The Daily Texan 2015-04-22

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Wednesday, April 22, 2015

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CITY

APD policy reduces drone restrictions By Wynne Davis @wynneellyn

Officers from the Austin Police Department said they will no longer check to see if drone operators have a certificate for themselves or for their drone, unless the drone is flying near a crowded area. The change is part of an attempt to shift focus to policing drones used near large events, such as concerts and sports games, while giving individuals

flying drones in less crowded areas freedom, APD officers said. Although policing drone usage hasn’t been much of an issue for APD, chief of staff Brian Manley said the department wanted to make the policies more friendly for those who may want to fly drones in their yard. “We’re always focused on the safety and well being for the community, and we realized that the ordinance is quite restric-

tive in that it bans all use in all places in all circumstances — unless the individual had the licenses and qualifications,” Manley said. “Individuals flying these in their own yards … [don’t] really present the same issues.” Drones’ potential to cause disturbances became evident when APD heard concerns about the drones’ presence during the South By Southwest festival this

DRONES page 3

Illustration by Andrew Brooks | Daily Texan Staff

Mariana Gonzalez | Daily Texan Staff

At the Student Government meeting Tuesday evening in the SAC, Kallen Dimitroff, government junior and University-wide representative, left, and law student Mohammed Nabulsi, a law school representative and author of the AR 3 resolution, debate the passing of the divestment resolution.

After weeks of contentious debate, the Student Government Assembly voted against a divestment resolution which would have asked the UT System Investment Management Company (UTIMCO) to pull investments from five corpora-

tions that the resolution claimed “facilitate in the oppression of the Palestinian people by the State of Israel.” The Assembly voted against the resolution by a 11-23-1 vote Tuesday night. The resolution asked UTIMCO to divest specifically from Alstom, Cemex, Hewlett-Packard, Procter & Gamble and

United Technologies because of “human rights violations,” according to the resolution. University-wide representative Santiago Rosales said he voted against the resolution because he thought it was too divisive to support. “I do not mean to say that either side is divisive in itself but rather that the approach of

By Eleanor Dearman @ellydearman

Jack DuFon Daily Texan Staff

University: Exam space insufficient As the University continues to expand its range of online classes, officials at the Center for Teaching and Learning said they have recognized a need for a larger testing center. The Center currently

opposition to the decision. University of Texas Police Department officers came to monitor the scene. UTIMCO CEO and CIO Bruce Zimmerman said the company makes investment decisions solely based on the financial interest of the

SG page 2

House committee bill proposes Stetson as official hat of Texas

Nestled on the ground floor of the Graduate School of Business Building, the Center for Teaching and Learning’s testing facilities serve thousands of students.

@sam_kett

[the resolution] is divisive in nature,” Rosales said. “This student government has taken unified approaches of bridging differences in this campus, bringing students together to bring meaningful change.” After the vote, many students who had lobbied in support of the resolution protested outside of the Assembly room, voicing

An investigation conducted by the dean of students office found no connection between UT’s chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon and a racist chant the University of Oklahoma’s SAE chapter was punished for singing last month. A video of members of the OU SAE chapter singing a chant that included lynching references and anti-Black slurs went nationally viral in March. Three weeks ago, an OU investigation found the students learned the chant on a cruise sponsored by SAE’s national organization, its use was likely widespread. Dean of Students Soncia Reagins-Lilly said an investigation into UT’s SAE chapter, launched in the wake of the video, found the chapter was not connected to the song. “Following the events involving the Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) fraternity chapter at the University of Oklahoma, our office was made aware of online rumors of similar behavior at our local chapter of SAE,” Reagins-Lilly said in a statement. “Our review of these statements included contacting current organization leadership and speaking with alumni of different periods, who all stated no knowledge of the chant and that such behavior had no place in their organization.” Reagans-Lily said the investigation was complete. “At this time, our office has received no official complaints or reports of this behavior and found no evidence in our review,” she said.

STATE

CAMPUS

By Samantha Ketterer

University: No evidence SAE tied to racist chant @sam_kett

SG votes against divestment resolution

@sam_kett

CAMPUS

By Samantha Ketterer

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

By Samantha Ketterer

bit.ly/dtvid

operates a testing space in the Graduate School of Business Building, although the space is not considered an official testing center. The space has 23 seats for testing, according to executive director Harrison Keller, and allows students to take exams in a proctored location. Students come to take exams for online

courses, take placement exams to test out of courses or receive testing accommodations for a disability. David Laude, senior vice provost for Enrollment and Curriculum Services, said an increased number of online courses has

TESTING page 2

When liberal arts sophomore Madi Maino, originally from Virginia, prepared to move to Texas for college, her image of the state boiled down to one thing: a cowboy wearing boots and a hat. “When I came down here, I remember driving and seeing cowboys working on the side of the road — working on fences or something,” Maino said. “They were wearing stereotypical boots, jeans, a big belt buckle and a cowboy hat.” The House Culture, Recreation and Tourism Committee heard a resolution Tuesday that, if passed, would further confirm Maino’s initial impression. Several representatives, led by author Rep. Marsha Farney (R-Georgetown), proposed a resolution that would

Name: HOUSE; Untitled 21; Width: Width: 60p0; 60p0; Depth: Depth: 2 in; 2 in; Color: Color: Process Process color, color, HOUSE; Untitled Ad21; Number: Ad Number: -

make the cowboy hat Texas’s official headgear. The bill was left pending in committee. Farney, who did not attend the hearing, wrote in the resolution that the cowboy hat is a “stylish” representation of Texas’ history, worthy of its own recognition by the 84th legislature. “The cowboy hat is recognized all over the world as a symbol of the Texas Western heritage,” said Rep. Lyle Larson (R-San Antonio), who spoke on Farney’s behalf. “It’s very distinctive when you wear that hat anywhere in the world. People ask the question, whether you’re from Colorado or Texas — ‘Are you a cowboy?’” Texas currently has more than 50 official state symbols — chili is the state dish, the Texas Toad is the state amphibian and the state’s official epic

poem is “The Legend of Old Stone Ranch.” The modern cowboy hat’s origins date back to the 19th century, when a Philadelphia hat maker, John Stetson, made an exaggerated version of popular hats such as fedoras and bolo hats, according to Jeannette Vaught, a Ph.D. candidate who researches the history of cowboys and rodeos in the state. The hats became a status symbol because of their high price tags. As the hat grew in popularity, different styles emerged across the nation. Vaught said the hat is part of Western culture as a whole but is especially associated with Texas because of ranching’s prominence in the state. “Obviously people all over the country … wear cowboy

COWBOY HAT page 2

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Volume 115, Issue 141

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Mariana Gonzalez | Daily Texan Staff Freshman business major Samantha Fox walks around the Senior Design Exhibition at the Art Building and Museum Tuesday afternoon.

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continues from page 1 University and so would not have taken the resolution into consideration even if it had passed. “The current policy is not to take into account political and social considerations,” Zimmerman said. “That’s a long standing policy, and it’s a policy supported by staff.” Mohammed Nabulsi, SG law representative and an author of the resolution, said the authors wanted to pass the resolution despite UTIMCO’s stance on divestment based on political and social issues. “What we’re doing with this resolution is saying, irrespective of what [UTIMCO has] already said, our student body continues, continues, continues to support divesting from human rights abuses,” Nabulsi said. “This is just

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Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Senior Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noah M. Horwitz Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivia Berkeley, Cullen Bounds, Olive Liu Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jordan Rudner Associate Managing Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brett Donohoe, Jack Mitts News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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Albert Lee, Connor Murphy Senior Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Crystal Marie, Isabella Palacios, Amber Perry, Rodolfo Suarez Special Projects Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amanda Voeller Tech Team Lead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miles Hutson Social Media Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sydney Rubin Editorial Adviser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Chen

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Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Florence, Sebastian Herrera, Caleb Wong Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Baez, Jack DuFon, Mariana Gonzalez, Joshua Guerra Sports Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Lieberman Life&Arts Writers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chris Duncan, Emily Givson, Olivia Lewman Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Dolan, Jazmyn Griffin Page Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lillian Michel Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Myra Ali, Nicole Farrell Comic Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah Alerasoul, Will Everidge, John Pesina, Leah Rushin

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following in line with other resolutions Student Government has already passed.” The 2010–2011 SG Assembly passed a resolution asking UTIMCO to revise its policies to include consideration of social policy. The divestment resolution also cited precedent from the 2014–2015 SG session, during which the Assembly passed a resolution calling for divestment from companies that facilitate genocide in Sudan. The resolution was based out of a national boycott-sanctioning-divestment, or “BDS,” movement started by Palestinian human rights groups. Nabulsi told the Texan on April 9 that Unify Texas, a student organization opposing the BDS resolution, does not understand the BDS movement. “Unify Texas relies on a mischaracterization of BDS and our goals here on campus in

order to make a straw man argument,” Nabulsi said. “BDS is a step towards leveling the negotiating playing field so that the Israeli government is forced to take Palestinian demands seriously.” Earlier Tuesday, 17 former SG presidents and vice presidents sent a letter to the current Assembly, asking them not to vote in favor of the resolution. “As our former student body presidents have said — the people who care most about our University — it is not our place to support this philosophy,” University-wide representative Kallen Dimitroff said. “The alienation it would cause certain groups on campus, the stance and precedent it would set for student government, would be very detrimental.” Carmel Abuzaid, a international relations and global studies freshman and sup-

porter of divestment, said passing the resolution would specifically recognize the oppression she and other UT students have experienced in Palestine firsthand. “Passing this resolution would not only recognize my experiences as valid but would also unify the University against injustice and oppression,” Abuzaid said. Maya Russo, an international relations and global studies sophomore who spoke in opposition to the resolution, said she felt personally targeted. “This is not a human rights legislation, nor is it one that promotes justice. This is an anti-Israel legislation,” Russo said. “This hateful rhetoric that is directed at my people and at me personally is one-sided. … This is a step in the wrong direction toward the ultimate objective — peace.”

NEWS

COWBOY HAT

continues from page 1 boots and cowboy hats and wear Western clothing. … For Texas to make claim to any part of these Western wardrobes is really an artificial designation of it as Texas’,” Vaught said. While most students won’t see an abundance of cowboy hats when they walk across campus, they are prominent at football games, and particularly for student organizations such as the Texas Cowboys. Business senior Jaan Bains, Texas Cowboy’s vice president, said the Texas Cowboys wear cowboy hats and other western gear to honor Texas history. Bains said he supports the House’s legislation. “We really respect the tradition of not only cowboys but also the tradition of the University and the tradition of the state,” Bains said. “So what we wear is — we wear a hat, we wear chaps, we wear a neckerchief, which is all symbolic and relevant of what cowboys wore years ago in Texas.”

TESTING

continues from page 1 accordingly increased demand for using the testing facilities. Laude said the government and psychology departments offered a combined total of around 1,000 online courses in the fall and spring this year alone. “We absolutely need a substantially larger testing facility,” Laude said. “We’re in the planning stages, but this is something that’s going to have to come.” Keller said other universities in the U.S. have established testing centers. “We’re scanning right now for what kind of facilities other universities have,” Keller said. “We’re also looking at what kind of technologies are available.” The current space where students can take proctored tests relies heavily on old technology, such as scantrons, according to Keller. “It’s clear that this is a pinch point that needs to be addressed,” Keller said. “As the pace of innovations is accelerating on campus, that puts a different kind of demand on our facilities.” Laude, who teaches an introductory chemistry course with approximately 500 students each semester, said not every student is able to make the testing course’s time. He said he offers a makeup date for every exam and has generally been able to accommodate each student. “Because we hold evening exams, there’ll always be lots of conflicts,” Laude said. “[But] there’s almost never any issue with students missing an exam.” Kelli Bradley, executive director of Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD), said the number of students registered with SSD has increased from around 1,500 in 2009 to 2,300 this year. Bradley said 80–85 percent of registered students request testing accommodations. “The more students register, the more students receiving extended time or test accommodations, the more likely there’s going to be the need for this space,” Bradley said. Erin Gleim, Student Government director of the Students with Disabilities Agency, authored a resolution that supported the construction of a larger testing center. SG voted in support of the Center on Tuesday. “It’s an expectation that we have [a testing center], and the fact that we don’t is a disservice,” Gleim said. Over the past five to six years, SSD increased the number of exams they proctored, from 500 tests a semester to 6,000, according to the resolution. “We’re mostly hoping to raise awareness that this is an issue,” Gleim said. “This is something that benefits everyone.”


W&N 3

NEWS

3

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

CAMPUS

Student groups discuss racism, guns at forum By Sebastian Herrera @SebasAHerrera

Different student organizations focused on human rights discussed campus racism, gun safety and sexual assault at an open talk Tuesday at Benedict Hall. UT’s chapter of Amnesty International, a global human rights movement, hosted the event, which sought to educate students about the three topics and begin a wider discourse on campus, according to Amnesty International Vice President Ana Hernandez. Voices Against Violence and Students Against Guns on Campus co-hosted the talk. “These three topics affect the daily lives of students, and they are issues that we have here on the UT campus,” Hernandez said. “As students, it is our responsibility to have honest conversations about these issues. As a human rights

organization, we feel that it is our role to help facilitate those conversations about the rights that students have to their bodies, property and well-being.” In a presentation to the 15 people gathered, Hernandez reviewed the University’s past problems with racism, highlighting racist fraternity parties beginning in the 19th century, alleged “bleach bomb” incidents at UT in 2013, a series of controversies that have surrounded the Young Conservatives organization and a party the Fiji fraternity hosted this semester which guests said was themed “border patrol.” Hernandez said leaders at UT have not stepped up enough to take stands on these issues, making accountability by students critical. Accountability for sexual assault has also plagued campuses such as UT, according to a different pre-

sentation given by Amnesty International members. According to the presentation, 81 percent of students at universities in Texas report experiencing sexual harassment, but presenters said statistics show many incidents go unreported. First-year law student Heather Kerstetter, who said she experienced sexual assault at while UT and reported it, said she believes the University was not there enough in her time of need. “I feel like UT kind of brushes things under the rug as far as sexual assault goes,” Kerstetter said. “From my own experience, the person who I’ve had an issue with still walks the campus, and I still see them. The University needs to have better policies set up so [students like me] feel safer.” On-campus safety, including sexual assault, should be further

Ana Hernandez, UT Amnesty International chapter vice president, standing, hosted a forum discussing racism, guns and assault in Benedict Hall on Tuesday evening. Jack DuFon Daily Texan Staff

discussed because of campus carry legislation passed that could allow handguns on campus, said Hannah Guernsey, a member of Students Against Guns on Campus who spoke at the discussion. While Guernsey argued that guns on campus would make the University more dangerous because of factors such as

binge-drinking, drug abuse, mental health issues and accidental shootings, she said students need to more openly debate this issue to form a student voice legislators can hear. “The rights to security of people has to be open to argument,” Guernsey said. “This debate directly impacts [us].” More students need to

participate in these dialogues to create change, Kerstetter said. “I wish more people knew about [events such as these] and had access to them, because I really think the more communication there is around campus and society, the better,” Kerstetter said. “These topics aren’t discussed enough.”

CITY

Campaign leads to influx of city traffic citations By Jackie Wang @jcqlnwng

The Austin Police Department has issued more than 800 citations related to the newly implemented “Don’t Block the Box” campaign, which started April 6. The campaign, targeted at downtown Austin, aims to reduce traffic bottling — when cars stopped in the middle of an intersection block the rest of traffic flow, according to City Council member Ann Kitchen. Over the two-week period from April 6

to Friday, APD issued 653 moving violations and 153 non-moving violations as well as 90 warning citations. “It is still on the evaluation stage, but there are reports, at least from the police department, that they are seeing some improvements from it in seeing people changing their behavior,” Kitchen, who is head of the city’s Mobility Committee, said. “[Drivers are] learning how to make sure they don’t end up in the middle of the intersection.” Mayor Steve Adler said he’s been watching the

Don’t Block the Box campaign implementation from his office. “I’ve been watching people get tickets from City Hall,” Adler said. Adler said “Don’t Block the Box” is only one tool in the City’s belt to combat Austin’s growing traffic congestion problem. City Manager Marc Ott released the Transportation Congestion Action Plan on March 27, an outline of solutions to traffic including short- and longterm fixes. “We’re limiting left turns in traffic, coordinating construction activity.

CAMPUS

Speaker: New tech poses risks By Lauren Florence @laurenreneeflo

New advances in technology have significant potential to be manipulated and weaponized, posing a threat to personal information and safety, according to a visiting author who spoke about the future of violence. Benjamin Wittes, cofounder and editor-in-chief of national security blog Lawfare, said even as governments use surveillance techniques to ensure national security, private citizens and other countries will use those same surveillance techniques in ways that pose a threat to the U.S. Wittes, who spoke Tuesday at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law, said ordinary individuals can now pose a threat to the federal government and to other private citizens as a result of the exponential advances of new technologies, such as drones and robotics. “The individual can have

DRONES

continues from page 1 March, Manley said. In another incident, a drone flew over the Darrell K. Royal Texas Memorial Stadium during the Longhorns’ first football game of the season. “I honestly thought that someone did it to get a bird’s-eye-view picture of the stadium during the game,” electrical engineering senior Mary Ryan Gilmore said. “I’m not sure what it was really for.” While the event at the football game did involve a high profile drone sighting, aerospace engineering assistant professor Todd Humphreys said ahe believes recreational use of drones has not been a

his own weapons-of-mass-destruction program. We haven’t seen a lot of this, but it’s totally doable,” Wittes said. “Everybody’s naked, everybody’s menacing, and everybody’s a critical feature of defense.” Wittes said there’s never been a technology created that someone hasn’t tried to weaponize. Modern technologies increase people’s ability to do violence from a less accountable position. A few years ago, 200 women were attacked and blackmailed when a man used malware to hack into their webcams and threatened to publicly distribute photos of them, Wittes said. He called this an act of “sextortion.” “You, individually, can literally be attacked from anywhere. The power to attack is radically disseminating and proliferating,” Wittes said. “Think of the number of modes by which you can be attacked today and think how much exponentially greater

that number is than it was 10 or 20 years ago.” Mechanical engineering sophomore Christian Atayde said some 3-D printers are now encrypted to block certain things, such as weapons, from being printed, because of the potential for misuse. “Giving people more technology, it will empower them, and they have the power to abuse this technology,” Atayde said. “Is it right for engineers to keep creating more technology over the fear that people will find a way to misuse it?” Plan II senior Mark Jbeily said now that personal information on the Internet is widely available, he worries that people aren’t aware of how many ways their security can be at risk. “We’ve learned how to conduct ourselves online, like, ‘Do I post this picture or not?’” Jbeily said. “Now, we have to think about bank security and other ways to protect ourselves.”

problem in Austin. Often, people have concerns about footage captured by drones of people without their knowledge, Humphreys said. “If you happen to get somebody’s house in those pictures or video, and you happen to catch somebody walking in their yard, you should destroy that video instead of uploading it to YouTube,” Humphreys said. Regardless of where drones are being used, Manley said people operating them should always be cautious of others. “Individuals need to be careful and cautious and need to maintain a visual at all times when they’re flying these devices, so they don’t accidently bring

them into an area that may place others in danger,” Manley said. Under new rules that the Federal Aviation Association is considering implementing, drone operators would be required to take a test to become certified to fly, which Humphreys said he thinks is reasonable. “If you want to become a hand radio operator, you have to take a test and become government certified before you can broadcast in the space that has been allocated for amateur use,” Humphrey said. “I think it’s a perfectly reasonable parallel to say that if you’re going to be operating a drone, you need to have passed a test and gotten the certificate.”

We’re going to be synchronizing lights … in real time, [so] it will shift with the traffic,” Adler said. “Don’t Block the Box was one of 20 different initiatives we are trying.” Kitchen said she thinks immediate solutions are critical to solving the City’s traffic problems. “We grow so fast … that we dump a lot of additional traffic on existing roads and [are] not fast enough [at] adjusting to how those roads can handle the traffic,” Kitchen said. “With these kinds of actions, you get more bang for your buck because you can do

them faster and less costly. They are infrastructure things we need to do right away.” DJ Roberts, a radiotelevision-film and history sophomore, said he tends to disregard traffic infractions such as blocking intersections when he is in a hurry. “I think solutions dealing with infrastructure would be far more effective than those shifting the mentality of Austin drivers,” Roberts said. “While getting people to stay out of ‘the box’ might help on a smaller scale, Austin’s traffic problem is

the result of an infrastructure not built for the City’s growing problem.” Mobility affects many other issues, such as cost of living, so Kitchen said short-term solutions are not enough to fix Austin’s traffic problem. “It is a huge issue all over the city and also a linchpin issue,” Kitchen said. “If we can’t get around — because of transportation, and we’re stuck in traffic — then we can’t get to jobs and school and it impacts where we can live. It’s a linchpin issue that way. It affects a lot of other things.”

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RILEY BRANDS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF / @TexanEditorial Wednesday, April 22, 2015

4

COLUMN

Tuition deregulation places unnecessary burden on students By Mary Dolan

Daily Texan Columnist @mimimdolan

As the 2014-2015 school year draws to a close, many high school students around the state are already looking toward next year. The summer before one’s freshman year of college is filled with many milestones like orientation and registration. However, there is one decision that few students are probably looking forward to: deciding how much student loan debt to take on. The cost of college has risen at an exponential

The cost of college has risen to an exponential rate over the last couple of decades, and Texas colleges have not been immune to this trend.

rate over the last couple of decades, and Texas colleges have not been immune to this trend. According to a recent article in the Houston Chronicle, Texas colleges’ cost of tuition has more than doubled since 2003, the year the state did away with tuition regulation. This has allowed colleges in Texas to raise their tuition prices as much as they wish with no interference from the state. The change in tuition prices has been enormous. The average cost of tuition for Texas colleges in 2013 was $3,951 per semester. Of course, this does not include the cost of housing and meal plans or any other fees students may incur. Students are now leaving colleges with record high amounts of debt. (As the cliché goes, student loan debt numbers have now climbed higher than those of credit card debt.) As the state funds less and less of Texas colleges’ budgets, universities are pushing these costs onto students and their families. There are cheerful reminders from colleges to “apply for scholarships” and “talk to your financial aid office,” but students rarely receive significant amounts of scholarship money or other forms of “gift

aid.” Instead, they are encouraged to apply for more loans, and colleges tend to act as if these loans will benefit a student enormously. Perhaps they will in the short run, but the student is still saddled with thousands of dollars of debt after college. According to a recent article in the Texan, there have been six bills supporting tuition regulation filed in the Texas Legislature. These bills only serve to emphasize the fact that more and more students in Texas are finding it difficult or simply impossible to pay for college. Tuition rates can (and usually will) increase from year to year. This makes it so that students who stay at one college for four or more years end up paying significantly more at the end of their college career than they were at the start. Many university officials are in favor of keeping tuition deregulated. UT System Chancellor William McRaven was quoted in the Texan as saying that universities should remain deregulated, and should be “smart and thoughtful about how [they] have tuition increases.” Of course, having universities be “smart and thoughtful” about tuition increases is ideal. the past few years have shown that tuition

deregulation has led less to thoughtfulness and more to substantial price increases. It is certainly possible that tuition regulation could bring with it a larger set of problems. It is hard to imagine, however, that it would place an even greater burden on students. With tuition deregulation, students are being forced to take on massive amounts of debt as universities raise or keep prices steady every year. Many prospective students are even forced to give up on college entirely because of prices they can’t afford. University tuition should be re-regulated so that students are able to afford higher education. As it stands, students are pressured to take out an ever-increasing amount of loans in order to keep up with payments. If circumstances do not change, more and more students will have to give up on the thought of having a college education. As next year’s college freshmen make their decisions about where to go and what to do, they should not be made to feel as if they are drowning in loans before they even step on campus. They should feel free to pursue their chosen career path without the threat of debt hanging over them. Dolan is a journalism freshman from Abilene.

EDITORIAL

College of Education dean discusses programs, future of graduates Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of Qand-A’s with UT’s deans. Manuel J. Justiz is dean of the College of Education. He assumed the position in 1990. Daily Texan: Could you start off by telling us about the most interesting projects going on in the College of Education? Dean Justiz: We are the largest college of education in the country in size. We are a non-traditional school, meaning that we are very performance-based with a heavy emphasis on student performance and research. If you look at our national rankings, we were ranked number one among publics for four years in a row. We have been ranked number one in research expenditures among public and private [universities] for five or six years. We place heavy emphasis on being interdisciplinary. We are cofounders of the UTeach program within the Natural Sciences [college] preparing math and science teachers. We’re also cofounders with Cockrell [School of Engineering] on UTeach engineering. Those are examples of some collaborative efforts. We took the lead with Governor Richards on STEM initiatives. At her request, we developed the only proposal for the entire state on STEM education. We’re working with Governor Abbott’s office on their current education initiative. Internally, we have the Office of Educational Research to improve the participation of faculty, and we have the third highest research expenditure at the University, which is strange for a college of education. It’s a very large college with a comprehensive mission, but we are very proud. DT: What percentage of undergrad students go into graduate school immediately versus going into teaching? Justiz: Our undergraduate population are the ones wanting to be teachers. Probably 85-90 percent of undergrads go on to

teach. The rest are going to graduate school. We have 100 percent job placement and have a 100 percent pass rate in our Teacher Certification Exam. I think a lot of our graduates will come back after a few years for graduate programs. DT: You are the first dean we’ve talked to that has mentioned working with gubernatorial administrations. Is that something the college tries to initiate or do those different administrations reach out to you? Justiz: They reach out to us. I think that speaks to how well regarded the college is. I’ve been here 25 years, I’m the senior dean at UT. When I came here, the first initiative we had came from Governor Richards, with whom I traveled extensively and visited schools. She chose our STEM proposal to send to a federal level. We’re being asked to take the lead on Governor Abbott’s initiative. We don’t look inward, we look outward. DT: What brought you to UT and what are the biggest changes you’ve seen in your time here? Justiz: When I was selected in a national search for a dean, I had been in a subcabinet post heading up the Research Agency in Education in Washington. I came to UT because it was a great opportunity. I fell in love with Austin and UT. It has been a great privilege for me to be a dean at the university. When I came, the college was under review. There were questions about academic integrity and the quality of our degrees. I felt this place could only go up. It was a low-risk situation. If I could build a team of people with the same vision, I knew I could improve the college and help it fulfill its promise. It is a work in progress, there are still problems and we need to make sure the leadership team is always working together.

Photo courtesy of Marsha Miller I’ve probably hired 92 percent of the college faculty by now. DT: Have you seen any changes in the types of students coming into the college? Justiz: When we started, most of our graduates were going into teacher education. Kinesiology has grown. Less people are going into teacher education and more into the health sciences.That isn’t so different from the rest of the university. DT: How large of a role does diversity play in your college? Justiz: Anywhere from 40 to 50 percent of minority graduates at UT graduate with a degree in education, and we have a strong,

diverse faculty. In fact, I was the first minority dean in the history of the university. DT: What do you think will be the next big change in education? Justiz: We’ve been talking about creating a unique marriage between pedagogy and content in education through gaming. How do we bring the best facets of gaming to teaching and learning? How do we build that into a challenging curriculum that really engages you? How do you bring these practices in without compromising the integrity of the content? We think we need a public-private partnership to do this, but those are the kind of discussions we are having.

COLUMN

Despite growing debate over police tactics, students must stay cautious By Jazmyn Griffin

Daily Texan Columnist @JazmynAlynn

Recent events surrounding fatal encounters with unarmed citizens have sparked a nationwide debate over the accountability of police forces. For instance, take the indictment of South Carolina police officer Michael T. Slager after a video of him killing a man during a traffic stop surfaced or, even closer to home, the indictment of former APD Detective Charles Kleinhart after the accidental shooting death of a robbery suspect. These instances and others have pitted two diametrically opposed groups against each other.

These instances and others have pitted two diametrically opposed groups against each other.

While some claim no harm would have come to the victims if they had just cooperated with the police, others believe discrimination and excessive force came into play. The two arguments will inevitably continue, but no one disagrees that we should find a way to reduce the number of violent encounters between police and citizens. I think the reform should start with the police. Police departments should reform the way they’re trained to handle seemingly dangerous situations. If they feel a citizen is getting violent, they should analyze whether to go for a baton or taser first and aim for a less harmful spot if a gun is completely necessary. Another element of strife is the distrust communities feel toward largely white police forces. Edwin Dorn, race relations expert and UT professor of public affairs, said that officers, while certainly needing better training to de-escalate situations, also need to reflect the communities they serve — a vital factor in keeping encounters as fair as possible. In cities like Ferguson, Missouri, where citizens claimed police were biased against the black population, just three out of 53 officers were black while 67 percent of the population is black.

LEGALESE | Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

Across the nation, local police officers in any given community are about 75 percent white, regardless of racial makeup of the city. This is not to say that white officers are inherently racist, but rather that a diverse city deserves a diverse force, to ensure discrimination does not prevent justice from being served. Although black Americans are thought to be disproportionately targeted by police, as reported by sites like NAACP.org, Dorn believes resisting arrest is not the way to fight back. “It saddens me to say this, but in the short term, the best advice is the advice that all black parents give to their sons: If a policeman stops you, don’t argue, don’t resist and don’t run,” Dorn said. If racism or bias comes into play, little can be done by a citizen to protect his or her life at the hands of a corrupt cop. However, respecting the commands of an officer can prevent further trouble. Whether an officer has probable cause or not, if someone is stopped, they should fully cooperate. While many, however innocent, may wish to withhold identification, it’s not worth the risk of escalating a potentially simple situation. For example, former Texan columnist and associate

SUBMIT A FIRING LINE OR GUEST COLUMN | E-mail your Firing Lines and guest columns to editor@dailytexanonline.com. Letters must be between 100 and 300 words and guest columns between 500 and 1,000. The Texan reserves the right to edit all submissions for brevity, clarity and liability.

editor Eric Nikolaides refused to comply with police demands when he refused to let the cops enter without a warrant after receiving a noise complaint, resulting in an arrest on his formerly clean criminal record. I myself have been in a similar situation, as a loud party I attended in College Station was interrupted by a noise complaint. The police showed up to find several inebriated students, some of whom were underage, and simply asked that we comply and answer questions truthfully. Several anxiety-inducing moments later, we were free to continue — at a lower volume, of course. While I understand not every police encounter goes this smoothly, I also recognize that my compliance protected my clean criminal record. As students with our entire lives ahead of us, no one wants to be the smart mouth who intensifies a situation or the unfortunate victim of police brutality. While we all should push for police to re-examine their methods, we should also take necessary precautions. Police exist to protect and serve, so citizens and cops alike must do their part to ensure innocent individuals are released and criminals see their day in court. Griffin is a journalism freshman from Houston.

RECYCLE | Please recycle this copy of The Daily Texan. Place the paper in one of the recycling bins on campus or back in the burnt-orange newsstand where you found it. EDITORIAL TWITTER | Follow The Daily Texan Editorial Board on Twitter (@TexanEditorial) and receive updates on our latest editorials and columns.


CLASS 5

LIFE&ARTS

5

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

ALBUM REVIEW | ‘SOUND & COLOR’

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Alabama Shakes hit their stride on their second album Sound & Color, using their eclectic tastes to create a memorable record.

Alabama Shakes’ new album shows maturity, sound variety By Chris Duncan @thedailytexan

Alabama Shakes’ first tour proved they have the charisma of some of the liveliest bands in music today. But their first album, Boys & Girls, failed to capture that performance style, leaving much to be desired. Their second record, Sound & Color, released Tuesday, incorporates a variety of instrumentation and draws on a wide array of influences to create an album that not only defines the band’s sound but also captures the spontaneity and color of their live performances. Lead singer and guitarist Brittney Howard’s voice is the highlight of almost every song on Sound & Color. Her vocals bring enormous tonal variety, establishing an initially hazy dream state on “Sound & Color” and energizing the angry and demanding frenzy of “Gimme All Your Love.” Howard’s soothing register on “Future People” accentuates the confident and boisterous “Don’t Wanna Fight.” In an instant, Howard can go from absolutely irate to gently compassionate and

back again. Her emotions consume her when she sings of heartbreak; she focuses solely on her pain and nothing else. Combined with Howard’s heavy guitar chords and Zac Cockrell’s jazzy bass work, Howard’s voice helps every song on this record leave a lasting impression. Steve Johnson, the band’s drummer, brings his punk and metal influence to each song. He helps Alabama Shakes create explosive moments in songs such as “Miss You,” in which Johnson controls the pace with his dynamic drumming. Johnson contributes to the band’s overall effort to keep the listeners on the edge of their seats by eliminating predictability in his drumming. With a start-and-stop style throughout the record, this album isn’t a casual listen. Experiencing all of the ups and downs of the album requires paying attention to details. Sound & Color takes a toll on the listener, but the end result is worth the effort. At points, Howard’s lyrical content feels generic. Themes of personal turmoil, regret and

SOUND & COLOR Artist: Alabama Shakes Tracks: 12 Rating: 9/10

helplessness dominate Sound & Color, but Howard neglects to add personal detail to these struggles. Although a more personal account of Howard’s stories would have given the lyrics depth, the lack of specificity does allow listeners to use their imagination and project their own experiences onto the music. Not to say every song is bleak and hopeless; Sound & Color offers more empowering tracks of equal magnitude. “Shoegaze” invigorates listeners to the extent that songs such as “This Feeling” force contemplation. Sound & Color makes the listener feel closer to the Alabama Shakes with every note. This record signifies the group’s maturation as a band. This album makes it clear that the Shakes’ efforts to translate their live performance style into digital recordings paid off.

Illustration by Lindsay Rojas | Daily Texan Staff

INSPIRE

continues from page 8 questions and experiences they will likely face as female leaders. “We see a seed or a foundation for an interest in women’s leadership,” Sapio said. “It doesn’t come across explicitly in the application — like, women don’t often give a philosophy of feminism. But we see the seeds, and we want to give those women an opportunity for them to germinate and flourish.”

DANCE

continues from page 8 in Punjab, a state in India. “[Bhangra] is basically a series of high knees, jumping jacks and squats,” D’aguilar said. “It’s intense cardio. We need about six water breaks.” The group blends English and South Asian music to accompany the dances, and, in recent years, they have hired professional DJs to mix the songs. Preparation for the various dance competitions they attend begins over the summer, when the officers select the theme and music for the year’s main performance. “You don’t want everyone just dancing for eight minutes,” Kachru said. “Your storyline is important.” Saaya’s dance this year had the theme “dark circus.”

Seniors usually choose their mentees based on shared experiences. Nguyen said she and her mentee match perfectly because neither feels as if they fit in at the Red McCombs School of Business. Nguyen said she urges her mentee to remember that life is composed of more than just academics. “You know, business school is nice, and you learn useful things, but you should pursue outside interests if you have those outside interests,” Nguyen said. Nguyen said one of the most

valuable gifts the group has given her are excellent communication skills, which she said she knows will be useful no matter where she decides to work. “As an intern, I had to talk to head of accounting for an entire program — that was kind of weird,” Nguyen said. “I was 21 at the time and making these demands from this person that has worked at this company for forever — those communication skills were important.”

The story follows a group of people who audition for the circus. Once they make it in, the ringleader holds them all captive. The captains created props and designed costumes, which included red and black vests and gold salwars — loose pants worn in South Asia. Saaya performed the routine at Dance Ke Deewane, a national competition in Miami, in the fall but did not place. The team performed again in March at a state competition held at Baylor University called Gateway to India, and they placed first. “It’s a year-long process,” Kachru said. “We’ve had to change the routine over time. We took what the judges said and made changes. We’d remove songs or change the choreography up.”

To prepare the choreography, members taught each other the various moves. “We have certain people on the team that are really good at certain things, and we utilize that,” D’aguilar said. “Everyone on the team just helps each other.” Mathematics sophomore Ajay Patel, a member of the team who sometimes gives pep talks before performances, said getting to display the choreography on stage is his favorite aspect of being a part of Saaya. “Having the music blast to the point where you can’t hear yourself think is probably the best part,” Patel said. “You shut everything else out. You’re not thinking about anything. The only thing that’s on your mind is how you’re going to entertain and what’s your next move.”

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GARRETT CALLAHAN, SPORTS EDITOR | @texansports Wednesday, April 22, 2015

TEXAS

TEXAS STATE

VS.

Long ball powers Texas past Bobcats By Jacob Martella

Texas’ offensive struggles and inconsistent ability to move the chains played a pivotal role in the team’s loss of seven of its last 12 games in 2014 — but with the faster tempo the team demonstrated at the recent Orange-White scrimmage, players may gain more yards in the season to come. In the last 12 games of last season, the Longhorns gained just 4,385 yards on 892 plays from scrimmage and averaged less than five yards per play for the first time since 1991, ranking 110th in the country and next to last in the conference at 4.92 yards per play. With so little production per play, the Longhorns finished the year averaging 337 yards of total offense per game, the team’s second-lowest mark in the past 30 seasons. Texas clearly needed to mix up its offensive philosophy for the upcoming season to be a success. One way the Longhorns will be able to be more successful is to make the offensive pace more up-tempo. Both offenses in the recent

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NCAA Baseball DALLAS BAPTIST

Joshua Guerra Daily Texan Staff

Texas the lead. Two innings later, sophomore center fielder Zane Gurwitz lined a shot off the left-field foul pole for a tworun homer to give the Longhorns a 5–2 lead. The blast was the first Texas home run at UFCU Disch-Falk Field since senior right fielder Collin Shaw hit a two-run home run against Kansas State on March 22. Gurwitz, who had six hits and three RBIs in the series against Kansas, said

keeping the game simple is what ultimately led to the team’s success. “It’s been working — just keeping the game simple and bringing it back to the basics,” Gurwitz said. “If you make it too hard on yourself, it’s going to eat you up.” Boswell added a two-run home run, his first collegiate four-bagger, in the eighth inning to up the lead to 7–3. Sophomore starting pitcher Josh Sawyer, who has been up and down this

season since being dropped from the weekend rotation, struggled early in the game. He threw 29 pitches, giving up two runs on a double to left and a single up the middle. But Sawyer settled in after that, retiring the next 11 batters and finishing the night with four strikeouts in five innings of work — the most innings he’s thrown since March 8 at Stanford. “I was leaning forward, so [associate head coach Skip

Johnson] said, ‘Just stop when you get down to the bottom — and then go forward,’” Sawyer said. The win is Texas’ second victory over Texas State this season. The Longhorns defeated the Bobcats 6–4 in San Marcos on March 24. The two will meet again May 5 in Texas’ last regular-season home game. The Longhorns resume conference play with a crucial series at TCU beginning Friday.

OKLA STATE

TOP TWEET Blake Goins @Blake_Goins

Getting scar tissue rubbed on after surgery has to be one of the most painful things ever!

BASEBALL

Despite a tweaked offensive scheme, Texas still in search of play-makers @DrewLieberman

CELTICS

MAVERICKS

FOOTBALL | STAT GUY

By Drew Lieberman

NBA

Sophomore center fielder Zane Gurwitz rounds the bases after his home run in a 7–3 win over Texas State. Gurwitz’s home run was the first for the Longhorns since March 22.

@ViewFromTheBox

If fans worried that the Longhorns’ outburst of runs at Kansas this past weekend might not carry over to Austin, those fears were put to rest quickly Tuesday night. Texas batters lashed out eight hits and scored five runs in the first three innings, including the team’s first home run at home in almost a month, in a 7–3 win over Texas State. After giving up two runs in the top of the first, the Longhorns immediately responded in the bottom half of the inning by getting the first three batters on base, none of which came on a hit. Freshman first baseman Michael Cantu followed that up with a double-play grounder that brought in a run. “All of us as coaches saw a good carry over from the Sunday game into this game,” head coach Augie Garrido said. Sophomore first baseman Tres Barrera tied the game when the Texas State center fielder whiffed on a catch, allowing a run to come across and Barrera to scamper all the way to third. Freshman third baseman Bret Boswell drew a bases-loaded walk later in the inning to give

SIDELINE

Orange-White scrimmage did this, finishing the opening half with more than 40 plays each, putting them on pace to shatter the 68.6 plays the team ran per game in 2014. But Texas failed to display any possible gamebreakers on its offense, one that ranked ahead of only Kansas in the Big 12 in producing plays from scrimmage of 10 yards or greater with 165 last fall. Quarterbacks junior Tyrone Swoopes and redshirt freshman Jerrod Heard were unable to distinguish themselves from each other. Each signal caller led his squad on 65-yard opening drives capped by individual touchdown runs inside the redzone. Then both struggled for the rest of the first half, as Swoopes’ squad produced 4.19 yards per play, while the Heardled offense produced just 3.72 yards per play in that the span. Sophomore running back D’Onta Foreman made an impact with 13 touches for 83 yards, including a 28-yard carry — Texas’ longest play of the afternoon — and a touchdown plunge from a yard out. Foreman could excel as Texas’ short-yardage back, but senior running

back Johnathan Gray will likely take the bulk of the team’s carries. There are also plenty of questions surrounding the wide receiver position, particularly replacing John Harris, who became the sixth player in school history to go over the 1,000yard receiving plateau. With senior wide receiver Marcus Johnson out with a knee injury, all eyes were on a pair of sophomores and an oftentroubled senior. Sophomores Dorian Leonard and Armanti Foreman, potential impact players before the game, were each unable to haul in would-be touchdown passes. Many hoped senior Daje Johnson would return to his freshman and sophomore form, when he combined for 1,330 all-purpose yards and five touchdowns. However, Johnson struggled throughout the afternoon, muffing a punt and losing another fumble, while finishing with four receptions for 43 yards. The faster tempo should help the offense gain more yards than 2014. Even so, without a go-to playmaker, the Longhorns will likely continue struggling to produce explosive plays.

Griffin Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Junior quarterback Tyrone Swoopes, pictured above, and redshirt freshman Jerrod Heard hope to take advantage of Texas’ switch to a more up-tempo offensive style.

TODAY IN HISTORY

1954

Joshua Guerra | Daily Texan Staff

Former Longhorn player, cancer survivor and Texas State head coach Ty Harrington returns to UFCU Disch-Falk Field.

Harrington returns to Texas cancer-free By Nick Castillo @Nick_Castillo74

Tuesday night, Texas State’s head coach, Ty Harrington, made a surprise appearance at UFCU Disch-Falk Field in front of an unusually large crowd. Harrington, a former Texas player and coach, has been away from the Bobcats while he battles rectal cancer. The former two-time Longhorn letterman hugged Texas head coach Augie Garrido at home plate as the crowd cheered after the opposing coaches exchanging lineup cards before the game. Garrido said the embrace at the plate was emotional because of his friendship with Harrington. “I know what he’s going through,” Garrido said. “I was with my mother when she went through that. She didn’t make it, but he did. So we thank God for that. It was very emotional.” Harrington said the crowd’s response was uplifting, especially since he hasn’t been around the game for a while. “The crowd was unbelievably gracious tonight to applaud me at the beginning of the game,” Harrington said. “I appreciate that from the Longhorn crowd, and I certainly appreciate that from Augie and his staff. … To have these kinds of things are heartfelt and nice. It makes you feel good.” This was Harrington’s second appearance this season. His first was in Waco against Baylor on April 2. During his playing days

as a Longhorn, Harrington was a two-time letterman. He was infielder from 1984– 1987 and went to the College World Series three times. Harrington continued his time at Texas as a coach. He served as a student coach and a graduate assistant coach from 1988–1991. He moved to Arkansas State to become an assistant coach for the Red Wolves in 1992 before serving as head coach for Northeast Texas Community College in 1995 and Blinn College in 1999. Harrington became the Bobcats’ head coach in 2000 and has lead Texas State to a 507–381–1 record, three Southland conference championships and three NCAA Regional Tournaments. While Harrington enjoyed his time at the ballpark, he isn’t sure when he’ll be back full time. He said he’s hopeful that time will come soon, as he is done with his cancer treatment and is starting to feel better. “I’m trying to work my way back in there,” Harrington said. “My first thought is I’ve got my health before the dugout. I don’t know that I’m ready to get in there and grind.” Garrido said he has admired Harrington’s strength as he has battled cancer. “I love what he’s had to go through and how he’s conquered it,” Garrido said. “I admire him. I respect him. And I love him for winning the battle.” Texas ultimately won the game 7–3, but the play on the diamond only served as a backdrop to an emotional night at the ballpark.

NBA adopts 24-second shot clock and 6 team-foul rule

USA Today/NFCA Coaches Softball Poll 1 2 3 4 5 6 16 25 RV

Florida 44–4 Oregon 37–5 LSU 41–5 Michigan 41–6 Alabama 35–10 Oklahoma 38–6 Baylor 31–11 Texas A&M 33–14 Texas 10

SPORTS BRIEFLY Five Longhorns make Big 12 academic team

Five members of the men’s tennis team have been named to the Academic All-Big 12 Men’s Tennis Teams. Seniors Lloyd Glasspool, Søren Hess-Olesen and Jacoby Lewis as well as Ivy-league transfer junior Michael Riechmann were awarded first-team honors. Nick Naumann was awarded second-team honors. To qualify for the Academic All-Big 12 teams, an individual must have a GPA that either cumulatively or over the previous two semesters is at least a 3.00. Furthermore, the team member must have participated in at least 60 percent of the team’s matches. Seniors who have been a part of the team for at least two years are exempt from the percent of participation criteria. —Evan Berkowitz


COMICS 7

COMICS

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Wednesday, April 22, 2015

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KAT SAMPSON, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR | @thedailytexan Wednesday, April 22, 2015

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THEATER & DANCE

Fusion dance group places at national competition By Marisa Charpentier @thedailytexan

A group of dancers huddle backstage, preparing for the third and final round of the competition. Danielle D’aguilar, Plan II and international relations and global studies freshman, listens as a dancer reminds Saaya, a UT co-ed fusion dance team, that this is their last performance of the year. Months of mixing songs, designing costumes and choreographing routines have all led to this moment. “We knew that we were neck and neck,” D’aguilar said. “I was jarred with energy, and I just started crying.” After seven teams from across the nation took the stage April 11 at Naach Naach Revolution, a national Bollywoodfusion dance competition in the District of Columbia, the judges counted up the points and announced the results. Saaya came in second place — less than a point away from the

first place team, New York University’s Khalbali. One of the team captains, Anuva Kachru, radio-television-film and corporate communications studies junior, said the results were surprising because Saaya had never performed in a competition that required them to compete in three separate rounds before. “Winning second was a really big deal because we didn’t really know what we were doing,” Kachru said. “The teams that won first and third both had competed at the competition before.” This is the second time Saaya has placed at a national competition since the group was founded in 2008. Saaya is one of several fusion teams on campus and currently consists of 17 students who mix hiphop and contemporary dance moves with South Asian dance styles. These styles include Bollywood, a fast-paced dance from India, and Bhangra, a high-energy dance that formed

DANCE page 5

Zoe Fu| Daily Texan Staff

Saaya, a UT co-ed fusion dance team, recently placed second in a national Bollywood-fusion dance competition in the District of Columbia, Saaya is one of several fusion teams on campus, and currently consists of 17 students.

CAMPUS

INSPIRE seeks to equip women for success in leadership By Olivia Lewman @thedailytexan

Each year, about a dozen freshmen women get the opportunity to spend their next three years doing one thing: inspiring. INSPIRE is a three-year-long program open to freshmen that aims to provide a socially and academically supportive space in which young women practice the skills required to be successful world leaders. They aim to inspire themselves and each other. From the beginning, the program’s application committee looks for students who they believe could benefit most from

the program. Around 50 percent of INSPIRE’s members are firstgeneration college students, and 85 percent are women of color. Accounting grad student Alexis Nguyen will finish her last semester with INSPIRE this year. She is a first-generation student whose parents left Vietnam for America during the Vietnam War. “My parents have never stopped working since the day they came to the U.S.,” Nguyen said. “They worked really hard to give me the opportunities to get me where I am today.” The Center for Women’s and Gender Studies designed

the program, which promotes leadership and professional skills to three cohorts divided by class — sophomores, juniors and seniors. The groups meet every other month to work on different professional and leadership strengthening projects. Program coordinator Nancy Ewert said INSPIRE’s guidelines are intentionally vague. This way, she said, students can focus on what they want to learn, and each group can evolve based on the experiences of its individual memberes. “Leadership is defined differently by each person,” Ewert said. “And in the INSPIRE

MUSIC

Local psych-rock band plans for festival, upcoming album By Emily Gibson @emgeemtee

The members of Austinbased Calliope Musicals haven’t had just one near-death experience on tour — they’ve had multiple. Once, a rattlesnake nearly bit guitarist Matt Roth on Tennessee’s Smoky Mountains while the rest of the band unknowingly kept hiking. Another time, they walked barefoot around Joshua Tree National Park in California before discovering they shared their campsite with scorpions. And when they drove through inner-city Baltimore, they were almost carjacked. According to guitarist Chris Webb, the band wouldn’t have it any other way. “If you don’t almost die on tour, it was a really shitty tour,” Webb said. The members of the psychrock band are preparing for another nationwide tour and the release of the album they finished recording in February. The band’s upcoming album is the first time the member have “gotten their feet wet” in the recording studio because they prefer to focus on live performances. In person, the members build off each other’s jokes and recount their near-death experiences with enthusiasm, speaking over each other and completing each others’ sentences. But despite the band members’ chemistry, Calliope Musicals wasn’t always comprised of today’s six members. The band first formed in 2009 when guitarist Matt Roth booked front woman Carrie Fussell to play a show at Pipe’s Plus on the Drag. The pair started writing songs together. They then connected with vibraphone player Craig Finkelstein on Craiglist, and

Griffin Smith | Daily Texan Staff

Psychedelic-rock band Calliope Musicals have been developing their sound and identity since they formed in 2009.

Fussell’s then-boyfriend, now-husband Josh Bickley started playing the drums. Guitarist Chris Webb and bassist Andrew Vizzone joined Calliope Musicals two years ago. Vizzone said the band’s sound morphed from a folk-vibe to psychadelic party-rock after he and Webb joined the band with electric guitars and bass. “We were originally thinking Mamas and the Papas — or kind of Peter, Paul and Mary,” Roth said. “But then electric guitars came into the mix.” Roth said the band members like to collaborate on their songwriting, so the music doesn’t fully conform to one person’s ideas. “We look at ourselves as all different songwriters, so we try to come together to create something cohesive,” Roth said. “We’re more like, ‘Let’s throw all of our sounds together and try to make something from it.’” Vizzone said the band members don’t have a definitive way to describe their sound, but Fussell said it’s always “colorful, energetic and fun.” Calliope Musicals is one of three acts that played Saturday’s Untapped Festival. Fussell said Calliope Musicals likes playing festivals because they draw a

different, more energetic crowd than smaller-venue shows. “People at festivals have signed up for that experience — they’ve got their ticket, their cooler, their friends — and they picked out their clothes they want to wear,” Fussell said. “People just seem to be really excited about a festival.” Calliope’s live shows involve a confetti cannon, animal costumes, candles and dancers. Roth said the band members elicit audience participation in all of its shows by having them sing along or come up on stage and dance. “It’s not just about, ‘Here’s the band, here’s the crowd and here’s the barrier in between,’” Roth said. “It’s more about, ‘What can we create in this moment together?’” For the next few months, Calliope Musicals will promote their album and work on booking their tour. Fussell said the band’s main objective on this tour is to give the audience a good experience. “I think the most important thing, and one of the things we love most about playing music, is making people feel happy,” Fussell said. “Making them feel good and making them feel empowered.”

program, we work towards developing the concept of leadership with each individual.“ The students participate in a six-week improv class and work on community service projects with nonprofits such as SafePlace, GENaustin and Casa Marianella. They attend conferences, present a research study and serve as mentors to freshmen students. Senior members attend an all-expenses-paid trip to the District of Columbia for the National Conference of College Women Student Leaders. Graduate students facilitate the cohorts for the three-year

Leadership is defined differently by each person. And in the INSPIRE program, we work towards developing the concept of leadership with each individual.

—Nancy Ewert, Program coordinator

term. The program chooses these mentors based on their experience in education or focus on gender and women’s issues. Textiles and apparel sophomore Rachelle Allen said she values her INSPIRE mentor, English grad student Jennifer Sapio, because she can speak openly with her.

Sapio specializes in ancient texts and the strategies and mechanisms of anti-feminism in literature. She said INSPIRE’s curriculum does not specifically aim to teach major feminist theory but does center around helping the students address the

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