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Monday, June 17, 2013

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MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTS NEWS Volume 114, Issue 2

A federal judge has ruled unpaid internships to be illegal. / PAGE 5

CONTACT US Main Telephone (512) 471-4591 Editor Laura Wright (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com

OPINION Governor Perry’s veto of SB15 shows that he’s more committed to personal drama than actual progress in higher education. / PAGE 4 Regent Wallace Hall has requested documents ranging from emails to Post-it notes from President Bill Powers. / PAGE 4

Managing Editor Kristine Reyna (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com

This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25 Permanent Staff

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Wright Associate Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kristine Reyna Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick Print News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jody Serrano Online News Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard Print Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore Online Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christine Ayala Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Alberto Long, Colton Pence, Rabeea Tahir Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amy Lach, Lan Le, Sara Reinsch Creative Director. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Natasha Smith Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hirrah Barlas, Jenny Messer, Jack Mitts Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marisa Vasquez Associate Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Zachary Strain Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Guillermo Hernandez Martinez, Emily Ng, Lawrence Peart Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Elyana Barrera Senior Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sarah-Grace Sweeney, Alex Williams Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sara Beth Purdy Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona, Brittany Lamas Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Massingill Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Omar Longoria Social Media Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Paschall Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Brick

Issue Staff

Multimedia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Erika Rich Columnists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Birkenstock Comics Artists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ploy Buraparate, Alyssa Creagh, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Hadidi, David Hook, Albert Lee, Aaron Rodriguez Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Diego Contreras

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SPORTS A national champ at Texas, Tarell Brown is upholding the “DBU” legacy in the NFL, starting for the 49ers in last season’s Super Bowl. / PAGE 7 After setting multiple school records, Longhorns softball standouts Taylor Hoagland and Taylor Thom make the USA National Team. / PAGE

LIFE&ARTS

The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com.

Zach Snyder bases the latest Superman movie, “Man of Steel,” on the original comic books. / PAGE 9 “This is the End” delivers end of the world comedy and reunites Judd Apatow MVPs. / PAGE 9

Copyright 2013 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER Low High

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COPYRIGHT

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UT cancer researchers have been without their state funds for months, but they may see it soon. / PAGE 3

NEWS

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COVER PHOTO ERIKA RICH / Daily Texan Staff

Mubariz Hayat, a computer science senior, is an international student from Pakistan. Hayat, like many international students, struggles to pay tuition.

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NEWS 3

NEWS

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

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STATE

Bill could fund cancer research By Colton Pence @thedailytexan

UT faculty who have struggled to continue their cancer research projects because of an ongoing moratorium on the state’s cancer research institute may get their promised money in the next few weeks. Wayne Roberts, the interim executive director for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, said there are talks about releasing the 118 cancer research grants totaling $110 million soon. Some say it is likely the grants will be released after Gov. Rick Perry signs a bill overhauling CPRIT, which is currently under criminal investigation. It is unclear whether the criminal investigation on the institute will continue. Perry cut funding on Friday for the Travis County Public Integrity Unit, which investigates corruption in state agencies. Travis County could vote to fund the institute, but officials have given no indication of doing so. Perry froze the research grants after it was discovered the institute had awarded some grants without scientific review. The bill automatically became law on June 16 because Perry did not veto it. UT researchers said not having their money has prevented them from hiring graduate student assistants and beginning certain aspects of their projects. Although UT has provided some money to keep research projects afloat, it has not been enough to continue with work as scheduled. The moratorium has affected UT researchers in Austin and across the state. At one point, $108 million

in grants for UT researchers were on hold, including $9 million for UT-Austin. On top of the frozen CPRIT grants, UT-Austin could lose up to $18 million research dollars this year under the across-the-board federal spending cuts known as the sequester. This crunch on research dollars is raising red flags statewide and has many worried that decreased funding will discourage students and researchers from coming to Texas. Laura Suggs, an associate biomedical engineering professor at UT, was supposed to receive about $900,000 for a project aiming to prevent the spread of cancer using infrared light. Without her CPRIT money, Suggs said the project has not been able to acquire the animals to conduct live

testing and take her research to the next level. “We have been able to do only benchtop work and not any of the proposed animal studies,” Suggs said. Suggs said UT has provided temporary funds to help the project, but it has not been enough to continue the project as scheduled. Suggs said she is liable for the money if her CPRIT grant does not come through. CPRIT reform bill SB 149, by state Sen. Jane Nelson, R-Flower Mound, aimed to reform the troubled cancer agency by clarifying rules on conflicts of interests, tightening the peer review process to increase scientific rigor, improving methods to monitor grantee expenditures and increasing transparency in the grant review process, among other reforms. Texans voted to create

Biomedical engineering PhD candidate Ryan Stowers prepares a centrifuge for use on Thursday afternoon. Stowers is a graduate research assistant at a cancer research laboratory at UT.

GUILLERMO HERNANDEZ MARTINEZ Daily Texan Staff

CPRIT in 2007 and authorized it to award $3 billion for cancer research over the next 10 years. Roberts said the institute is committed to meeting the criteria in the bill and working hard to improve operations and end the moratorium.

“We are currently developing rules and procedures necessary to implement SB 149,” Roberts said. “We will move carefully and deliberately in implementing these changes.” Greg Fenves, dean of the Cockrell School of Engineering, said the

biomedical engineering department has not been able to recruit new researchers because of the moratorium. Fenves said CPRIT funding has been invaluable in promoting cancer research in Texas and attracting talented

BILL page 5

A Student’s Right To Privacy The information below is considered directory information. Under federal law, directory information can be made available to the public. You may restrict access to this information by visiting http://registrar.utexas.edu/restrictmyinfo. Please be aware that if you would like to restrict information from appearing in the printed directory, you must make your changes at this web page by the twelfth class day of the fall semester. If you request that ALL your directory information be restricted NO information about you will be given to anyone, including your family members, except as required by law. Any restriction you make will remain in effect until you revoke it. • name • local and permanent addresses • phone number • e-mail address • public user name (UT EID) • place of birth • dates of attendance • enrollment status

• classification • major field(s) of study • expected date of graduation

• weight and height if member of an athletic team • student parking permit information • degrees, awards, and honors • the most recent previous received (including selection educational institution attended criteria) • job title and dates of employ• participation in officially ment when employed by the recognized activities and University in a position that sports requires student status

DIRECTORY INFORMATION SHOULD BE KEPT CURRENT. Official correspondence is sent to the postal or e-mail address last given to the registrar; if the student has failed to correct this address, he or she will not be relieved of responsibility on the grounds that the correspondence was not delivered. For details about educational records and official communications with the University see General Information, 2012–2013.

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4 OPINION

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LAURA WRIGHT, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, @DTeditorial MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

GALLERY

VIEWPOINT

Perry should let drama die Last Friday, Gov. Rick Perry vetoed Senate Bill 15, a piece of legislation by Sen. Kel Seliger (RAmarillo) that would have limited the power of governing boards of Texas public universities by, among other measures, mandating that a board of regents cannot fire an institution’s president without first receiving a recommendation to do so from a chancellor. In a statement issued on Friday night, Sen. Seliger predicted that the veto of SB 15 would ensure that “the conflicts, controversies, and lack of transparency will continue.” Of course, it was in the name of transparency that Regent Wallace Hall filed a massive open records request with the University on June 7. The request, which was obtained by the Texas Tribune through an open records request of its own, called for President Powers to turn

VIEWPOINT

over an array of documents, ranging from emails to Post-it notes. If this request seemed overreaching to Gov. Perry, his statement on the veto of SB 15 didn’t betray that sentiment. In that statement, Perry justified his veto by saying that “limiting oversight authority of a board of regents … is a step in the wrong direction.” But if Hall’s open records request is any indication, SB 15 would have done little to limit the power of regents to influence university business through less-than-official channels. But allowing the bill to pass into law would have allowed us all — regents, administrators, legislators, alumni and students — to take a step away from the muddled mess of the Regents v. Powers showdown and focus our energies on the bigger questions plaguing higher education, like the future of

MOOCs and fixed-rate tuition. Wallace Hall is entitled to his Post-it notes, and Gov. Perry is entitled to his vetoes, but the students of Texas are entitled to a change of conversation. In a letter obtained by the Texas Tribune from Regent Bobby Stilwell, who expressed concern over Hall’s most recent open records request, to board Chairman Gene Powell, Stilwell wrote, “There is no excuse or cover provided for personal agendas or vindictive actions.” Stilwell was referring to the ‘fiduciary duty’ clause of the regents’ job description in particular, but we believe it could well be applied to the entire situation. The veto of SB 15 made it clear that Perry is more interested in winning even the smallest battles than swallowing his pride and letting legislators and students mark down a minor victory.

JOHN MASSINGILL / Daily Texan Staff

Of Post-it notes and President Powers

Recently, the Texas Tribune uncovered an open records request made on June 6 by Regent Wallace Hall directed at the office of President William Powers Jr. The extensive request called for “any and all emails, attachments to emails, documents, notes, post-it notes” and “memoranda” that had been exchanged between Powers and a list of individuals that included all current and former

members of the state and national legislatures, along with Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and the trustees of the contreversial School of Law foundation, since January 1, 2009. In the spirit of helping Regent Hall as he begins to shuffle through the many documents he’s requested, the Daily Texan has taken a guess at some of the riveting post-it notes Regent Hall might uncover in his search.


NEWS 5

NEWS

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

5

NATIONAL

Judge: unpaid internships unlawful By Alberto Long @albertolong

Journalism junior Alyssa Morin said she is often treated like a paid employee at her unpaid internship. She has her work published and is sometimes asked to work extra. Many UT academic programs require students to complete internships to receive their degrees. Although getting real-world experience is important for postgraduation job searches, some students encounter financial problems for taking unpaid internships. Various academic institutions nationwide believe internships should be paid. UT students like Morin who work at unpaid internships might find it harder to get one in the future. This month, New York District Judge William H. Pauley III ruled that unpaid internships breach federal labor laws. Pauley ruled against Fox Searchlight Pictures and said it violated the law when it did not pay company interns who worked on the production of the Oscar-winning film “Black Swan.” The judge said employers must either pay interns for their work or directly supervise their education. Pauley said employers should receive “no immediate advantage” from intern labor. He also said employers should follow a six-point memo by the Department of Labor to

BILL

continues from page 3 faculty to UT. “It has funded truly innovative advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment,” Fenves said. “I hope the program continues with the need-

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ensure interns do not displace other employees. The labor department states that the internship must be similar to training given in an educational environment, the experience must be for the benefit of the intern and the intern must not displace regular employees and work under close supervision of staff, among other provisions. These criteria only apply to for-profit companies. Nonprofits and government entities may still award internships by stating that the intern’s work is an act of public service. “Footman [the intern] did not receive any formal training or education during his internship,” Pauley said in his ruling. “It is not enough that Footman ‘learned what the function of a production office was through experience.’” Although she has gained valuable experience through her internships, Morin said her financial situation has made it difficult for her to accept otherwise “exceptional” internship opportunities. “I feel like fortunate kids with parents who take care of them can go for an unpaid

internship,” Morin said. “I need to pay for groceries, gas and utilities. I’ve been awarded with great opportunities, but at the end of the day, I cannot continue to work for free.” On the academic side, a recent survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers — of which UT is a member — found that many universities felt internships should be paid. Wanda Cash, a journalism professor who coordinates internships for UT’s School of Journalism, said all internships are vetted by the school’s career services office and various coordinators. Valuable internships include those that provide legitimate learning experiences, as well as offering mentorship and feedback, she said. “If we find that an internship doesn’t offer valuable, journalistic experience to our students, we remove that employer from our list of approved placements,” Cash said. Cash said she believes professional experience is essential for a successful undergraduate career, but believes all internships should be paid. It is not clear if the ruling will survive on appeal.

ed changes to assure its integrity.” James Tunnell, an associate biomedical engineering professor, has also been unable to recruit new researchers, which he says has delayed his project to develop a method for a noninvasive

diagnosis of skin cancer. “If the funds come in, we won’t have appropriate overlap and training of the new researchers,” Tunnell said. “Knowledge will be lost, and it will take significantly more effort to get these projects up and running again.”

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6 NEWS 6

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

NEWS

UNIVERSITY

Towering tuition costs tax international students By Rabeea Tahir @rabeaatahir2

Nearly 8,000 miles away and a full day ahead of Austin, UT student Mubariz Hayat’s Pakistani parents each work two jobs to support their son’s tuition. His parents face financial problems and are doing all they can to give him an education. He’s not alone. Getting into UT as an international student is not easy — and for many students, the challenges do not end there. International students at UT can pay as much as $25,000 more per year in tuition than in-state residents, and the cost continues to rise each year. Some face other obstacles, such as adjusting to American culture, having trouble making friends and finding food they are familiar with. Even finding a job after graduation can be difficult because of language proficiency and citizenship status. Yet many international students and their families say the struggle is worth it. “We have to increase and diversify our sources of income to pay for our child’s college, but the cost is worth the quality of education he is getting,” Mubariz’s mother Sarah Hayat said. There were a total of 6,393 international students and visiting scholars enrolled at UT in the 2012-2013 academic year, according to UT. Deana Williams, UT’s assistant director of admissions, said UT has a high profile overseas and attracts students from more than 125 countries, a majority from China, Korea, Mexico and India.

Despite UT’s impressive reputation, Williams said international students only make up about 3 percent of the freshman class because of restrictions in Texas laws. 90 percent of the class is from Texas and 7 percent is from other U.S. states. “[This makes] international admissions highly competitive,” Williams said. In addition to facing competitive admissions, international students also pay large sums in tuition. Brittany Ruetzel, an administrative assistant at UT’s International Office, said international students pay about $16,000 or $17,000 a semester in tuition, depending on what college they are in. “There’s really not a lot available in financial aid for international undergraduates and most scholarships are set up so they have stipulations that they’re reserved for citizens and/or permanent residents,” Ruetzel said. Ruetzel said this results in few scholarship opportunities available to international students. In contrast, American students studying abroad might face a completely different situation. Andre Mikhail, an American student transferring from Harvard to UT, described his experience as an international student at the American University of Cairo, Egypt as a “financial relief.” “My international tuition in Egypt was significantly less than my local tuition both at Harvard and UT,” Mikhail said. For some international students in America, the financial pressure and

PLOY BURAPARATE / Daily Texan Staff

adjustment to a new country becomes a dilemma. Hyun Kyung Kim, a public relations sophomore and international student from South Korea, said even though her parents can afford her full tuition, she is guilt-stricken about her parents being “burdened” with the cumbersome tuition. To help her parents, she said she tried to look for on-campus jobs, which were not readily available to her because of her international status. Kim has also had problems adjusting to Texas. She said she felt scared and lonely when she first came to UT last semester. Kim said she was intimidated to talk to American people because of her weak English language skills and did not know what common topics to talk about. Until recently, Kim said she had mostly Chinese and Korean friends and almost no

local friends. Kim also had trouble adjusting to American food and called her experience “painful.” She said she was used to eating Korean and Chinese food back home and lost more than 15 pounds during her first semester at UT. Homesickness becomes an issue for Kim when her peers leave Austin to visit their families on holidays and breaks. She said the airfare to return home is typically more than $1,900. Kim said she is very doubtful about finding a job in America because she has seen her brother, also an international student, struggle in the American job market after his graduation. Despite his business degree from the University of Michigan, Kim said her brother was rejected from several jobs even before an interview because he is

not an American citizen or permanent resident. After spending a year job-hunting in America, Kim’s brother returned to Korea. Kim is afraid she is going to end up in the same situation. Hayat, an economics and computer science senior, said he found the Austin environment welcoming and became president of the UT Pakistani Student Association. However, Hayat echoed Kim’s fears about job prospects after graduation. “From my involvement and experience with the international students’ alumni network, I have seen a fairly recurrent trend that unless they have an engineering or IT-related degree, most international students end up returning to their home countries because they cannot find jobs in America,” Hayat said.

Not all international students have a hard time finding jobs. Technology companies are eager to hire international and immigrant graduates in math, science and technology and have pushed immigration reform over the last year. A bill in the U.S. Senate, SB 744, would make it easier for immigrant students who graduate with degrees in science and math to obtain residency. Despite the challenges, Williams said international applications for this year are up from last year. Going to school in the U.S. is a challenge, he said. But the benefits of graduating from an internationally renowned school increase job prospects at home and around the world. “It makes the challenge all the more worth it,” Hayat said.


SPORTS 7

7

SARA BETH PURDY, SPORTS EDITOR, @texansports MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

NFL

Brown thriving for Niners

SIDELINE NBA

By Christian Corona @christianc0rona

It seems like everyone knows him here. Tarell Brown shakes dozens of hands and signs hundreds of autographs after running his sixth football and cheerleading camp in Mesquite since beginning his NFL career. He’s joined by former Longhorn teammates Michael Griffin, Michael Huff and Aaron Ross — four of the 13 Longhorn defensive backs that have been drafted since 2002. “It’s a fraternity,” Huff said. “At Texas, us DBs pride ourselves in being a family and keeping the tradition going. Any time one of our DBs have something going, we’re going to be there.” After spending an hour signing autographs for the throng of adoring young campers, Brown, Huff, Ross and Griffin proudly put on shirts that proclaimed “Texas Football is the new DBU.” Brown has done a fine job upholding that “DBU” legacy, but his path to success hasn’t always been a smooth one. He partially tore his ACL after his rookie season and spent his first four years in the NFL as a backup. One of two Heisman Trophy winners for USC, Matt Leinart went into the fourth quarter of that season’s national title game without a touchdown pass. That changed with 6:42 left, when Dwayne Jarrett rose over Brown and Griffin

Game 6

Tuesday, 8 p.m., ABC

Game 7 (if necessary) Thursday, 8 p.m., ABC

MLB

vs. Oakland A’s Monday, 7:05 p.m. Fox Sports Southwest Tuesday, 7:05 p.m. Fox Sports Southwest Wednesday, 7:05 p.m. Fox Sports Southwest Thursday, 1:05 p.m. Fox Sports Southwest EMILY NG / Daily Texan Staff

Tarell Brown instructs at his football camp in Mesquite, which was free for all participants. A national champ at Texas, Brown started in the Super Bowl last season and is one of many former Texas defensive backs to be drafted recently.

and plucked a Matt Leinart pass out of the air as Griffin and Brown collided and Jarrett’s outstretched arm crossed the goal line to give USC a 38-26 lead. Griffin was fine, but Brown, who made a careerhigh 10 tackles in that game, suffered a broken right forearm. He was forced to watch Vince Young lead the Longhorns to a scintillating 41-38 victory on the television in the locker room. “I was going for the ball and I just got hit. That’s all I really remember,” Brown said. “I remember breaking my forearm and my whole

right side going numb. I knew something was broken. We did a great job finishing the game off.” Eight years later, Brown had a much different championship experience. In his second season as a starter, Brown helped the San Francisco 49ers reach their first Super Bowl in nearly two decades. Brown, who the 49ers drafted in the fifth round of the 2006 NFL Draft, was part of a secondary that boasted the fourth-best pass defense in the league. But Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco picked

it apart to the tune of three first-half touchdown passes. Brown forced a momentumswinging Ray Rice fumble in the third quarter that led to a field goal but San Francisco fell to Baltimore, 34-31. “There’s nothing like playing in the Super Bowl,” Brown said. “It’s all about winning. I remember the national championship a lot more because we won. The Super Bowl was great. We had a great run. We just couldn’t finish it at the end.” Brown has come a long way since starring at North Mesquite High School, where he rushed for more

than 3,000 yards in his last two years and established himself as one of the top cornerback prospects in the country. He returned to Mesquite last weekend for his camp, which he doesn’t charge for because he couldn’t afford to go to such camps as a child. “I always thought it was something important for my community,” Brown said. “This was always big for me, always something I wanted to do, just to give something back to the kids.” Maybe next year he’ll come to the camp wearing a Super Bowl ring.

at St. Louis Cardinals Friday, 7:15 p.m. MLB Network Saturday, 6:15 p.m. FOX Sunday, 7:05 p.m. ESPN

vs. White Sox Monday, 8:10 p.m.

vs. Brewers Tuesday, 8:10 p.m. Wednesday, 8:10 p.m. Thursday, 2:10 p.m.


8 SPORTS 8

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

WOMEN’S DIVING

SPORTS

SOFTBALL

Maren Taylor to dive in Spain By Brittany Lamas @brittany_lamas

After she dislocated her right elbow at the 2011 NCAA Championships, diver Maren Taylor opted to redshirt what would have been her third year, the 2011-12 season, to heal. Now that she has recovered, she is back on the board and headed to Spain to compete in the FINA World Championships. Taylor earned a spot in the individual three-meter diving event at the Championships, which begin July 19 in Barcelona, Spain. She will be the only American woman to compete in the event and is the first Texas

diver to represent the U.S. in international competition since Laura Wilkinson in 2008. Texas diving coach Matt Scoggin will join her as an assistant coach on the team. To qualify, divers competed in the 2013 USA Diving World Trials and had to earn a minimum of 903 points, with a combined degree of difficulty of 14.8 in the finals. Taylor finished with a 905.50 points and a 14.8 difficulty level on her five dives. Scoggin said the meet was successful and proved what Taylor could do. “What Maren did today was exactly what we thought she’d be able to do

in the three-meter event at the NCAA Championships,” Scoggin said. “Her three-meter finish at NCAAs was disappointing, but she was able to shake it off. That’s a big key to her success. She moved on, prepared for this meet and knew she could do this today.” During the season, Taylor brought her Big 12 title total to three and was selected as the Big 12 Diver of the Year. She earned AllAmerican honors in the one-meter and platform events this year at the 2013 NCAA Championships, giving her All-American awards for each year she has competed.

SHWETA GULATI / Daily Texan file photo

Taylor Hoagland left Texas as the school’s career leader in home runs (58), runs (221), walks (178), on-base percentage (.501) and slugging percentage (.708).

Thom, Hoagland make USA team as Horns earn highest-ever ranking By Diego Contreras @texassports

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Texas women’s softball standouts Taylor Thom and Taylor Hoagland have been selected to play for the 2013 USA Softball Women’s National Team. The decision was announced early Friday afternoon by USA Softball and the Amateur Softball Association of America. Both are coming off a successful Texas season which saw the Longhorns make their third trip in program history to the Women’s College World Series Semifinal and their highest post-season ranking,

finishing No. 3 in both the USA Today/National Fastpitch Coaches Association and ESPN.com/USA Softball final polls. Texas has never ranked higher in the NFCA final poll and tied with the 2006 squad for its highest ranking in the last USA Softball poll. Hoagland’s second USA roster selection after three invitations will finalize what was an outstanding career as a Longhorn, while Thom, a junior, will be playing with the national team for the first time, before returning for her senior season at Texas. The USA women’s softball

Taylor Thom Shortstop

team will begin play for the World Cup of Softball in Oklahoma City on July 11 until July 14, before competing in events throughout the summer in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico.

RECYCLE AFTER READING YOUR COPY


10 L&A 10

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Monday, June 17, 2013

Crossword Across

  1 Judge’s  garment    5 Plant with  fronds   9 Book after  Jonah 14 Zenith 15 Et ___ (and  others) 16 Machine at a  construction  site 17 Lofty 18 Last ones in  the pool, say 20 Chicago Cubs  spring training  site 22 Hosp. areas  for accident  victims 23 Actress  Thurman 24 Pattern for  many 1960s  T-shirts 26 “Rag Mop”  hitmakers,  1950 32 Prefix with task 33 Unmannered  sort 34 Lawbreaker, in  police lingo

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Edited by Will Shortz 1

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puzzle by allan e. parrish

41 ___ 

51 Small Indian 

60 Camaro ___-Z

44 Where the 

52 Nabisco 

61 Something you 

decongestant

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drum

cookies 53 Fruit with a pit 57 Italian wine  area 58 Conductance  units 59 Where a baby  develops

might get your  hand slapped  for doing

62 Chew like a 

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64 Luau 

instrument,  informally

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

COMICS


10 L&A

ELYANA BARRERA, LIFE&ARTS EDITOR, @DTlifeandarts MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘THIS IS THE END’

MOVIE REVIEW | ‘MAN OF STEEL’

All-star cast’s latest movie proves apocalyptic success By Alex Williams @AlexWilliamsdt

With their previous works, “Superbad” and “Pineapple Express,” Seth Rogen and writing partner Evan Goldberg perfected the formula of the bromantic comedy. The pair’s directorial debut, “This Is The End,” covers similar ground to diminishing returns, offsetting the familiarity with a hilarious survival narrative and a surprisingly impressive apocalyptic scale. “This Is The End” deviates from your standard apocalypse film by letting its stars play exaggerated versions of themselves, tweaking their personalities for maximum comedic effect. Rogen and Jay Baruchel play old friends reuniting for a weekend, their long-standing relationship tested by Rogen’s success and Baruchel’s immaturity. Tensions mount when Rogen drags Baruchel to a party at James Franco’s house, and the film delivers a revolving door of cameos, including Michael Cera, playing against type as a brash cocaine vacuum in Rogen’s most demented bit of casting. Just as Baruchel confronts Rogen, the apocalypse happens, and the pair find themselves trapped at Franco’s house with a small ensemble of game comedic actors. Of the few survivors, Craig Robinson portrays himself as a terrified teddy bear with no idea how to react to impending doom, while Jonah Hill plays against type as the most aggressively friendly guy in the room. Danny McBride is easily the MPV, cranking his caustic screen persona all the

way up and taking his brand of bullheadedness to revolting extremes. While Rogen and Goldberg’s previous films have smartly balanced the pathos of male camaraderie with spurts of juvenile comedy, “This Is The End” has trouble keeping Baruchel and Rogen’s friendship front and center. Baruchel’s character is consistently unpleasant to everyone around him, and while learning to stop being self-righteous is his character’s arc, it also makes him hard to root for. It’s easy for the rest of the cast’s rapid-fire joke delivery to overshadow the film’s emotional center. “This Is The End” finishes strong, and the final sequence of the film steps up the scale in a huge way. While the film was made on a relatively low budget, you can tell where the money went once Rogen and Goldberg unleash stunningly impressive and massive monsters on our heroes. Even though the film’s final stretch indulges in the directors’ juvenile mind-set a bit too often —

9

especially when dealing with massive demonic genitalia — this is the rare comedy where things get funnier as they get more horrific, and “This Is The End” even manages to salvage its struggling central friendship story line in a few genuinely sweet moments. “This Is The End” is more or less “The Avengers” of comedy, gathering together a few of the sharpest young actors working in the genre for a hyper-meta ensemble piece that avoids being self-congratulatory. Even though the film has trouble negotiating where its occasionally corny jokes and troublesome narrative meet up, “This Is The End” is a top-notch assembly of hilarious jokes, apocalyptic chaos and hysterical performances, making it a strong comedic counterpoint to the spectacle of summer cinema.

THIS IS THE END Directors: Evan Goldberg & Seth Rogen Genre: Comedy Runtime: 107 minutes

PHOTO COURTESY OF SONY PICTURES

Jay Baruchel, Jonah Hill and Seth Rogen play themselves in the apocalyptically funny “This Is The End.”

Henry Cavill stars as Superman, man of steel, the title role of the Zach Snyder directed reboot, which redefines the superhero for a new generation.

PHOTO COURTESY OF WARNER BROS.

Snyder gives original superhero new life in comic-based remake By Andrew Huygen @AndrewHuygen

In 1978, director Richard Donner, along with Christopher Reeve, convinced their innocent and believing audience that a man could fly. After seeing “Man of Steel,” I can tell you this: Zach Snyder and Henry Cavill did the improbable and made it nearly possible for our modern, skeptical world to believe that a “man” can fly. I use the term “man” very lightly here — Superman is in no way a man. He is a god and this is why many people can’t connect with the character. Unless you shoot a kryptonite bullet through his heart (which isn’t as easy as it sounds), there’s no way to defeat him. He’s invincible. He’s unwavering. He’s everything we Americans strive to be: honest, just and good. Snyder made the difficult decision to skip the 30-minute origin story of Clark Kent, instead cleverly intertwining flashbacks that

would thematically match the scenes preceding them. While it seems everyone and their grandmother knows Superman’s origins, Snyder still had to include some form of background for this newly redefined Superman. Henry Cavill was brilliantly cast as Clark Kent/ Kal-El, bringing his own take on the title character. He’s stated in numerous interviews he chose to base his interpretation on the comic books and not the films that came before, which in the end made him a more believable “big, blue boy scout.” While it was doubted he could play a menacing villain, Michael Shannon delivered leaps and bounds above my expectations. His cold and relentless Zod was a perfect foil for Cavill’s man of steel. This isn’t to say that the film was without its issues. While Cavill, Shannon and Russell Crowe breathed life into their otherworldly roles, Amy Adams seemed forced as Lois Lane. Because

MAN OF STEEL Director: Zach Snyder Genre: Action Runtime: 143 minutes Lois has been very similarly characterized for the past several decades, one comes to expect an actress to fit a clearly defined “Lois” mold. Adams seemed to “phone in” many of her lines, one example being her confrontation with Lawrence Fishburne’s Perry White. And some of the over-the-top CGI was a little undercooked and stuck out like a sore thumb in some scenes. Superman may not be the hero we deserve, but he’s without a doubt the one we need right now.

TELL US WHICH SUMMER BLOCKBUSTER YOU SAW THIS WEEKEND

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OFFICE OF THE SENIOR ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT AFFAIRS AND DEAN OF STUDENTS 100 West Dean Keeton Street A5800

Austin, Texas 78712-1100

512-471-5017

Fx 512-471-7833

deanofstudents.utexas.edu

Date: June 17, 2013 To: All Students at The University of Texas at Austin From: Dr. Soncia Reagins-Lilly, Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Subject: Texas Hazing Statute Summary and The University of Texas at Austin’s Hazing Regulations The 70th Texas Legislature enacted a law concerning hazing. Under the law, individuals or organizations engaging in hazing could be subject to fines and charged with a criminal offense. According to the law, a person can commit a hazing offense not only by engaging in a hazing activity, but also by soliciting, directing, encouraging, aiding or attempting to aid another in hazing; by intentionally, knowingly or recklessly allowing hazing to occur; or by failing to report, in writing to the Dean of Students or another appropriate official of the institution, first-hand knowledge that a hazing incident is planned or has occurred. The fact that a person consented to or acquiesced in a hazing activity is not a defense to prosecution for hazing under this law. In an effort to encourage reporting of hazing incidents, the law grants immunity from civil or criminal liability to any person who reports a specific hazing event in good faith and without malice to the Dean of Students or other appropriate official of the institution and immunizes that person from participation in any judicial proceeding resulting from liability that might otherwise be incurred or imposed as a result of the report. Additionally, a doctor or other medical practitioner who treats a student who may have been subjected to hazing may make a good faith report of the suspected hazing activities to police or other law enforcement officials and is immune from civil or other liability that might otherwise be imposed or incurred as a result of the report. The penalty for failure to report is a fine of up to $1,000, up to 180 days in jail, or both. Penalties for other hazing offenses vary according to the severity of the injury which results and include fines from $500 to $10,000 and/or confinement for up to two years.

HAzing DefineD The law defines hazing as any intentional, knowing or reckless act, occurring on or off the campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are or include students at an educational institution. Hazing includes but is not limited to: A. any type of physical brutality, such as whipping, beating, striking, branding, electric shocking, placing of a harmful substance on the body or similar activity; B. any type of physical activity, such as sleep deprivation, exposure to the elements, confinement in a small space, calisthenics, or other activity that subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or that adversely affects the mental or physical health or safety of the student; C. any activity involving consumption of food, liquid, alcoholic beverage, liquor, drug or other substance which subjects the student to an unreasonable risk of harm or which adversely affects the mental or physical health of the student; D. any activity that intimidates or threatens the student with ostracism, that subjects the student to extreme mental stress, shame or humiliation, that adversely affects the mental health or dignity of the student or discourages the student from entering or remaining registered in an educational institution, or that may reasonably be expected to cause a student to leave the organization or the institution rather than submit to acts described in this subsection; E. any activity that induces, causes or requires the student to perform a duty or task which involves a violation of the Penal Code.

UniveRSiTy DiSciplinARy RUleS This law does not affect or in any way limit the right of the university to enforce its own rules against hazing under Chapter 14 of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities.

DAngeRoUS oR DegRADing AcTiviTieS Activities which under certain conditions constitute acts which are dangerous, harmful or degrading, in violation of Chapter 14 and subsections 6-303(b)(3) and 11-404(a)(8) of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities include but are not limited to:

c calisthenics, such as sit-ups, push-ups or any other form of physical exercise; c total or partial nudity at any time; c the eating or ingestion of any unwanted substance; c the wearing or carrying of any embarrassing, degrading or physically burdensome article; c paddle swats, including the trading of swats;

deanofstudents@austin.utexas.edu

c pushing, shoving, tackling or any other physical contact; c throwing any substance on a person; c consumption of alcoholic beverages accompanied by either threats or peer pressure; c lineups for the purpose of interrogating, demeaning or intimidating; c transportation and abandonment (road trips, kidnaps, walks, rides, drops, etc.); c confining individuals in an area that is uncomfortable or dangerous (hot box effect, high temperature, too small, etc.); c any form of individual interrogation; c any type of servitude that is of personal benefit to the individual members; c wearing of embarrassing or uncomfortable clothing; c assigning pranks such as stealing, painting objects, harassing other organizations; c intentionally messing up the house or a room for clean up; c demeaning names; c yelling or screaming; and c requiring boxing matches or fights for entertainment.

DiSciplineD oRgAnizATionS, inclUDing THoSe ReSolveD viA MUTUAl AgReeMenTS In accordance with requirements of the Texas Education Code Section 51.936(c), the following organizations have been disciplined for hazing and/or convicted for hazing, on or off campus, during the preceding three years:

c Alpha epsilon pi Penalty issued August 12, 2011 (Probation through August 12, 2013). c alpha Kappa Delta phi* Conditional registration is three (3) years (June 10, 2013). c Alpha Kappa psi-Business* Conditional registration is one (1) year (February 15, 2014). c Alpha Rho chi-Architecture* Conditional registration is three (3) years (May 29, 2015). c Alpha Tau omega* Conditional registration is two (2) years (August 15, 2014). c Beta chi Theta* Conditional registration is one (1) year (Completed August 24, 2010). c Delta Sigma phi Found to be in violation; Penalty pending. c Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, inc. Penalty issued November 10, 2009 (Suspended through December 31, 2009; Probation through October 30, 2012). c Delta Tau Delta* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed September 9, 2012). c Kappa phi gamma Sorority, inc.* Conditional registration is two (2) years (April 30, 2014). c lambda phi epsilon Penalty issued December 20, 2005 (Cancelled through December 19, 2011; Suspended through May 31, 2014; Probation through May 31, 2015). c omega phi gamma* Conditional registration is three (3) years (July 12, 2014). c phi chi Theta-Business* Conditional registration is two (2) years (July 7, 2014). c phi Delta Theta* Conditional registration is two (2) years (August 9, 2014). c phi gamma Delta* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed July 15, 2010). c pi Kappa phi* Conditional registration is two (2) years (February 27, 2014). c Sigma Alpha epsilon* Conditional registration is five (5) years (Completed April 7, 2013). c Sigma Alpha Mu* Conditional registration is two (2) years (April 20, 2014). c Sigma phi epsilon* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed September 1, 2012). c Silver Spurs* Conditional registration is two (2) years (July 13, 2013). c Texas cheer and pom* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed July 23, 2011). c Texas iron Spikes* Conditional registration is three (3) years (March 7, 2014). c Texas omicron (formerly known as Kappa Alpha order)* Conditional registration is three (3) years (April 11, 2015). c Texas Wranglers* Conditional registration is two (2) years (Completed October 6, 2010). c zeta Beta Tau Found to be in violation; Penalty pending. *Resolved via Mutual Agreement To report an act of hazing to the Office of the Dean of Students, visit deanofstudents.utexas.edu/complaint. php. For further information or clarification of probationary member activities, please contact Student Activities in the Office of the Dean of Students, Student Services Building (SSB) 4.400, 512-471-3065.


The Daily Texan 2013-06-17