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NEWS PAGE 5

SPORTS PAGE 8

Baseball says goodbye to national championship hopes

Soccer club brings international sport to UT men LIFE&ARTS PAGE 6

Comedy writer steps into Austin’s spotlight

THE DAILY TEXAN Monday, June 14, 2010

THE WEEK AHEAD

Serving the University of Texas at Austin community since 1900

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A GOP ‘free-for-all’

TODAY 6:30 a.m.

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the caucuses had grown heated. Adams, a longtime conservative activist, suffered a blow when Mechler dropped out of the race and the nominations committee recommended Munisteri to the delegates by a 22-9 vote. Adams challenged the committee report, and rank-and-file delegates didn’t seem happy with the job that Adams had been doing. Brazos County delegate Trey Jennings said he was supporting Munisteri because he thought that Munisteri could attract more youths to the Republican Party.

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Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Gov. Rick Perry addresses the Texas Republican convention in Dallas on Friday afternoon. With thousands in attendance, the convention provided an opportunity for Republicans to define their image and clarify positions on key issues heading into the November election. VS

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Chaos breaks out on second day of Republican convention in Dallas By Nolan Hicks Daily Texan Staff DALLAS — They were shouting themselves hoarse. More than a dozen delegates were lined up at each of the four microphones, and all of them were screaming at the stage, where the convention chairwoman was struggling to maintain order. It was just after 4 p.m. Saturday when a floor fight had broken out over the rules report. At the Republican convention in Dallas, contentious issues, such as immigration, wouldn’t be debated for almost another three hours. By the time the convention was

over, Cathie Adams, the current GOP chairwoman who had been endorsed by Perry in his acceptance speech, had been tossed out of office. Perry’s input on the immigration planks of the platform had been ignored. A resolution to remove Texas Speaker of the House Joe Straus from his leadership position had generated voiced support before it was tabled, to raucous booing from delegates. What began as a coronation for Perry as he runs for his third term as governor had turned into a free-for-all on the convention floor.

Chairmanship fight There had been indications of a potential explosion on the convention floor early Saturday morning. Convention delegates had started the morning by caucusing with other delegates from their respective Senate districts. In the caucus meetings, which were closed to the press, delegates debated whether or not to keep current Texas Republican Party chairwoman Cathie Adams or to replace her with one of her two challengers, Steve Munisteri and Tom Mechler. Rumors on the convention floor Saturday morning seemed to indicate

16th annual ROT Rally rides through Austin

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Mourin Nazim | Daily Texan Staff

UT research fellow Zachary Simpson talks to an audience member about the importance of the process of research over results at the “Science at the Pub” discussion at the Cactus Cafe on Friday.

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Quote to note “She said yes!”

— Collin Eaton Daily Texan staff member on proposing to his fiance

Horns torn between pull to Pac-10, Big 12 push By Dan Hurwitz Daily Texan Staff On the same day that Pac-10 officials were in Austin to extend a formal invitation to the University of Texas to join the West Coast-based conference, the Big 12 announced its plan to persuade Texas to stay put. A c c o rd i n g t o t h e A u s t i n American-Statesman, Commissioner Larry Scott and Deputy Commissioner Kevin Weiberg traveled to Texas Tech University, the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University in addition to UT last weekend to extend an invitation to join the Pac-10. While a decision regarding the Pac-10’s offer has not been announced, the Board of Regents of both UT and Texas Tech are meeting separately Tuesday to discuss their options. OU’s Board of Regents will convene Wednesday. With the University of Nebraska officially leaving the Big 12 for the Big Ten on Friday and the University of Colorado joining the Pac-10, the Big 12 is left with only 10 universities. Big 12 Commissioner Dan Beebe, however, believes that the conference can survive with the 10 remaining schools. Beebe has formulated a plan to increase television revenue to $17 million per team — the same amount that the Southeastern Conference generates. His plan also includes a clause that would allow individual universities to have their own television networks. Because the Pac-10 doesn’t allow its universities to have their own television networks, Beebe hopes to keep UT, which has shown interest in having a Longhorn sports network, in the Big 12.

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Discussion series brings science to pubs Meeting helps scientists break ‘free from the box’ with informal forum By Destinee Hodge Daily Texan Staff Considering the tense mood surrounding the Cactus Cafe in the spring, the atmosphere in the cafe Friday was light and cheery for the launch of the “Science in the Pub” discussion series. The series is designed to provide a casual forum for scientists to discuss issues in the discipline and for locals to feel like part of the science community. Attendees of the event ranged from UT professors, researchers and students,

to family and friends of the presenters. “[We thought that] by talking about science here, information would flow,” event co-creator Jamie Vernon said. “[We’re] free from the box.” Vernon, who also founded the on-campus chapter of Scientists and Engineers for America, thought there were very few opportunities for scientists to get together and share ideas. Event co-creator and fellow scientist Dan Boutz worked with Vernon to decide on an atmosphere that would be best for casual scientific discussion. “The key to ‘Science in the Pub’ was ‘in the pub,’” Boutz said.

“This is not ‘academic’; this is not a seminar [either].” The first meeting featured two guest speakers: Zachary Simpson, a UT research fellow, and Joshua Russell, a doctoral candidate at the University. Simpson asked the audience to focus on the process of science rather than just the results because doing so will highlight the values of science. “From an outsider’s perspective, the views they have about science are all result-oriented instead of process-oriented,” Simpson said. “And what I think is bad about this is that our values

SERIES continues on page 2

By Destinee Hodge Daily Texan Staff The streets of downtown Austin were inundated with leather, flames, tattoos and skulls over the weekend, as the 16th annual Republic of Texas Biker Rally descended upon Austin. Thousands of spectators lined Congress Avenue on Friday evening to watch as motorcyclists filtered into the motorcycle parade, the longest in the nation. “What started at 4,000 [bikers] is now 40,000,” event spokeswoman Denise Garcia said. “The expectation [for the growth of the event] was more set by the people who came.” Through the cracking sound

of deafening exhaust pipes, the shouts of beer-tinged revelry and the fumes of lit cigarettes, motorcycles of all shapes and sizes emerged. The weekend was filled with a variety of events, from helicopter rides to talent shows and even a church service for Christian motorcyclists Sunday. Blue Oyster Cult took the stage Thursday, followed by Bret Michaels on Saturday, and were met with screaming and clamoring fans. Other events included the Wall of Death and a tattoo expo. Jerry and Colleen Bragg started the ROT rally 16 years ago after they broke away from planning the Harley Owners Group rally. When the Braggs helped organize a Harley-Davidson rally, almost 5,000 people showed up — the company was used to seeing

ROT continues on page 2

Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

Rick and Beverly Smith, who have been riding for 30 years, watch motorcycles drive to the Travis County Exposition Center.


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NEWS

Monday, June 14, 2010

BIG 12: Conference switch

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may end UT, A&M rivalry

CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591

has an invitation waiting for Texas A&M. But the school has not Beebe has learned that in los- ruled out the Pac-10 or staying in ing Colorado and Nebraska, the the Big 12. Big 12 would only lose 8.2 perU.S. Rep. Joe Barton, a former cent of the league’s revenue in- Aggie, doesn’t want to see an stead of the projected 16 per- end to the Longhorn-Aggie ricent because of Colorado’s poor valry. athletic performance in recent “It would be funny not to years. have a [football] game [between Also interested in keeping the UT and Texas A&M] that doesn’t Big 12 intact are the teams that have conference championship would be left out implications of the conference for the school expansion. The around ThanksKansas City Star giving,� Barton reported Satursaid. day that officials Barton sees [Texas A&M moving from Baylor Unithe school as a to the SEC] would be versity, the Unibetter fit with a lot easier with the versity of Kanthe SEC than sas, Kansas State with the Pac-10. fans ... � University, Iowa “It would be —Joe Barton a lot easier with State University and the UniverU.S. representative the fans, and it’s sity of Missouri certainly more had a confercompatible than ence call to disit is with the cuss their desire We s t C o a s t , � to remain with the Big 12. The Barton said. “I would love to Fort Worth Star-Telegram report- have Texas A&M and Texas go ed that the Mountain West Con- east, but if Texas is bound and ference, which added Boise State determined to go to the PacUniversity on Friday, is showing 10, I would recommend Texas interest in adding Kansas, Kan- A&M to go ahead and go to the sas State and Missouri. [SEC].� Also stirring interest is what Although there has been mencould be the end of a century- tion of the SEC expressing inlong rivalry between UT and terest in UT and OU, the LongTexas A&M University. Accord- horns are likely to either go west ing to Orangebloods.com, the SEC or stay put in the Big 12.

From page 1

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COPYRIGHT Danielle Villasana | Daily Texan Staff

The Boozefighters Motorcyle Club was founded by five World War II veterans in California in 1946 and discourages the use of nonprescription drugs and illegal behavior.

ROT: Rally gets bike lovers all revved up From page 1 about 1,300 motorcyclists in the past. The Braggs continued to help to organize the event as the company supplied them with more funds to create even more elaborate events. However, when Harley-Davidson decided that it wanted to keep the rallies exclusively for Harley owners, the Braggs decided to branch off to do their own event. Their first separate event, named the “Republic of Texas� rally — the suggestion of a close friend with an interest in Texas history — attracted almost 4,000 people. Year after year, the number

of attendees continued to grow and shatter the Braggs’ expectations. “They only hoped that they could continue to bring bikers in and create camaraderie,� Garcia said. It was only a few years ago that the founders decided to rename the event for the sake of convenience. “As the years passed, it became difficult to always say ‘Republic of Texas’ rally,� Jerry Bragg said. “It was a tongue twister, so we have changed the name to ‘ROT’ rally.� This weekend, the event lived up to its reputation, attracting visitors from across the nation. “I drove 1,300 miles from Las

Vegas,� said Jerry Bowser, who has been riding his Harley-Davidson for 15 years. “[There’s a] good atmosphere — I like it.� The number of women both in the parade and on the sidelines was also a testament to the diversity of the event. “I’m the eye candy,� Houston resident Barbara Kippley said. “[The ROT rally] is quirky and fun. I guess anything can happen in Austin.� Also on the sidelines were spectators who came for the sole purpose of observing a unique culture. “This is my first time,� said Richard Crow, a spectator from the Austin area. “I’m glad I came; it’s not what I expected.�

Copyright 2010 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TODAY’S WEATHER

communicating those values.� Russell focused on using meare process-oriented values. dia that are intuitive to most They’re not based on results.� people, such as art and music, Vernon, Boutz and Simpson to convey scientific principles. all agreed that society, by and “I tend to be inspired by the large, appreciates the scientif- science generally around me,� ic method. Russell said. “[So] I want to “The good news is that the present science to a broader auvalues we stand for as scientists dience.� are in fact the prevailing valAlthough the dates for the ues within the culture,� Simp- next discussions are not yet son said. “[But] the bad news confirmed, Vernon said they is that we do a terrible job of hope to meet in the cafe at least

once a month. The founders and speakers were adamant about the need for the general population to have an appreciation for scientific processes. “The way things are going now, science is our future. If the general public doesn’t understand [science], we’re going to be way behind the rest of the world,� UT researcher Michelle Gadush said. “Science affects every aspect of our lives.�

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DALLAS: Perry accepts nomination to run for third term in office From page 1 Tillie Pope, a delegate from Williamson County, said she was backing Munisteri because he had more energy than Adams and because she thought he’d do a better job showcasing the party’s key values. Adams’ challenge to the committee report lost by more than 20 percentage points. An attempt to nominate her as vice-chairwoman was loudly booed and quickly withdrawn.

Immigration Battle While the convention leadership had been able to largely sidestep a minority report that recommended the GOP take a more moderate position on providing a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants, the issue exploded when the platform committee attempted to insert one sentence that read, “We oppose illegal immigration amnesty in any form, leading to citizenship or legal status for illegal immigration.� More moderate delegates attempted to offer an amendment to that proviso, which would allow illegal aliens to become citizens if they successfully completed military service and were honorably discharged, as is current policy. The proposal sparked a firestorm on the floor. Dozens of delegates stood to speak against the amendment. One, who couldn’t be identified, took to the microphone and said, “As a former platoon leader, I would not allow an illegal alien to serve in my unit. They can’t be trusted.� Another delegate said illegal immigrants should all be deported. A third claimed gangs like MS13 had infiltrated the American military because illegal aliens were allowed to serve. Dianne Costa, chairwoman of the Latino National Republican Coalition of Texas and former Highland Village mayor, said she wasn’t angry when the measure passed, but was instead disappointed. “It’s always going to get worse before it gets better,� she said. She pointed out that many Latinos

identified more with the Republican Party on social issues, but said the party’s rhetoric on immigration made it harder to reach out to the Latino community. “It will make it even more of a challenge,� Costa said.

Perry accepts Political conventions are generally where parties that have been divided by bitter primary battles reunite around a common purpose — defeating their opposition. The well-orchestrated events of Friday created an impression of a united party, which was upended by Saturday’s tumult. Friday morning, Perry and Kay Bailey Hutchison stood side by side at Texas Federation of Republican Women’s convention breakfast and made peace as Hutchison endorsed Perry, her opponent in a bitter primary fight in March. Friday afternoon, Perry strode onto the stage, took his place at the podium beneath a big golden star and accepted his party’s nomination to run for a third term in office. “I believe in Texas,� he said. “And we have a noble calling to continue guiding our state.� Perry framed his policy arguments in part by attacking Washington, D.C., and what he called the failed policies of the Obama administration. “We take offense at the unelected bureaucrats who conspire to derail our energy industry,� he said, critiquing the EPA’s threat to federalize Texas’ permitting process for polluters that has been attacked by environmental groups for being too lax. “They tighten the red tape with which they bind us, choking the life out of important industries and laying waste the once-productive fields of our economy.� His critique of the Obama administration spanned from attacking the health care reform legislation passed earlier this year to insisting that the expansion of the federal government meant a loss of personal liberties. “As Washington steadily encroaches on our freedoms, we must not be silenced by their criticism or intimidated by their

Tamir Kalifa | Daily Texan Staff

Above, Jonathan Kaplan and Josh McDowell of the San Antonio Tea Party rush through the Dallas Convention Center with a petition for a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution. The petition is part of a national effort to unveil the proposed amendment on the National Mall in the Sept. 12 taxpayer march on Washington. Right, representatives of the Bay Area Republican Women, dressed as 1920s suffragists, participate in the breakfast hosted by the Texas Federation of Republican Women, where Kay Bailey Hutchison endorsed Rick Perry for governor Friday morning. threats of litigation,� Perry said. “Instead, we must continue to speak with the freedoms guaranteed us by the Constitution of this great country.� Perry also didn’t waste any time attacking Democratic candidate Bill White, saying that a vote for White would speed the Washington takeover of Texas. “Electing my opponent will accelerate Washington’s takeover of our state. Are you willing to accept that?� he asked the crowd,

which responded with a round of loud booing. For its part, the White campaign responded with a statement an hour after the speech, attacking Perry’s handling of the state budget deficit.

         

                

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Fri. 18 Jun. through Mon. 21 Jun. Fri. 30 Jul. through Mon. 2 Aug. Multiple Outpatient Visits

Men and Postmenopausal or Surgically Sterile Women 18 to 55

Up to $3200

Healthy & Non-Smoking BMI between 18 and 30

Wed. 23 Jun. through Sun. 27 Jun. Fri. 30 Jul. through Tue. 3 Aug. Multiple Outpatient Visits

Men 21 to 45

Up to $3500

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Thu. 24 Jun. through Sun. 27 Jun. Thu. 8 Jul. through Sun. 11 Jul. Thu. 15 Jul. through Sun. 18 Jul. Thu. 22 Jul. through Sun. 25 Jul.

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OPINION

4

Monday, June 14, 2010

Editor-in-Chief: Lauren Winchester Phone: (512) 232-2212 E-mail: editor@dailytexanonline.com Associate Editors: Heath Cleveland Doug Luippold Dave Player Dan Treadway

T HE DAILY T EXAN

GALLERY

HORNS UP, HORNS DOWN

Unrestricted research The UT Oversight Committee made a wise decision in allowing UT students the opportunity to conduct research and study abroad in nations marked with a U.S. State Department travel warning. Christian Clarke Casarez, director of international public affairs, told The Daily Texan of the decision, “With strong academic preparation and faculty support, our graduate students all have demonstrated a compelling reason [for] why they must travel to a restricted region. They also have demonstrated an understanding of the risks and a plan to mitigate those risks.” While countries such as Israel, Mexico, Iraq and Afghanistan contain elements of danger for any visitor, firsthand experience in these countries is vital for students at UT in fields such as Latin American studies and Middle Eastern studies, both of which are among the top programs of their kind in the nation. By not imposing travel restrictions, UT may be taking a risk, but the students who choose to travel to these countries are fully aware of the dangers they face and should be applauded for their willingness to face them for the sake of their academic advancement.

Perry’s scare tactics Gov. Rick Perry’s continued refusal to comply with EPA regulations may result in Texas losing its ability to regulate its own environmental standards. Perry told the Austin American-Statesman, “The EPA is determined to ‘federalize’ our 16-year-old system. It’s a move that will kill tens of thousands of Texas jobs and effectively kick the legs out from under one of the strongest economies in the country during a time when our national economy remains on shaky ground.” Since 1995, Texas policy has allowed corporations to operate under pollution limits that do not comply with the Clean Air Act. Under the act, states are to set limits on individual production units within a plant, whereas Texas only sets a production limit for entire facilities and not their subunits. Of course, what Perry neglects to mention is that job losses would only occur if certain corporations were in fact violating pollution standards. Unsurprisingly, Perry is more interested in scaring voters with threats of job loss than with urging CEOs to find an economically viable, environmentally sound solution to the problem.

Dormitories for pets Stephens College, an all-women’s college in Columbia, Mo., is renovating a dormitory to accommodate students whom own pets. The dorm, nicknamed “Pet Central,” will house students who bring small animals, mostly dogs or cats. The dorm will also include a kennel staffed by work-study students, according to The New York Times. Stephens is among of a growing group of universities, including elite schools such as MIT and Caltech, that allow dormitory residents to have small animals. Last year, researchers at Ohio State University conducted a study on pets and students that found that students who live with animals were less likely to experience loneliness, depression and stress. Additionally, the pet owners said their animals helped them to remain active and disciplined. This study is part of a growing body of research about how pets help mitigate the emotional and psychological issues college students traditionally face. Every semester, UT offers “pet therapy dogs” as part of the “Stressfest” program aimed at reducing stress before finals. Seeing as the Counseling and Mental Health Center is currently experiencing a record number of students seeking assistance in the coming semesters, a dormitory for students with pets is an idea worth examining.

Is Texas ready for a bald governor?

By Benjamin Miller Daily Texan Guest Columnist The Texas gubernatorial election is less than five months away. Many of you won’t bother to vote; others will intend to but forget; and a slim minority will trek to the nearest polling place to dutifully select the candidate who will lead Texas for the next four years. As the race heats up, the state and country are abuzz about this highly anticipated election. Because Gov. Rick Perry is so divisive, many believe Texas will elect its first Democratic governor since Ann Richards in 1991, which leads many to ask: “Is Texas ready for a Democratic governor?” However, the real question regarding Democratic candidate Bill White’s chances of winning the election has less to do with his politics and more to do with what is — or is not — on his head. Try as he might to hide it, White is a bald man — and that could be the key to his loss. While the last Democratic governor was in office 20 years ago, the most recent bald governor was Preston Smith in 1969, more than 40 years ago. Time and time again, Texas voters have shown their unwilling-

ness to vote a bald candidate into the governorship, and for good reason — bald people are notoriously untrustworthy. Lex Luthor, Superman’s greatest foe, is bald. Dr. Evil, Austin Powers’ archenemy, and Ernst Stavro Blofeld, the James Bond villain upon whom Dr. Evil is based, are both bald. Fiction has repeatedly shown us that men who lack hair on their heads also lack humanity in their hearts. Even more troublesome for White is his opponent’s magnificent hair. Perry is well-known for the fashionably coiffed mop sprouting atop his thick head. In fact, much of Perry’s electoral appeal is based on his luscious locks. Exit polling from Perry’s 2002 Texas re-election victory indicate that the most important issue on voters’ minds, far above the economy and education, was the quality of each candidate’s hair. Perry’s superior tresses helped him clinch the governorship over his lesser-haired opponent, Tony Sanchez. Additionally, many believe Perry only received 38 percent of the vote in his 2006 re-reelection because he was forced to compete with Kinky Friedman’s thick mustache. To overcome the political liability of his baldness, White must take imme-

GALLERY

While driving back from Houston the other day, I listened to “Number One Spot” by Ludacris — a song I had not heard in years. Naturally, I pumped up the volume and enthusiastically sang along. Despite my subpar rapping skills, I was able to sing every last lyric of the song. Up until that moment, I assumed the lyrics had slipped out of my memory into oblivion. After all, I have no special connection with the song. There is no reason I should have an instant recall of every word — but I did. Our ability to retain music lyrics is nothing short of phenomenal. Psychological studies suggest we do not actually lose memories; rather, the memories we consider forgotten are simply irretrievable, and there are a multitude of cues that allow us to recall memories. In a recent blog post for Cognitive Daily, psychologist Dave Muncher suggested melodies can act as one of these pow-

erful memory cues. Song lyrics also produce a certain rhythmic quality that helps in memory retrieval, and creates patterns that help us instill information into longterm memories. In other words, remembering patterns in songs is often easier than recalling straight facts. This made me wonder how much information I retained by learning with a song or melody in comparison with just memorizing facts. In my eighth-grade algebra class, I learned the quadratic formula to the tune of “Frere a Jacques.” I am proud to say that if asked, I can undoubtedly repeat this formula without a problem. Last week, I listened to a couple of friends sing “Fifty Nifty United States” — a musical listing of our country’s states taught to elementary school students. While listening to my friends sing, I discovered a discrepancy in our public education system — my friends learned different versions of the last stanza. The song ends with “North, South, East,

Miller is an applied learning and development junior.

THE FIRING LINE Closed meetings can be beneficial

Thank you for the music By Egu Ramanathan Daily Texan Guest Columnist

diate action and cover his head. Fortunately, male pattern baldness is a subject well-traversed by medical science. A toupee, for example, is the perfect way to tell the world, “I’m self-conscious about my baldness but not sufficiently self-aware to realize how ridiculous I look.” Alternatively, White may be able to grow out his hair using Rogaine or the HairMax LaserComb. The former is a well-known topical foam while the latter is a comb with lasers attached to it, making it useful for both hair growth and Powerpoint presentations. If White’s hair follicles are beyond reinvigoration, then, as a last resort, I recommend spreading Chia Pet seeds on his scalp and watering them vigorously, in the hopes he will grow a bed of sprouts resembling hair. Growing a ‘fro must become White’s top campaign priority. No matter how much partisan showboating and pandering Perry indulges in, regardless of how many scandals surface in which he is complicit and no matter how incompetent or corrupt Perry may be, Texans still won’t elect a bald governor.

West in our common, objective opinion ...” — and this is where the discrepancy arises. Someone had taught one of my friends to sing “Maryland is the best.” My other friend, luckily, did not make that same flagrant error — she sang “Texas is the best.” State pride aside, both of my friends were still able to recite each of the 50, nifty United States in alphabetical order. This is a skill I must admit I do not have, for I never learned this enlightening masterpiece. For some, a memorized song is the most powerful information-retention tool. If Weird Al Yankovic had a political agenda, disseminating his opinions through song would be pure genius. The next time you’re racking your brain trying to figure out how to remember a mathematical formula or a series of historical events for an exam, try writing the information into a song. No matter how lame you may feel, you’re bound to remember it. Ramanathan is an urban studies junior.

After spending the whole of the spring semester embroiled in the fight to keep the Cactus Cafe alive, I can confidently say that increasing transparency is one of the biggest challenges facing UT’s administration and decision-making entities. As our University community ventures further into the land of budget cuts, we students must continue to make it our priority to call for a certain degree of openness in all major decision-making processes. However, I disagree with Thursday’s editorial, “Open the Doors.” Often, a closed-door meeting simply facilitates more candid — and productive — conversation. Participants can share their honest thoughts and feelings without worrying about how they’ll be perceived (or misinterpreted) by the public, and they don’t have to worry about overly passionate individuals in attendance trying to hijack the discussion. During March and April, I had the opportunity to participate in some closed-door meetings myself, regarding (you guessed it) the Cactus Cafe, and I’m actually glad that the meeting was restricted to just the seven of us. Although there were thousands of other individuals in the UT and Austin communities who agreed with me and my position, the “Cactus conversation” meetings would not have been the best time or place for them to posit their thoughts and listen to ours. That said, what is clearly missing from the current meeting in question is an open forum before the series of closed-door meetings to provide the public with an opportunity to express their unfettered opinions and perspectives directly to Dr. Vincent and the panel. I realize that there is an e-mail address to which the public has been invited to send its thoughts, but open forums — although heated — tend to shed the most light on what the public really thinks. President William Powers Jr. earned a great amount of respect from me when he had the guts to do this at the beginning of the Cactus Cafe fiasco in February, and I think a similar gesture on the part of Dr. Vincent would be well-received by the community at large. — Matt Portillo SG University-wide representative

LEGALESE

Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE E-mail your Firing Lines to firingline@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be more than 100 and fewer than 300 words. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.


5A CLASS/NEWS

5

NEWS

Monday, June 14, 2010

Men’s soccer club offsets lack of Division 1 team throughout the nation, the U.S. By Skyler Sanchez Office for Civil Rights created a Daily Texan Staff As the 2010 FIFA World Cup “safe harbor,� a term referenccommenced Friday, soccer fans ing a mandated proportionality flocked to a number of local between both men and womsports bars to watch the action. en’s teams, under Title IX. In Among the patrons who visit- the years since then, the numed Pluckers Wing Bar in West ber of female soccer teams and Campus was the Texas Men’s players has skyrocketed while the numbers among male playSoccer club. The club holds the distinc- ers have remained nearly stagtion of being the sole men’s or- nant. Southern Methodist Uniganization on campus to offer versity in Dallas is the only competitive soccer playing. While there is an estab- school in Texas to offer a Division 1 soclished Division 1 cer program soccer program for men. Many for women at i n c o m i n g UT, men do not Being associated with c o l l e g e s t u have the chance the club is something dents looking to participate at to play socthe NCAA level. we can really take cer may have The day before pride in ...� to reconsider the World Cup school kick ed o ff , t h e — Johnny Gordon which to attend beCollege Sports Texas Men’s Soccer c a u s e o n l y Council, a national organization of president a h a n d f u l o f universities coaches, parents, across the naathletes and coltion offer soclege alumni, recer programs leased a study that detailed significant op- with scholarship incentives portunity gaps between male for men, said Russell Gelland female soccer players in man, vice president of Texas Men’s Soccer. recent years. Gellman said he had to conInformation in the study came directly from the NCAA’s sider the fact that he “didn’t Academic Progress Rate report want to sacrifice an education card for the 2008-09 academ- to go play somewhere else.� The UT athletic department ic year. The findings show that although there are 310 wom- did not return phone calls by en’s soccer teams, there are just press time Sunday. Many athletes desire to pur197 male teams. Likewise, female athletes account for 8,117 sue a competitive sports caof Division 1 players, while reer in college, and while UT only 5,607 male players are re- doesn’t offer an NCAA soccer corded throughout the nation program for men, Texas Men’s Soccer does provide an outlet in Division 1. In 1996, when men’s and for students wishing to play women’s soccer teams were soccer at a competitive level. “Even though we’re not an nearly equal in number

‘‘

campus watch Can you hear me now?

University Police Building, 2201 Robert Dedman Dr. Harassment: A UT student reported receiving four harassing text messages from his friend’s boyfriend. Reported June 10, at 11:26 p.m.

Call the locksmith!

Parking Lot 108, 1500 Red River St. Burglary of Motor Vehicle / Criminal Mischief (Criminal Episode): Four UT students reported their vehicles had been burglarized or damaged while parked in

NEWS BRIEFLY BP increases response before Obama’s visit to Gulf of Mexico NEW ORLEANS — British Petroleum mounted a more aggressive response to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday as it deployed undersea sensors to better measure the ferocious flow of crude oil, while drawing up new plans to meet a government demand to speed up the containment effort ahead of President Barack Obama’s visit to the coast. The financial ramifications of the disaster are growing by the day as the White House and states put pressure on BP to set aside billions of dollars to pay spill-related claims in a move that could quickly drain the company’s cash reserves and hasten its path toward possible bankruptcy. BP was also trying to meet a Sunday deadline to respond to a letter from the Coast Guard demanding that it intensify the efforts to stop the spill. One of the actions BP took Sunday was to use robotic submarines to position sensors inside the well to gauge how much oil is spilling. Scientists haven’t been able to pin down just how much oil is leaking into the Gulf, although the high-end estimates indicated the spill could exceed 100 million gallons. The government has stressed that the larger estimates were still preliminary and considered a worse-case scenario. The Obama administration’s point man on the oil spill, Adm. Thad Allen, said Sunday that government officials think the best figures are from a middle-of-the-road estimate, which would put the spill at around 66 million gallons of oil. That is about six times the size of the Exxon Valdez spill.

Nineteen dead in flash flood; one person still missing Friday LANGLEY, Ark. — State police say the death toll from a flash flood that tore through an Arkan-

Parking Lot 108. During the investigation, the officers learned three of the victims were not missing any property. The unknown suspect had broken either the passenger side or driver’s window of their vehicles. The fourth victim stated the following property had been removed from her vehicle: a Felt bicycle, Oakley sunglasses, 75 CDs, a Social Security card, several credit cards and personal identification. Loss value: $625.00. Occurred June 9, between 8:40 a.m. and 11:50 a.m. Compiled by UTPD Officer Darrell Halstead

sas campground has reached 19 and searchers are looking for just one more missing person. State Police Capt. Mike Fletcher says one more body was recovered at midday Sunday. He says searchers are looking for one more person who went missing after the pre-dawn Friday flood swept through the Albert Pike Recreation Area. Fletcher did not disclose the latest victim’s identity. Sixteen of the 19 people confirmed killed in the flood have been publicly identified.

Holloway suspect claims innocence in Chilean killing LIMA, Peru — Joran van der Sloot told police in Chile that it was an unidentified robber who beat a young woman to death in his hotel room, a killing for which the Dutchman has been charged with murder in Peru. Peruvian police say Van der Sloot, long suspected in the 2005 disappearance of U.S. teen Natalee Holloway, has confessed to killing 21-year-old business student Stephany Flores on May 30 after they met playing poker. But according to a Chilean police report obtained by The Associated Press through Peruvian authorities late Saturday, Van der Sloot gave a different account of events while in custody in neighboring Chile, where he was captured after the killing and quickly extradited. In the version offered to Chilean investigators, Van der Sloot said he and Flores were surprised in the early morning by two robbers in an apparent assault. “A man came out of the bathroom blocking the access door with a knife in his hand. On the bed was another man with a gun,� the Spanish-language report quotes him as saying. “The man with the knife said to be quiet, but Stephany began talking in a loud voice and he hit her in the face, making her nose bleed.� Compiled from Associated Press reports

NCAA team, many people think we’re just an intramural team and everybody can try out. But there really is a high level of talent present,� Texas Men’s Soccer President Johnny Gordon said. “Being associated with the club is something we can really take pride in because the dedication is there from all members.� Roughly 45 players constitute multiple men’s soccer teams in the soccer club. Texas Men’s Soccer has a long history of success and competes both in the state arena, with the Texas Collegiate Soccer League, and on the national level, with the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association national tournament. day, month day, 2008

CLASSIFIEDS

Mourin Nazim Daily Texan Staff

CLASSIFIEDS

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1

THE DAILY TEXAN

UNS AD IRNE FOR ONL d wor

Drew Bitter sings the national anthem with members of the Texas Men’s Soccer club before the U.S.’s match against England at the Pluckers Wing Bar in West Campus on Friday.

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6A ENT

LIFE&ARTS

6

Monday, June 14, 2010

Life&Arts Editor: Mary Lingwall E-mail: dailytexan@gmail.com Phone: (512) 232-2209 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

Comedy writer shines onstage with stand-up act By Madeleine Crum Daily Texan Staff Fidgeting with the straw in his drink and quietly observing the opening act before taking the stage at the Capitol City Comedy Club, Dan French is a far cry from Chris Farley, Adam Sandler and other satirical, vivacious comedians who seem to epitomize American humor. “I was always the quiet kid in school,� French said. With bachelor ’s degrees in both English and journalism, and a Ph.D. in rhetoric, French’s academic background has propelled him into a successful career performing stand-up, writing Emmy-nominated comedy sketches for such notable performers as David Letterman and George Lopez, producing “webisodes� and teaching improv classes. “My degree is essentially an English degree, and, you know, jokes are delivered by words,� French said. French began his comedic writing career with a job at “The Best Damn Sports Show Period� for Fox Sports in Los Angeles before moving on to “The Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn� and “The Dennis Miller Show.� “I’m more of a Dennis Miller writer, naturally,� French said. “He loves words and intricate metaphors.� At “The Best Damn Sports Show Period,� French was a monologue writer, and had the opportunity to write humorous sketches for William Shatner and Jerry Springer. French cites Jack Black as his favorite performer to work for, as Black’s

acting abilities complement his writing well. “He’s a performer for sure, and he can be funny in person, too. But he can turn it on and off,� French said. Despite writing for and mingling with celebrities, French denies that a career in comedy writing is all glamour. “It’s still a job,� French said. “Like anything else, you have to show up and produce quality work.� With his comedy-writing career in full swing, French decided to expand his repertoire by trying his hand at standup. While teaching at the University of Louisville, he began working as a bartender at a club called Funny Farm and eventually worked up the nerve to perform. “Stand-up is a lot different than TV, where a lot of the humor is topical,� French said. “[In stand-up] you have your evergreens, your jokes that are always funny, and you use them again and again.� This theory is evident throughout his routine, as the bulk of his jokes center around a subject that everyone can relate to: sleep. As he makes jabs at the unhealthily alarming nature of alarms and mocks insomniacs and cuddlers, French’s monologue is met with roars of laughter and applause. “There’s no such thing as a trite topic. For a while, they were saying that jokes about airports were hackneyed, but every comic has a new and different take on things,� French said. In addition to writing and performing stand-up, French enjoys teaching the ins and outs of his profession. He taught a televi-

Madeleine Crum | Daily Texan Staff

Comedian Dan French performs onstage at the Capitol City Comedy Club, located on Research Boulevard. French was a writer for “The Best Damn Sports Show Period� and “The Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn� before he started performing his own stand-up comedy. sion-writing course at UT and offers small improv courses in his home. Former students have gone on to work for “Saturday Night Live� and win “Last Comic Standing.� “One thing you have to learn to do is crowd work,� French said. “If an audience isn’t responding, you ask them questions and joke about things, like

what they do for a living.� French’s more current work i n c l u d e s w r i t i n g a n d p ro ducing short sketches for the We b , w h i c h p a ro d y e v e r y thing from “SportsCenter� to late-night infomercials. “The Internet is a tricky place for comedy because a lot of people want to make parodies, but they don’t have the rights to

things like songs and TV clips,� French said. “For our ‘SportsCenter ’ parody we had to use old, old black-and-white footage.� His next big project will venture into a new realm of comedy, as he will be collaborating with the producer of “Two and a Half Men� to write a new show, “Mike and Molly.� Though he enjoys the more pro-

fessional comedy scenes in New York and L.A., French plans to stay in Austin, where his family lives. His children, ages 7 and 10, both enjoy his work, and he often performs puppet routines for their elementary school classes. “I’ve never felt like more of a rock star,� French said, “than I did while putting on a show for my kids and their friends.�

CONCERT PREVIEW

RESTAURANT REVIEW

DOLCE FINALE

JOSH RITTER & THE ROYAL CITY BAND

Cafe ‘sweetens the pot’ with decadent desserts

Folk songwriter combines history with rock in lyrics

By Zach Miller Daily Texan Staff Nestled in the Quarters apartment complex at 2700 Nueces St., Italian cafe Dolce Finale is a gem waiting to be discovered. The posh eggshell chairs and daybeds create a chic, upscale atmosphere that seems out of place in casual West Campus. Which is exactly what the owner, Aliah Warmund, is counting on. With fast-food restaurants anchoring West Campus, Warmund opened Dolce Finale as a fresh alternative for students. From gelato, espresso, sandwiches and salads to a variety of pastries, the cafe offers an upscale atmosphere at a decent price. And with free Wi-Fi, Dolce Finale is an ideal spot to spend an afternoon writing a term paper or just hanging out. For $7, the cafe’s sandwiches are just large enough not to be considered overpriced. Though the ingredients are light and simple, each sandwich is hearty and filling. The fresh, on-site-baked basil focaccia bread took the Finale panino — a sandwich akin to a turkey club — to another level. Although Dolce Finale successfully crafts sandwiches and salads,

WHAT: Dolce Finale WHERE: 2700 Nueces St., Ste. 100 HOURS: Monday - Wednesday, 8 a.m. - 11 p.m.; Thursday - Friday, 8 a.m. - midnight; Saturday - Sunday, 9 a.m. midnight WEB: dolcefinale.net pastries are more its forte, with two pastry chefs on staff. The caramel tart is a light chocolate-flake brownie with a delicious layer of caramel on the bottom. This treat pairs perfectly with one of Dolce Finale’s caramel macchiatos or cafe lattes. Dolce Finale also serves handmade gelato, a dessert as rich as ice cream without seeming thick and heavy. Since it’s prepared on-site, the gelato flavor combinations are endless. The chocolate banana has a distinctly fruity flavor that transitions into a chocolaty aftertaste. The flavors are potent, as the dreamsicle actually tastes like the icecream-truck classic. The coffee selection is impres-

Ryan Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Dolce Finale, a cafe located in West Campus, offers an array of desserts, sandwiches, beverages and gelato. sive as well; it offers an espresso called “the victory blend,� which consists of a mixture of various coffee beans from near the equator. This little shot offers sweet and zesty flavors that are rarely found in traditional coffee. The only issue the restaurant may have to face is its lack of parking — a problem that Warmund plans to address by putting timers on the parking spots near her store.

A REAL WORLD JOB TO JUMP-START A REAL WORLD CAREER.

The largest college media agency in the nation, Texas Student Media, is looking for a few business-minded college students to work as Media Sales Consultants HERE ON CAMPUS!

Do you think you have what it takes? Find Out! Email us and send your resume to: jbcorbett@mail.utexas.edu Or stop by the William Randolph Hearst Building 2500 Whitis Ave. – Rm. 3.210

Until then, the location is only convenient for pedestrians and cyclists, as parking in West Campus can be a nightmare. As the summer heat sets in, having to hoof it for several blocks may be more hassle than it’s worth. There is almost nothing less appealing than walking through 100-degree weather with a full stomach. Once the fall semester begins, Dolce Finale will showcase entertainment on the weekends. Warmund wants the cafe to become a hang-out alternative to bars.

By Mark Lopez Daily Texan Staff “History repeats itself,� Americana singer-songwriter Josh Ritter said. “I love that [saying] and think it’s true. When you’re interested in history, it’s being interested in story. These are things that happen to people. It helps us live our own lives.� With relying on his own thoughts about historical events and biblical allusions in his lyrics, it’s hard to deny that Josh Ritter has a way with contextualizing his lyrics and creating an effortless window through which listeners feel like a part of a bigger picture. Ritter is currently on tour with his group, The Royal City Band, in support of his sixth studio album, So Runs the World Away. When asked how his latest album compares to his previous work, Ritter demonstrates ambivalence and modesty concerning his stylistic changes. “I never compare them,� Rit-

         

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WHAT: Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band with The Mynabirds WHERE: Antone’s Nightclub WHEN: Tonight; doors open at 8 p.m. TICKETS: $17 at the door, $15 in advance ter said. “They’re pretty large and complex, and I worked really hard on it. But, as records go, I find it really impossible to compare. But I’m really proud of it. I feel like it’s my first record as an adult.� Ritter’s modesty can be linked to his slow rise as a name in American music. Despite releasing his first album in 1999, Ritter didn’t gain widespread critical acclaim until the 2006 release of his fourth album, The Animal Years. But once the album was released, Ritter garnered praise and appreciation for his creative brand of rock ‘n’ roll, folk and Americana. From being named one of Paste magazine’s “100 Greatest Living Songwriters� of 2006 to receiving public support from fan Stephen King, 2006 launched Ritter into the spotlight. But even in the limelight, Ritter is about as unpretentious as a person can be. When asked whom he would most like to work with in the future, his response was as quirky as it was nonchalant. “Ben Franklin,� Ritter said. “I like him. He invented electricity, which is pretty rock ‘n’ roll.� Ritter’s zany obsession with history also has led him to appreciate Texas as a historical hub for the genre of music that he creates. Knowing that folk legends such as Nanci Griffith and Robert Earl Keen Jr. hail from Texas, Ritter seems to feel right at home playing for an Austin audience. “I grew up listening to some great Texas writers, like Butch Hancock and Townes Van Zandt,� Ritter said. “I’m just happy to be playing. And to play at a venue like Antone’s in the summertime, well, that’s just a dream come true.�


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Monday, June 14, 2010


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Monday, June 14, 2010

Sports Editor: Dan Hurwitz E-mail: sports@dailytexanonline.com Phone: (512) 232-2210 www.dailytexanonline.com

T HE DAILY T EXAN

2010 SUPER REGIONALS

SIDELINE NBA

GAME 1

GAME 2

GAME 3

13

141

14

Lakers 86 Celtics 92

WORLD CUP Algeria 0 Slovenia 1

BASEBALL

Horns’ dream of Omaha crushed

Schultz’s two-run home run sends TCU over the top and all the way

By Chris Tavarez Daily Texan Staff The sound of the ball hitting Matt Curry’s outstretched glove on first base — for the final out of the game — was all TCU needed to hear. Then it was a mad dash for shallow center field, where the Horned Frogs all dog-piled on the burntorange Longhorn logo as they celebrated their 4-1 win over Texas to clinch their first appearance in the College World Series in the school’s history. But the celebration for TCU had begun earlier in the game, when Aaron Schultz sent a 2-2 slider from Chance Ruffin over the leftfield fence for a two-run home run that put TCU up 3-0 in the bottom of the seventh. “I was looking for a good pitch to hit, and he started me off with two fastballs that I probably should have swung at,” Schultz said. “I was just looking for him to make a mistake with his slider, which is a really good pitch, and he did. I just put a good swing on it.” Brandon Workman started for Texas, and despite only giving up one earned run on four hits and throwing 65 pitches, he was pulled for Ruffin, who had six wins and 14 saves. “I think we had a good recipe for success, one that’s been good to us,” head coach Augie Garrido said when asked if he pulled his starter too early. “TCU was able to do something with Chance that no one else has been able to do. I really don’t second-guess that thought just because of what happened. No one wishes it didn’t happen

Texas’ loss is ‘like a bad dream’ as TCU makes first trip to nationals By Austin Ries Daily Texan Staff Texas’ desperate ninth-inning attempt for one more base runner, one more run and one more look at TCU closer Tyler Lockwood was a perfect picture of its offensive performance all day Sunday — missed opportunities. It ended with another runner left stranded in scoring position as Jordan Weymouth rolled over a final cutting fastball toward second baseman Jerome Pena. And as first baseman Matt Curry squeezed that final out, sending a sea of white and purple over the dugout railing, the squad of Horned Frogs that couldn’t take down the Longhorns a year ago

Germany 4 Australia 0

MLB Cardinals 5 Diamondbacks 7 Phillies 5 Red Sox 3 White Sox 0 Cubs 1 Nationals 9 Indians 4 Royals 7 Reds 3 Pirates 3 Tigers 4 Rangers 7 Brewers 2 Astros 5 NY Yankees 9 Blue Jays 3 Rockies 10 NY Mets 11 Orioles 4 Mariners 4 Padres 2 Bobby Longoria | Daily Texan Staff

Texas pitcher Chance Ruffin covers his face after letting TCU’s Aaron Schultz send a 2-2 slider over the left-field fence for a two-run home run, putting the Horned Frogs in a lead they kept. The team will head to the College World Series in Omaha, Neb. more than he does.” Ruffin gave up three runs on two homers after having given up only five earned runs and two homers in 36 appearances this season. “You really wish you could have it back and do it all over again,” Ruffin said. “It’s just an [indescribably] bad feeling.” TCU first scored in the top of the fifth. Leadoff batter Taylor Featherston hit a double to right cen-

ter, but advanced to third when right fielder Kevin Keyes’ throw bounced through the infield and all the way to the backstop. Jason Coats immediately brought Featherston home when he sent Workman’s 1-2 delivery down the first baseline to put the Frogs up 1-0. Texas found itself with plenty of chances to take an early lead against TCU starter Kyle Winkler when it had men on second and

third base in the first inning, Kevin Lusson on third in the second inning and Keyes on third in the fourth inning. But all three times, the Horns were unable to bring any of them home. Texas left 10 runners stranded on base. “It was kind of frustrating when you leave runners on base, especially in a big game like this when it’s win or go home,” Kevin Lusson said. “But, we gotta look at it as another challenge, and you

try to build off it and try to improve the next inning, but it just didn’t happen.” Texas scored its only run of the game in the bottom of the ninth — with one out left in its season — when pinch hitter Paul Montalbano scored on a throwing error by Jerome Pena. Texas advanced to Sunday’s championship game after blowing out TCU 14-1 to even the series, after losing the opener Friday 3-1.

sprinted toward center field before piling on top of one another on the steer head behind second base. At least, that’s the way it looked. “I was just looking for the first person to grab, and that’s where it happened to be,” winning pitcher Kyle Winkler said, noting that the location of the dogpile didn’t have anything to do with the Longhorn logo’s location. All the Longhorns could do was watch. Some still with their hats on backwards, some sitting down, kneeling or standing with their hands on their heads — all were crushed. A little more than 24 hours after pummeling the Frogs for 14 runs, the Longhorn bats fell silent — stranding 10 runners on base with six in scoring position and three on third — in Sunday’s 4-1 loss. It was a series of “could’ve beens” and “what ifs” for Texas. What if Cole Green didn’t catch

his cleat Friday afternoon, transforming an intentional walk into a wild pitch and a two-run inning? If only Russell Moldenhauer’s two-out grounder down the first baseline somehow maneuvered its way past a diving Curry to bring home Tant Shepherd and Cohl Walla in the first inning Sunday. How does Aaron Schultz, who was 0-for-8 for the weekend, turn on a fastball from Chance Ruffin, the best closer in college baseball, and blast it over the left-field wall and into the trees to give TCU a 3-0 lead? “It’s always difficult to deal with the unexpected,” head coach Augie Garrido said. “This is what I’m talking about when I say this is a cruel game. This is one of those moments where it is absolutely heartbreaking and gut-wrenching.” Schultz wasn’t done with the

Horns. Half an inning later, the sophomore drove a dagger deeper into Texas’ heart when he ran down Shepherd’s leadoff line drive to center field to make an over-the-shoulder catch before slamming into the wall. “I just knew that a ball was going to be hit to me,” Schultz said. “I felt like I was flying out there.” Maybe he did know. Maybe for that moment Schultz had just enough adrenaline to squash Texas’ hopes at a comeback five outs before dog-piling a few feet in front of him. It was that kind of day for the Horned Frogs, who proved to be the better team in possibly the most evenly matched super regional series in the nation. “I thought I was going to be sick if this team doesn’t play in Omaha simply because we’re playing another team that belongs in Omaha,”

TCU coach Jim Schlossnagle said. Schlossnagle felt just fine. Texas just never took advantage of its opportunities. Even in innings when the leadoff runner got on base — which happened only once Sunday and five times all weekend — the Horns didn’t make TCU pay. And unlike last season, when Texas seemed to have as much magic as Rodgers and Hammerstein, the late-inning heroics never came into play and the TCU team that had been building up to this moment for seven years finally has its chance at the championship. “I can’t even find the words to describe it,” Ruffin said after the loss. “It’s like a bad dream.” Garrido said Sunday’s game would be a war with nine battles. The Horns just let one too many chances to build momentum slip away, giving TCU a dream of its own in Omaha.

TRACK AND FIELD

Track season wrapped up with men’s success By Ryan Betori Daily Texan Staff Texas freshman Marquise Goodwin took the gold in the long jump as the Longhorns tied for 17th place at the NCAA Outdoor Track & Field Championships on Saturday. Goodwin’s winning jump was one inch away from his lifetime-best of 26-10. “First off, I just want to thank God,” Goodwin said. “I feel really blessed with all the things that happened this year. I had to battle through an injury, so to be able to come out and be at my best during the end of the year was great. The crowd was really into it, and I was so amped up for the finals, I just didn’t get on the board. But, I thought I put the pressure on with my first jump, and I’m glad it held up.” Freshmen Hayden Baillio and Keiron Stewart also stood out, as Baillio finished sixth in the shot put with a personal best of 61-

Serbia 0 Ghana 1

7.5, and Stewart claimed seventh in the 110-meter hurdles, becoming the first Longhorn to earn AllAmerica honors in the event since Jermaine Cooper in 2002. “We finished in the top 20 again, so we’re happy about that,” head coach Bubba Thornton said. “Every one of our individual performers was making their first trip to the national meet, so we think we can build on this.” For the women’s track and field team, last week’s championship brought a crushing culmination to what was otherwise a promising season. Recording a lowly three points, the team placed 51st at the meet. Having placed in the top 10 in 15 of the past 16 years, the finish comes as one of the most disappointing in recent memory. Making matters worse, Texas A&M, a perennial conference rival and a team the Longhorns challenged all year, took the title with 72 points. The team ended day one in a

solid position — the Longhorns’ mile relay team secured a spot in the finals, and Chantel Malone garnered a respectable ninthplace finish in the triple jump. But on day two, the tremors of an impending storm began to surface. Although Angele Cooper, Jordyn Brown and Mia Behm all made a good effort in their respective events, it just wasn’t enough to propel the team to championship position. Cooper placed eighth in the 400 hurdles, Brown finished 14th in the shot put, and Behm collected a 15th-place finish in the 5,000. All of these finishes were solid — Cooper even earned an All-American bid — but they didn’t give the Longhorns the push the team needed. With this, the sixth-ranked Longhorns entered the final day of competition with little hope of collecting the national title that had once seemed so attainable. Malone, the reigning Big 12 long jump champi-

Marlins 6 Rays 1 Athletics 2 Giants 6 Braves 7 Twins 3 LA Angels 6 LA Dodgers 5

SPORTS BRIEFLY Vince Young receives assault citation after at a strip club fight DALLAS — Tennessee Titans quarterback Vince Young received an assault citation after getting into a fight at a Dallas strip club and leaving before authorities arrived early Sunday, police said. Surveillance video footage released by police showed the former University of Texas star and several people talking in a small room before Young attacked someone in the room. Others tried to break up the fight. Young wasn’t at Club Onyx when police responded to a call about the fight, Dallas police Lt. Andy Harvey said. Harvey said an investigation led to Young receiving a Class C assault citation, punishable by a fine up to $500. Titans spokesman Robbie Bohren said the team was aware of the incident and had contacted Young. He said the team was still gathering information. Titans coach Jeff Fisher was holding his annual charity softball game Sunday night in Nashville. Young was not on the early list of players committed to appear in the game. The Titans resume on-field sessions Monday. Young, the No. 3 pick overall in 2006, got his starting job back last fall when Tennessee started 0-6 and owner Bud Adams put him back in the lineup. He helped the Titans win eight of their final 10 and heads into his fifth NFL season with a 26-13 record as a starter. — The Associated Press

TRY OUT FOR THE TEXAN! Dan Petty | Daily Texan Staff

Texas’ 4x400-meter relay team finished seventh in this weekend’s NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships. on, finished 13th in the event and failed to record a personal best. The song was very much the same for the defending national champion 4x400 relay team, and the group placed seventh.

Both the men and women will be returning the nucleus of their team. With so many freshmen already stepping up, next year’s season seems to be brimming with promise.

Come pick up an application in the basement of HSM and sign up for tryouts.

THROUGH JUNE 23


The Daily Texan 6-14-10