Liberation issue 23

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THE

FORUMIST

Issue 23

Liberation 01


THE

FORUMIST STORE

OLOF GRIND PHOTOGRAPHED BY NILS LÖFHOLM

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Liberation

Issue 23

The enjoyable moments of being together once again with friends and family in recent months have been like a reawakening. They have reminded us of the importance of social interaction with others and the freedom of exchanging ideas and joy. Being able to travel again and the expansion of our everyday life back to something like it was before has brought us back to a kind of familiar normality. But why not take this opportunity to continue this path towards deeper grounds by evolving and liberating ourselves further? There is for many of us a desire for that unstoppable feeling to expand our minds and unchain our spirit to be free of the old limitations and restrictions, to bring life-changing possibilities for you and your world. Let’s not be controlled by negative thoughts and the powers that try to direct your state of mind. Listen to your inner voice and you will find the answers. Allow creativity and the beauty of life to lead your way, and embrace love and understanding to treat others well, bring peace, forgiveness and generosity to solve disputes. Treat our planet with care. Liberation starts within you and it’s your duty to share it with others. In this issue, we have called on creatives and talents from around the world to explore the theme of liberation and, hopefully, their thoughts and ideas will direct you towards your own personal liberation. COVER: JANICE (LEFT) AND SABINA DDUMBA. PHOTOGRAPHY: PELLE LANNEFORS. STYLING: AMANDA HÖRLIN. MAKE-UP: ELVIRA BRANDT. HAIR BY RAHWA BELAYE. PHOTO ASSISTANT: NILS LÖFHOLM. STYLING ASSISTANT: SOFIA MATÉ

Editor-in-Chief Pejman Biroun Vand (Stockholm)

Lifestyle Editor Tor Bergman (Stockholm)

Creative Direction See Studio (London)

Music Editor Filip Lindström (Stockholm)

Executive Editor Sofia-Li Molin (Stockholm)

Art Editor Ted Hammerin (Tallinn)

The Forumist Store Director Aleksandra Srndovic (Stockholm)

Sub-editor Andrew Lindesay (London)

Beauty Editor Céline Exbrayat (Paris)

Sustainability Editor Charles Westerberg (Stockholm)

Paris Editor Victoire Seveno

Web Developer Gustav Bagge (Stockholm)

Contributing Fashion Editors Victoire Seveno (Paris) Pholoso Selebogo (Copenhagen) Sophie Giannoule (Berlin) Amanda Hörlin (Stockholm) Arianna Cavallo (Paris) Cameron Broomfield (NY) Amanda Ljungkvist (Stockholm) Anna Sundelin (Stockholm) Contributing Photographers Linus Morales (Stockholm) Thierry Lebraly (Paris) Madeleine Dalla (NY) John Scarisbrick (Stockholm) Jeremy Josselin (Paris) Pelle Lannefors (Stockholm) Rickard Aronsson (Stockholm) Monica Menez (Berlin) 01

Théo Gosselin (Paris) Chris Calmer (Copenhagen) Contributing Editors Tor Bergman (Stockholm) Sofia-Li Molin (Stockholm) Linnéa Ruiz Mutikaine (Stockholm) Filip Lindström (Stockholm) Charles Westerberg (Stockholm) Printing Trydells Inquiries and online submission info@theforumist.com Advertising ad@theforumist.com

© 2020. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without permission from the publisher. The views expressed in the magazine are those of the contributors and not necessarily shared by the magazine. The Forumist AB Mariagränd 2 116 46 Stockholm SWEDEN info@theforumist.com theforumist.com facebook.com/theforumist instagram.com/theforumist


Changes Scene

Stories of initiation and metamorphosis set the stage for new identities and new looks Photography by CHRIS CALMER Art Direction and styling by PHOLOSO SELEBOGO Beauty direction by MASSIMO MØ MØLLER Make-up by MAC THIS PAGE: HEAD SCARF STYLIST’S OWN, BLANKET BY TEKLA FABRICS OPPOSITE PAGE: JACKET BY (DI)VISION 02




OPPOSITE PAGE: BLANKET BY TEKLA FABRICS THIS PAGE, TOP LEFT: SCARVES BY MALENE BIRGER TOP RIGHT: OUTER SCARF BY BAUM UND PFERGARTEN, WRAPPED BLANKET BY SOTHO TRADITIONAL WEAR, HEADSCARF STYLIST’S OWN ABOVE RIGHT: SHOULDER BLANKET BY TEKLA FABRICS, SKIRT BY BAUM UND PFERGARTEN, CAP AND EARRING STYLIST’S OWN ABOVE LEFT: BLANKETS BY(LEFT) TEKLA FABRICS AND (RIGHT) COS 05


THIS PAGE: WHOLE LOOK BY TEKLA FABRICS OPPOSITE PAGE: BLANKETS BY TEKLA FABRICS, TROUSERS AND BELT STYLIST’S OWN MODELS: MILTON AND JAYCE @ 95MGM

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Crossover crafting

In a transformative creative landscape, unexpected collaborations pave the way for a new approach to craftsmanship. A recent crossover between jewellers In Gold We Trust and tech brand NUDIENT exemplifies this ongoing paradigm shift Photography by JOHN SCARISBRICK Styling by KEN MOGEKWU Words by LINNÉA RUIZ MUTIKAINEN 08


THIS PAGE: PEARL & BALL CHAIN BOLD CASE JACKET BY CHRISTIANA HADJIPAPA, SHORTS BY STAND STUDIO, BOOTS BY MAYA SUNDHOLM OPPOSITE PAGE: CARABINER & CUBAN CHAINS BOLD CASE BANDEU STYLIST’S OWN, TROUSERS BY MIKO MAYA, EYEWEAR BY ALICE GRUVANDER


Ever since digitalisation and one-click consumption entered the field of play, brands have been forced to rethink. Besides catering to an overwhelming demand, it has become acutely necessary to evaluate brand identity to stand out in a sea of competition. The fashion industry is already under an intense gaze due to its overarching lack of sustainability measures. But if we zoom in on the current landscape and try to identify micro-level actions with the potential to switch up the landscape, we can see that there is a strong candidate in crossover collaboration. With collaborations, you see less of the each-to-their-own industry mindset and more of unexpected matchmaking. What stands out to me are the blurred boundaries in how interior establishments collaborate with fashion designers, progressive design studios team up with niche scent makers, and – to highlight one in particular – the unexpected link up between an emerging accessory brand and a well-established tech institution. The collaboration is clear. You get two everyday tech gadgets in an elevated costume. A minimalist phone case and matching AirPods case, both functional pieces yet with an embellished, high-end feel. Although perceived as small gadgets, they carry an immense impact, steering two distinct brands into unexplored territory. In this case, the unexpected match is what initiated the romance in the first place. For In Gold We Trust, the upcoming Paris-based progressive jewellers, the collaboration directs them towards a new market. Their aesthetic is raw, frequently offering perspective-altering takes on traditional crafting. Swedish tech-brand NUDIENT has the established platform yet wants to break out of the strictly functional sphere and instead reside within fashion. What intrigues me is not only the collaboration in itself, but the motives behind it. In order to fully grasp In Gold We Trust, we need to break down the brand. Unlike most contemporary jewellers, In Gold We Trust has no previous expertise within the jewellery field. Architect Héloïse Chiron acutely felt the need to break away from the regular, nine-to-five life. Craftsman tailor Louis Mariede Bridiers shared the same need, volunteering to provide artistic direction to this new, unknown project. “We perceive jewellery as a means rather than an end. It’s a medium of expression, of which we have no experience,” Chiron says. “Self-taught in jewellery, we don’t know any codes, so here are no intellectual barriers in the way of our creative process.” Curious to hear how they manage to remain true to their creative direction in a collaborative setting, without being too influenced by outside factors, Chiron shares: “We like to play with the direct and indirect meaning of objects and materials. This collaboration actually makes sense to us, since our latest collection addressed artificial intelligence,” she says. “Here, we have

THIS PAGE: PEARL & BALL CHAIN BOLD CASE BRA AND SKIRT BY FROLOV OPPOSITE PAGE: SCREW LINK ON CUBAN CHAIN BOLD AIRPODS CASE TOP, BRALETTE AND SKIRT BY MARAN

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just asked ourselves what mobile phones actually represent to us. Being constantly connected, eyes riveted on the screen, it is clear that we are linked or almost chained to our phones.” Héloïse Chiron sees each collaboration, although choosing them with care, as ideal ways to express yourself in a new context. Although vocal about creative and economical benefits of collaborations, she accentuates the complexity, “It’s not just a simple image association to boost sales. A collaboration must be balanced and encourage experimentation. Ultimately, this is the meeting of two distinct universes that give birth to a new vision, new idea, and new objects.” On the other side of the coin, shaped by an ambition to rethink the meaning of functional design, we meet NUDIENT. Founded in 2016 by three entrepreneurs, their foremost vision was to create a unisex fashion tech brand characterised two words – minimal and urban. Co-founder Pontus Krusing explains: “With roots in Sweden, it became natural to acknowledge the minimalist design that has been paramount within Scandinavian design since the 1950s. We also wanted to highlight progressive and contemporary street-urban design that has influenced the narrative for the past years.” Intrigued by the partnership between minimalist Scandinavian and blossoming Mediterranean, I ask Krusing to provide his take. To him, NUDIENT’s already existing focus on innovative production methods, sustainability and high-quality materials is essential. The combination has already challenged traditional fashion manufacturing paradigms on several occasions. “NUDIENT is a brand that takes functional design to a new level. The collaboration with In Gold We Trust shows common grounds in functionality, technicality but also curiosity to new things. I think it confirms our vision to move phone accessories into the room of fashion, where they belong.” When asked about his thoughts on the emerging wave of crossover collaboration, with craftsmanship spearheading creativity rather than strict marketing, Krusing answers. “It’s important to keep the fundamentals of each brand and create common ground where it’s possible. In a world where people expect you to be adaptive and fast changing to new trends, collaborations are a great way to get influences from other emerging brands, sometimes in other product categories.” It is precisely this kind of process of mixing up different kinds of knowledge and experience that can reveal how businesses can evolve into the future. It takes creativity and imagination to come up with these fresh and unexpected links, and once followed through in collaborations like the one between NUDIENT and In Gold We Trust, new journeys of discovery spark further creativity in a free-ranging exploration of the landscape that we thought we knew, changing it forever with a liberated spirit of entrepreneurship.




THIS PAGE: PEARL & BALL CHAIN BOLD CASE JACKET AND SHORTS BY SAMUEL WESTERBERG LEGGINGS STYLIST’S OWN OPPOSITE PAGE: CARABINER & CUBAN CHAINS BOLD CASE TOP AND LEGGINGS BY FROLOV HAIR & MAKE-UP: ELVIRA BRANDT MODEL: JOANNE O @ MIKAS


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Side Wild

Embrace the strangeness of the backwoods, don’t tame the wildness in nature or yourself Photography by THÉO GOSSELIN @ LGA Artistic direction by JULIA SULTANA Styling by VICTOIRE SEVENO @ KAPTIVE OPPOSITE PAGE: FULL LOOK BY LOEWE THIS PAGE: TOP AND SKIRT BY LOU DE BETOLY, SHOES BY LOEWE

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TOP: KNITTED GARMENT BY LEWIS DUSSURGET, BROWN CROCHET PANTIES BY AIKOMOTO ABOVE LEFT: DRESS BY MARVIN MTOUMO, WHITE OVERKNEE COWBOY BOOTS BY NEITH NYER X CORCEL.SHOP ABOVE RIGHT: TOP AND SKIRT BY LOU DE BETOLY OPPOSITE PAGE: KNITTED GARMENT BY LEWIS DUSSURGET

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TOP: BRA AND PANTIES BY MIU MIU, MULTICOLOUR SKIRT BY VITELLI ABOVE LEFT: POLKA DOT CROCHET PANTS BY LEWIS DUSSURGET ABOVE RIGHT AND OPPOSITE PAGE: SHELL DRESS BY JEANNE FRIOT, TIGHTS BY LOU DE BETOLY, LOAFER BY MIU MIU MAKE-UP: AURÉLIE DELTOUR SPECIAL THANKS TO SOPHIE PAGET

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talents Reaching out to new

We are proud to present the recipients of our New Talent Award. Ten award winners have been chosen, all of whom have graduated from one of the top two fashion design schools in Sweden – Beckmans College of Design and The Swedish School of Textiles In collaboration with the House of Peroni Nastro Azzurro 0.0% The award winners’ designs are worn here by the leading Swedish singers Sabina Ddumba and Janice Photography by PELLE LANNEFORS Styling: AMANDA HÖRLIN @ MAU MAU COLLECTIVE

LINN STOOSS Unisex fashion is often mostly male-coded garments. Linn Stooss proposes instead to use something neutral, such as a non-human object, to be able to gain perspective. Choosing a chair she explores how that object alters our preconceived notions of unisex. BA Fashion, Swedish School of Textiles

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DESIRÉE BJURINDER FRITZON Modular garments play with function as an exercise to find new perspectives on previously preferred design aesthetics. Bold and edgy meet the understated in deadstock denim, leather and wool and the outcome is brilliant kind of power dressing. BA Fashion, Beckmans College of Design

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LINNÉA DAHL Through abstracting flowers, Linnéa Dahl investigates how knitting can mimic the floral universe and add texture to knitwear. All garments in the collection are knitted in a full fashion and with minimal to no waste. BA Fashion, Swedish School of Textiles 22

The House of Peroni Nastro Azzurro 0.0% has always represented a culture of finesse and style. This was epitomised with the launch of Peroni Nastro Azzurro in 1963 at a time when creative expression is what the 1960s in Italy was all about. That decade marked a final liberation from the post-war years, as seen in Italian culture with films by Antonioni that showed a whole new direction in cinematography, with fashion and music, and with iconic cars such as the Fiat 500. Peroni Nastro Azzurro reflected this emergence of Italian fashion and design, and was developed with the sharp, sophisticated beer drinker in mind. Today, The House of Peroni Nastro Azzurro 0.0% supports creative industries and contemporary fashion, making it the perfect collaborator with whom to pick the inaugural winners for The Forumist New Talent Award, presented at the Stockholm Fashion Week during August 2022. The careers of this year’s awardees are all in their formative years, when the designers can choose to either go to join an established fashion house or start their own independent fashion brand. And if they happen to choose to start their own brand they really need courage and focus. To make the leap from being a fashion graduate to a fully fledged design brand involves many trades, such as PR and marketing, financial partners and strategists, that seemingly have little to nothing with the work you do. In many ways, the fashion industry is very similar to the world of music, where you can either choose to be directed by PR and marketing teams or to go your own way. To liberate yourself. The leading Swedish singers Sabina Ddumba and Janice Kavander, better known as just Janice, are known to always make their own decisions. Two strong women in a tough business, trusting their instincts. “Perhaps it sounds vague, but I don’t think about what is hip or not”, Sabina explains. “It just has to feel right. When I work with stylists, I share my visions and thoughts, so the stylist can interpret it in their own way.” Today Sabina is a praised artist and music producer, and as passionate to make statements for independent fashion as she is about creating her own record label. She is often seen wearing young designer brands on stage. Recently she released the first part of her two-part EP Dear 27 Pt 1, a salute to her age and what lessons she has learned so far. One of them is an innate urge to create her own independent record label. The next part will have an even heavier R&B sound and, according to the artist, will be the kind of music she and her friends would listen to. Choosing to go independent marks a new beginning and, as it is part of her whole creative expression, it is crucial at such a moment to make sure all the elements of the business work together to make it ‘feel right’. Janice, who today is one of Sweden’s most established young singers, has been recently trying to liberate herself from her old being and explore new horizons. “I have spent a lot of time reflecting about what I want to say and meditating with my music,” Janice says. “I have also thrown myself out there and done things I’ve only dreamt of. I see the light so strongly, it might already be there.” Passion, creativity and authenticity are still at the core of Peroni Nastro Azzurro and now live through the experiential platform House of Peroni Nastro Azzurro 0.0% – a celebration of passion and style, but also a platform for future talent. Peroni Nastro Azzurro has a long tradition of working with the big fashion weeks around the globe and has been the main sponsor of Stockholm Fashion Week on several occasions since the event began. Fashion and style have always played an integral role in the Peroni brand’s DNA and are naturally linked to Italian heritage and style. Back in 2019, The House of Peroni


MAJA SUNDHOLM The Ugly in fashion have in recent years created the concept Fugly. Maja Sundholm is intrigued by the contrasts between the beautiful versus the ugly and her attraction to kitsch, a playground where she has created a collection where imperfections are enhanced. BA Fashion, Beckmans College of Design


ALICE GRUVANDER The absurdity to conform to national norms is confronted by Alice Gruvander as she mirrors perspectives from her own identity and journey as a transracial adoptee. The collection is as much a political statement as it is beautifully experimental. BA Fashion, Swedish School of Textiles 24


ELMINA EKMAN Rag paper is a sustainable way to reuse low-value cotton waste into a new product. Elmina Ekman mimics that technique in her collection to create an experimental surface expression and the result is beautifully mindful of our resources and creates a sheer yet edgy look. BA Fashion, Swedish School of Textiles 25


SAMUEL WESTERBERG Borrowing your partner’s clothes is a classic style play for straight relations. In a collection by Samuel Westerberg, male same-sex relations inspire fashion to become both more intimate and tender as well as reimagining the phenomenon. BA Fashion, Beckmans College of Design 26


MIKO MAYA OLMEDO GABE The longevity of garments versus the new is investigated in the collection by Miko Maya Olmedo Gabe. Classic styles have enhanced drapings that would appear on the clothes when worn, creating a subtle beauty. BA Fashion, Swedish School of Textiles 27


ALICE SVENSSON BROSTEDT Nostalgia and childhood memories are explored in the collection by Alice Svensson Brostedt, bringing handwoven textiles into a contemporary fashion context. Several of the garment resembles armour and their fabrics are woven by the designer herself, in a melancholic colour palette. BA Fashion, Beckmans College of Design


MAKE-UP: ELVIRA BRANDT HAIR: RAHWA BELAYE PHOTO ASSISTANT: NILS LÖFHOLM STYLING ASSISTANT: SOFIA MATÉ

ELIN ARVIDSSON Garment types are understood by details such as decided cuts and seams. In the collection by Elin Arvidsson, those details play the lead and by rearranging those lines she has created new frames for what fashion is. MA Fashion, Swedish School of Textiles

Fashion Studio was launched and became home to eight of the best emerging designers from across the UK and Ireland. The designers received industry-leading mentorship and a cutting-edge fashion studio to help craft their collections for a showcase during London Fashion Week. “We always strive to bring purpose to the communities in which we work,” Ida Schramme, Peroni Nastro Azzurro’s Marketing Manager – Nordics, says. “With fashion and style being an important part of our brand’s heritage, it’s only fair that we try to give back to the industry by supporting platforms for future talent, in this case by sponsoring The Forumist new talent award. We see similarities between the designers and us as a brand by the passion they put into their work. Peroni Nastro Azzurro 0.0% exemplifies the

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traditions of Italian craftsmanship, passion and flair upon which it was formed”. It was not easy to pick our winners, since Sweden at the moment is bursting with creativity, released after the lockdown of all fashion events and gatherings. From our own experience, we are well aware of just how challenging the creative industries can be. It took a lot of hard work, but in a great collaboration with The House of Peroni Nastro Azzurro 0.0%, we have finally decided to celebrate the true talents of tomorrow – talents that are not afraid to seek outside cultural borders, that want to liberate themselves and the wider world of fashion. Still as stylish and contemporary as a cold Peroni Nastro Azzurro 0.0%.



Double Exposure

We are inseparable. We are the same and different. What we wear defines the other. We are free. Photography by MADELEINE DALLA TORRE CASTILLO Styling by CAMERON BROOMFIELD OPPOSITE PAGE: DRESSES BY LEBLANCSTUDIOS THIS PAGE, LEFT: (LEFT) COAT BY ESTELLE, SHORTS BY TOTÊME, SHOES BY JEFFREY CAMPBELL (RIGHT) DRESS BY CINQ À SEPT, SHOES BY AQUATALIA RIGHT: (LEFT) TOP AND DRESS BY MELITTA BAUMEISTER, SHOES BY AQUATALIA (RIGHT) TOP BY LEBLANCSTUDIOS, PANTS BY MELITTA BAUMEISTER, SHOES BY ZARA

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THIS PAGE: (LEFT) TOP BY REN HAIXI, DRESS BY SPRING HAZE; (RIGHT) BODYSUIT BY HOT AND DELICIOUS, PANTS BY COLLINA STRADA OPPOSITE PAGE: (LEFT) HEADPIECE AND DRESS BY ARTEMIS; (RIGHT) HEADPIECE BY LEBLANCSTUDIOS, TOP AND SKIRT BY YANYAN



THIS PAGE: (LEFT) COAT AND PANTS BY IAN ALEXANDER, ALEXANDER, SHOES BY ZARA ZARA;; (RIGHT) COAT AND PANTS BY IAN ALEXANDER, ALEXANDER, SHOES BY STUART WEITZMAN OPPOSITE PAGE: (LEFT) DRESS BY MELITTA BAUMEISTER; BAUMEISTER; (RIGHT) TOP BY LEBLANCSTUDIOS MAKE-UP: DEBORAH ALTIZIO HAIR: TIMOTHY AYLWARD MODELS: MANNAT KAUR & SIRAT KAUR



Less is More

Modern society’s instinct to consume is making too many demands of the Earth’s finite resources. The fashion world has made it all too tempting to buy the new thing, but we need to change our habits and liberate ourselves from the endless cycle of consumption Words by CHARLES WESTBERG

After 300,000 years of existence, we humans have climbed the greasy pole and become the true masters of this planet we call Earth. Certainly, since the start of the industrial revolution some 200 years ago, our living standards have improved immensely. Child mortality, life expectancy and wealth have increased to levels previously unachievable. But who pays the bill for this global prosperity? Planet Earth has been treated as an infinite source of riches, free to use as we see fit. But the limits are beginning to show. Overconsumption is perhaps the most significant contributor to climate change, jet-fuelled by advertising companies telling us that we are no good unless we buy the next thing. The fashion industry is one of the main culprits. Globally, clothing production contributes more greenhouse gases than international flights and maritime shipping combined. Growing cotton requires vast amounts of water, and the production of synthetic fabrics such as polyester, spandex and nylon use up to 342 million barrels of oil per year. Fast fashion is now the fastest growing segment of the fashion industry. Two collection seasons per year is a thing of the past, and brands are constantly releasing new items to meet the growing demand of trend-sensitive consumers. In 1980, the average American consumer bought 12 clothing items per year. This figure has now risen to about 68 items per year, most of which are usually worn seven times or less before they are discarded. We spoke to Kirsi Niinimäki, Associate Professor in Design and the leader of the Fashion/Textiles Futures research group at Aalto University, for her view on the future of fashion. She describes how the current fashion system has an enormous

You need to know what you buy, where it comes from and how it is made. Being conscious about sustainability, recycling, upcycling, and knowing where your product comes from is already a good start. Start small is better than no start at all.” Remaking old fashion pieces is one way of cutting down on resource use. But French designer Marianna Ladreyt has a slightly different approach. Her latest collection is made from salvaged inflatable pool animals which she has turned into garments and accessories. She explains how the inspiration came to her during a walk along the beach: “Last summer, I was walking on the beach side, and I saw a blow-up animal that was thrown next to a garbage bin. I instantly got triggered and couldn’t stop thinking of it.” Marianna brought home the discarded pool toy and started experimenting. “I decided to try something with it once I got back to my studio, because I found the ‘fabric’ super interesting. It is waterproof, shiny, super colourful and beautiful. In the end, all my experiments worked and I decided to go further with those pool-animal skins and work with them as a kind of fake leather to create bags, accessories and even ready-to-wear.” Marianna believes overconsumption leads to a disconnect, both from ourselves and the products in itself. “To me, one of the worst effects of overconsumption is that it disconnects us, humans, from our own nature, our actual needs and wants. It makes us loose our perception of exchange in the process of buying. We don’t understand the product anymore.” She ends the interview by giving some advice for more mindful consumption. “I guess we can all make small but essential steps in this way, but to me, I would say consume less or just ‘better’. Buying from small, ethical and local businesses, negative environmental impact and how we as consumers have helped to maintain it. “We are part of the fashion system,” she says, “and the way consumers behave keeps up the system and the fashion business.” She explains how moving away from destructive business practices will require extensive changes: “We need new ways of consuming fashion. From a system-level approach, behaviour changes such as buying and throwing away less stuff would help slow down and shrink the system which would affect the environmental impact.” What will be the biggest driver behind this shift, consumers or market changes, I ask? “The development is run by two powers. Consumers are becoming more aware as they increasingly understand the impact that fashion has on the planet. At the same time, I believe policy changes to be a more powerful tool to steer companies in more sustainable ways.” Doing more with less is clearly the way forward. Paris RE Made is a French fashion brand that combines vintage designer items and deadstock fabrics into new designs. Xuan Thu Nguyen, creative director at Paris RE Made, tells The Forumist how she thinks overconsumption affects us: “I think it makes us greedy. It is an old mindset which is slowly turning into a more conscious way of looking at things and life.” The high-status value of the designer items used in the designs of Paris RE Made is not lost as it is transformed into new pieces. Reusing and recycling instead add value, according to Nguyen. “In terms of status symbol,” she says, “more high-end design items already have a heritage history, a history of quality. To be able to re-design those pieces into more contemporary items or more updated wearable versions for consumers only add more value to the design piece and the whole story behind it.” She believes that people are increasingly adopting a more holistic way of thinking, but that this comes with its challenges as well. “People are turning more towards sustainability,” she explains. “But I understand it is not possible for every consumer. Being sustainable in fashion is not cheap and it is a mindset that is not understandable for most consumers/buyers. 36

rather than large brands that greenwash. I have to say that I’m not against consumption as an idea, because I think it’s part of what we are as humans, and that is what is making us innovate nonstop. It should just be a beautiful innovation that makes us more connected to nature as a whole and our own natures and not for the sake of money.” There is magic in decluttering both your wardrobe and your head, with the liberation from physical objects and mental weight they carry. Like the tidying expert Marie Kondo says, why keep anything that does not inspire joy? TOP AND OPPOSITE PAGE: CLOTHES, BAGS AND ACCESSORIES BY MARIANNA LADREYT, PHOTO BORIS OVINI. LEFT: LOOK FROM FW2022 COLLECTION BY PARIS RE MADE, PHOT DIANE SANGNIER. ABOVE: CUSHION BY PARIS RE MADE, PHOTO LAN NGUYEN


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SHORTS & SHOES VINTAGE

For You Only

It’s the hair, it’s the inner wear-outer wear, it’s the strong-but-feminine, controlled-but-free look of the 1980s Photography by MONICA MENEZ Styling by SOPHIE GIANNOULES



THIS PAGE: CORSAGE BY ALEXANDRA FUKS, FUKS, SHORTS VINTAGE OPPOSITE PAGE: CORSAGE BY ALEXANDRA FUKS, FUKS, SHOES BY VERSACE




OPPOSITE PAGE: PANTS BY LEOHEX LEOHEX,, SHOES BY VERSACE THIS PAGE: CORSAGE BY BONDY BONDY,, SHORTS BY SPANX HAIR & MAKE-UP: SABINE NANIA MODEL: MANOT BOEHM @ HER MANAGEMENT


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Power

Flower

Evoke the innocence and freedom of the natural world with these floral inspirations Photography by THIERRY LEBRALY Make-up by CELINE EXPAYAT THIS PAGE: CONCEALER 017, BLUSH HIGHLIGHT AND BLUSH 103, LIPS HIGH GLOSS GURL , EYES COLOURING VISION GREEN OPPOSITE PAGE: ULTRA UNDERBASE, CONCEALER 017, HIGH GLOSS TOFFEE

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UNDERWEAR: AMERICAN APPAREL TOP: VINTAGE LÉONARD MAKE-UP: LIPS STRAIN ELECTRO CONCEALER 017

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THIS PAGE, TOP CENTRE: BODY JEWELS PEARLS, CONCEALER 017 ABOVE: AQUACOLOR SET STYLING, VINTAGE PERSONAL DRESS WITH BRUT LEE JEANS

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Dreams Electric

Find yourself in another dimension, where you can be whatever you want to be, where you are yourself Photography by JEREMY JOSSELIN Creative Direction by XIMENA MEDROA Styling by ARIANNA CAVALLO ONE-PIECE JUMPSUIT BY CLAUDE MONTANA FROM BYRONESQUE, RE-ISSUED 2019 TOP BY SANDA SIMONA, SIMONA, BLAZER BY DRIES VAN NOTEN, NOTEN, SOCKS BY MIU MIU, MIU, SHOES BY ROMBAUT

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THIS PAGE: BLAZER BY MATERIEL, EARRINGS BY PANCONESI, TROUSERS BY ROBERTO CAVALLI EARLY 2000s 2000s FROM AESANE OPPOSITE PAGE: TOP BY RORY WILLIAM DOCHERTY DOCHERTY,, TROUSERS BY ANNA GALAGANENKO, HEADBAND BY OBERKAMPF OBERKAMPF,, BELT BY MOLISM 01


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TOP LEFT: TOP BY ISSEY MIYAKE, MIYAKE, TIGHTS BY COMME DES GARÇONS PSYCHEDELIC FROM SS2001, 20 AGE ARCHIVE, SHOES BY DRIES VAN NOTEN TOP RIGHT: TOP AND TROUSERS BY ANNE ISABELLA, ISABELLA, BLAZER (WORN AROUND NECK) BY MM6 MAISON MARGIELA, MARGIELA, EARRING (ON LEFT EAR) BY PANCONESI,, EARRING (ON RIGHT EAR) BY IN GOLD WE TRUST PANCONESI BOTTOM RIGHT: KNIT BY LOEWE PAULA’S IBIZA 2019, 20 AGE ARCHIVE, BODYSUIT BY ALAIA FW1991 FROM AESANE, TROUSERS BY UMA WANG, WANG, EARRINGS BY SISTER MORPHINE, MORPHINE, SOCKS BY MIU MIU, MIU, SHOES BY ACNE STUDIOS BOTTOM LEFT: BODYSUIT BY ALAIA FW1991 FROM AESANE, EARRING (ON LEFT EAR) BY MOLISM MOLISM,, EARRINGS VINTAGE 01


SKIRT (WORN AS TOP) FW1998 FROM BYRONESQUE, SKIRT AND SHOES BY MIU MIU MIU,, TROUSERS BY MINUIT, BRACELET (WORN ON ARM) VINTAGE MAKE-UP: EVA LOUIS HAIR STYLIST: ALAN ANTOINE PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT: NICOLAS DARDE MODEL: ANNA LISA @ MADEMOISELLE PRODUCTION: LMADAM PRODUCTION 01


Figure it out

It’s a matter of attitude, how you stand, where you lie, what you wear, how you think Photography by LINUS MORALES Styling by AMANDA LJUNGKVIST ABOVE LEFT: JACKET AND TROUSERS BY ACNE STUDIOS, EARRINGS BY MUSSELS AND MUSCLES ABOVE RIGHT: DRESS BY FILIPPA FUXE OPPOSITE PAGE: BODY BY FILIPPA FUXE

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THIS PAGE: DRESS BY FILIPPA FUXE, EARRING BY KSW JEWELRY OPPOSITE PAGE: TOP AND TROUSERS BY ELIN ARVIDSSON

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TOP AND TROUSERS BY ELIN ARVIDSSON

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LEFT: TOP BY MAIN NUE BELOW: JACKET BY ACNE STUDIOS, SHORTS BY FREJA WESIK BOTTOM: SKIRT (WORN HERE AS A DRESS) BY XUAN PARIS, TIGHTS BY SWEDISH STOCKINGS, SHOES STYLIST’S OWN HAIR: ANGELICA BECKMAN @ MIKAS LOOKS MAKE-UP: JASMINE ÄRNSTRÖM MODEL: AJSA MOVIC @ TWO MANAGEMENT BERLIN

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The painter Anna Camner and sculptor Fabian Bergmark Näsman, who have both recently joined The Forumist’s roster of artists, share a common interest in process and form, resulting in highly finished works which could be as much the result of industrial means as an organic emerging from the subconscious. The Forumist talks to them about their work Photography by Words by SOFIA-LI MOLIN

If you enter the first floor of Liljevalchs, the newly extended three-storey art gallery on Djurgården, and turn left into the permanent art collection, you will find a small painting that seems to have a special glow to it, almost like it is illuminated from within. The artwork has, despite its small presence, huge integrity and speaks loudly to the gallery visitors. It is a somewhat scary piece of painting to look at and when I approach the artist with my thoughts about it, she shows equal confidence: “Well. Lukewarm has never been my thing... it only makes sense to explore stronger feelings.” The painting is the work of Anna Camner. In a much tinier space of Stockholm, the white-cube gallery StudyForArtPlatform squeezed between the crowded bars of the Sofo neighbourhood, we first encountered and were enthralled by the extraordinary sculptures of Fabian Bergmark Näsman. From ceiling to floor, a pole-shaped sculpture of perfected swirls reminiscent of a 90’s tribal tattoo in a glistening smooth metallic finish. Passersby are surely sobered up when they see it. Such is the perfection in his craft that the artist says, “People have often thought that my works are renderings when they see pictures of it”.

Anna Canmer The artist Anna Camner has a background in science and studied maths and physics in high school. After graduation she took a year off and went to art school, which would change her direction from then on. But her genuine interest in science is still very much evident in the art made in her Södermalm studio, where she has worked full time for the past 20 years with a production of seven to ten paintings a year. The studio is also the place where she daydreams about “finding the perfect brush”, and creating the new art platform Black Iris with her husband Mattias. Acrylic paintings on plexiglass, depicting materials like membranes, fat and plastic with motifs from her subconscious has become her signature. “I keep returning to the same materials, especially when they balance between natural and artificial, like dynamic membrane structures that can transform both structurally and functionally.” At the moment it is especially fat and plastics that make her heart tick: “Fat in my paintings is energy and fuel, it’s organic, beautiful and a necessary component in many living things but at the same time it has a low status, which is an interesting contrast to play with. Plastic is always all around us and is such an important part of our lives that it almost seems integrated with our bodies. Recent research has found it is even in our blood and lungs.” Several of her recent paintings are of a melting substance pouring out from industrial pipes, and it is difficult not to think of the gushing bubblegum-like mass as a comment on efforts to be sustainable. It has that same scary gothic quality as her earlier work and somehow that is partly why it is so intriguing.

TOP: ANNA WEARS BODYSUIT BY ALICE GRUVANDER; ABOVE: CLOTHES AND SHOES ARTIST’S OWN OPPOSITE PAGE: TULLE COAT BY CHRISTINA PRIETH

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Fabian Bergmark Näsman Bergmark Näsman works exclusively within the field of sculpture and makes objects in synthetic materials and metals such as aluminium and bronze. In his work process, he mixes traditional techniques such as mould making and casting with relatively new materials such as silicones and resins. The sculptor has been quite busy during the past year, having made public art in the Stockholm suburb Årsta and collaborated with the high-end travel luggage brand Rimowa. Fashion has always excited the artist and it was the first field where he felt he could start exploring his visual interests. That being said, he mainly dresses in work clothes: “Eventually everything I own becomes work clothes. Which makes me a little bit sad, but with that, I also started enjoying not drawing attention to myself because of what I wear or how I look.” That real-deal kind of approach stands in stark contrast to the sculptures that have qualities of fantasy and artificiality, something the artist never consciously aimed for. It is the technical aspects of making them that brings out the surreal or extraordinary. “What fascinates me about how we portray the artificial, unreal, or even superficial,” Bergmark Näsman explains, “is how it is constructed. The elements of which it is composed are often borrowed from the real and natural world. I think it is the misplacement of these elements that makes something appear as unreal, it has more to do with new combinations and contexts for the already existing.” The work of these two artists have much in common, not least the ability to conjure the tingling sensation you get on your back when looking at something that catches you off guard, something that is liberated from norms and conventional rules, as well as the emphasis they both bring to bear on their premium craftmanship. In our time, where it is hard to find time to do anything properly, the skills of these two artists are simply liberating.

TOP: FABIAN WEARS SHIRT BY GÖRAN SUNDBERG ABOVE: JACKET AND TROUSERS BY GÖRAN SUNDBERG, TANK TOP ARTIST’S OWN OPPOSITE PAGE: COAT BY MIKO MAYA 62


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THE BEST OF SCHWEPPES FOR YOUR COCKTAILS

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