Page 1

the

Journal

Senior Issue

June 2011

By and for the seniors of Guilderland Central High School

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Senior Journal Staff, 2010-2011 Back (l-r): Katherine Bickmore, Abby Levy, Gregory Barber, Rory Carroll, James McQuade Middle (l-r): Devon Gingrich, Meghan Bodo, Anastasia Mazur, Haejin Hwang, Aimee Denn Front (l-r): Libby Gioia, Beatrice Malsky, Michael Marcantonio

A Letter From the Editor High school is almost over with and I’m not sad. OK that’s a lie, I’m a little sad, but I’m so happy to be going to college and to be done with this part of my life. I keep having what if thoughts about spending another year in high school, and I’m beside myself; I don’t know what I’d do if I had to repeat my senior year. I can confidently say that I’m ready to leave Guilderland High School and embark on new adventures in college. To be honest, I did enjoy myself at GHS. Guilderland is a wonderful school district, and I’m honored that I was a part of it. I loved being a Dutchman and I will always be part of the Red Sea. I will miss coming to the Friday night football games, decked out in red and white, rooting for my fellow classmates. I will miss seeing all of my friends on a

daily basis, awkwardly smiling or saying “hi” in the hallways. Surprisingly I will miss working on The Journal every month, always pressured when deadline arrived (I actually liked the pressure around deadline because I got work accomplished in those situations). But I think the biggest thing I’ll miss are the teachers. I can’t recall a teacher I strongly disliked. I will admit that I liked some better than others, but I’m very fortunate for all the talented teachers I’ve had. Some of them are truly the nicest people I’ve ever met and I want to thank them for shaping who I am and what I will become. One of the main reasons I am sad about leaving is because I won’t be able to see them next year. When I first entered high school I thought I’d have all the freedom I’d want. False. This wasn’t true and I soon realized

it. All of the rules GHS has, like needing a pass to go see a teacher and needing a pass to go out to your car were just straight out ridiculous. And by the time senior year came around, I couldn’t have cared less about anything else. Never again will I have to ask to go to the bathroom, never again will I need a pass to go see a teacher, and never again will I have to do some of the tedious, useless assignments teachers would give out. Along with my happiness of leaving GHS rules behind, I am happy to be leaving Guilderland as well. Driving up and down Western Avenue everyday has gotten very repetitive. I need to go someplace where I can’t name every pizza place AND ice cream store in town. I’ve lived here for all of my life and I think it’s necessary that I experience a different

way of living next year. I can’t wait to get out of Guilderland because, I have to say it, sometimes yerrrrr beat. Writing this was a lot harder than I thought it would be because as much as I complain and say I’m happy to leave, I am going to miss this school and community. I realized that come graduation day, I will be saddened with the fact that I will be leaving everything I’ve known to start a new journey. I’m scared and nervous, but at the same time, I’m excited and ready. I will miss Guilderland High School, and I genuinely mean that. I want to congratulate the Class of 2011, I love ya and hopefully I’ll see you before a reunion. Michael Marcantonio Co-Editor-in-Chief

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Actual Senior Journal Staff, 2010-2011

A Letter From the (Other) Editor Dear Senior Class of 2011,

Reflection #1: I should have read Kurt Vonnegut sooner. This is less ridiculous as a reflection on four full years of life if you’re familiar with how much of a genius Mr. Vonnegut actually is. And yet some of my favorite advice from him is so blindingly simple it could be put in a cutesy font and surrounded with flowers and framed in a cabin bathroom: “I urge you to please notice when you are happy, and exclaim or murmur or think at some point, ‘If this isn’t nice, I don’t know what is.’”

nate enough to have a natural command of English, the lingua franca of today’s international business, science, and technology. Over 95% of our class is going to college. Our lives are at the edges of a bottleneck— from this point onwards, our worlds are only going to get exponentially bigger. On the whole, the Class of 2011 has been granted privileges inaccessible to large portions of the world. It’s our humble responsibility to allocate a little brainspace for appreciation. Simply living in middle-to-upper-middle-class suburbia gives us a fairly large responsibility to give back to the world, and the first step towards that is stepping back every so often and recognizing how nice our lives can be.

Accordingly, Reflection #2: In the large scale of Everything-with-a-capital-E, Guilderland is a pretty great place. We’re all lucky enough to live in the richest nation in the world. We are fortu-

Reflection #3: I should have watched Annie Hall sooner. As the movie wraps up, the esteemed Mr. Allen ruminates: “This guy goes to a psychiatrist and

For this final Journal issue I have just a few reflections I would like to share with you all.

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says, ‘Doc, uh, my brother’s crazy; he thinks he’s a chicken.’ And, uh, the doctor says, ‘Well, why don’t you turn him in?’ The guy says, ‘I would, but I need the eggs.’ Well, I guess that’s pretty much now how I feel about relationships; y’know, they’re totally irrational, and crazy, and absurd, and... but, uh, I guess we keep goin’ through it because, uh, most of us... need the eggs.” Which leads me to Reflection #4: High School ultimately taught me how little I know about the world, and I am ok with that. Parts of high school were totally irrational and crazy and absurd, but now it’s official: all of our high school stories have already happened. If you didn’t catch that star touchdown, you never will. If you dreaded finding a lunch table each and every day, stop dreading. It’s over. For some of us, these last four years will turn out to have been the best times of our life. For others, they will have been the

worst. That set of awkward tenses reveal a strange truth: it’s over, but we don’t yet know what it meant. Interpretation can be left for the future. We have our whole lives to put this all into context. Underclassmen who may be reading this, my advice to you is to go consume the above media and more as soon as possible. It’s one of the best ways to make the world bigger. Keep your mind and eyes open and your mouth closed more often than not. Other than that, you have to find your own way within the relatively narrow lines of high school life. Fellow seniors, I hope you find something of some sort of sentimental value in the next sixteen or so pages. Thank you for a great high school experience. I really needed the eggs. Keep in touch, Beatrice Malsky Co-Editor-in-Chief

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Milestones endings, & beginnings Bernadette Javier, Senior

Walking away from all of this – the high school friends, the attentive guidance, the carefree times – it’s monumental. We take one last glance at everything we have worked on for the past thirteen years of our education and the remaining sparks of our ignited memories suddenly

We have tiptoed through this high school together as the innocent freshmen lost in the wide open sea... force us back to every milestone we’ve ever reached. It has been a long, vigorous challenge to shrug off the bad grades, to ignore the tainted words directed towards us, and to dig ourselves out of sticky situations. It’s difficult to comprehend that we’re so close to walking away from all of it now. I can still remember the first day of high school where my biggest problem had been trying to avoid ultimate annihilation when the six-foot-five football players squeezed through the hallways. I still remember the week long bomb threats that haunted our school during freshman year, which essentially had us sitting on the scorching football field for the majority of the afternoon as they searched the school. I remember the bonfires and the late night sports games. Oh the memories! We have tiptoed through this high school together as the innocent freshmen lost in the wide open sea, as dignified sophomores more familiar with the unwritten rules, as self-assured juniors strained with the responsibility of making our names glisten outstandingly to our desired colleges, and finally, as mighty seniors with the apathetic struts. Being in this building, to say the least, is the most exhausting job a kid could ever have. But finally, this journey we’ve been on together is slowly slipping through our very fingers. The physical, mental, and emotional

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strain throughout my experiences here has provoked a myriad of fights, whines, and tears. We have changed so much since our timid freshmen year, yet the one thing that has not changed is our ability to withstand anything that came our way. We went through the overwhelming pressures of college applications with as much tears as the Niagara Falls display. We have fought through those unforgiving project due dates, impossible exams, witty teachers, assertive hall monitors, dramatic friends, and of course, we fought off the unavoidable black plague that never fails to infect every senior – the dreaded senioritis, which the only known cure, I’ve heard, is the short walk across the stage on graduation day. For four years, we survived this school together; as a class, as teammates, as friends, and as family. If we could break every clock and halt every season from arriving, maybe we could stay in this moment of bliss and triumph together for as long as we could. We have gotten so used to the daily routines of arriving at school in the morning and fooling around with friends in the hallway in between classes that it’s overwhelming to even think

It’s almost frightening to think that high school is the ultimate prelude to the rest of our lives. of doing something different. We have waited for this moment all our lives – the chance to finally be free and venture the unknown world on our own. But now that it’s here, how can we even begin to predict what will come next? It’s almost frightening to think that high school is the ultimate prelude to the rest of our lives. We’ve been pampered and fussed over and steered towards every possible path. But now, we’ve reached the end of our childhood. And on graduation day, we’ll walk away with the memories that we will never forget and a family that we will always cherish.

Sunsets,

sentimentality,

& exhaustion Michael Diana, Senior It was an unfortunate hour: seven o’ clock. It was far too early to be awake, certainly far too early to be at school. I got off the bus, sleepwalking despite the bitter shock of cold air, and stepped into the teeming mass that was my peers. Even in my delirium I couldn’t help but notice how the building stood silhouetted against the sunrise, couldn’t help but realize that there was bound to be some grand aesthetic value here to appreciate. It might have been in how the sky chocked with clouds burned in shades of crimson and gold, or maybe in how the lights glowed warmly in the otherwise imposing edifice. Or perhaps I’m just excessively sentimental and need more sleep. In any case I could only take a superficial register of its beauty, knew I couldn’t afford to stand around enjoying the view, chasing intangibles. I had places to be or rather, places to find, it was my first day at Guilderland High School after all. So, comforted and glad for my seemingly mundane experience, I shouldered my backpack and kept on walking toward a new chapter in my life. Its funny how that very first morning, a scenario I would relive –apathetically-

hundreds of times over, would come to characterize my experience at GHS. One might imagine high school to be a chore, an experience wholly unworthy of prolonged reflection. And while I have done my fair share of watching the clock, I have also had a great deal of fun. I’ve met friends to laugh and commiserate with me, met teachers who’ve challenged and inspired me and made fond memories that will long outlive the not-so-fond ones (I admit there were a few). More often than not I would stop myself to realize that- despite tests and papers (and more tests) - I hadn’t a care in the world. But even for all that, even now, I feel as though I haven’t had the time to gain more than a superficial registry of all that Guilderland has to offer. Surely I would’ve needed more than four years to do so. Again I find myself struggling to articulate the intangible comfort I feel at Guilderland and again, just as I did on my very first day, I realize I have little time for sentimentality. A new chapter in my life has begun and all I can do now is face it head on, ever thankful for the chapter I’m about to conclude here at Guilderland High School.

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Couches, camels, & blissing Andrew Federov, Freshman I’ve only really learned one thing this year, and that is a pleasant way to live. In high school the mandate, it seems, is that you do everything worrying about what colleges will think of it. This goes against how you should live. If you follow the mandate you will be flushed into a world of melancholic apathy. The image of a college admissions board is one of a group of elderly conservative people who wear corduroy coats with off-color patches and wide rim glasses. They dictate the camel race of life. If you get bored, shoot the camel, drain its water into a bottle and walk in a more interesting direction. That’s the right way to live. This morning, in an old apartment building in Pine Hills, where once resided Thatcher, but now my grandparents live, I went upstairs to see their beatnik neighbor. He used to be Greg, but now he calls himself Tony. I wanted to give him a Tommy Dorsey record and to ask if he had a copy of Romeo and Juliet, which I needed to write an essay on Mercutio. But I had forgotten my copy in that traitorous whirlpool called a locker, which at the worst moment takes from me all I find value in, but I won’t worry until it swallows a human. Tony duped me into watching a video about the ryhmes of Cassius Clay. I had planned to write one of these but I thought “if I get it done, it’s an extra article and if I don’t, well, nobody was going to read it anyway.” After the video was over he told me that the only edition of Shakespeare he had was a 70 pound book. I was a little disapointed but he suggested “Why don’t we go to the library?” We started walking down the street toward the library with Tony’s shitsu, Franky, and saw a upon a patch of grass between the sidewalk and the road a couch and a table. We sat down and after a few minutes and decided “forget the

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library, this couch is comfortable”. The verb to describe the hour and a half we had on that couch talking as cars drove by and honked and we toasted them with

Standing in the pouring rain, in flip flops, shorts, and a hoodie, I realized that, though this was the right way to live, I’d probably catch pneumonia. cups full of lemonade can be found in Russian, and roughly translated it would be something like blissing. When he felt the first tiny droplets of the evil rain to come Tony decided that it was worth it to bring the table up to his apartment before it started raining hard. When we came back to the couch there was a dark stranger. We asked him if he wanted the couch. He confirmed our suspicions. We three made our struggle in the general direction which the stranger pointed, lifting the couch until we could stand to hold it no longer and switched places with the man holding the pillows. The couch dragged in the general direction the stranger, named Al, pointed in until he mentioned that he lived about 20 minutes away. We stopped under a tree and it was raining pretty hard by now. We stood for about half an hour with thumbs outstretched towards any pick-up truck that passed. Standing in the pouring rain, in flip flops, shorts, and a hoodie, I realized that, though this was the right way to live, I’d probably catch pneumonia.

Football, expectations, & stress Nina Obwald, Sophomore

It is really hard to believe that I’m halfway done with high school. Freshman year seems like just yesterday, and the beginning of this year seems only to be five hours ago. It was definitely a year of greater expectations. Our teachers expected more out of us, our peers expected more out of us, and I think we expected more out of ourselves. Next year we will be upperclassmen, and the year after that, seniors. I know it’s a big shock, at least for me, that there is only two more years before leaving GHS for college. The increase in the amount of work was one of the hardest parts about sophomore year. Deadlines were stricter, tests were harder, and I spent a lot more time on homework. It was difficult to adjust at first, but by the third week of September, spending more than an hour on homework became a normal thing. Of course, my old habit of procrastinating did not help to reduce the amount of work. Many advisories were spent doing last minute homework before chemistry or math, not to mention the infinite number of textbook pages my global teacher gave us to read. Next year will probably mean double the amount of work, but I’m up for the challenge.

Even with all the work, there was still time for fun. It was my second year attending school traditions like the Cultural Fair, Friday night football games, and it was my first year seeing the school play and Guilderland Gold. For some reason, school events are sometimes labeled as lame, but that is a word I would never use to describe them. School events give you a chance to hang out with your friends and see what your classmates are capable of. Amazing dancers, athletes, and actors walk by us in the hallway everyday. The amount of talent at Guilderland is incredible and that is something I’m glad I got to witness myself this year. As the end of the year gets closer, my stress level has begun to rise. Final projects and tests are always in the back of my mind. The number of days until Regents Week is alarmingly small and, in a way, I feel like a freshman again, scared to death of failing one or more of my final tests. It is hard to stay calm when there’s so much work still to be done but less than a month of school left to do it all. My time as a sophomore is running out more quickly than I would like, but looking back on the year, I am proud to say that it was a fantastic year.

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APUSH, cliques, & ambitions Haewon Hwang, Sophomore I entered sophomore year thinking I could breeze through it. I didn’t plan on any of my classes being too hard and I really looked forward to making friends with more people and basically just “chilling” out. On the contrary, this year came, quite frankly, as a wake up call. First of all, I had signed up for the hardest course this year. I can easily say AP European History dominated my life. I would spend three or more hours a day reading the textbook, memorizing it, and then getting the worst grades I ever received. I spent months figuring out which way was the best way to study for this, but nothing proved to worked. This ended with me becoming upset and super stressed out. I lost a lot of sleep, but I am glad I worked so hard. I proved to myself that I could work that hard. I can succeed if I really wanted to. “Shoot for the moon; even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars,” was always a quote that I thought sounded pretty. It was “deep” and sounded cool, but it was just another inspirational quote. This year, however, I figured it out. Set your goals high. If you do, there’s always a chance of achieving them. When they’re low, there’s a higher chance of achieving your goals, but the potential for more is blocked off. When I was down, and told myself that I couldn’t do this, I couldn’t do that, my mom would say- set your goals high, even if they seem unreasonable, and work towards them. I am the co-vice president of my class (2013) along with another student. I can’t say we worked together much this year though. We both held the title, we campaigned together, and we worked hard for class events. Yes, our class did reach success, but I can’t say much communication went on between us. It marks

a significant falling out for me, and I hope the next campaign- that is promising to look tumultuous- will go smoothly. In my elementary years, I was introverted and didn’t talk much. In middle school, seventh grade marked the year when everybody changed- for better and for worse. I went through a confused stage: who were my friends? Who can I trust? What does it mean to be popular? I decided to reshape myself for eighth grade. I built up my confidence and tried to find a means of figuring out my own style. I didn’t let social problems get in the way of work, and I developed a close knot of friends. Things changed so much in my freshman year. I was put in honors classes and I lost touch with some of my friends. When one doesn’t have classes with another at GHS, it seems really hard to keep up that relationship. A common ground isn’t so common anymore, and two people drift apart. That happened to about 90% of my friends from middle school. Cliques formed (quite distinctly) and I had to find myself a new knot. I did, and I was happy again. This year, I am very content with my friends. It’s not a huge bubble of people, but these are people I’ve come to trust with anything. When somebody asks me how my sophomore year was, I respond: it was boring. It was busy, mainly just a lot of work, but nothing really happened. And that’s true. For me, this year, it was all work, no fun. My sister went through the college application process, and I’ve come to realize that what I do today, tomorrow, the next year, will determine my life. I am holding these days precious, and I am working hard. I really do hope that my results reflect my means.

Checklists, colleges, & Bram Bram Peterson, Junior Junior year is just about over, and I am quite happy. As I expected, it was the hardest year of school I had ever experienced. This makes sense, seeing that grades tend to get harder as the numbers get bigger, but still- it’s junior year. It’s just thought of as “that year” where you need to get your act together and do work because you’re not going to be in

Junior year is kind of like a neverending checklist, where you cross off one thing and the next three show up on the horizon. high school much longer. It was that year when you kind of wake up and think “I won’t be here in two years,” and it’s kind of scary. I don’t know what I want to do with my life; I don’t even know what elective I want to take senior year. Junior year is kind of like a neverending checklist, where you cross off one thing and the next three show up on

the horizon. Congrats, the SAT is over, get ready for the ACT. Oh good job, now study for that AP test that you have. Wait you have two of those, have fun with that. Did you remember to take your SAT Subject Tests too? Don’t forget to keep your grades up, colleges are watching. But be well rounded too, those extracurriculars look good on that application. Oh, and if you feel like it go visit some colleges too. And learn to drive and get your license. And get your community service hours in, need those. Oh, don’t forget to have a life too, that’s kind of important. Some classes watch movies and play kickball while others assign practice Regents every class, but one way or another every class begins to wind down this time of year. Whether their teachers are burying them with review sheets or just trying to get them to show up for class, summer is the main thing on the minds of most juniors. A well-deserved reprieve from waking up at six in the morning, five days a week and coming home with a backpack full of homework. Summer will be fun, but the checklist will still be in the back of my mind. College is still right around the corner, and sooner than later I’ll be back on the road visiting campuses, filling out applications and trying to find the essence of “Bram” into a five hundred word essay. This should be fun. But there will be plenty of time to stress about going to college next year. Now I can just say goodbye to junior year, hello to summer, and see you later to all my stresses for a while.

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Whisker, Mittens, & bridges

Justina Liu, Freshman

High school began on the second day in first period geometry. She laid down code of conduct, and then swept the classroom for names, grades and some characteristics not meeting the eye. Descriptions were crisp and dead end conversations. I have two cats. Ah. Names? Whisker and Mitten. Mitten is a short hair. Twenty five students outlined their life stories, and those of feline friends. I dropped an invisible penny into the imaginary wishing well and made a silent plea for lessons to start. Scandalous, I know. Our first unit was logic. If logic starts now, then we will finish in a school year minus one day. Very logical. Upperclassmen with under eye circles and callused fingers—walking, breathing epitomes of the fruit high school bears. And freedom? It can keep its freedom. This was to me the beginning of a battle,

set to prolong too long, a victory to remain standing in the end among others, or without. Then, the soldier too the first fall. “And after a test, it is not in your interest to tell the other class what’s on it. When it comes down to class rank and colleges, the margin between those above and below you will be a tenth of a point.” She cleared her throat and continued, “Look around, these people are competitors in the very end.” The bell rang and I glanced at the master of Whisker and Mitten. Indeed, some things fail to meet the eyes. Tennis season came to a close in the second week of October. Practice was daily after school, and on occasion the cross country team would run by the courts. We would then become a herd of grazing cattle, they, galloping gazelles. But despite the mellowness of the sport, the weight of my tweed tote and its contents became apparent within a week after cessation of play. I traded in the navy bag for an aquamarine Timber-

land backpack. Aquamarine was still in season then. And in the Timberland were the to do’s, should do’s, and haven’t done’s, that moved rhythmically with my fatigued figure. I fantasized about leaving it, perhaps under a tree, somewhere in Bethlehem, in Bethlehem, Palestine for that matter! And that some poor person would find it and the contents within would become theirs. I treaded on, like a soldier would stride with his bag, because in it were the necessities for his survival, or at least that’s what they told him. I began the New Year with a new backpack, Swiss Army this time. The left strap on the Timberland had ripped, robbing it of any preference over my original tote. It was black, masculine, and rather ugly, but it freed my eyes from my old carry’s blue tint, which bore a disturbingly strong resemblance to the grade speed background. The toughness, brutality, and intensely studious aura— the way it told school to suck it—especially satiating. With a companion on my back, I strolled the halls for three weeks leading up to midterms with a determination to be reach, be, academic perfection. Like a soldier. Get the enemy before he gets you.

I wanted to consume myself with school. I didn’t know it had already begun consuming me. I remained faithful to my Swiss, even more so to the contents within. I was on a fast track, one track, one stop, train to success. It never occurred to me that a train would run out of fuel. What did trains run on anyone? I hadn’t a clue. So I threw in everything I had. I gasped for air. The air was toxic. But, were these not the fumes of excellence? And then the little soldier realized, she’d gotten on the wrong train. Dad why is it so hard? And she cried herself a river. If you loved me you’d home school me! Built herself a bridge. What do you mean I’m building my own mountains? Watched the smoky clouds clear from the summit. And prayed to God that no one steps on that train.

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Hitchhiker’s Guide to

the

Class of 2011

15

Undecided % are on a major

33 15

are majoring in Engineering

are entering employment

3 33

are joining the military

are majoring in Biology

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5/26/2011 11:03:09 AM


71

82

staying in % are New York State

are attending HVCC

Switzerland

Korea

10

moving to % are New England

25

are moving to the South

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5/26/2011 11:26:46 AM


Road races, Chipotle, & the ZZZ’s Julianne Legnard, Junior Go straight at the walk-in. Dodge to the left at Powderpuff. Stop at the bubble sheet… now park. Much to the dismay of many newly-licensed juniors, there is no GPS to help you coast through GHS. In fact, the road race to graduation would not be complete without the up-hill sprint that is 11th grade. At year’s end we’re all nearing the point of collapse…as well as the winner’s circle. After summiting the peak, our award is a hard-earned diploma. Though our schedules are filled with AP’s and SAT’s, 11th graders at Guilderland are lacking on the ZZZ’s. As the Regents curriculum picks up the pace, tasks are packed into our A-Pads like freshmen in the lobby. Life becomes a balancing act; the typical teen juggles a DBQ essay, a Spanish project, a Chemistry quiz and the almighty road test in any given week. Admittedly, I’ve spent many late nights dozing off at my desk and fending off a premature case of senioritis. My flash drive is now on the brink of overflow, and McManus notes are bursting the seams of my backpack. Yet despite these side effects of academic overload, the knowledge I’ve gained has given me strength, nourishing my mind in preparation for the future. Often while mapping out the course of our future, many of us encounter a fork in the road. Which path are we going to choose for our lives? After numerous guidance meetings, talks with teachers

and perhaps some early college visits, many juniors have begun to explore new possibilities. But for those still feeling lost, be it known that 11th grade is not a lone hike up the pike. Thankfully, we are accompanied by our classmates along the trek; together we cram for exams, fawn over university lawns, and vent about the drama that we’re soon to leave behind. These same companions also accompany us on the enjoyable pit-stops to graduation. Whether you’re a homecoming fan amidst the Red Sea at last, or a Varsity Dutchman finally fighting under the lights, junior year is a time of social growth and experience. This year, we sported class shirts to show off our first day swag, no longer held back by underclassmen jitters. This year, we transformed Chipotle into 2012 headquarters, meeting up for hearty laughs and burritos with our buds. This year, lunchtime banter turned to plans for the prom, where Guilderland guys looked spiffy in their tuxes, escorting trendy ladies in tones of tan. With our cheeks still sore from photo ops and hands still cramped from essays, we wave goodbye to the senior class as they venture beyond the peak. Although in the long run we too will be heading in different directions, for now let’s rejoice in scaling the hill. Although junior year took us for quite a loop, it’s finally our turn on top.

Highlights, choices, & pegboards Isaac Malsky, Freshman

A long time ago (it seems a lifetime) I remember being in second grade and looking up at the giant sixth graders who came back to see their elementary school teachers from years before. Like most of my memories from more than a couple years ago, it seems out of focus, as if viewed through old glasses. Finishing a year of high school feels just like trying to think back on years-old memories. Most of the year is difficult to recall, but small aspects seem to be superimposed on a much larger memory like highlights in a thousand-page paper. I’m not saying that the year went by so quickly or another cliché sentiment because honestly, it was a lot of work. There were days that went by without any sleep, but they only made the weekends more refreshing. In a year of classes it’s impossible to remember everything. All that can be recalled are little snippets of reality augmented with wishful thinking. Every once in a while a moment is recalled in perfect clarity but more often than not, it is only the true turning points that are remembered. At the end of each year we are constantly reminded of how time is running out, but not necessarily in

a negative way. I always imagined high school as just one big carnival game where you drop a ball down a vertical board with pegs for it to bounce off of. It is impossible to predict which slot the ball will ultimately end up in, and yet its path is determined by the obstacles it meets on the way down. In high school, our final destination is determined by each individual choice, or peg, we meet. It is impossible to predict the effect of the choices that we make, but down the line, each can make a profound impact. Looking back on the year, all I can do is hope I made the right choices, hoping I didn’t miss an opportunity that would have changed my life. But in truth, looking back serves no purpose. Absolutely nothing will come of analyzing every action that I’ve made in the last nine months. And for that I am grateful that my memory isn’t crystal clear. Who would want to live life saddled down by the evergrowing knowledge of the mistakes that one has made? I for one would rather spend my time looking forward into the future and hoping that the carnival game of life isn’t rigged.

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Costa Rica,

cross country,

&

high five races

Dev Gingrich, Senior With only days left until graduation, I look back on the past four years with mixed feelings. Looking at senior year alone, so much has changed since the first day sticker frenzy, and after a year of way too many hours dedicated to talking about college, I can’t wait to finally get there. But as excited as I may be to finally live life as a full-time Bearcat, there are certainly some things from high school that I’ll miss--most of all, the people, and, for good or bad, an endless list of unforgettable memories and moments. Despite all of its low points, I can honestly say that I really enjoyed high school. Yes, of course there’s pointless drama, annoying people, and stupid classes, but at the same time, if you push past all that there are some solid things to be taken away from the experience. Over the years I’ve had a few fantastic teachers, and as nerdy as it sounds, they are a part of some of my favorite memories. I mean, how could I honestly forget jamming out to oldies during labs with Mr. Arnold, or high intensity high five races before Mr. Renaud’s tests, or hard core bird watching in 11X? I can only hope that I have many more moments like those to come. While I’m fairly certain everyone can agree that Guilderland isn’t exactly the most exciting place in the world, I’ve been able to find people and things to do that make everyday life not quite as painfully

mundane. I guess I’ve never been the kind of person who’s had (or wanted to have) a set group of friends, and that has made me so happy. I feel like I’ve been able to form a nice variety of friendships--from best friends since elementary school to friendships only formed a few months ago--but regardless, I know there is a select handful of people that I’m really going to miss seeing every day next year. High school finally gives you the opportunity to find things that you really love doing and, if you put forth the energy, really get into them. Surprisingly enough for me, traveling became a huge passion of mine. Going on the trips to Costa Rica and the Mediterranean Coast were amazing, and they meant all the more to me when they helped me land my first job at Mickey D’s. Just this year, joining Cross Country was literally the best decision I’ve ever made and just proves that it is always possible to find something new to love--you just need to look. High school can be a pretty bad experience if you just decide to just stay in your group of friends, go to the same parties every weekend, and take the same boring classes, but who knows? All I know is that regardless of its rep, I’ve had some great times and found some amazing people in high school.

Bitter, sweet, & tired Libby Gioia, Senior Bittersweet is how I would describe senior year, a time filled with bitter fights between people who have been placed in the same building for 12 years, bitter memories coming back to haunt us as we forgot the lessons that we were supposed to have learned, and bitter tears as we say goodbye to one another and take our separate paths that probably won’t intersect after high school. Sitting at the top of the food chain, we enjoyed the sweet taste of power-running the Red Sea, clogging up the senior hallway simply because we could, and being allowed into the senior lounge. We showed the school that we were here to leave a legacy. Tired is another word that I would use to describe the school year. We were all tired of having to do work and thought senior year would be a breeze--and it was, but not until April. Before then we had homework, tests to study for, college apps that needed to be finished, and sports to play. Basically, junior year ended nearly a year too late. (Good luck, Class of 2012…) We’re still tired, even though most of us have checked out. We’re tired of report cards being sent home (because by fourth quarter, who bothers doing homework

anymore, let alone showing up to school for a full five days?). Classes deemed unnecessary by the college-bound student body slowly melt away as fewer and fewer bother to show up--especially if they were first or fourth block. The day consists of only second and third block for a fourth quarter senior High school seems like it shouldn’t be over yet, but we are so glad that it is. Not that GHS is a bad place to be at, but the stories and the weekend experiences of college have made us more than ready to leave the halls of high school and move on to bigger and better things. High school has taught us the basics of how to get things done, and how to do our best with minimal sleep. The real challenge is what awaits us. Senior year has seemed to speed up and slow down at certain points along the way, and all of us have had college in the back of our minds since the last first day we came to school. Leaving the school will be sad (though more so for some than for others), but will more likely be exciting for everyone as we leave to go on and have more adventures than we could have ever imagined.

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Lunch dates,

Pinnies, the Red Sea, & community Dustin Maguire, Senior

We began our final year together on an early September morning. Gathered in the back lot, we represented our Dutchmen pride by sporting the infamous “Senior Pinnie”. Throughout the fall, the Red Sea gathered on Friday nights to support the football team in typical Dutchmen fashion. The Red Sea’s shining moment came when we silenced the 7,000 Shen fans at their homecoming. Moving through the winter and spring, Senioritis ravaged our seniors like the plague, but we never lost our Dutchmen spirit. We consistently made an effort to support our friends in whatever endeavor they set out upon whether it be sports, concerts, or plays. Senior year brought about three main questions that you probably discussed on a daily basis: “Where did you apply?” “Where did you get accepted?” and “Where are you going next year?” The question “Where did you apply?” was probably the most frequent in the fall. College applications and the Common App dominated our lives and caused more stress than most could handle. The spring brought about both excitement and disappointment as we anxiously received our responses from the colleges and the question “Where did you get accepted?” became an everyday occurrence. Finally, we moved into our final stage of the year: “Where are you going next

year?” As GHS hallways overflowed with college apparel, indications of one of the biggest decisions of our lives finally materialized. Regardless of where each of us is headed next year, the fact that we took this long journey together means that we will always share the Dutchmen bond. What makes us so special is the spirit we all possess. We are Dutchmen and as we move on from high school, we always will be. Every senior knows what it means to be a Dutchman; it means wearing a suit of red at least once a week, it means supporting our friends in their sports or other activities, it means being a part of a larger family. Whether you’re staying local or moving thousands of miles away for college, or meeting new friends, teachers, and mascots, you will forever remember who you were from the beginning. Before all else, you were a Dutchmen and will continue to be one. I would like to take an opportunity to congratulate the entire class of 2011 and wish them all the best of luck. Our four years together were merely the beginning. Graduation doesn’t mean the end; it means the start of something even bigger and better for each and every one of us. Never forget how proudly we once wore our red shirts and how much our Dutchmen community meant to us.

comforts zone, & lack thereof Nikki Smolenski, Senior It’s a weird thing being a senior. Lunch dates happen a lot more often, it’s acceptable to dress up as a lifeguard for school, and teachers will plan their schedules around the days they know everyone in the class will skip. Every senior transforms into a completely carefree individual. For the first time, people stop caring about literally everything from grades to due dates to outfits to how people percieve them. We’re all kind of grown up now, starting to branch out into our own lives but still floating in that lazy space between being a highschooler and being a college student. You know you’re a senior when all conversations you have with anyone somehow leads right back to college. Your friends, your teachers, your relatives, your dental hygienist, random customers at work; they all start to ask about what your plans are for next year. However, I don’t have plans. I have a location and a program to study, but from there I’m just going to roll with the punches. It’s impossible to plan for everything because we have absolutely no idea what the coming semester will be like. We can pretend we know what college life will be like based off of what older siblings tell us, but we will never truly know until we spend a few nights on campus. I’m going completely random for roommate and housing, I don’t know yet what kind of clubs, if any, I’m going to join, I barely know how to get around campus. But that’s exactly how it should be. I want to step into a completely different world and be forced to figure out everything on my own. I want to be out

of my comfort zone and challenged to deal with it. I’m most excited to be in charge of everything I do. No longer will I need permission to go to the bathroom or a pass to walk two doors down the hall. I will be able do what I want when I want. I am so ready for that freedom. Not only that, but freedom from our long established reputations. We have been with about the same group of people for the past thirteen years. I know that you cried at your first sleepover, and I know something about you that you probably don’t want anyone to know, I know how different you act outside of school, and I know who you “like liked” when we were ten. We all know each other. We are each other’s comfort zone. Even the random kids I never talk to I’m going to miss next year. You were always there walking past me in the hall or sitting at the lunch table next to mine, and now you’re gone. Everything will be different. After June 25, I might not ever see you again. It’s crazy we’ve spent six hours a day, five days a week for the past thirteen years together and now we’re done. We had high school together but good luck with the rest of your life. We are done. Looking back, we’ve come a long way but the road ahead of us is limitless, which is scary and exciting and nervewracking and exhilarating. Real life is out there waiting. In the words of Nicki Minaj, “We done did everything they could think of, greatness is what we’re on the brink of.”

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5/26/2011 11:05:02 AM


College Destinations Class of 2011

Kirsten Ackerman

Marist College

Undecided

Thomas Benson

SUNY Oswego

Finance/Accounting

Daniel Ainspan

SUNY Oneonta

Music Industry

Tyler Berberick

HVCC

Undecided

David Ainspan

HVCC

Paramedicine

Katherine Bickmore

Hamilton College

Studio Art

Yunis Alloush

HVCC

Biology

Katherine Bierman

MICA

Fiber or Illustration

Justine Aloise

North Carolina State University

Nuclear Engineering

Jonathan Bintz

SUNY Potsdam

Music Education

Michael Alsante

HVCC

Physical Education

Catherine Biondo

Syracuse University

Chemical Engineering

Jomar Alvarez

Military

Army

Joshua Blaauboer

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Torin Anders

SUNY Geneseo

Undecided

Meghan Bodo

Tufts University

International Relations and Economics

Jasmine Andres

Employment

Employment

Nathan Boehm

HVCC

Nursing

Haley Anderson

Le Moyne College

Criminology

Kathryn Bolognino

HVCC

Architecture

Laura Anderson

Syracuse University

Journalism

James Bondi

SUNY Potsdam

Archeology

Gabrielle Andrea

Elmira College

Nursing

Eric Bowers

SUNY Alfred

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Elizabeth Angleson

University Of Hartford

BFA Dance Performance

Dannielle Bratt

Suny Oneonta

Biology

Nikki Anthony

College of Saint Rose

Childhood Education

Rebecca Brittell

Employment

Employment

Veronica Anthony

HVCC

Undecided

Harry Brodsky

SUNY Buffalo

Undecided

Janelle Anziano

SCCC

Culinary

Brandon Brown

HVCC

Undecided

Wade Appleby

Norwich University

Computer Security & Informations Assurance

Michael Buchanan

Employment

Employment

Brandon Armony

SUNY Morrisville

Business Administration

Jordan Burns

SUNY Morrisville

Criminal Justice

Brianna Askew

Keuka College

Occupational Therapy

Kaitlyn Butler

Capital Region Career Tech Nursing

Mutia Assyifa

Unknown

Unknown

Matthew Callanan

Castleton College

Business

Dylan August

Western New England College

Undecided

Daniel Calzadilla

SUNY Buffalo

Chemical Engineering

Nicholas Austin

HVCC

Mechanical Engineering Technology

Reynalyn Canchela

Union College

Biology

Kari Balogh

Penn State University

Civil Engineering

Anthony Cannistraci

College of Saint Rose

Business

Carli Barbarotto

Nazareth College

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Ryan Cardiff

SUNY Canton

Criminal Justice

Gregory Barber

Columbia University

Political Science-Economics

Ellie Carr

UMass Amherst

Undecided

Adam Barbera

HVCC

Physical Education

Rory Carroll

SUNY Binghamton

Biology

Frederick Basile

Employment

Employment

Matthew Cattell

HVCC

Individual Studies

Shaina Bass

Russell Sage College

Nursing

Rachael Cerutti

University of Connecticut

Elementary Education

Kevin Bates

Johnson & Wales University

Culinary Arts

John Ciccarelli

Pace University

International Marketing

Megan Bauer

SUNY Oneonta

Early/Childhood Education B-6

Mark Ciccarelli

Gap year in Switzerland

-

Maxene Beale-MacBeth

Tompkins Cortland CC

Liberal Arts

Kristin Clark

Xavier University

Chemistry or Biology

Stephen Beattie

HVCC

Electricity

Colin Clarke

Temple University

Film

Joshua Beck

Employment

Employment

Brandon Cleveland

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Cameron Becker

HVCC

Criminal Justice

James Clum Dolan

HVCC

Gallery Management

Steven Bellegarde

SUNY New Paltz

Adolescence Education

Dominique Cochrane Undecided

Undecided

Zachary Belokopitsky

University of Miami

Finance

Hannah Cohen

St. Lawrence University

Economics and Global Studies

Jessica Ben-Yishay

Pace University

Undecided

Dallas Colavito

Coastal Carolina University Exercise and Sports Sciences

Terence Bender Jr

St.John Fisher

Sports Management and Law

Cassandra Cole

SUNY Oswego

Undecided

Mikayla Bennett

SCCC

Nutrition

Kimberly Coleman

College of Saint Rose

Secondary Education

Daniel Bennison

Georgia Southern University

Business Administration

MacKenzie Collins

Employment

Employment

14 pg15 listings1.indd 1

5/26/2011 11:05:24 AM


Meghan Collins

SUNY Binghamton

Undecided

John Evans

SUNY Oswego

Accounting

Louis Coluccio

HVCC

Auto Trades

Kelsey Evans

HVCC

Sociology/Human Services & Social Sciences

Kameron Connor

SUNY IT

Computer Science

Nikole Evereth

SUNY Albany

Psychology

Elijah Cooley

HVCC

Architectural Technology

James Fanciullo

SUNY Albany

Undecided

Danielle Cooper

SUNY Cortland

Childhood Education

Andrew Faragon

HVCC

Sports Management/Business

Alexis Cortese

Utica College

Occupational Therapy

Carleen Farruggia

HVCC

Nursing/Individual Study

Laura Cox

SUNY Delhi

Biology

Zachary Favreau

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Andrew Coy

Canisius College

Biology

Allison Feinman

SUNY Potsdam

Undecided

Justine Cozza

MCLA

Undecided

Bradley Fellner

HVCC

X-ray Tech

Haley Crast

Keene State

Elementary Education

David Fengshi

Cornell University

Engineering

Amanda Cubello

Endicott College

Journalism

Thomas Fiacco

Military

Military

Daniel Curry

HVCC

Computer Technician and Administration

Nicholas Flaherty

SUNY Oswego

Business

Kevin Danckert

SUNY Delhi

Electrical Construction

Shane Foley

Roger Williams University

Business

Rachel Danto

UMass Amherst

Communications

Courtney Franklin

Undecided

Undecided

Felicia Danzy

HVCC

Nursing

Dominick Futia

HVCC

Undecided

Jennifer David

University of Chicago

English

David Gao

University of Waterloo

Computing and Financial Management

Michael Davis

University of Vermont

Psychology

Christopher Gareau

SCCC

Music Performance

Michael Dawson

HVCC

Architecture

Dominic Gemmiti

Western New England College Undecided

Jasmine Day

American University

Communications

Andrew Genovese

University of Maryland

Criminology/Criminal Justice

Giuliana De Angelis

SUNY Cortland

Undecided

Aimee George-Denn

SUNY Geneseo

Pre Medical

Brandon Dederick

HVCC

Electrical Trades

Lawrence Gerchikov

SUNY Binghamton

Biology

Vincent DelBene

SUNY Buffalo

Engineering

Waliyat Ghaffar

Undecided

Undecided

Victoria Deluise

SUNY Oswego

Undecided

Naeem Gibson-Ancrum North Carolina A&T State

Nanoscale Engineering

Benjamin Des Moines Western New England College

Biomedical Engineering

Devon Gingrich

SUNY Binghamton

International Relations

Sean Desch

SUNY Plattsburgh

Criminal Justice

Elisabeth Gioia

SUNY Stony Brook

Psychology

Kirstyn Desrosiers

HVCC

Undecided

Julian Girard

Siena College

Undecided

Sabrina Devine

Employment

Employment

Daniel Golderman

Quinnipiac University

Accounting

James Diana

Orlo School of Cosmotology

Cosmetology

Kara Goodknight

HVCC

Undecided

Michael Diana

Hamilton College

History

Cereena Gordon

SUNY Plattsburgh

Spanish

Brendan Doak

SUNY Oneonta

Elementary Education

Michael Gouvakis

HVCC

Business

Caleb Doak

HVCC

Architectural Technology

Steven Gouvakis

Siena College

Mathematics

Michael Donadio

Clarkson Universtiy

Political Science

Theresa Graffeo

Siena College

History

Justin Donohue

HVCC

Undecided

Louis Greco

Fairfield University

Psychology

Nicholas Dorato

New School of Radio and Television Broadcast communications

Kyle Greenhouse

HVCC

Electrical Construction & Maintenance

William Dougherty

Rochester Institute of Technology Computer Science

Victoria Gregory

SUNY Albany

Math or Accounting

Sean Doyle

Roger Williams University

Graphic Design

Alyssa Grogan

Hartwick College

Undecided

Elizabeth Drooby

SUNY Binghamton

Physics

Mia Guyette

SUNY Plattsburgh

Nutrition

Tess Dube

Le Moyne College

Undecided

Christopher Halloran

Undecided

Undecided

Alessia Duca

SUNY Buffalo

Biology

Audra Hamill

Nazareth College

Italian and International Studies

Jordan Duke

St. Lawrence University

Biology

Michelle Hand

SUNY Buffalo

Political Science

Nicholas Dunn

HVCC

Pre Law (Marines)

Adam Hart

SUNY Albany

Civil Engineering

Andrew Durand

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Alicia Hatker

Employment

Employment

Alexander Dvorscak

SUNY Buffalo

Political Science

Danielle Heath

University of Rhode Island

Writing and Rhetoric

Lauren Dvorscak

Syracuse University

History

Amber Hedjazi

SUNY Buffalo

Nursing

Emily Easley

Roger Williams University

Psychology

John Patrick Henry

Siena College

Business

Janet Eckhardt

SCCC

Culinary

Yvonia Hepburn

SUNY Oneonta

Political Science

Jacob Eisele

Trade School

Trade School

Stephanie Hilson

Siena College

Undecided

Meg Eisele

SUNY Cobelskill

Animal Science

Cori Hilt

Covenant College

Biology/Pre-Med

Rachael Ellenbogen

SUNY Stony Brook

Journalism

Heather Hitt

SUNY Albany

Criminal Justice

Taylor Evanchick

HVCC

Humanities and Social Sciences

Brandon Hoenig

SUNY Oswego

Unknown

15 pg16 listings2.indd 1

5/26/2011 11:05:39 AM


John Patrick Horan

Nazareth College

Physical Therapy

Jessica LePore

College of Saint Rose

Michael Horan

Herkimer County CC

Digital Film Making

Abigail Levy

Pennsylvania State University Undecided

Justin Horne

HVCC

Physical Education

Dominic Litz

Loyola University

Finance

Melissa Horton

Le Moyne College

Biology

Kevin Lo

Syracuse University

Electrical Engineering

Conor Hurley

SUNY Buffalo

Accounting

Madeline Logiudice College of Saint Rose Timothy Love

Katherine Hutson

SUNY Binghamton

Philosophy, Politics and Law

Haejin Hwang

Cornell University

Government /International Relations Kasey Lozano

Daniel Japikse

HVCC

Business Administration

Robert Jenks III

HVCC

Traci Jill Lindsey Johnson

Undecided

Elementary education

Worcester Polytechnic Insitute Civil Engineering St. John Fisher College

Communications/Journalism

David Ludwig

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Human Services

Michael Luizzi

Employment

Employment

Hartwick College

Pre-Med, Biology

Joana Lule

Cornell University

Economics

SUNY Oneonta

Geography

Jeremy Lundquist

Siena College

Biology

Undecided

Undecided

Taylor Johnston

SCCC

Business/Agricultural Business

Lisa Luther

Matthew Jones

Herkimer CC

Accounting

Brittany Lynch

Christopher Joseph

College of Saint Rose

Business Administration/Economics Brett MacNeil

Jared Joseph

Employment

Employment

Carli Jurczynski

Marist College

Kelly Kane Nicholas Kappes

Pennsylvania State University Undecided HVCC

Independent Studies

Alexander Madaio

SCCC

Criminal Justice

Communications

Jared Magee

Employment

Employment

HVCC

Undecided

Dustin Maguire

Old Dominion University

Marketing

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Kyra Malamood

Villanova University

Undecided

Christopher Kaszluga SUNY Plattsburgh

History

Megan Malamood

Villanova University

Undecided

Sean Keegan

SCCC

Nanotechnology

Danielle Malitz

University of Michigan

Biology

Nolan Kehn

Universal Technical Institute

Diesel Mechanic

Beatrice Malsky

University of Chicago

Neuroscience/Linguistics

Mary Kelly

SUNY Cortland

Speech and Language Disabilities

Sabihah Mamdani

Albany College of Pharmacy

Pharmacy

Ryan Kenyon

St. Bonaventure University

Undecided/Business

Sindhura Mandava

SUNY Binghamton

Political Science/Economics/Pre-Med

Christian Kernozek SUNY Plattsburgh

English

Michael Marcantonio Syracuse University

Finance and Marketing

Sarah Khaliqi

HVCC

Undecided

Jessica Marini

Le Moyne College

Biology

Zoe King

Barnard College

Undecided

Katelyn Markellos

HVCC

Undecided

Jared Kline

SUNY Oswego

Biological Sciences (Pre-Med)

Connor Marshall

HVCC

Communications

Andrew Klug

Clarkson University

Engineering

Danielle Martin

Russell Sage College

Early Childhood Education

Amy Knapp

Austin Beauty School

Cosmetology

Deirdre Martin

Hartwick College

Undecided

Michelle Knightes

HVCC

Undecided

Jamie Martin

HVCC

Engineering

Chrystie Koottumkal HVCC

Liberal Arts

Alexandra Martini

University of Connecticut

Business

Rachel Korman

SUNY New Paltz

Undecided

Whitney Massey

HVCC

Undecided

Audra Kowalczyk

SUNY Brockport

Biology/Earth Science

Nicholas Mastrianni Bentley University

Business

Joshua Kraushaar

SUNY Buffalo

Mechanical Engineering

William Matthews

Paul Smith’s College

Wildlife Sciences

Tiffany Krofft

SCCC

Humanities/Social Sciences

Anastasia Mazur

Ithaca College

English Education

Nicole LaFreniere

SUNY Cortland

Secondary Education/Biology

Jonathan McBride II Albany College of Phamacy

Pharmacy

Renee LaFreniere

SUNY Oswego

Psychology

Shamyr McCain

Mohawk Vallley CC

Psychology

Aaron Lally

HVCC

Individual Studies

Carle McDonald

HVCC

Accounting

Jenna Lamparski

SUNY Oneonta

Psychology

Nicholas McDonnell Military

Army

Devan Landry

Marymount Manhattan College

Dance

Dana McLaughlin

School of Visual Arts

Fine Arts

Sarah Lansaw

Hobart and William Smith College Art History

Amber McNeal

Bowie State University

Biology

Stephanie Lasselle

Houghton College

Music Education

James McQuade

Cornell University

Mechanical Engineering

Connor Lassonde

HVCC

Mechanical Engineering Technology Meghan Meddleton SUNY Cortland

Criminology

John Lavelle

Louisiana State University

Mechanical Engineer

Francesca Mesiti

SUNY Oswego

Public Relations

Richard Lavare

SUNY Cobleskill

Fisheries and Wildlife

Harima Mian

SUNY Albany

Biology

Kayla Leach

Daemen College

Art Education

Hannah Miele

Nyack College

Vocal Performance

Sugyeong Lee

College in Korea

Pastry Art

Timothy Miller

Trade School

Trade School

Brandon Leichman

SUNY Cobleskill

Paramedics/Physical Education

Tyler Mitchell

SUNY Oneonta

Environmental Science

Dominick Lemme

HVCC

Undecided

Brian Moore Jr

HVCC

Marketing/Advertisement

Erica Lenseth

Springfield College

Early Childhood Education

Hannah Morier

SUNY Oneonta

Undecided

pg17 listings3.indd 1

16 5/26/2011 11:05:54 AM


Lauren Morse

WPI

Biomedical Engineering

Michael Pultz

SUNY New Paltz

Accounting

Christopher Mosall SCCC

Culinary Arts

Saseen Punyala

SUNY Buffalo

Computer Engineering

Christopher Mosher Virginia Polytechnic Institute

Chemical Engineering

Candace Race

Maria College

Psychology

Erin Mossop

Robert Morris University

Nursing

Brenden Ragotzkie

SUNY Albany

History

Nicolas Muia

Herkimer County CC

Communications

Steven Ratner

Boston University

Engineering

Caroline Murphy

University of Delaware

Wildlife Conservation

Brian Reed

Lehigh University

Mechanical Engineering

Olivia Muztafago

SUNY Oneonta

Fashion Merchandising

Brianna Reed

Russell Sage College

Political Science

Emily Nagle

Marist College

Undecided

Alexa Reilly

University of Vermont

English

Kelly Nash

University of Delaware

Criminal Justice

Alexander Relyea

Undecided

Undecided

Yves Nazon II

University of Maryland

Mechanical Engineering

Zachary Relyea

SUNY Cortland

Business

Leah Nelson

Carleton College

Undecided

Kyungduk Rho

Cornell University

Biology

Trevor Nelson

HVCC

Liberal Arts and Sciences

Jacob Rhoades

HVCC

Computer Science

Brett Newberry

SUNY Buffalo

Civil Engineering

Davi Rich

University of Rhode Island

Marine Biology

Zachary Newhart

Employment

Employment

Jack Richards

Western New England College Pharmacy

Don Nguyen

SUNY Buffalo

Undecided

Ian Richardson

SUNY Alfred

Mechanical engineering

Jun Xi Ni

George Washington University

Biomedical Engineering

Jennifer Robbiano

Northeastern University

International Affairs

Sajad Noor

HVCC

Pre-Med

Armane Robinson

SUNY Albany

Journalism

HVCC

Individual Studies

Michael Noyse

SCCC

Biology

Briana Rodriguez

Amani Ntabona

Herkimer County CC

Undeclared

Sara Roemer

SCCC

Culinary Arts

Russell Oliver

SUNY Buffalo

Communications

Margaret Rogers

HVCC

Adolescent Education

Ryan Orsini

Ithaca College

Business Administration

Andres Roma

SUNY Binghamton

Math

Worcester Polytechnic Institute Aerospace Engineering

Melissa Osborne

SCCC

Early Childhood

Ashley Rosano

Ashley O`Brien

SUNY Oswego

Biology

Kathleen Rose

University of Vermont

Elementary Education

Sean O`Brien

SUNY Morrisville

Criminal Justice

Hannah Rosen

Paul Smith’s College

Culinary Arts

Kaitlin O`Riley

SUNY Oneonta

Psychology or Public Relations

Philip Rotella

HVCC

Pharmacist

Joshua Palagyi

Westminster Choir College of Rider University Vocal Performance

Noah Rubin

University of Pennsylvania

Physics or Engineering

Shante Papa

Pace University

Business/Undecided

Scott Rubin

University of Hartford

Acoustical Engineering

Kayla Pariseau

Siena College

Social Work

Robert Ruggles

College of Saint Rose

Communications

Keon Wan Park

Georgia Institute of Technology

Engineering

Shelby Ruppenthal

SUNY New Paltz

Undecided

Morgan Parker

HVCC

Undecided

Kristi Russell

East Carolina University

Elementary Education

Samantha Pasquini SUNY New Paltz

Art

Shannon Ruth

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Isaac Patka

SUNY Binghamton

Mechanical Engineering

Vincenzo Russo

Albany College of Pharmacy

Pharmaceutical Science

Alexa Patnaude

College of Saint Rose

Undecided

Dilan Samarasinghe

SUNY Albany

Computer Science

David Peacock

Arizona State University

Computer Engineering, Aviation

Neil Sanders

Rochester Institute of Technology

Engineering Technology

Alexander Peebles Roger Williams University

Engineering

James Sands

University of Missisippi

Entrepreneurship Business Management

Olivia Peek

HVCC

Undecided

Thomas Santiago

HVCC

Business Administration

Nicole Pelkey

HVCC

Dietician

Joshua Santos

SUNY New Paltz

English

Gianna Pennacchia SUNY Plattsburgh

Marketing

Emma Sarachan

Columbia University

Physics

Brittani Peterson

SCCC

Health Studies

Kristin Scally

Fashion Institute of Technology

Fashion Merchandising

Katherine Phelan

Colgate University

Undecided

Jeremy Schmidt

SUNY New Paltz

Computer Engineering

Heidi Pikcilingis

HVCC

Dental Hygiene

Niko Sciocchetti

Fordham University

Undecided

Shawn Playford

SUNY Oswego

Undecided

Nathaniel Scott

Saint Michaels

Environmental Science

Nicholas Plue

Paul Smith’s College

Culinary Arts

Alexandra Selca

HVCC

Dental Hygiene

Matthew Poelma

HVCC

Business

Samuel Segal

University of Michigan

Biophysics/Biomedical engineering (Pre-Med)

Jacob Polfleit

Paul Smith’s College

Environmental/Conservational Biology (Army)

Dmitriy Setchenkov

HVCC

Computer Science and Information

Benjamin Pontillo American University

International Studies

Lee Setzen

Boston University

Finance and Accounting

Jared Ports

SUNY IT

Computer Information and Science

Leslie Shaffer

Hamilton College

Government

Sobhana Potluri

SUNY Albany

Undecided

Matthew Shamlian

Miami University

Undecided

Ryan Prendergast

American University

International Service

Natalie Shea

Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

Undecided

Martin Primett

HVCC

Undecided

Kyle Sheehan

University of New Haven

Law Enforcement/Criminal Justice

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Meghan Sheehan

Elon University

Pre-Law

Ryan Wager

SCCC

Music Business

Erica Sheridan

SUNY Purchase

Creative Writing

Shannon Wahrlich

Employment

Employment

Zachary Sicard

St. John Fisher College

Sports Management

Matthew Walsh

Princeton University

Engineering or physics

Nicole Siino

Roger Williams University

History

John Walsh III

University of Maryland

Accounting/Finance

Katie Silva

Marist College

Computer Science

Tyler Warchol

Pennsylvania College of Technology

Computer Aided Drafting Design

Alex Simpson

Newbury College

Culinary Arts

Leah Wassermann

George Washington University

Political Communications

Daniel Sipzner

Temple University

Fine Arts

Autumn Waterhouse

HVCC

Mortuary Science

Christopher Siracusa

Canisius College

Biology

Kacie Weatherhead

York College

Nursing

Ernestine Skipper

Undecided

Undecided

Jordan Weeden

Temple University

Criminal Justice

Hannah Smith

SUNY Cortland

exercise science

Rachel Weston

Ithaca College

Athletic Training

Kelsey Smith

SCCC

Culinary Arts

Christopher Whalen

SUNY Maritime College

Naval Architecture

Kevin Smith

SUNY Cobleskill

Humanities

Elizabeth Whalen

St. Thomas Aquinas College

Art Therapy

Ryan Smith

Colgate University

Undecided

Alexandra White

Butte College

Early Childhood Education

Timothy Smith

SUNY New Paltz

Business

Anna Whitney

SCCC

Nursing

Nicole Smolenski

Syracuse University

Architecture

Monika Wicks

Adult Nursing

Nursing

Bryan Snow

SCCC

Culinary Arts

Bobbi-Jo Wier

SCCC

Criminal Justice/Forensic Science

Evan Snow

HVCC

Engineering Science

Katherine Williamson

George Washington University

Archaeology

Peyton Snyder

SUNY Potsdam

Elementary Education

Jenna Witzleben

Cornell University

Chemical Engineering

Joshua Sommers

Utica College

Cybersecurity

Kathryn Wood

SUNY Oneonta

Chemistry and Secondary Education

Sarah Sonenberg

Cornell University

Biology

Kelsey Wood

Le Moyne College

Nursing

Aleksandr Spevak

Siena College

Biology

James Woods

SUNY Albany

Undecided

Alexis Sprio

Marist College

Biomedical Sciences

Lanxi Xing

RIT

Computer Science

Independent Studies

Kodey Stanley

HVCC

Christopher Yankowski

SUNY Plattsburgh

Undecided

Ayla Stoecklin

NewYork Institute of Technology Architecture and Urban Planning

Sarah Zalewski

SUNY Plattsburgh

Accounting

Lindsey Sullivan

HVCC

Individual studies

Kali Zervos

Employment

Employment

Kathryn Zuchowski

Cornell University

Biology

Daniel Sweeney

Employment

Employment

Brittni Switser

SUNY Oswego

Anthropology

Kendra Szingle

HVCC

Social Work

Caitlan Swyer

SCCC

Music Education

Vincent Tamburello

SUNY Albany

Criminal Justice

Ved Tanavde

Columbia University

Molecular Biophysics/Biochemistry

Elizabeth Tapler

Pacific Lutheran University

Undecided

McKee Taylor

Norfolk State University

Undecided

Marissa Testa

Fashion Institute of Technology

Advertising and Marketing Communications

Daniel Thompson

HVCC

Civil Engineering

Anthony Toffenetti

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Iphigenia Tortora

Nazareth College

Occupational Therapy

Dominic Tralongo

HVCC

Auto Mechanics

Vimee Tran

Oglethorpe University

Chemistry

Paul Travers

University of Massachusetts

Music: Trumpet Performance

Kaitlin Trimboli

SUNY Brockport

Social Work

Lisa Trova

Rochester Institute of Technology

Computer Engineering

Jerry Tseng

SUNY Buffalo

Biomedical engineering

Joelle Turek

SUNY Buffalo

Computer Science

Andrew Turner

HVCC

Criminal Justice

Shayne Tybur

HVCC

Electrical Construction

Alan Vaisman

Northeastern University

Business

Michael Valletta

University of Connecticut

Business

Jenna Vanwely

HVCC

Liberal Arts

Lisa Velesko

SUNY Geneseo

Political Science / Education

Over 20 years Experience Specializing in treatment of individuals with orthopedic related conditions and rheumatic diseases as well as conditions involving the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. 3434 Carman Road Schenectady, NY 12303

(518) 630-6167 Fax (518) 357-0018 handtherapyguilderland@yahoo.com

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Volume 62 Senior Issue  

The GHS Journal Volume 62, 2010-2011 Senior Issue, June 2011

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