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S P R I N G 2 02 0


Hello and welcome to our second issue of the eighth. This isn’t quite how we expected it to come out, but we hope it can still serve as an inspiration, distraction or whatever else you need during this time. Our first edition was dedicated to reminding ourselves just how awesome it can be to make, craft, write or create, just for the heck of it. And now? Well, that mission seems even more important now. So, let’s collaborate. Let’s make art. Let’s get started.


KNIT CON BY ENID H. // PINTEREST W O R D S & I M A G E R Y / / P U B L I S H E D O N P I N T E R E S T. C O M BRAND IDENTITY & IMAGERY // PUBLISHED ON HYBRID-DESIGN.COM


Let’s take the time to look back at these amazing events. How will these events change in the future? Something fun to brainstorm and/or think about. Enjoy and stay inspired!

PINTEREST // KNIT CON What would an in-real-life version of Pinterest look like? Every year Pinterest employees get together and create just that with our internal conference called Knit Con, where we take two days to put down our computers and teach each other new skills. We recently held our fifth annual Knit Con with 250 employee-teachers around the world, dozens of guest speakers and over 20 Pinner- and creator-led classes. Little known secret: within the walls of Pinterest sit employees who are also experts in beekeeping, survival, ultramarathoning, kickboxing and watercoloring, and Knit Con is where they share their skills with their colleagues and friends - a practice we affectionately call “knitting”. It’s where classes like disaster preparedness, watercolor painting, and jiu-jitsu are explored. By bridging online ideas to offline action, Knit Con is essentially Pinterest in real life.something totally different.

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TYPOGRAPHIC EXPRESSIONS, I L L U S T R AT I O N , ART DIRECTION & PHOTOGRAPHY WORK TOGETHER T O L I T E R A L LY T I E IDEAS TOGETHER & TA K E O V E R THE BEAUTIFUL P H Y S I C A L S PA C E T H AT T H E P I N N E R S CALL HOME.

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“IT WAS MY FIRST KNIT CON AND I LOVED DISCOVERING MY CO -WORKER’S PASSIONS AS WELL AS THE CHANCE TO CONNECT WITH FELLOW PINPLOYEES FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD...” SPRING 20


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KNIT CON B R A N D E D H AT DOZENS OF GUEST SPEAKERS AND OVER 20 PINNER-AND C R E AT O R - L E D CLASSES

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KNIT CON BRANDED MARKETING M AT E R I A L S

As our largest internal event of the year, Knit Con underscores Pinterest’s mission and the uniqueness of our product. Every day, we work to bring inspiration to everyone to create a life they love. During Knit Con, we specifically immerse ourselves in what inspiration feels like and why it matters so we can continue building with these themes in mind. We believe the only way we can build a product used all over the world is if we have worldly perspectives at the table— both at the technological level and the human level.

work or beyond our job titles are just as integral to the experiences we deliver. This is why Pinterest hires people who have more interests than they have time. That’s reflected in Knit Con and how it’s been supported by employees and leadership from the very beginning.

More than 250 million people use Pinterest each month around the world to discover ideas in travel, art, style, food and more, so we know our skills and passions from outside of

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Knit Con is a reminder of why I started at Pinterest and why this company continues to inspire me every day. The event is meant to be a manifestation of Pinterest in real life: Open-minded to all types of hobbies and topics, surprising and exciting, and most importantly a positive nudge to try something new—even if your kokedama, dance moves, or cryptic crosswords aren’t perfect. What’s more, Knit Con is by Pinterest, for Pinterest. Each year I’m impressed all over again by the incredible range of talent we have

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on our team. Not only do we rally a small army of volunteer teachers who prepare for months to host their best possible class, but we also have an annual Open Mic Night which showcases musicians and performers of all types. Watching all these components take shape, I’m reminded that magic is possible when people pull together great attitudes and a ton of creativity.


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EVERY DAY.”

“KNIT CON IS A REMIND

INUES TO INSPIRE ME SPRING 20


DER OF WHY I STARTED AT PINTEREST & WHY THIS COMPANY CONT 21


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SELECTED WORDS BY MIMI ZHU DESIGNS BY LINH-YEN HOANG

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THE

ART

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TIST Mimi Zhu is a queer Chinese Australian writer and organizer who works through ideas of self-love, identity, trauma, ancestry, and more in her monthly newsletter Write, to Heals. Currently based in Brooklyn, she moved to the United States two years ago to pursue her twin dreams of writing and community organizing. Her work gained notoriety when Britney Spears first shared her poems on Instagram. They have been especially vital during these uncertain times. I wanted to share (and design) a select few of her posts. Enjoy.

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DURING THIS TIME OF ISOLATION, WE NEED CONNECTION NOW MORE THAN EVER. CALL YOUR LOVED ONES, WRITE VIRTUAL LOVE LETTERS. TECHNOLOGIES LIKE VIRTUAL COMMUNICATION, STREAMING AND BROADCASTING ARE PART OF OUR COMMUNITY COLLABORATION. WE WILL LEARN TO KISS AND HOLD EACH OTHER THROUGH THE WAVES OF THE WEB. WE WILL FEED EACH OTHER, RE-DISTRIBUTE WEALTH, STRIKE. WE WILL UNDERSTAND OUR OWN IMPORTANCE FROM THE PLACES WE MUST STAY. COMMUNION MOVES BEYOND WALLS. WE CAN STILL BE TOGETHER. SPRING 20


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NOW IS A TIME OF RECKONING. THERE ARE NO DISTRACTIONS FROM OURSELVES. I AM EVERYWHERE I LOOK. A WORLD BUILT ON CASH IS A WORLD THAT CRUMBLES. THE FLOWERS OUTSIDE ARE STILL BLOOMING. MY WEAKNESSES ARE SPLAYED BEFORE ME, BUT SO ARE MY STRENGTHS. I CANNOT RUN, SO I SEE MYSELF AS WHOLE; FLAWED AND LOVING. DURING THIS TIME, MOURN YOUR MISTAKES WHILE YOU CELEBRATE COMPASSION. HAVE PATIENCE IN THIS PROCESS AND FAITH IN YOURSELF.

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I GIVE THANKS TO THE ARTISTS W EQUIPPED US FOR SELF MEDITAT DURING THIS CHAOS. THEIR CALLINGS A GIFTS THAT MORPH AND MAKE SENSE EACH CELEBRATION AND CRISIS HISTORY. TO BE AN ARTIST IS TO CRE SOMETHING THAT MAKES SENSE OF PAIN AND TOGETHERNESS. ART COMMUNITY, MOVEMENT, FOOD A STORY. ART GROWS AS WE DO; IT RIPP AND AFFECTS. WITH THE GUIDANCE THOSE WHO HAVE ENDURED EA APOCALYPSE THAT PRECEDED US, ARE LEARNING WHAT TOGETHERN MEANS IN THIS NEW WAY OF BEING. COMMEMORATE THE BODIES OF WO THAT ALLOW OUR OWN BODIES TO F BEAUTY AND LIGHT. WE GROW. SPRING 20


WHO TION ARE E OF IN ATE JOY, IS AND PLES E OF ACH WE NESS . WE ORK FIND

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WRI

TO H

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ITE,

HEAL Please do not be intimidated by writing—this is your sign. I send you this newsletter to you as a serendipitous gift of synchronicity, to tell you that writing is a practice that we can all use to heal. Allow yourself to understand the importance of your feelings. “Write, to Heal” is Zhu’s writing newsletter. See notes for the link to support.

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PUBLISHED ON MORGANHARPERNICHOLS.COM

BY MORGAN HARPER NICHOLS

NICHOLS

HARPER

MORGAN


PHOTO OF MORGAN HARPER NICHOLS BY JENNA KUTCHER SPRING 20


Morgan Harper Nichols is an artist and poet whose work is inspired by real life interactions and stories. Morgan spent the first couple of years of her professional life as a college admission counselor, and then, as a full-time touring singer-songwriter and musician. It was on the road that she cultivated her curiosity and passion for writing, art, and design and slowly began to share her work online. In 2017, Morgan started a project where she invites people to submit their stories to her website. From there, she creates art as a response to their stories and sends it to them before sharing the work publicly. All stories and names are kept private. The fruit of this project is shared daily around social media, in publications, and various creative collaborations and installations.

A R T I S T S TAT E M E N T I write poetry and make digital mixed media art as a daily creative practice. My practice consists of making new art series every day using both digital and handmade elements on creative consumer applications like Adobe Sketch, Adobe Fresco, and ProCreate. I like to include both abstract and figurative elements in my work, as well as both conversational and poetic language. For me, this is about learning to hold what is known and unknown, in grace. My work is inspired by real life and in-the-moment experiences, including my interactions with others. At the heart of what I share, I believe art and creativity are valuable ways to connect with others about matters most.

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Making BY ALEXA RIDDLE

E D I T E D B Y L O R A FA R I S


Marks As a visual artist, I have a lot to say. But not necessarily the words to express it with. I ‘ve always felt saying you’re an artist is narcissistic. And saying things as an artist… Well, who would be interested in what I have to say? I’m a boring white girl from the suburbs. Do I have anything to say that’s particularly worthwhile? Well, these are strange times and it’s forcing me to reconsider. Because the vulnerability of making and sharing art that is true to myself allows others to do the same. Suddenly, it feels okay to make things just to make them if that’s what serves me.

AN ARTSY PHOTO OF M Y PA L E T T E IN THE MORNING LIGHT

So, I’ve used this as an opportunity to look a little harder at the things we don’t typically stop to notice in nature or the people around us. Most of the things I’ve started to explore are taken from places around the Presidio, since it’s readily available to me in my neighborhood. I’ve now walked or run most of the trails and used Google Lens to educate myself on the plants along the way.


And when I return to my home studio (a spare bedroom with a glamourous dumpster view) I’ll go back through photos and paint something that inspired me. Some days, it’s a landscape or a plant, other days it’s a more abstract sketchbook exploration. Most of the time, I use very bright colors or paint things a color that wouldn’t exist in nature normally. It’s about exploring the things I’m drawn to. Patterns. Bright colors. Nature. Motel signs. I don’t always like what I make, but that doesn’t matter. I’m taking away the preciousness of making things perfect and embracing the trial and error that leads to creating what works. And once I create what works, I take it and use it on something in the future. The goal isn’t to make anything specific, but to make something on my own every day. Even if it’s small. It’s therapy, but cheaper. So, if you’re stressed or anxious or stuck in your head and your Headspace app isn’t cutting it, I’d suggest making some marks on a page until those negative emotions are gone. It doesn’t have to look like anything. It can just be lines. But maybe, it will feel meditative. Maybe, you will feel just a little bit better. And maybe, if you share your work, your vulnerability will help others feel a little better too. As for me? I’m just going to keep making things, create my own world outside of the craziness and get through the day. It doesn’t have to be more complicated than that. Especially not right now. To see more of the things I make follow @pincdoor on Instagram. CLASSES I’VE FOUND H E L P F U L / / I N S P I R AT I O N Refferal link to get $$ off for CreativeBug CreativeBug Concept- Sketchbook- Lindsay Stripling CreativeBug -Any classes by Lisa Congdon SkillShare- Mixed Media Self Portrait

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If it all seems like too much and you don’t know where to start email me alexa.riddle@thisisheat.com. I’m happy to help. :)

EXAMPLE OF JUST MAKING MARKS TO MAKE ‘EM WITH W AT E R C O L O R A N D W H I T E COLORED PENCIL

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LAND SCAP ES GOUACHE AND COLORED PENCILS STUDIES


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IN TERIOR EXT TERIOR “WASH YOUR HANDS” GOUACHE


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PORT RAITS


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AB STRACT


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NOW, GO MAKE STUFF! S E R I O U S LY , D O N ’ T B E S C A R E D Y O U O N LY G E T B E T T E R B Y M A K I N G A W H O L E B U N C H O F U G LY S T U F F F I R S T. N O O N E E V E R S H O W S T H E U G LY S T U F F. EMBRACE THE GOOD, BAD, AND THE WEIRD!

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YOU OUG TO KNOW

ADAM WADE A PERFECT QUARANTINE LISTEN B Y L O R A FA R I S

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GHT W

E

Recent graduate Shui Chang was briefed to rebrand the bakery and meeting place Tartine. The independent cafe needed an upgrade from their dated brand, with an approachable and welcoming feel. She was also tasked with enhancing the French aspects of the identity. The new brand is slick, elegant and relaxing. It reminds us of creamy latte’s and soft pastries. The branding is thoughtful and minimal, which adds a sophisticated feel to the coffee shop. The lovely added typographical details to the Lyon Display throughout Tartine, gives the brand a cuter look. From brand identity to editorial piece, Chang’s work is brilliantly executed; the minimallooking waves on the food bags are a brilliant added illustrated piece which works great with the typographically lead brand.

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YOU OUGHT TO KNOW There’s a little window in Hoboken you can see from your couch. The blinds are raised. The curtains open. And you can’t feel it, but you’re sure there’s a soft breeze. The skies are sometimes grey or a little green and oftentimes blue. Regardless, they always seem sunny. No, I’m not having a Sarah Palin moment. I’m watching comedic storyteller Adam Wade go live from his Hoboken windowsill. A video sandwiched on my Facebook newsfeed between other bits of virtual humanity. The formidable Adam Wade from New Hampshire is livestreaming, describing his day and calling out viewers as the camera sits firmly locked on his windowsill. It’s nice. It’s simple. And if things can be nostalgic in the moment they are happening, it’s that too. The same authenticity that brands have been attempting to emulate these past few weeks is there. Authenticity is Wade’s schtick, though it feels a little dirty to call it that. This is just him. We’ve seen the best and worst from humanity recently, which is why this window is a welcome break. In a world

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that seems to be constantly oscillating between extremes, Wade is serving up something comfortably in-between. For as long as Wade has been a fixture in the New York comedy scene, he’s created what could be best described as comedy comfort food. Relatable and heartfelt, his work has won him 20 Moth Storytelling Slams, coverage on NPR and in the New York Times, and now, his Audible special You Ought to Know Adam Wade has sat in the top five of the Audible charts for over twelve weeks straight, including four weeks at #1. Wade’s a staple at New York’s Magnet theater and Kraine theatre, where you can imagine him performing his special to an audience that’s a mixture of regulars, former students, and people who are just curious enough to discover for themselves what a comedic storyteller actually is. People are usually pleasantly surprised. Others, expecting two hours of standup, might be taken aback when Wade launches into a particularly emotional story. Wade will admit, it’s not necessarily about comedy, and is instead, he notes, “more about the human condition than anything.”


Wade shows more vulnerability in a single show than most people would be comfortable sharing over the course of a lifetime. Go with a few friends, and you’ll soon know more about the trials, tribulations, and childhood trauma of the man on stage than you do about those sitting to your right and left. This onstage presence has translated beautifully to You Ought to Know Adam Wade. True to form, Wade’s special focuses on small moments and everyday embarrassments. They have magic in their mundanity. Within moments of starting, listeners are transported to a New Hampshire pediatrician’s office where the patient, coronavirus-free, has just received the terrifying diagnosis of “baby lungs,” a condition best described as an asthma diagnosis mixed with a bad joke. And with that, we’re off.

the News, and a beautiful girl with a dead green tooth with dreams of studying penguins in the North Pole. It’s a coming of age tale performed as a series of unsatisfied (but extremely satisfying) underdog stories. Wade’s voice quakes and breaks as we follow his determined journey from New Hampshire to “making it” in New York City. It’s often hilarious, sometimes emotional, and always heartfelt. If you can call a “poop yourself on the PATH train” story heartfelt- I’d argue yes. But it’s this unabashed openness that makes it the perfect listen for unsettling times. A little slice of humanity that’s simple and sincere, with a vulnerability that makes your heart ache. That’s the power of You Ought to Know Adam Wade. And that’s the “Power of Love”.

Over the next two hours, we weave our way through the many loves and losses of our imperfect protagonist, a boy described by his band teacher as lacking both the mental and physical fortitude to play the saxophone. We meet the Madonna to Wade’s Huey Lewis and

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N E W S R O O M . P I N T E R E S T. C O M

HYBRID-DESIGN.COM

@MIMIZHUXIYUAN

W R I T E 2 H E A L . S U B S TA C K . C O M / S U B S C R I B E

MORGANHARPERNICHOLS.COM

@MORGANHARPERNICHOLS

ALEXAJRIDDLE.COM

@PINCDOOR

@ADAMWADESTORYTELLER


CONTRIBUTORS Alexa Riddle Linh-Yen Hoang Kirsten Finkas Lora Faris Zac Carroll

PRINTER All digital for this issue!

TYPOGRAPHY Noe Text DINPro

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the eighth magazine  

A beautiful supply of art compiled for you by the lovely designers of an advertising agency that starts with the eighth letter of the alphab...

the eighth magazine  

A beautiful supply of art compiled for you by the lovely designers of an advertising agency that starts with the eighth letter of the alphab...

Profile for theighth
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