Page 26

OUR GORGE : LOCAVORE

Good for What Ails You A small Gorge company aims to spread good health through bone broth STORY BY RUTH BERKOWITZ • PHOTOS BY PALOMA AYALA

B

eth Kandell ladles me a warm mug of beef broth on a rainy, late-fall morning. I inhale the steam and sip slowly, feeling instantly relieved, even slightly stronger, as if good health is flowing into my body. I have made my own broth at home with remnants from a roasted chicken dinner, but mine often tastes oily. Kandell, who produces gallons of bone broth weekly and sells it locally through her company, Simply Fine Gourmet, has perfected her recipe to taste smooth and earthy.

26 WINTER 2018-19 : THE GORGE MAGAZINE

A step up from Grandma’s hefty pot simmering on the back of the stove, organic bone broth is making a comeback. The rise of “broth-ers” is partly attributed to the Paleo, or caveman, diet and the trend to eat whole foods. Think chicken soup, the liquid gold that’s long been thought of as a cure for the common cold. Kandell first learned about the benefits of broth when she met a cancer patient who claimed that bone broth had cured her. Intrigued, Kandell, who suffered from leaky gut issues, began making her own broth, starting with a standard recipe from the cooking website Epicurious. After a few months of sipping broth throughout the day, Kandell healed her gut and noticed that her hair and nails were thicker and her gums ceased to have deep pockets. When Kandell moved from Los Angeles to her dream home in Stevenson, Wash., a few years ago, she spent time perfecting her broth. Both broth and stock include bones and meat, but stock has a higher proportion of bones to meat and simmers for only a few hours as opposed to the 12 to 24 hours required to make gelatinous, nutrient-rich broth. Kandell thoroughly tests each ingredient and continually tweaks her recipes, both for taste and nutrition. At first, she used whole chicken carcasses, but now prefers chicken necks and feet because these parts produce more gelatin and collagen, a protein essential for bones, muscles, tendons, skin and nails. Her beef bone broth comes from cows that are grass fed their entire lives and never given antibiotics or GMO feed. Adding acid to the pot, like vinegar, wine or tomato paste, helps extract the nutrients from the bones. Kandell discovered that using dense celery root instead of the stalks is both more flavorful and more nutritious. The earthy flavor of the beverage derives from dried Maitake mushrooms. In her pursuit of making the highest quality product possible, Kandell also uses a special Kangen water filter that adds more alkaline to the water, making it higher in magnesium and calcium. To seal the flavors of the broth and reduce the cooking time, Kandell places all of her ingredients in a commercial pressure cooker and instant pots.

Profile for The Gorge Magazine

The Gorge Magazine - Winter 2018-19  

Enjoy our colorful winter issue full of captivating stories and beautiful photography. Happy reading!

The Gorge Magazine - Winter 2018-19  

Enjoy our colorful winter issue full of captivating stories and beautiful photography. Happy reading!

Advertisement