor, East Block, Confederation Building, P.O. Box 8700, St. John’s, NL, A1B 4J6, Ph# 709-729-3786, Fax# 709-729-6729, and viewed at the offices of the Newfoundland and Labrador Construction Association. Tenders addressed to the Deputy Minister of Transportation and Works must be delivered to Tendering and Contacts at the address above and be submitted on forms and in sealed enveloped provided, clearly marked as to the contents. Tenders will be opened immediately after the tender closing time. The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender. Hon. Joan Burke Minister Dept. of Education

Upon receipt of the purchase price indicated above, (NON REFUNDABLE, HST INCLUDED) plans and specifications may be obtained from Tendering and Contracts, Ground Floor, East Block, Confederation Building, P.O. Box 8700, St. John’s, NL, A1B 4J6, Ph# 709-729-3786, Fax# 709-729-6729, and viewed at the offices of the Newfoundland and Labrador Construction Association. Tenders addressed to the Deputy Minister of Transportation and Works must be delivered to Tendering and Contacts at the address above and be submitted on forms and in sealed enveloped provided, clearly marked as to the contents. Tenders will be opened immediately after the tender closing time. The Department does not bind itself to accept the lowest or any tender. Hon. John Hickey Minister Transportation & Works

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

The complete Request for Proposals Document is available on the Government Purchasing Agency website at www.gpa. gov.nl.ca or you may request a copy by contacting: Government Purchasing Agency Tel: (709) 729-3348 Fax: (709) 729-5817


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

‘A solid road map’ From page 15 Baker suggest the business ethics employed by Hydro-Quebec at the time of negotiations could perhaps hold legal implications that have never been considered before. Section 92a of the revised Canadian Constitution is another legal option yet to be fully explored in relation to the upper Churchill deal. If implemented, the clause could give the province the power to tax hydroelectricity, meaning millions of dollars more in revenue to the province. Back in 2005, Williams strongly stressed the need for the federal government to step in and play a role in any potential recompense scenarios, but with the current strained relationship between the premier and the prime minister, such federal assistance seems unlikely. Some other points raised by the recently released energy plan will also require federal co-operation, such as the need for the inter-provincial transmission of electricity to enable the province to sell hydro across Canada and the States. The province is also still planning to acquire the federal government’s 8.5 per cent share in Hibernia. Dunderdale says they continue to push for that at “every opportunity with the federal government.” Both these issues have yet to generate any actual federal commitments, however. “The national energy board has responsibility for regulation of international transmission of energy,” she says. “It has capacity to intervene in inter-provincial transmission but only if directed by the federal government to do so.” For the time being, all eyes are on oil and one particularly important date. Dunderdale says she believes the newly released energy plan has longevity and won’t be forgotten no matter who holds provincial power in four years time. “This is a solid road map to take us to 2041 and beyond … and I don’t know of any reason for anyone to take us off that path.”

Beyond bad From page 15 kitchen staff than wait staff. You hair feeling limp or looking mis-tinted may be the fault of the product being used and not the colourist. The gash in your suitcase might be because of its quality and not the responsibility of the person placing it aboard your cab. Therefore, you should raise service concerns with a manager as opposed to front-line personnel, if for no other reason than to avoid embarrassing yourself. I recall an up-market Toronto restaurant where I felt the service had simply been awful. Our party of three — we’d all met for the first time that day — had taken over two hours for lunch. The soup was cold, the salad had no dressing first nor last, and one colleague’s coffee was half in her cup with the remainder in the saucer. We never did get any cream. I left a $5 tip for a $75 meal. Well! The waiter followed us into the parking lot to inquire what our problem was. That’s one situation I’ll remember for a long time. Thankfully, the manager appeared and explained this was the first week the waiter was back to work following a sudden and tragic death in his family. While I continue to feel the service that day was beyond bad, at least I had a sense of why. And that’s my tip for this month! Al Antle is the executive director of Credit and Debt Solutions.

INDEPENDENTBUSINESS • 19

Man transferred to penitentiary, begins serving sentence in ATV case

A

Newfoundland man jailed for several ATV offences has been transferred to Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in St. John’s to serve his sentence. Wade Maxwell Rogers, 42, was sentenced to 18 months by provincial court Judge Harold Porter in

Marystown Sept. 12. Rogers was driving an ATV while carrying his two-year-old son when he was spotted by RCMP on Sept. 5. He fled at high speed, but was later arrested. Neither Rogers nor the child was wearing a helmet.

He pleaded guilty to dangerous driving and two other offences. In addition to jail time, Rogers is prohibited from driving any motor vehicle, including ATVs, for three years. He was also ordered to pay $3,000 in fines and will be on probation for three years after his release from jail.

The incident has also been referred to child protection officials. The Independent contacted the Marystown RCMP detachment, where Rogers was being held until his transfer to St. John’s, to request an interview, but was refused by police. brian.callahan@theindependent.ca


20 • INDEPENDENTBUSINESS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007


INDEPENDENTLIFE

FRIDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-20, 2007 — PAGE 21

Newfoundland author Bernice Morgan.

Paul Daly/The Independent

‘Classic without a qualifier’ Bernice Morgan talks about the skull beneath the skin, memory, grief and the TD Building Dogmen breed and bleed, eat and shit, they are born, love, feel joy, they feel pain and die just as people do. Yet they are not people. They do not know earth as we do, do not see that earth is owned by others — by animals and animal spirits, by the spirits of all things that live and have lived in this sweet world. — Shanawdithit on Europeans, from Cloud of Bone took Bernice Morgan’s new book, Cloud of Bone, to bed one night a few weeks ago, intending to read for an hour or so. A book, a cup of tea and a cat to help warm the sheets — my favourite prelude to sleep. But by seven the next morning the sheets were cold and tangled, the tea had a dead fly floating in it and the cat and I were both red-eyed. I was nearly twothirds of the way through Morgan’s 442page, gut-wrenching opus, and I felt like a

I

SUSAN RENDELL Screed and Coke kid with its tongue stuck to frozen metal — it hurt to stay where I was, but I figured it would hurt even more if I tried to tear myself away. If Morgan’s Random Passage is a Newfoundland classic (and it is), Cloud of Bone is a classic without a qualifier. In this book — 10 years in the making — Morgan has managed to transcend time and place, even though the story is rooted in very specific times and places: Newfoundland and England during the Second World War, 19th-century Newfoundland, Rwanda, modern England and St. John’s. Her characters (even the minor ones are as real as they come) carry Morgan’s story, their own stories and the eternal story of humanity’s inhumanity like boxes within boxes — like the skull in the box near the end of the book, which is, metaphorically, every skull from every war that ever was, yet also the skull of an individual,

Shanawdithit, last of the Beothuk, whose story Morgan tells with great tenderness. Toughness, too. Morgan and I meet at the Bagel Café; it’s a dreary day, but the Bagel is never dreary — its owner is continually redecorating, and the results are always bright and eclectic (kind of like Martha Stewart on acid). I’m surprised when Morgan, a small woman in a blue sweater, tells me she’s 71; she looks 10 years younger. Her age is not really relevant, but the idea that this bright-eyed sparrow woman who laughs as much as she talks has given birth to a book like Cloud of Bone amazes me. And birth it was. I ask her how she feels about the new novel in relation to the rest of her work. “I’ve never thought of my work as a unit,” Morgan says. “I’m always most involved with the last thing I’ve written, like a mother with the youngest child. It’s so like going through a long pregnancy, and having a baby — only it’s born as a teenager, and then its scruffy self goes out into the world, and it’s going to reflect on you, you know (laughs).” Yes, I say (thinking of my own book), you feel protective, but also that perhaps the book had

it coming (any bad press) — ‘If you’d only brushed your hair. . .’ “Yes,” says Morgan, laughing again — “‘If I’d only brushed your hair!’” I tell her what another writer said to me once: that it should be like cars — you ought to be able to recall a book after it’s printed as soon as you realize a paragraph is fatally flawed. “Oh, I know,” Morgan says. “It’s painful. I was reading from Random Passage at a school one time … my reading copy is all marked up (with changes), and a student said, ‘That’s not what’s in my book.’You could keep on forever, but at some point you know you’re making it worse.” So where did Cloud of Bone come from? Morgan tells me she always intended to write about the Second World War: “I was thinking about that the other day, how growing up in that period (the Depression and the war) has shaped me, for good and for bad.” The first part of the book is about a 16-year-old St. John’s native who deserts from the Royal Navy during the war and ends up underneath St. Mary’s Church on the Southside Hills, where he hears the spectral voice of

Shanawdithit. Morgan says she was looking out the window of her former downtown office one day at the excavation of the Southside. There used to be a marker there, she tells me, a plaque commemorating Shanawdithit, whose bones disappeared, likely into the harbour, in the 1960s when St. Mary’s was torn down (the last “Red Indian” was buried beside the church). “I was sitting on the radiator looking out, and the marker had gone — gone. It just infuriated me. We certainly contributed to the disappearance of her people; we buried her up there, we chopped her head off and sent it to England. But it took me a couple of more years (to begin the book), because I think where you go into a story is really important. It took me a long time … because I really wanted them (the Navy deserter and Shanawdithit’s ghost) talking at the same time.” How did she manage to inhabit the skin of a 16-year-old hard-case “corner boy” so perfectly — three of them, in fact?

paign signs went up in my neighbourhood, and probably in yours, too, unless you’re unfortunate enough to live in an area of St. John’s where the now dilapidated and extensively vandalized David Crosbie pre-campaign signs have been a blot on the landscape for months now. So it begins. For the next few weeks, we the people will be temporarily inundated with pamphlets, phone calls and even home visits from the total strangers who run our lives. But just because the outcome of the

upcoming election is certain, that doesn’t mean we can’t use the equally certain election media frenzy to our advantage. Now is a grand time to publicly grill all candidates on their stand re: all your favourite topics, while they’re still obliged to appear to be listening to you. At best, you could bring an issue to the attention of someone empowered to do a little something about it. At worst, you could score a point or two at their expense and maybe get them on tape making a promise you could try and embarrass them with later.

Being who I am and doing what I do, I plan to ask a whole lot of questions about everyone’s plans for the future of arts and culture in our fair province. Those who don’t know/don’t understand the question will be ushered off the doorstep post-haste. It shouldn’t be a tough question for members of Team Danny. The Williams government outlined their plan in the much anticipated and oh-so-snappilytitled Creative Newfoundland and

See “About memory,” page 23

Remember Us? ere we stand on the cusp of what will unquestionably be the least suspenseful, least dramatic and — unless Danny “The Unstoppable Force” Williams and Gerry “The Blunt Instrument” Reid decide to say shag the nasty battle of words and just start punching each other instead — least exciting election in this province’s history. Yes, in a few short weeks the PCs will ride their big, blue Hebron-fuelled machine right back into office, crushing the opposition and setting up another de

H

SEAN PANTING

State of the art facto Progressive Conservative dictatorship. But democracy being what it is, potential MHAs will still have to go through the motions, get out on the campaign trail and solicit votes from us. Last week, a whole forest of cam-

See “Taking a page,” page 23


INDEPENDENTLIFE

FRIDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-20, 2007 — PAGE 21

Newfoundland author Bernice Morgan.

Paul Daly/The Independent

‘Classic without a qualifier’ Bernice Morgan talks about the skull beneath the skin, memory, grief and the TD Building Dogmen breed and bleed, eat and shit, they are born, love, feel joy, they feel pain and die just as people do. Yet they are not people. They do not know earth as we do, do not see that earth is owned by others — by animals and animal spirits, by the spirits of all things that live and have lived in this sweet world.

I

— Shanawdithit on Europeans, from Cloud of Bone

took Bernice Morgan’s new book, Cloud of Bone, to bed one night a few weeks ago, intending to read for an hour or so. A book, a cup of tea and a cat to help warm the sheets — my favourite prelude to sleep. But by seven the next morning the sheets were cold and tangled, the tea had a dead fly floating in it and the cat and I were both red-eyed. I was nearly twothirds of the way through Morgan’s 442page, gut-wrenching opus, and I felt like a

SUSAN RENDELL Screed and Coke kid with its tongue stuck to frozen metal — it hurt to stay where I was, but I figured it would hurt even more if I tried to tear myself away. If Morgan’s Random Passage is a Newfoundland classic (and it is), Cloud of Bone is a classic without a qualifier. In this book — 10 years in the making — Morgan has managed to transcend time and place, even though the story is rooted in very specific times and places: Newfoundland and England during the Second World War, 19th-century Newfoundland, Rwanda, modern England and St. John’s. Her characters (even the minor ones are as real as they come) carry Morgan’s story, their own stories and the eternal story of humanity’s inhumanity like boxes within boxes — like the skull in the box near the end of the book, which is, metaphorically, every skull from every war that ever was, yet also the skull of an individual,

Shanawdithit, last of the Beothuk, whose story Morgan tells with great tenderness. Toughness, too. Morgan and I meet at the Bagel Café; it’s a dreary day, but the Bagel is never dreary — its owner is continually redecorating, and the results are always bright and eclectic (kind of like Martha Stewart on acid). I’m surprised when Morgan, a small woman in a blue sweater, tells me she’s 71; she looks 10 years younger. Her age is not really relevant, but the idea that this bright-eyed sparrow woman who laughs as much as she talks has given birth to a book like Cloud of Bone amazes me. And birth it was. I ask her how she feels about the new novel in relation to the rest of her work. “I’ve never thought of my work as a unit,” Morgan says. “I’m always most involved with the last thing I’ve written, like a mother with the youngest child. It’s so like going through a long pregnancy, and having a baby — only it’s born as a teenager, and then its scruffy self goes out into the world, and it’s going to reflect on you, you know (laughs).” Yes, I say (thinking of my own book), you feel protective, but also that perhaps the book had

it coming (any bad press) — ‘If you’d only brushed your hair. . .’ “Yes,” says Morgan, laughing again — “‘If I’d only brushed your hair!’” I tell her what another writer said to me once: that it should be like cars — you ought to be able to recall a book after it’s printed as soon as you realize a paragraph is fatally flawed. “Oh, I know,” Morgan says. “It’s painful. I was reading from Random Passage at a school one time … my reading copy is all marked up (with changes), and a student said, ‘That’s not what’s in my book.’You could keep on forever, but at some point you know you’re making it worse.” So where did Cloud of Bone come from? Morgan tells me she always intended to write about the Second World War: “I was thinking about that the other day, how growing up in that period (the Depression and the war) has shaped me, for good and for bad.” The first part of the book is about a 16-year-old St. John’s native who deserts from the Royal Navy during the war and ends up underneath St. Mary’s Church on the Southside Hills, where he hears the spectral voice of

Shanawdithit. Morgan says she was looking out the window of her former downtown office one day at the excavation of the Southside. There used to be a marker there, she tells me, a plaque commemorating Shanawdithit, whose bones disappeared, likely into the harbour, in the 1960s when St. Mary’s was torn down (the last “Red Indian” was buried beside the church). “I was sitting on the radiator looking out, and the marker had gone — gone. It just infuriated me. We certainly contributed to the disappearance of her people; we buried her up there, we chopped her head off and sent it to England. But it took me a couple of more years (to begin the book), because I think where you go into a story is really important. It took me a long time … because I really wanted them (the Navy deserter and Shanawdithit’s ghost) talking at the same time.” How did she manage to inhabit the skin of a 16-year-old hard-case “corner boy” so perfectly — three of them, in fact?

paign signs went up in my neighbourhood, and probably in yours, too, unless you’re unfortunate enough to live in an area of St. John’s where the now dilapidated and extensively vandalized David Crosbie pre-campaign signs have been a blot on the landscape for months now. So it begins. For the next few weeks, we the people will be temporarily inundated with pamphlets, phone calls and even home visits from the total strangers who run our lives. But just because the outcome of the

upcoming election is certain, that doesn’t mean we can’t use the equally certain election media frenzy to our advantage. Now is a grand time to publicly grill all candidates on their stand re: all your favourite topics, while they’re still obliged to appear to be listening to you. At best, you could bring an issue to the attention of someone empowered to do a little something about it. At worst, you could score a point or two at their expense and maybe get them on tape making a promise you could try and embarrass them with later.

Being who I am and doing what I do, I plan to ask a whole lot of questions about everyone’s plans for the future of arts and culture in our fair province. Those who don’t know/don’t understand the question will be ushered off the doorstep post-haste. It shouldn’t be a tough question for members of Team Danny. The Williams government outlined their plan in the much anticipated and oh-so-snappilytitled Creative Newfoundland and

See “About memory,” page 23

Remember Us?

H

ere we stand on the cusp of what will unquestionably be the least suspenseful, least dramatic and — unless Danny “The Unstoppable Force” Williams and Gerry “The Blunt Instrument” Reid decide to say shag the nasty battle of words and just start punching each other instead — least exciting election in this province’s history. Yes, in a few short weeks the PCs will ride their big, blue Hebron-fuelled machine right back into office, crushing the opposition and setting up another de

SEAN PANTING

State of the art facto Progressive Conservative dictatorship. But democracy being what it is, potential MHAs will still have to go through the motions, get out on the campaign trail and solicit votes from us. Last week, a whole forest of cam-

See “Taking a page,” page 23


22 • INDEPENDENTLIFE

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

‘I play the bouzouki, not the bazooka’ The Fables play Afghanistan twice before releasing latest album By Mandy Cook The Independent mongst the regular musical paraphernalia to be found around The Fables’ Billy Sutton’s downtown St. John’s home — a variety of guitars, bongo drums, amps and backstage passes to name a few — are two framed certificates issued by the Canadian military. Beneath Sutton’s name and the heading ‘Operation Athena’ is a message of appreciation for a performance for NATO soldiers in Afghanistan and his subsequent contribution to “morale and consequently aiding the mission.” Sutton, a Harbour Grace native and the self-proclaimed “musical mutt” of the group due to his multiple talents on the accordion, mandola, fiddle, drums, banjo and more, has two certificates — one from a trip in November 2006 and another from May of this year. When the opportunity arose to play in Kabul and Kandahar, the boys in the (mostly) traditional Celtic band knew it was something they wanted to do. “I think part of the reason we got this gig is because of the huge percentage of easterners that were on the last rotation,” says Sutton. “Most of them were from Ontario east. I saw more Newfoundlanders over there … it was pretty crazy.” Touring such exotic locales was just one of the events taking place in the run-up to the writing and releasing of The Fables’ latest and fourth album, Kings and Little Ones. Principle songwriter and Wonderful Grand Band alumnus Glenn Simmons says not only did they make the 17-hour trek to the war zone twice, they went through a couple of member lineup changes and decided to push their creative limits further than ever during the past 10 years the group has been together. “We ran out of traditional tunes to do because they’ve all been done many, many times,” Simmons says. “The resurgence of Celtic music has been going on a while now and it’s pretty difficult to find something that someone else hasn’t popularized in some form.” With nine original tracks out of 12 (eight by Simmons and one instrumental by Sutton), the band is determined to rely less on the Celtic

A

See “It’s military,” page 24


22 • INDEPENDENTLIFE

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

‘I play the bouzouki, not the bazooka’ The Fables play Afghanistan twice before releasing latest album By Mandy Cook The Independent

A

mongst the regular musical paraphernalia to be found around The Fables’ Billy Sutton’s downtown St. John’s home — a variety of guitars, bongo drums, amps and backstage passes to name a few — are two framed certificates issued by the Canadian military. Beneath Sutton’s name and the heading ‘Operation Athena’ is a message of appreciation for a performance for NATO soldiers in Afghanistan and his subsequent contribution to “morale and consequently aiding the mission.” Sutton, a Harbour Grace native and the self-proclaimed “musical mutt” of the group due to his multiple talents on the accordion, mandola, fiddle, drums, banjo and more, has two certificates — one from a trip in November 2006 and another from May of this year. When the opportunity arose to play in Kabul and Kandahar, the boys in the (mostly) traditional Celtic band knew it was something they wanted to do. “I think part of the reason we got this gig is because of the huge percentage of easterners that were on the last rotation,” says Sutton. “Most of them were from Ontario east. I saw more Newfoundlanders over there … it was pretty crazy.” Touring such exotic locales was just one of the events taking place in the run-up to the writing and releasing of The Fables’ latest and fourth album, Kings and Little Ones. Principle songwriter and Wonderful Grand Band alumnus Glenn Simmons says not only did they make the 17-hour trek to the war zone twice, they went through a couple of member lineup changes and decided to push their creative limits further than ever during the past 10 years the group has been together. “We ran out of traditional tunes to do because they’ve all been done many, many times,” Simmons says. “The resurgence of Celtic music has been going on a while now and it’s pretty difficult to find something that someone else hasn’t popularized in some form.” With nine original tracks out of 12 (eight by Simmons and one instrumental by Sutton), the band is determined to rely less on the Celtic See “It’s military,” page 24


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTLIFE • 23

Taking a page from Danny’s book From page 21 Labrador: The Blueprint for Development and Investment in Culture in 2006. It’s all right there on the provincial government’s website. At 55 pages it’s a fun — if slightly vague — read. Perhaps the most encouraging thing is it demonstrates an understanding of arts and culture as distinct from tourism. It also shows a general grasp of the big issues and acknowledges the vast economic and social importance of the cul-

‘About memory and grief’ From page 21 “They were like the boys I knew in school. I think there was a much broader acceptance then of what was the norm in young adult males. These guys would not have been thought of as juvenile delinquents the way they would today.” They’d be on Ritalin today, I say. Morgan laughs. “They probably would. I mean, I knew a lot of people pretty well in that spectrum, and most of them grew up to be decent human beings. There were a lot more employment opportunities for someone with a Grade 6 education back then … stocking shelves or driving a truck. There’s a whole segment of society now that has no place. And I really think that they’re used … these are the people who are used for wars.” Or as minimum-wage slaves at McDonalds, I say. “Another kind of war,” says Morgan. “An economic war, which controls the other war, of course: it’s all part of one war.” Morgan finally decided to leave her deserter under St. Mary’s by himself, and tell Shanawdithit’s story in the second part of the book. “I really wanted to avoid that noble savage thing: these people are human, just like us. I really hate that: the idea that any group is perfect, that there’s a ‘they’ and an ‘us.’” Morgan’s Beothuk are as cruel in their own way as the “Dogmen” (Europeans); they do, however, have a sacred bond with the land, and don’t war among themselves. There’s a lot of convincing native mythology in Cloud of Bone: Morgan tells me she read “a lot of (Joseph) Campbell’s stuff … and some of them (the myths) I just made up. Like Old Caribou. They must have had stories like that, but they haven’t been passed down to us.” It’s time to ask Morgan that idiotic question: what’s Cloud of Bone about? “What is it about? I don’t know … it’s about memory and grief. How we hide our memories, deny that things happen.” And how did Morgan manage to survive emotionally while she was writing the novel? I nearly didn’t survive reading it, I tell her. “It took a lot out of me. More than Random Passage, much more. Several times I told myself, ‘This is too hard, you can’t do this. You don’t have what it takes to write this book — give it to someone else who’s better equipped.’ (Laughs) Of course, I was in a time in my life where it was hard to be there (in the book), but it was hard to be in my life, too.” Which brings us to Judith Muir, the pivotal character of the third and final section of Cloud of Bone. An archeologist in her 60s, Muir is suddenly widowed when her husband is murdered in front of her. Muir’s grief is beautifully common and exquisitely idiosyncratic; she becomes old overnight, feels “heavier, less elastic, more encumbered when so much has fallen away.” Morgan herself was widowed several years ago after 47 years of marriage: did she tap into that experience to bring Muir to life? Morgan’s voice thickens; her eyes seem brighter behind the glasses. “I know now in retrospect I did tap into it,” she says, “because of my daughter Jennifer. We were going up to Halifax … I was supposed to say something about the book somewhere, and I said, ‘I don’t know what I’m going to say.’ Jennifer said, ‘It’s about mourning — aren’t you going to say anything about Dad?’ And I didn’t know; that was the first moment I knew, when she said that … I didn’t know it was my mourning.” It’s late. I’ve kept Morgan talking well past the hour I told her the interview would take. But she has so much to say, I’m loathe to part with her. She reminds me a little of Old One, Shanawdithit’s grandmother in the book — a woman who tells stories so the tribal memory won’t die. She offers me a ride home, but I decline. I drink a fourth cup of coffee from an oversized orange mug, watch pedestrians standing beside TD Place wait for the traffic light to change. “That damn building,” Morgan referred to it at one point in the conversation. It’s one of many things she went on the street to protest — none of which ever got cured or prevented. I guess if we can’t stop injustice and slaughter, the next best thing is to keep the memory of the victims alive. And Bernice Morgan is one dab hand at that. srendell@nf.sympatico.ca

tural sector. There’s a good deal of talk about improving the lot of artists, safeguarding our tangible and intangible cultural heritage and so forth. Obviously the fine folks over at the Department of Tourism, Culture and Recreation (Tom Hedderson, minister) asked a lot of questions and paid attention to the answers. All lovely as far as it goes, but what now? The report (which actually describes itself as a “sketch” as

opposed to a “final drawing”) devotes just one page to the subject of implementation, monitoring and review. Now that we have a government with a plan, it’s up to the rest of us to light a fire under them so things start happening. We all know how easy it is for issues to move to the backburner once the public consultation has been done and the reports written. It’s only fair to point out the Williams government has done the cultural sector

a lot of good up to now. Recent increases in funding for arts organizations have been a great start, but as nice as it is to see a bump in spending, we’re still a long way from where we can and should be. In a campaign that’s going to be all about oil revenue and constituency spending, it’s going to be more important than ever to keep reminding everyone about the government’s commitment to the arts in Newfoundland and Labrador.

What artists have to do now is take a page from the Danny Williams playbook and keep pushing for more instead of being satisfied with simply getting better than we used to get. This election might just be a chance to do that while the TV cameras roll, the microphones wave and the electorate looks on. Sean Panting is a writer, actor and musician living in St. John’s. His column returns Sept. 28.


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

24 • INDEPENDENTLIFE

‘It’s military morning, noon and night’ From page 22 repertoire and more so on their own creative instincts. But it is their toe-tapping, jig-inducing traditional musical base they say resonated most with the men and women in uniform overseas. After each performance (when maybe a handful of guys would get up and dance — difficult to do with the ever-present guns strapped to their backs) Sutton says hundreds of soldiers would line up to shake the musicians’ hands and thank them for the show. Tapping the table for emphasis, Sutton says “every one” of the serving men and women would say how much the music meant to them. But even more than the show, the soldiers seemed to most enjoy giving the musicians a tour of the base which served as their home for their half-a-year rotation. “You’ve got civilians hanging around,” says Simmons. “You’re there for six

months, it’s military morning, noon and night, you’re living it, that’s all you do, you see guys with uniforms on. Then all of a sudden a bunch of guys walk in with long hair: ‘Come in b’ys, come in!’” There were moments of uneasiness amongst the lighthearted ones, however. Upon landing at the Kabul airport in November 2006, the band was met with a warning by Romanian soldiers that there might be a suicide bomber on their route to the base. Warned to keep an eye out for a clean-shaven young man or boy dressed in his Sunday best (“they dress up to die because they’re going to meet Allah,” says Sutton), the band members were coached on how to use a disposable grenade launcher between the seats of their G-Wagon jeep. After a few sober moments, Sutton cracked a joke to break the tension. “I play a bouzouki, not a bazooka.” mandy.cook@theindependent.ca Glenn Simmons and Billy Sutton of The Fables.

Paul Daly/The Independent

Back to the drawing board MARK CALLANAN On the shelf The Architects Are Here, 372 pp Michael Winter. Viking Canada, 2007 hen a freak accident with a gas line blows out the windows of novelist Gabriel English’s apartment, driving a sun-drenched billboard advertising Cuba through his bed,” the dustcover synopsis of Michael Winter’s latest novel, The Architects Are Here, goes, “he is forced to come to terms with the

“W

disappearance of his enigmatic girlfriend, Nell.” And while this action-laden teaser is very much in keeping with the Robert Ludlum-esque cover of Winter’s fifth book, it is a bit misleading. The main body of the novel, you see, the part to which the above quoted promotional text alludes, actually begins on page 146: There was a concussion of air. It powdered itself through the gaps between the buttons of my shirt. Then the three tall windows of the café crinkled and shone and collapsed in a shower of wet ice. A wall of boom forced its way in, a buckling gulf of heat and wind. I point this out, not to criticize the

liberties taken by Viking’s blurb writers, but rather to show their clear-sightedness in perceiving this event as the ideal beginning of the narrative. Minus that awkward phrase, “A wall of boom forced its way in,” it would have made a riveting opening. Everything up to that point in Winter’s new novel is purely setup, a prologue rendered in the sedated (and sedating) tone of one who is not terribly interested in the back story he is telling but nonetheless insists on its importance. Therein we read of the boyhood of Gabriel and his friend David Twombly, the drowning death of David’s brother Zac, and their earliest connections with Gabriel’s present-day girlfriend, Nell. Nell, apparently, had an affair with

her college professor, David’s father Arthur, she got pregnant and then gave the resulting son up for adoption to the much-feared Hurley family. In the time since then, Gabriel moved to Toronto, reconnected with David and began seeing Nell. While much of this material is necessary to an understanding of the story, it would have been better meted out over the course of the book. Winter tends to explicate rather than demonstrate in this opening section — to tell rather than show — so eager is he to usher his readers toward the point at which the story proper begins (would that some sympathetic friend or editor had played Pound to Winter’s Eliot and slashed all the laboured explanation from the front of the book).

Having established and analyzed his characters’ personal histories, and explained their motivations all to pieces in this opening section, Winter plunges Gabriel and David into a comically charged road trip from Toronto to Newfoundland — they are going to visit David’s father who has been put in hospital by a member of the Hurley clan. This extended sequence is by far the best part of the book and involves, among other things, a chance encounter with the Prince of Wales, the grizzly death of a dog, and a banal but comically satisfying conversation about whiteheads. There is also, of course, the expected linguistic playfulness of Winter’s style (“Her name was Nell Tarkington, a name like a ptarmigan ringing a bell, a name full of innocence and foreboding. Death knells, and it also harkens.”) and his ability to make metaphoric leaps that reveal something of the essential nature of things. David’s mobile device, for instance, “felt like rubber, like a sex toy”; a whining refrigerator fan “made all the milk seem possessed by a fast and threatening thing. Automobiles and accidents and high insurance.” But these alone are not enough to salvage the book. Its overarching theme, that Gabriel’s generation marks the conclusion of an old world order, fails to unify the novel. “We had grown up in a time when we missed the major cultural events,” Gabriel writes. “We had the secondbest of things or the sequels to the classics […] This sounds trivial but it can affect the level of importance one gives the world.” And later: “Our generation will be the last, we think. And if not the last generation, then the last of the old generations.” For those readers titillated by the story behind the story, Winter has concocted a Facebook page detailing the writing of The Architects Are Here (a fact that has featured largely in the press). Think of it as the literary equivalent of a bonus features disc, the cast interviews and director’s commentary of a DVD release. But for those readers who place more weight on the finished product than on the process, Winter’s latest book is likely to disappoint; The Architects Are Here is more event than finished work, more news item than novel. Mark Callanan writes from St. John’s. His column returns Sept. 28.


INDEPENDENTSTYLE

FRIDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-20, 2007 — PAGE 25

Carbonear native Jessica Parsons models a classic knit sweater available at The Newfoundland Weavery in St. John’s for $215.

By Mandy Cook The Independent

T

he best thing about damp and blustery September days is undoing their ill-effects with a mug of hot tea and a fuzzy sweater with a tag in the back that says Made with Love by Grandma. Autumn is undeniably upon us, so now is the time to break out some fabulous fall knits to take the edge off winter’s coming chill. Luxuriate in a chunky wrap — this

Paul Daly/The Independent

Woolly weather Nan’s knitted sweaters still classic amidst new twists season’s hot-ticket item — or throw a classic cable-knit on over a pair of black leggings and high boots and

effortlessly look the part of a style maven. There’s nothing more fashionable

than dressing up and looking weatherready. Although Judy Anderson, manager

at Nonia on Water Street in St. John’s, says their typical fishermen-knit sweaters are “always popular” and keep their 200-plus knitters across the province — including one woman from Salvage who just retired after 67 years — plenty busy, Jaclyn Gruchy of Twisted Sisters Boutik, also on Water Street, says there is a demand for fashion-forward knits at her shop. According to Gruchy, this fall’s wool knits are longer and belted with See “Belts,” page 26


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

26 • INDEPENDENTSTYLE

Enjoying the fruits of your labour H

ome again, and it feels really nice. There is that freshness in the air that can only come from this island. This is my season. With my birthday only around the corner, I always liked the crispness of this time of year. Air conditioners are put away and I can always count on a good night’s sleep. That crispness in the air reminds me that it is time to preserve all that is around us and in the garden. Some of the best foods of the season are placed in the mason jars across this province to keep fresh-tasting foods through the winter. Food preservation has been around for as long as man has been in existence. Now, mind you, I am not sure that they were really making Bronto-jerky to keep them through the winter months but there is documentation that suggests the earliest cave dwellings had places near the fire pits where food could have been stored — an early form of Italian proscuitto, a dried,

NICHOLAS GARDNER

Off the Eating Path cured meat. For all you gardeners out there who have planted vegetables, this is the perfect opportunity to bring your bounty to the table through the harsh winter months when we could all use a good pick-me-up. Some of the easiest produce to grow, even in this harsh climate, are tomatoes. I know I go on and on about them but they are full of flavour and packed with nutrients. Who wouldn’t get excited over them? Roma (also known as plum) tomatoes work well for drying. You don’t need a commercial dehydrator which could cost hundreds of dollars — your kitchen oven does a good job. You need to set the oven on the lowest setting — about 100 C or 200 F. Cut

the roma tomatoes in half lengthwise and gently squeeze the seeds out. Place the cut tomatoes side up on a cookie rack, making sure they do not touch, and place the cookie rack in the oven. In about 6-12 hours you’ll have wonderful, fresh dehydrated tomatoes. Once dried, remove from the oven and allow to cool completely before storing in Ziploc bags. These will put more smiles on faces around the table than anything else over the winter. Use them in every thing from salads to soups, wherever tomatoes could be used. While Bronto-jerky seems a little farfetched, modern canning as we know it is actually still an old form of preservation. Nicolas Appert (1749-1841), a Frenchman, is credited with being the father of modern preserving, creating the modern canning method using a glass jar sealed with wax and tied securely with wire. Modern canning uses a little more sophisticated series of screw tops and

caps to keep your bounty fresh for the winter months. Light, heat and air are bug bears to the good preservative. Starve bacteria of one or more and there is no chance of the little critters multiplying. Another good way to keep the freshness of summer is freezing. While it is not as desirable an option for some people, it is a good way to preserve red berries and other firm fruits. Red fruits like strawberries and raspberries, as well as cranberries, blueberries and partridgeberries, stand up to freezer storage. When the fruit is ready after being washed and fully dried, spread the fruit onto a cookie sheet and place in the freezer until solid, making sure the fruit does not touch. In the business, this is called IQF or individually quick frozen. Once frozen, remove from the tray and bag in large Ziploc bags. The frozen fruit will then not stick together in great lumps. IQF freezing is fantastic if you are interested in making breakfast smoothies. With the fruit already frozen, there

is no need to add ice for that creamy texture. Here is my favorite: • 1 ripe banana, sliced • 1 handful of IQF blueberries • 3-4 IQF strawberries • 1 cup orange juice • 1/2 tsp sugar Place ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. Pour into a glass and serve with a few frozen blueberries over the top. It is the perfect start to a new day. These are some of the easier techniques for preserving fresh summer foods. Try them. It only takes a little while to do and you’ll enjoy the fruits of your labour all the rest of the year. Nicholas Gardner is a freelance writer and erstwhile chef living in St. John’s. nicholas.gardner@gmail.com

Belts: thin is in From page 25 some kind of tie around them but in a looser cut than seasons past. Unlike the recent wide-belt craze resurrected from the outlandish ’80s, when it comes to belts this autumn, thin is in. But the width of the belt is not the only change. Gruchy recommends belting sweaters higher up on the body, just below the bust for a more flattering Empire silhouette. She also says the knits in her store are roomier in general, stemming from the stillhot skinny jean. “Tops have been fitted for quite a while, but not everyone wants to be in a unitard,” she says. “Because the slim pant cut is in, people want something looser on top.” Gruchy thinks a black, cowl-neck cardigan that ties at the waist and goes down past the bum will be popular, as well as a knee-length, boiledwool jacket trimmed in leather with a Japanese neckline. Wool plaid allwinter coats are due to arrive in the next couple of weeks, as well as more tops.

“Because the slim pant cut is in, people want something looser on top.” Jaclyn Gruchy

But if none of the above appeals and you’re more of a D.I.Y-er, (do-ityourselfer) you can whip up your own warm woolies with a little help from The Knit Wit Café, held at the Anna Templeton Centre on Duckworth Street the last Sunday of every month. Executive director Beverly Barbour says handmade knits are enjoying a resurgence lately, and the café is meant for anyone of any level to come by the centre, have a coffee and cookie and settle in for a rousing stitch and bitch. She says it’s an exciting time to learn to knit because of the variety of wool colours and textures now available to the new knitter. Barbour says the café idea came from a neglect of her own knitting and therefore she wanted to set aside time to sit down and focus on her craft. She says her mother made a sweater for each of her five children every year and passed the tradition on to her. When Barbour first met her husband, she knit him a round-necked, steel-grey coloured sweater in three weeks. “It must have been love,” she laughs. “And then he lost it on a camping trip.” mandy.cook@theindependent.ca


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTSTYLE • 27

When bullies cross the line T

here are bullies everywhere, even in quaint little outports like mine. Some bullies are shamefully sly, like the fella who has placed homemade — and very dangerous — spike strips down around our berry hills. I guess he is hoping to deter the community children from zipping around otherwise usually abandoned hills on their dirt bikes. Not sure why this coward can’t place a phone call to a parent instead of actively trying to maim our children, but I guess he has his reasons. Perhaps the noise bothers him. God knows the delighted squeals of children can get annoying from time to time. He just better hope that he removes every damn one he has left around before I discover his identity. Surely the materials he uses to construct such weapons can’t be that hard to trace, and I will find out eventually. Rest assured I, and mothers like me, won’t take such covert aggressions lightly. Other bullies are more direct in their actions, but just as cowardly in their silence. “Someone” called the police the other day on one young fella who was out riding his dirt bike. This young boy was riding solo this particular day, so such actions seem somewhat targeted and mean-spirited. The police were given questionable information — the child was hurting no one in particular — and the officer did nothing about the situation besides performing a drivethrough and chatting up a few folks. Now before you get all huffy and self-righteous on me, I know what is legal and what isn’t. A representative from our local Royal Newfoundland Constabulary informed me that it is illegal for a child under the age of 16 to be riding any motorized bike or quad if it is over 100 cc. My son’s is 80 cc. For him to legally drive, he would have to be between the ages of 14 and 16. Interesting, considering my 10-year-old has out-grown his 80 and we are now in the market for a 125. We will be getting him one. While it is technically illegal for the kids to be on these things, the reality is

PAM PARDY GHENT

Seven-day talk many do have them, and the kids I see on them around here handle them respectfully and responsibly. No, I am not living in blissful denial. I am as, or more, observant than any parent out here. I have knowingly, and unknowingly, followed behind the kids as they ride. I have observed them from all the windows of my home as they zoom around the trails. I have walked the hills with my pooch so I can observe them on high and, besides the scatter death-defying wheelie or two that a few of them insist on performing, they are good, responsible children. Now, understand where we live. We are in a traditional outport community. We have one local store. There are no snack bars, no games arcades, and no hangouts besides the ones the boys construct themselves. The same road that leads in leads out, so the only traffic we see belongs here and the drivers are familiar with our youth and their habits. While we have no formal activities for our youth, we also have no crime or vandalism. The only thing the kids spray-paint out here are rocks, and the worst thing that happened here this past summer was a picnic table broke under the weight of a few too many children after it was moved near the basketball courts one too many times. Someone called the cops that time, too. Delinquents? Not likely. Maybe some of the folks who silently plot and scheme against our evil youth need to live for a week or two in some other province, or even another area of Newfoundland and Labrador. Some time spent in a place where their petty complaints might be deserving just might give them the validation they seem to be seeking. If “they” (and someone knows who “they” are) were really concerned about our outport children “they” would do

something constructive instead of destructive. Why not start up a youth group, or some other community program? If you have the time to build an arsenal of spike strips, then surely they can construct a path the kids could ride on. If you have time to phone the police and complain about the actions of active children, then why not make time to raise funds for sporting equipment. Funny how I (and the parents of these other bad, nasty, seemingly evil children) are the ones who head up the Sunday school and confirmation programs and hold the only other events around here for families and their children. Some of the complainers are old, while others are young with small children of their own. To the older folks: you will have older grandchildren soon. To those younger parents: your time will come. I hold one of those spike strips in my hand today as I dial the number of the local RCMP with my other. It seems the police are more passionate about a potentially deadly device being placed in a public area than they are about a few kids enjoying the great outdoors on a motorized vehicle — as long as they are being safe and causing no harm, of course. Spikes strips are criminal. Go figure. I will see this through, rest assured, and my child — and the others I care about so dearly — will be safe in this community. They will ride their bikes responsibly and safely around the hills of the harbour and they will not be fearful of landing face first on some homemade, nail-ridden device some idiot evilly crafted in their shed. These outport boys will remain outport boys and do the things they were meant to do until they leave on their own to go to school or find work. Perhaps they will have such fond memories of growing up here that they will return one day to raise their own children — if we are lucky. pamelamichpardy@yahoo.com


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

28 • INDEPENDENTSTYLE

EVENTS

Submit your events to Kayla Email: kayla.joy@theindependent.ca Phone: (709) 726-INDY (4639) Fax: (709) 726-8499

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 • Bridget Mulrooney Memorial Golf Tournament, in aid of the Children’s Wish Foundation, The Wilds, Salmonier Line, 2 p.m. • Allison Crowe and Les Trois Femmes, Corner Brook Arts and Culture Centre, 8 p.m. • Garland House: The Second, Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 8 p.m., 1-888-4643377. • Painting in the Garden, Art Group Exhibition, MUN Botanical Garden, Mt. Scio Road, 722-4278, until Sept. 23. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 • Walk for Life and Family Fun Day, presented by the Right to Life Association, Legion Hall, The Boulevard, Quidi Vidi Lake, St. John’s, 579-1500. • Big Land Fair, annual fall harvest festival, E.J. Broomfield Memorial Arena, Happy Valley-Goose Bay. • Musicians 4 Musicians benefit concert, D.F. Cook Recital Hall, MUN School of Music, St, John’s, 8 p.m. • Finding a Publisher and Writing from Life/Writing from Your Experience, workshops by Paul Butler, HB Creativity, 155 Water Street, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., and 2-5 p.m., 753-7740, www.writingworkshops.ca. • Jewel, 2 p.m., and Nobleman’s Wedding, 8 p.m., Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 1-888-464-3377. • Club Championship Competition, in aid of the Children’s Wish Foundation, with the competitors from Targa Newfoundland, 9 a.m., Confederation Building parking lot, St. John’s. Purchase a ride through the course in a

Targa or Club car from 1-4 p.m. • Community Shred, bring all unwanted personal documents for a free shred by a Shred-it mobile shredding truck, Coleman’s parking lot, Centennial Square, Mt. Pearl, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 • Family Fun Day, entertainment, barbecue, and fun for the whole family, Bowering Park, St. John’s, 1-4 p.m., 754-1399. • A Tidy Package, 2 p.m., and Garland House: The Second, 8 p.m., Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 1-888-464-3377. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 • Self Discovery Through Journaling, 693-1624, www.lifeonfire.ca. • Terese’s Creed and Judge Prowse Presiding, 8 p.m., Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 1-888-464-3377. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 • TD Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup, join 40,000 Canadians to remove harmful debris from local shorelines, 1-877-427-2422. • Affinity Group Process, 10-week process to help release emotional blockages and fears and connect to love and acceptance, www.lifeonfire.ca, 6931624. • A Tidy Package, 8 p.m., and A Time by Harbour, 9:30 p.m., Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 1-888-464-3377. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 • Reading by Tina Chaulk, author of This Much is True, A.C. Hunter Adult Library, St. John’s, 7 p.m. • Judge Prowse Presiding, 2 p.m., and

Michael Winter’s new novel, The Architects are Here, released Sept. 8 by Viking Canada, was recently reviewed in The Globe and Mail. Paul Daly/The Independent

Garland house: The Second, 8 p.m., Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 1-888-4643377. • Creative Writing for Beginners, fun practical workshop with Paul Butler, 155 Water St., Suite 304, St. John’s, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., 737-7740, info@writingworkships.ca.

• Book launch, The Flannigans, by M.T. Dohoney, Chapters, Kenmount Road, St. John’s, 7-9 p.m. • General meeting for The League of Artists of Western Newfoundland, Seminar Room of the Fine Arts building, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, Corner Brook, room FA 223, 7:30 p.m., refreshments will be served, current and new members welcome. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 • Mapping the Crossroads, six-week course with a life coach and supportive teams to reach goals and dreams, www.lifeonfire.ca, 693-1624. • Nobleman’s Wedding, Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 8:30 p.m., 1-888-4643377. • The Business of Writing, what you need to know as a writer-entrepreneur, with Maura Hanrahan, 155 Water St., Suite 304, St. John’s, 7-9 p.m., 7377740, info@writingworkships.ca. • In aid of the Alzheimer Society host a Coffee Break when donations from every cup of coffee poured will benefit the local Alzheimer Society’s programs and services, 576-0608. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 • Judge Prowse Presiding, 2 p.m., A Tidy Package, 8 p.m., and Nobleman’s Wedding, 9:30 p.m., Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 1-888-464-3377. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 • Newfoundland Equestrian Association provincial horse show, St. John’s, 726-0826, free admission, until Sept. 23. • Eyes Across the Province: Newfoundland and Labrador’s Invasive Alien Species, workshop, MUN Botanical Garden, Mt. Scio Road, St. John’s, registration required, 737-8590. The Fables, St. John’s Arts and Culture Centre. • Jewel, 2 p.m., So, Let’s Bring on our Favourite: The Joan Morrissey Story, 8 p.m., and Comedy Night, 10:30 p.m., Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 1-888-4643377. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 • AIDS Walk for Life, Quidi Vidi Lake, St. John’s, Sept. 23.

• Jewel, Rising Tide Theatre, Trinity, 8 p.m., 1-888-464-3377. UPCOMING EVENTS • Tai Chi Chih Joy Thru Movement classes for beginners and advanced with daytime and evening options in the St. John’s area, contact Sheila, 579-7863, www.envision.ca/webs/taichichihnl, starting Sept. 24. • The Fables, Gander Arts and Culture Centre, Sept. 24, Gordon Pinsent Centre for the Arts, Grand FallsWindsor, Sept. 25, Labrador West Arts and Culture Centre, Sept. 27, Corner Brook Arts and Culture Centre, Sept. 28, Stephenville Arts and Culture Centre, Sept. 29. • Book launch and celebration of publication by Bernice Morgan, author of Cloud of Bone, Bianca’s, 171 Water St., St. John’s, 6-8 p.m. • Evening with Margaret Trudeau in recognition of Mental Illness Awareness Week, Trudeau will share her personal story of recovery, The Fairmont, St. John’s, Oct. 1. • Reign: YC 2007, annual youth convention featuring renowned music guests, speakers, and other entertainers, Mile One Centre, St. John’s, Oct. 5-7, registration required, www.ycnewfoundland.org. • CLB Band Reunion, CLB Armoury, Harvey Road, St. John’s, Oct. 11, 7475701 or 579-4800. • The Alzheimer Society’s first annual Halloween Gala, sponsored by Sun Life Financial, to purchase tickets call 576-0608, Alzheimer_eventsplanner@nf.aibn.com. • St. Michael’s Printshop invites submissions from printmakers to apply for a one-month residency at St. Michael’s Printshop, 72 Harbour Dr., St. John’s, application deadline Oct. 31. ONGOING: • Easter Seals seeking clothes donations, including overalls, rubber boots, fleece jackets, pajama bottoms and tops, wigs, mannequins, and canes, and volunteers over 16 years of age for Harbour Haunt 2007, contact Amanda, 754-1399, or apply at www.easterseals.nf.ca. • All ’Round the Circle dinner theatre, The Collonade, 6 East Dr., Pleasantville, every Wednesday – Friday, 690-9929. • The Rooms, St. John’s, free admission Wednesday nights, 6-9 p.m., www.therooms.ca. • Gros Morne Theatre Festival, Main Street, Cow Head, until Sept. 15, 1-877243-2899, www.theatrenewfoundland.com. • Occupied St. John’s (book), wartime St. John’s oral history project, sponsored by the Paul Johnson Family Foundation, interviewees needed, contact 747-4113, or e-mail k_ohare@alcor.concordia.ca. IN THE GALLERIES: • Brian Jungen’s Vienna, giant sculpture in the form of a pristine whale skeleton suspended from the gallery’s cathedral ceiling, The Rooms, St. John’s, until Sept. 16. • Finest Kind: Objects of Identity, sampling display of Newfoundland’s stories of nationhood, World War I, and life on the land and sea through artifacts, artwork, images and documents, The Rooms, level 2, St. John’s, until Sept. 16. • Natural Energies by Anne Meredith Barry (1931–2003), including 90 works created since 1982, The Rooms, St. John’s, until Sept. 30. • The Will and Greg Show, new work by William Gill and Greg Bennett, opening 3 p.m. Sept. 8, Leyton Gallery of Fine Art, St. John’s, runs until Sept 29. • Defiant Beauty: William Hind in the Labrador Peninsula, The Rooms, St. John’s, opening Friday, Sept. 14, 8 p.m., on display until Nov. 10.


SEPTEMBER 14-20, 2007

What’s new in the automotive industry

FEATURED VEHICLE

2008 NISSAN VERSA. THE BEST NEVER LOOKED BETTER Enjoy the best of everything. Like the roomiest interior in its class, including the most rear leg and knee room. The confidence of the most powerful engine, while still logging up to 6.0 L/100km and 47 mpg. Go up to 833 kilometres between fill-ups. Play for keeps with 160,000 kilometres before needing a tuneup. The effortless wave of power that Xtronic CVTtm transmission delivers. The security of six standard airbags. The convenience of an auxiliary input for your iPod and Bluetooth hands-free technology for your phone. All wrapped up in a stylish choice of four doors or five.You’ll find Versa’s horsepower (122) and torque (127) deliver exhilarating performance along with inspiring fuel economy. It’s your lucky day. You can find the 2008 Nissan Versa at 238 Topsail Rd., St. John’s. Nicholas Langor/The Independent

‘Two-bay garage with three Baymen’ friend of mine (a girl who work. I, on the other hand, am a Bayman knows a lot more about cars and I needs horsepower.” than I do) kept me in mind durNeedless to say, I was in the fits ing a particularly hilarious laughing and grateful for her conversation and recollected keeping me in mind. It was a the event for me at the first brilliant observation and so opportunity. I was saving this funny on so many levels. I piece for the right occasion — didn’t want to open that partoday’s your lucky day. ticular can of worms and It was a staff luncheon with throw myself into the great a good mix of people, brought divide by using the “B” word, together by the common but remember — it’s the right thread of employment. One of occasion. The boy was right, MARK the guys in the group was condowntown is a hard place to WOOD sidering buying a car, as he raise a car. For the most part was without. Another young WOODY’S you’re parked right out on the buck was offering his vehicuThere are skeets out WHEELS street. lar experience and observathere breaking into cars, stealtions with great insight and ing them, and even spray candor. “You live downtown (St. John’s) painting crap on them. Try that someand got yer tofu and yer merlot. You where outside the city limits and you’ll should get something small and eco- be looking up at a team of doctors pournomical for scootin’ back and forth to ing over an X-ray of the size-11 boot

A

stuck in your arse. The fact that there’s an “895” area code, phone number, and the name Squires written in pen on the side of the boot won’t help you much either. It’s all part of the Great Divide. I know it’s unfair to generalize, but it’s a lot of fun to read about and, while I’m not an expert, as a columnist I get paid like one, so I’m just going to throw it all out there. There are city people who know how to work on cars — perhaps at least a dozen or more — but that’s about it. The bulk of the talent is imported. I fondly recollect a long gone service station on Freshwater Road called J.J.’s Gulf. You may not understand the term “service station”; it was an establishment that could refuel and repair your car. These days you refuel at a pizza shop or convenience store. J.J.’s had a sign out in front with a sense of humour — “Two-bay garage with

three Baymen.” God love him for speaking the truth. It’s a geographic anomaly that mechanical skills are nurtured beyond the fringe. Close to the trip-wire though — especially on the northeast Avalon — the ratio of “haves and have-nots” in terms of skills is dwindling due to the “gentrification” of scenic neighbourhoods. Gentrification is a polite term used to describe when a “knob” moves in next door and complains about the smoke from your fire pit. The term “knob” is closely related to the previously mentioned boot and X-ray episode. There is a solution for the term “Bayman,” though, as some would mistakenly take offense. I propose to replace and elevate it with the grand title of Outport Supremist, which kind of shoots down the whole, low-humoured Townie-versus-Baymen game. What we now have would be The Cultural and Financial

Epicenter versus Outport Supremacy. Fine, but who’s going to work on your car? You got your tofu and your merlot and probably an X-ray of a boot. If you look closely at the X-ray you’ll notice the ancient boot is laced halfway up, double-wrapped around the ankle and locked with a reef knot. A code of sorts — much the same as freemasons — and rife with symbolism. This is tied only once and will last the boot’s entire lifespan. The half-lace, double-wrap boot slips on quick, holds on tight in the woods, but releases easily when firmly planted in defense. Mark Wood of Portugal Cove-St. Philip’s has copyrighted the term Outport Supremist, which may not be reprinted (especially on T-shirts) or used in audio reproduction without prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted under section: 895-boot/X-ray.


30 • INDEPENDENTSHIFT

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

MINI CROP

A promotional installation of Mini cars that were stuck into a pile of sand is seen outside the fair grounds of the Frankfurt International Motor Show Sept. 12. After two days for the media and analysts, the Frankfurt motorshow will be open to the public Sept. 13-23. Green technology and lower fuel consumption will be a big theme at the largest and most prestigious auto show in the world this year. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay

Mercedes to sell fuel-cell cars Torstar wire service FRANKFURT ercedes-Benz will begin serial production within three years of a small car powered by a hydrogen fuel cell, the premium brand of DaimlerChrysler says. “The small-scale series production of the B-Class F-Cell will begin in early 2010,” the carmaker said in a statement at the Frankfurt International Motor Show. “The engine for this innovative vehicle will be a new generation of fuel-cell engine that is much more compact and yet at the same time more powerful and completely practicable for everyday use.” It did not say how much the car will cost or how many it intended to sell. Fuel cells use the interaction between hydrogen and oxygen to generate electricity that powers the car while emitting only water. They have not yet become commercially viable because of their high cost and limited durability. The new B-Class car’s electric engine will generate top output of 136 horsepower and perform on par with a two-litre petrol engine, the company said. It will consume the equivalent of 2.9 litres of diesel fuel per 100 kilometres driven.

M


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

INDEPENDENTSHIFT • 31

It’s futile Lamborghini rolls out million-dollar car to fight the family W pack rat By Gilles Castonguay Toronto Star wire service FRANKFURT

n 1985, I got one of the first Dodge minivans. It had no seats in the back and no windows, and as anyone who owns a pickup or van knows, for one LORRAINE day a month ownSOMMERFELD ing such a vehicle makes you the most popular person in your circle of friends and near-friends. Because you are reluctant to just hand over the keys to your baby, you end up donating not just the transport but also your own moving services. Somehow, being recompensed with all the beer and pizza you want is seen as a fair trade.

I

POWER SHIFT

LITTLE RAMCHICKEN The little Ramchicken, as we called it (my father had a full sized Ramcharger), was beyond handy. Its cargo space could haul a dorm room worth of furniture, and anything IKEA carried. But the biggest test of its usefulness was at the cottage. At home, my father was governed by municipal rules. You are only allowed to pile your “collectibles” to a certain point before the neighbours call the authorities. At the cottage, however, no such restraints could hold him. As he mastered the term “you never know when you might need this,” we watched a growing pile of scrap metal, rubber tires, storm windows, concrete blocks, rusted wheelbarrows and shingles become part of the view. Back in the days when you got rid of your garbage at the dump, my father would get out to fling a bag of refuse on our way home and we kids would hold our noses and squeal as loud as the seagulls. But it always took him 10 extra minutes, as my mother yelled at him to quit shopping and get in the car. He had so much junk he no longer even knew what he had. So without him knowing and with the aid of the Ramchicken, a few of us spent a summer making runs to the dump. We hauled tires out of the bush (they were being saved for a dock — let me know the next time you see a 20-foot dock with 37 tires around it for boat bumpers), rounded up rusty pipe, and

At home, my father was governed by municipal rules. You are only allowed to pile your “collectibles” to a certain point before the neighbours call the authorities. loaded up old boards. We crammed that little van full over and over, and watched nature reclaim her glory. The Dump Master helped us unload, and gladly accepted our money. My mother spent most of her time inside the cottage, but even she began to see an improvement of her surroundings. After a couple of weekends of furtive trips, my Dad started to ask what we were doing. I explained that we were cleaning up 20 years worth of junk, and that if he could name anything that was missing, I would buy him a new one. Smug in my belief that he collected out of whim rather than need, he stayed quiet. LONG SUMMER It was a long summer; by fall, we’d made a dent, but I’d underestimated just how much stuff had ensconced itself in the forest. I had dreams of larger trucks, open pickups and trailers. My obsessive need to dispose seemed as strong as my father’s need to accumulate. In the final run of the year, I backed the van up to the dump gates. Dump Master chuckled and asked if I’d given up yet. I looked at him quizzically. It seems my father had been paying him all along to put the stuff we brought off to the side, where my father would come up with his Ramcharger the following weekend and reclaim it. www.lorraineonline.ca

hat’s the price of exclusivity? If you ask Lamborghini, one million euros ($1.4 million U.S.) should do it – before tax, of course. In a bid to add more prestige to what it already has, the Italian maker of the super luxury sports car unveiled the Reventon at Frankfurt’s international auto show, a very limited edition car that looks more like an arrow than anything on four wheels. With the seven-figure price tag, it is the most expensive car that it has ever built. Needless to say, Lamborghini has already sold the 20 cars that it plans to build. “As soon as the word got out, we sold out in four days,” chief executive Stephan Winkelmann says, adding that they could have easily sold another 20.

Most of the buyers were men from the United States, Lamborghini’s biggest market, he says. Some of them are already owners of a Lamborghini, which competes with the likes of Ferrari in speed and exclusivity. “We have among our customers movie stars, sports stars... (but) the majority of our clients are businessmen. Men. Lovers of luxury goods,” says Winkelmann. True to its tradition of cultivating an aggressive image, Lamborghini named the car after a bull that killed matador Felix Guzman in 1943. Although it is based on its Murcielago LP640 model, Lamborghini’s engineers took inspiration from a fighter jet and reworked the composite carbon fibre body to accentuate the sleekness and angular edges usually associated with its cars. The engine is the same as the LP640: a 12-cylinder rocket that can propel the car from zero to 100 km/h in 3.4 sec-

Stephan Winkelmann, chief executive and president of Italian carmaker Lamborghini, presents the new Reventon in Frankfurt September 10, 2007. Alex Grimm/Reuters

onds. By comparison, the coupe version of the LP640 costs a relatively more modest 219,600 euros. Lamborghini, which is run by Volkswagen’s Audi division, will start

making the Reventon in January and deliver them in October. The car, which came in an opaque grey at the autoshow, has a three-year warranty.


32 • INDEPENDENTFUN

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

WEEKLY DIVERSIONS ACROSS 1 Moncton summer time 4 Man who took a ribbing? 8 Peter Robertson’s invention: socket-head ___ 13 Niagara Falls craft: ___ of the Mist 17 Constrictor 18 Lone 19 Wipe out 20 Unbleached colour 21 Convert into code 23 Hatching places 24 Harsh 25 Inkling 26 Penny-pinching 28 Stratas of opera 30 Many times 32 Rough cabin 33 French military cap 34 In addition to 35 Do to do, to Donizetti 36 “Fruit Stand Capital of Canada” (B.C.) 40 Ont. capital 41 Treaty that ended War of 1812 42 Canadian crooner with Sinatra voice 43 Pretend 44 Able to perceive 46 May 8th, 1945 47 Alaskan island

48 Use hip boots, perhaps 49 Chocolate substitute 50 In ___ daylight 51 Moans 54 Markdown events 55 Like fashionistas 56 Nail-biting, e.g. 57 Life-boat lowering device 58 Gator’s cousin 59 Port of Yemen 60 Angered 61 Earl Grey container (2 wds.) 65 “O Canada! Terre de ___ aïeux” 66 Yielded 67 Paw prints 68 State of seeing red 69 Bulge in a blood vessel 71 Castle, for some 72 Midge 73 Football kick 74 Make baby food 75 Finland to Finns 76 Coiffure 79 “The ___ Café” (with Stuart McLean) 80 Needless bustle 81 Italian river 82 Reclining 84 Co-founder of National Ballet School 88 Flaky mineral

CHUCKLE BROS

89 Italian poet Alighieri 90 Poetic valley 91 Italian one 92 German river 93 Wild animal’s trail 94 Old washstand item 95 Dreamer’s letters DOWN 1 Canadian chess grandmaster: ___ Yanofsky (19252000) 2 Ferguson of “Air Farce” 3 Inclined to silence 4 Quaker in a grove 5 Qatar’s capital 6 Schooner serving 7 Retailer 8 Ontario First Nation 9 Fright movie sound 10 Coarse file 11 East in l’Estrie 12 Like the prevailing winds 13 Migraine 14 Land unit 15 Bearded flower 16 Lower house of Russian parliament 22 Mid-month, once 27 Stop 29 Fencing piece 30 Makes a pick 31 Pan of sea ice 32 Public spat

33 Skewer of meat & veggies 35 Loses hair 36 Acclaim 37 Founder of a Canadian retail institution 38 Group of eight 39 Get ready for an exam 41 Edouard Beaupré of Willow Bunch (1881-1904) 42 Quartier Latin topper 45 Two 46 Legitimate 47 Betel nut tree 49 Gave in 50 Hero of War of 1812, who was buried 4 times 51 Togo’s neighbour 52 Bad basement gas 53 Really rotund 54 City of witchcraft trials (1692) 55 Barely detectable amount 57 Acted, in Biblical style 58 Discontinue 60 Alta. town with museum of old vehicles 61 Sweetheart (2 wds.) 62 T. rex, e.g. 63 Small drink of liquor 64 Asian Bigfoot 66 Disgusting gunk 67 Conservative 70 Turmoil

71 Need for food 72 Do like a geyser 74 Piebald horse 75 Building manager 76 Cured pork

77 Coloratura piece 78 Machu Picchu builders 79 Italian wine 80 Rank and ___ 83 Shrill bark

85 The long arm of the ___ 86 Wind dir. 87 Male turkey Solutions page 34

Brian and Ron Boychuk

WEEKLY STARS ARIES (MAR. 21 TO APRIL 19) After much travelling this year, you’re due for some settled time with family and friends. Use this period to check out situations that will soon require a lot of serious decision making. TAURUS (APRIL 20 TO MAY 20) Keep that keen bovine mind focused on your financial situation as it begins to undergo some changes. Consider your money moves carefully. Avoid impulsive investments. GEMINI (MAY 21 TO JUNE 20) You’ll need to adjust some of your financial plans now that things are changing more quickly than you expected. All the facts you need haven’t yet emerged, so move cautiously. CANCER

(JUNE 21 TO JULY 22) Personal and professional relationships dominate this period. Try to keep things uncomplicated to avoid misunderstandings that can cause problems down the line. LEO (JULY 23 TO AUG. 22) That elusive goal you’d been hoping to claim is still just out of reach. But something else has come along that could prove just as desirable, if only you would take the time to check it out. VIRGO (AUG. 23 TO SEPT. 22) This is a good time to get away for some much needed rest and relaxation. You’ll return refreshed and ready to take on the workplace challenge that awaits you. LIBRA (SEPT. 23 TO OCT. 22) Confidence grows as you work your

way through some knotty situations. Watch out for distractions from well-meaning supporters that could slow things down. SCORPIO (OCT. 23 TO NOV. 21) Consider spending more time contemplating the possibilities of an offer before opting to accept or reject it. But once you make a decision, act on it. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22 TO DEC. 21) You’re in a very strong position this week to tie up loose ends in as many areas as possible. Someone close to you has advice you might want to heed. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22 TO JAN. 19) Congratulations. This is the week you’ve been waiting for: After a period of sudden stops and fitful starts, your plans can now move

ahead with no significant disruptions. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20 TO FEB. 18) You’re in an exceptionally strong position this week to make decisions on many still-unresolved matters, especially those involving close personal relationships. PISCES (FEB. 19 TO MAR. 20) The new moon starts this week off with some positive movement in several areas. A special person becomes a partner in at least one of the major plans you’ll be working on. BORN THIS WEEK You work hard and get things done. You also inspire others to do their best. You would do well heading up a major corporation. (c) 2007 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Fill in the grid so that each row of nine squares, each column of nine and each section of nine (three squares by three) contains the numbers 1 through 9 in any order. There is only one solution to each puzzle. Solutions, tips and computer program available at www.sudoko.com SOLUTION ON PAGE 34


INDEPENDENTSPORTS

FRIDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-20, 2007 — PAGE 33

By Brian Callahan The Independent erry Ryan is nothing if not a realist. At age 30, and in arguably his best shape in a decade, he was offered a minor pro-hockey contract for this season, but turned it down. That’s ice hockey, by the way. Not ball hockey or in-line — not that there’s anything wrong with those sports. OK, so the contract was with the Dayton (Ohio) Bombers of the East Coast Hockey League and no, there were no guarantees of a callup to The Show with Columbus. But tempting? You better believe it. “Hey, it felt really, really good to be sought after again, ya know?” Ryan tells The Independent at his Mount Pearl home where there are two predominant shrines — one to the Montreal Canadiens and the other to The Beatles. “They can only take so many veterans … but they said they wanted to fax me the contract and sign it.” Common sense told Ryan — a sniper first, tough guy second — to ponder the fork in the road and take the one less travelled. And make no mistake: the 10kilometre dirt road to the First Nations reserve of Horse Lake in northern Alberta most certainly falls into the latter category. Ryan has agreed to play hockey this season with the Horse Lake Thunder, a team with a legitimate shot at an Allan Cup national senior hockey title. This also happens to be the 100th anniversary of the Allan Cup, with the champions moving on to the worlds in Europe. TSN is planning coverage of both. A myriad of issues factored into Ryan’s decision to go west — money, of course, being chief among them. He gave notice and quit his job recently as a local rep and distributor for the Red Bull energy drink, and flew to Calgary Sept. 12. “Hey, if I was 38 I’d be going to Alberta looking for a labour job like everybody else. But I’m going up to play hockey, to do what I love to do and make money at it,” says Ryan, adding he’s not permitted to divulge actual dollar figures. “But I can tell you I’ll be set up with a job making triple what I was making here … and I’ll also be doing what I really want to be doing — playing hockey again, in front of big crowds, and for money. “If I’m going to play, I want to have fun doing it. And playing for the (Mount Pearl) Blades the last two years didn’t do it. Don’t get me wrong — first and foremost, I want to play. I’ll play till my foot falls off. But with 40 fans in the stands, it was really hard to get into it. I know guys playing in Horse Lake, and I know we’ll be skating out to a packed rink — a $20-million rink. “It’ll be a rush.” Ryan, this province’s highest NHL draft pick (eighth overall to Montreal in 1995) was winning scoring titles in the Avalon East league, and always up for a good tilt. A three-minute bout between Ryan and former NHL enforcer and Deer Lake native Darren Langdon brought the house down in Corner Brook a few years ago. But questions persist about Ryan’s left ankle, which was also a key factor in choosing Horse Lake over Dayton. “You know, I could probably have done a full season (in the ECHL), but it’s a lot of games … 80 or something with playoffs,” he says, noting the ankle held

T

Terry Ryan with just some of his memorabilia at his home in Mount Pearl.

Paul Daly/The Independent

Defining Ryan Former NHLer Terry Ryan passes up minor-league contract to play for First Nations reserve in northern Alberta and shot at Allan Cup; will play till his foot ‘falls off’ up fine in local senior play. “The biggest thing in pro was three games in three nights. I did that in Orlando. Then I’d take a shot of cortisone and would almost be on crutches the next day.” The high ankle sprain doesn’t bother him in ball hockey or the in-line game, he says. “It’s only when I put on the skate. I’ve got to do a 90-minute prep on my ankle before a game. I’ve come to find out how to tape it … I use special pads, and the skate is altered, too.” That often means getting to the rink at about 3 p.m. for a seven o’clock game. “So I know how to prep it. But hey, if anything ever happens (in Alberta), too bad and I gotta come home.” Ryan says he expects to play a total of 50-60 games with Horse Lake, where the average age is 32 and there’s one trainer for every four players. That number of games includes Allan Cup playoffs, “and I’d be really disappointed if we didn’t get there (Brampton, Ont.).” Ryan says there’s a possibility the team won’t win, but he’s not secondguessing his decision. “I could go to Dayton instead, but what would I be doing it for? I know I couldn’t do a full year in the NHL, even if I got the call. The number of games, the every-day workouts; there’s not a day you’re not skating. I’m not sure my

ankle could take the wear and tear. So I had to be realistic and accept it … that it’s just a little too late to go back to pro.” There’s no mistaking the disappointment in Ryan’s voice; he lowers his gaze and wrings his hands as his own words sink in. The rare seconds of silence in the family living room, particularly in the presence of his ever-supportive, outgoing and often boisterous parents, is evidence they realize their son’s pro career is over, too. As always, the peace doesn’t last long. They’re quick to re-enforce their support for his decision, but are equally dismayed he can’t stay home and play for a Newfoundland entry in the Allan Cup. Ryan says he’d do that in a heartbeat, if only such a team existed. It doesn’t. “I still say we could’ve put a local allstar team together and probably won the whole thing, but all I’ve been told is the powers-that-be said no,” he says. “And I really don’t know why.” Instead, Ryan sent out a mass e-mail to past teammates, telling them Halifax was interested in putting together a team. What he got back was the proposal for Horse Lake. “My buddy, Zenith Komarniski, said, ‘If you’re serious, come up here’,” Ryan recalls, noting he’d already received the call from Dayton and was considering a move anyway.

The rest is history. Ryan also believes he’ll be treated with a little more respect in the North Peace Hockey League. “I can tell you now that I had guys comin’ at me (in Avalon East) with their elbows in my face in the first five minutes, knowing if I drop the gloves I’m gone for the game,” he says. “Up there (Alberta), it’s like the pros — three fights a game. And I definitely won’t get cheap-shotted up there, not like here. I have more chance of injury playing here than there.” Horse Lake, of course, is where former NHLer Theo Fleury ended up after being tossed for repeatedly breaking the league’s substance abuse policy. But other former NHLers like Gino Odjick are also there and making the most of their post-pro opportunity, Ryan notes. The plan, he says, is to live in Calgary with former Team Canada in-line teammate Mark Woolf, with whom Ryan won a silver medal. He’s also got a couple of day jobs lined up, when he’s not flying to Horse Lake in northwestern Alberta. Ryan makes it clear he’d be in no position to even consider making the move if it weren’t for two guys — Mike Wahl and Mike O’Neil — of Definitions gym in St. John’s. “I’ve got to give credit to those guys. It changed the way I eat, the way I work out, the way I live,” he says.

“I’m telling you, in Montreal they had the wrong people, wrong diets, they’d say eat less … all of that stuff. But with these guys, I eat more — almost every night a 16-oz steak, fish … “I don’t sleep on starch every night … and I feel guilty if I don’t go for a run every day. Back in the day, it was a drag to diet, it was a drag to work out. You just did it because you were a pro hockey player. But now, I couldn’t think of living any other way. I run, bike and swim, skate. Every day I do something. Cardio is huge for me now.” In many ways, the experience out west will also be nostalgic — an opportunity for Ryan to hook up, and play, with hockey buddies from his Tier II junior days with Quesnel Millionaires, as well as the WHL’s Tri-Cities Americans and Red Deer Rebels. Many of them still live and play in Alberta, where they grew up. “You know, there’s only so many years or days I have left to use hockey to my advantage … and to play it at this level, competitively. “But it’s bittersweet, too, I guess. But I know now my ultimate goal, as a senior hockey player, the highest I can go is an Allan Cup, and then the worlds, right? “I guess if you think about it, indirectly, there’s nothing else I can win at this point. It’s my Stanley Cup.” brian.callahan@theindependent.ca

that dream. “It’s not something I wanted to do,” Paiement the coach said after a recent practice as the team prepared for its season-opening, two-game road trip Sept. 15-16. “It wasn’t a dream of mine to coach my son, not at all. I still don’t think that it’s the healthiest situation for him, for me, or for his teammates.” But Paiement is also a realist. He watched his son captain the midget Maple Leafs last year. He drafted the boy prior to last season. If the kid could play at this level and help the team, then Paiement wanted him on his team. “I didn’t want him to be denied the opportunity if he deserved it,” he said.

“We drafted him because we felt he had some potential. We selected him to the team this year because he brings a lot of the things we’re looking for this year. He brings leadership, determination, some type of physical play. He’s got some definite points we have to work on, like a lot of other players.” It still is, however, a dicey situation. The dressing room is the players’ haven, their sanctuary, a place where they talk about the coach, positively and negatively. Now, with Vincent Paiement part of that dynamic, will the players feel comfortable in their discussions? Will the

Family affair For the first time, Real Paiement’s hockey bench will include his son rent Sutter just finished a celebrated junior hockey coaching career, leading Canada to two world championships and an astounding 7-0-1 record against Russia in the poorly named Super Series. But perhaps more than the great record (he never lost a game as the national junior coach), Sutter’s ability to coach his son in this most recent eightgame series drew plaudits from far and near. Coaching your son (or daughter) is one of the oldest traditions in sports. Usually it takes place at a level far from the international or national spotlight, such as novice hockey, or under-12 soc-

B

DON POWER

Power Point cer. I’m not sure if Real Paiement watched the Super Series very closely — he had his hands full preparing the St. John’s Fog Devils for the 2007-08 Quebec Major Junior Hockey League season after all — but Paiement finds himself in a similar situation to Sutter. Earlier this week, Paiement named a 25-man Fog Devils roster to start the

year, and Vincent Paiement was on that list. So for the first time ever in his career (save for a half-season at AAA midget in Miramichi), Real Paiement will coach his son. “Unlike Sutter and (Guy) Chouinard (who coached his son in major junior),” Paiement cautions though, “those guys are first- or second-line players. Vincent is a role player, our 13th forward.” For some, coaching their son in this situation is a dream come true. In hockey, perhaps more than any other sport, dads have long harboured dreams of their kids reaching the big time thanks to their hard work. Paiement, pere et fils, did not share

See “The team,” page 34


34 • INDEPENDENTSPORTS

SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

ATV dos and don’ts L ast week, I reminisced about my experiences hauling out moose before Japanese ATVs hit the North American market. For the most part, we use our quads to bring home our winter’s venison. An exception was three years ago when we shot a fine young bull moose about 500 yards from a pond with one of its long arms lapping at a woods road. Rather than bring in the quads, which would have involved significant trail cutting, we skidded the moose down to the pond in our canoes and paddled about a half hour to my waiting truck. But these days that sort of haul out is a rare exception. Quads are likely the ideal single-person hunting- and game-hauling vehicle. They are dependable, robust, manoeuvrable and relatively fuel-efficient. But before I go any further about hunting and quads, I would be remiss not to touch on safety. First and foremost, wear your helmet at all times when operating an ATV; not only where you can be seen by the authorities and issued a fine. A tip-over is more likely on rough terrain in the

PAUL SMITH

The Rock

Outdoors backwoods than riding at safe speed on a woods road or railbed. Secondly, novice riders should log some recreational hours before tackling the rough country, or attempting to haul out a 100-pound quarter of moose on the back rack. It requires skill and experience to safely negotiate these 400-pound machines over rocks, stumps and deadfalls. Steep, rough climbs can be particularly hazardous to the uninitiated. Too much throttle too quickly or poor rider positioning may cause the machine to wheelie or even flip completely over. Not enough gas and you might get stuck mid-hill faced with the precarious task of backing down for another run at it. Even loading a quad in your truck is potentially dangerous. I know a guy who bought a quad and attempted to drive it up a set of ramps into his pickup before familiarizing himself with

Quads are probably the ideal single-person hunting- and gamehauling vehicle. They are dependable, robust, manoeuvrable, and relatively fuel-efficient.

the machine. He flipped the machine and ended up in hospital. Others have escaped with just a broken rear truck window. If a quad is your choice hunting vehicle, then gun-toting capability is top priority. Just as the mountain hunters of Montana depend on their leather rifle scabbards as they pick their way into the mountains on horseback, the ATV hunter needs a means to carry and protect his or her rifle while winding through tree-lined, narrow and challenging trails. A moulded plastic gun boot that mounts on the ATV via a metal bracket seems to me the ideal

‘The team will not be affected’ solution. Mine is made by Kolpin and includes a padded cloth gun case fitted inside a weatherproof and sturdy plastic boot. Mounted along the front fender, it provides protection from knocks and scrapes as well as quick access. Be sure to mount your gun boot inside the wheelbase to avoid crushing sideswipes from trees, rocks, etc. A quad that’s taken off the beaten path needs storage for essential emergency supplies, survival gear, and tools. Most ATVs are equipped with a small weatherproof compartment, but few are big enough for all the essentials that hunters require. I prefer a waterproof box mounted on the front rack and reserve the back rack for game hauling and extra fuel. Mine is, again, made by Kolpin and holds core hunting kit items such as a folding saw with both wood and bonecutting blades, a small axe, a coil of stout nylon rope, first-aid kit, fire extinguisher, engine oil, 12-volt tire pump, tire plug kit, basic tools, tiedown straps, duct tape, fire-starting gear, tea bags, coffee and a mug. See “Tread lightly,” page 35

From page 33 younger Paiement? The coach feels the Fog Devils have the maturity to handle it smoothly. Before, he wasn’t so sure. “We haven’t gone through it, so I don’t know if we’re going to be able to live through it,” coach Paiement noted. “I’m going with the type of individuals we have in the dressing room. I don’t think, two years ago, we could have survived … I believe that with the type of person he is and the type of individuals we have in the dressing room, he will be able to survive and the team will not be affected.” As for the dressing-room banter that sometimes speaks ill of the coach and the moves he makes, that’s a bridge that hasn’t been crossed yet, but one that will have to be. Paiement says his son has heard the catcalls and the derogatory statements before. (“It won’t be the first time that he’s heard that his dad’s a bastard and doesn’t know anything about hockey and he’s a clown behind the bench.”) Vincent Paiement will have to figure out when Real Paiement is his coach, and when he’s Dad. Real Paiement will have to look down the bench and determine who to put on the ice that will best serve the interests of his team. He’ll also have to juggle the potential for trouble at home, when son’s ice time doesn’t match Mom’s hopes and dreams. He will also have to come to the realization that his son will help the team and remain part of the organization, or that his son’s presence is detrimental to their success, and move him. Whatever way the season unfolds, the Paiements are fine with either scenario. “I’m going back to feeling comfortable with my decision to keep him, and that he can bring something to the team. If he cannot, he’s well aware of this — and he was well aware of it in the summer — if he cannot (bring something), he’ll go. If we feel there are players in our system or players we can acquire that are better than him or serve our purpose better than him, he will move on, like any other player.” If the player and coach do part, you can bet the son and the father draw closer together. donniep@nl.rogers.com Solutions for crossword from page 32

Solutions for sudoku from page 32


SEPTEMBER 14, 2007

Tread lightly From page 34 You might be wondering about the fire extinguisher. I’ve seen a quad catch alight around the muffler area due to a buildup of bog that quickly dries to tinder in the intense heat. Can you imagine standing by helplessly while your $10,000 machine goes up in smoke 10 kilometres from the road? Some of the stuff on my list has obvious application; rope and straps for securing moose quarters, essentials for tire repair and general self-preservation. Duct tape is with me always and has proven to be indispensable too often to ignore. I’ve used it to patch boots, tents and canoes, splint paddles, build shelter, bind loads, and much more. Red Green would be proud. Last on my list are luxuries I intend never to do without — tea, coffee and my mug. Before caribou or moose season opens each year I check over my Arctic Cat ATV to ensure that all is in good mechanical order. I give her a good preinspection hosing and cleaning before crawling underneath to ensure no bolts, nuts or fastenings have worked themselves loose. Check for fluid leaks and make sure all hose clamps are secure. Inspect the CV boots carefully for cuts and abrasions. These inexpensive rubber housings keep moisture and dirt away from those expensive, constant velocity joints that are critical links in the drive train. A little preventive maintenance can save money or, more importantly, avoid a breakdown miles from the road. And you know that’s where it will happen. And while you’re at it, give those ball joints and tie rod ends the once over. They take a beating on rough terrain and should be replaced if worn excessively. If you aren’t confident enough mechanically to do this stuff yourself, either enlist the help of a buddy or have your dealer do the job. But it isn’t difficult to learn, and self-reliance has always been an integral part of woods craft. Service manuals are readily available online and are quite straightforward. I think a little effort to better understand how your ride works enhances the overall experience. And there’s no one to help you 10 miles back in the woods. Finally, obey the law as it pertains to back-country use of ATVs. Quads can destroy fragile marshlands and it is illegal in Newfoundland to drive ATV’s over our bogs. The only exception is to retrieve a downed moose or caribou. Even then, avoid spinning tires, and tread as lightly on the land as possible. Paul Smith is a freelance writer and outdoors enthusiast living in Spaniard’s Bay. His column appears weekly in The Independent’s sports section. flyfishtherock@hotmail.com

Fig.16

INDEPENDENTSPORTS • 35


INDEPENDENTCLASSIFIED FRIDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-20, 2007 — PAGE 36

FEATURED HOME 14 BAR HAVEN STREET

Photos by Nicholas Langor/The Independent Introducing 14 Bar Haven Street. New to the market and practically brand new in Kenmount Terrace subdivision, moments from everything. You can relax and enjoy the propane fireplace, oak plank floors, a gourmet’s open concept kitchen/dining and formal living room. This gorgeous property includes a master suite with ensuite, jacuzzi tub, corner shower, and spacious walk-in closet. There is also a large deck with evening sunsets, fully landscaped grounds, and a large attached garage. With a transferable new home warranty you can be at ease knowing you are covered. For more information on this stellar property please contact Donald Pacholka of ReMax Realty Specialists at 746-8688.

2007-09-14  

Bernice Morgan gets under the skin in latest novel Has Danny written off upper Churchill redress? SPORTS 33 Terry Ryan to play with First Na...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you