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Monday, November 12, 2012

INSIDE

dailytexanonline.com

Texas easily beats Iowa State in tribute to DKR.

The Record unmasks the owner of Lucy in Disguise.

SPORTS PAGE 6

LIFE&ARTS PAGE 10

5 NEWS

Austin Police chief Art Acevedo recieved a peace award Sunday.

7 SPORTS

Texas defeats Fresno State in close basketball season opener.

10 LIFE & ARTS

As part of a nationwide art exhibition, bones will be scattered on the south lawn Tuesday.

TODAY Veteran appreciation tabling event In recognition of Veterans Day, Student Veteran Services and the Student Veteran Association host a tabling event on the Six Pack for grassroots outreach from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Moscow-Texas Connections Program Attend an information session for the MoscowTexas Connections Program, a FulbrightHays Group Project Abroad, offering a 10week Russian language and culture summer program at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow, June 10 - Aug. 16. The info session will be held at CAL 422 at noon.

Mariachi Ensemble performs

The Mariachi Ensemble performs as part of World Music Week at the Butler School of Music Recital Studio 2.608 at 7:30 p.m.

Today in history In 1954

Ellis Island closes its doors. After six decades and more than 12 million immigrants passing through its doors since Jan. 2, 1892, the center closes due to a decrease of immigration into the U.S.

UNIVERSITY

Faculty donations lean toward Obama Editor’s Note: This is the third in a three-part series examining UT officials’ political donations. This installment examines contributions made by UT faculty members.

By Alexa Ura The College of Liberal Arts faculty has outspent all other UT colleges and schools in political contributions since 2008. Leading up to the elections earlier this month, UT professors

gave almost ten times as much to President Barack Obama as to Republican candidate Mitt Romney. Liberal arts professors donated $235,590 to political campaigns and political action committees in the past five years, according to fillings compiled by The Daily Texan from the Texas Ethics Commission and the Federal Election Commission. With 692 professors as of 2011, the College of Liberal Arts is the University’s largest college.

Campaign contributions made by UT professors from all colleges and schools totaled $791,472 since 2008. Reported figures for contributions by professors include all professors, associate professors, assistant professors and lecturers who identified the University as their employer in state and federal filings. State and federal guidelines do not require individual contributors to disclose their employer, and individuals with multiple em-

faculty campaign contributions since 2008 College of Liberal Arts $235,590 School of Law $191,359 Cockrell School of Engineering $144,185 College of Natural Sciences $139,840 ployers can choose which employer to list or opt not to include one. UT spokesperson Tara Doolittle recently told the Daily Texan that campaign contributions fall un-

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der an individual’s right to free speech. “As long as University resources or official positions are not used to advocate or

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VOLLEYBALL

Win against KU sets record for best Big 12 start under Elliott By Sara Beth Purdy

The game meant more than a “W” in the results column. For a Texas team who is itching to bring home a championship crown after so many near misses, the win represented just how dominating the Longhorns have been all season. No. 3 Texas walked into Lawrence, Kan. Saturday and brought home a close 3-2 win against No. 23 Kansas who was ranked second in the Big 12 (20-25, 25-15, 22-25, 25-16, 15-12). The game marked Kansas’ first home loss this season. Thanks to their 15th straight victory, Texas is now 21-3 on the season. More importantly, Texas is now 13-0 in conference play, marking its best start in the Big 12 in Texas history under head coach Jerritt Elliott. The win also guarantees Texas at

least a part of the Big 12 crown. “We have a chance to go 13-0 for the first time in 15 years in conference. We’ve never done that before so it is a big opportunity for us,” Elliott said last week after equaling the 12-0 record he had set before heading to Kansas. The Longhorns will clinch the title outright if they can defeat Texas Tech on Wednesday night at Gregory Gym. It will mark the Longhorn’s second consecutive and sixth total Big 12 volleyball title. Starting last season, the Longhorns have won 27 consecutive conference matches and 38 consecutive home conference matches. They have only three games left in the season before they are projected to host the first rounds of the NCAA tournament

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Haley Eckerman

LEGACY

CITY

Historical DKR memorabilia goes on auction Grand prix By David Maly Members of the public got a chance Sunday to take home memorabilia that belonged to legendary former head football coach Darrell K Royal. Items auctioned included Alamo Bowl and 2006 Rose Bowl rings, a 1973 photo of Darrell K Royal and his wife Edith Royal with Willie Nelson and Lady Bird Johnson and a photo of Charles Duke, lunar module pilot on the 1972 Apollo 16 mission, attempting to form a Hook ‘em hand gesture on the moon. Darrell K Royal died Wednesday of complications of cardiovascular disease at the age of 88. Ross Featherston, spokesperson for Austin Auction Gallery, said planning for the auction began in late August, and Edith Royal wanted to continue with the auction after her husband’s death for several reasons.

“This is about sharing their personal collection with the public, with his fans,” Featherston said. “She wanted people to have the opportunity to buy some of those things. There are 243 pieces here that they can [bid on], and they are related to Coach Royal.” Amy McMurrough, spokesperson for public relations firm McMurrough and Associates, that assisted in publicizing the auction, said Edith Royal also wanted to continue with the auction to take some of the strain off her family. “She didn’t want to burden her family with the difficulty of having to figure out what to do with things after he passed,” McMurrough said. She said roughly 600 people placed bids during the auction, with 300 in-person and 300 via internet or telephone. She said the highest bid was made by a UT alumnus, whose name was not

approaches as bus drivers look to strike By Joshua Fechter & David Maly

Featherston said a portion of the proceeds taken in by Featherston and Edith Royal will be given to the Darrell K Royal Fund for Alzheimer’s Research. He said Darrell K Royal’s passing received national publicity, undoubtedly contributing to the auction’s success.

The union representing bus drivers on about half of Capital Metro’s 83 routes voted last week to authorize a potential strike, citing unfair labor practices allegedly committed by the contractor that operates those routes. Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1091, which represents about 600 bus drivers and Capital Metro employees, accused McDonald Transit of declaring contract negotiations at an impasse in August. The

DKR continues on page

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Ricky Llamas | Daily Texan Staff An auction employee holds up a framed memorabilia from the Royal Collection on Sunday at the Austin Auction Gallery.

available, for the 2006 Rose Bowl ring at $105,000, roughly $120,000 with buyer’s premium, a tax charged by the auction house. McMurrough said the later bids on that ring produced a lively competition between two bidders. In addition to the Royal’s items, the auction included pieces from Beau Theriot, an Austin furniture designer.

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Monday, November 12, 2012

DKR

FRAMES | FEAtuREd photo

The Daily Texan Volume 113, Issue 64

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CONTACT US Main Telephone: (512) 471-4591 Editor: Susannah Jacob (512) 232-2212 editor@dailytexanonline.com Managing Editor: Aleksander Chan (512) 232-2217 managingeditor@ dailytexanonline.com News Office: (512) 232-2207 news@dailytexanonline.com Multimedia Office: (512) 471-7835 dailytexanmultimedia@gmail.com Sports Office: (512) 232-2210 sports@dailytexanonline.com

Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff Three siblings attempt to shoot a bee with a BB gun on the shores of Windy Point on Lake Travis Saturday afternoon.

Life & Arts Office: (512) 232-2209 dailytexan@gmail.com

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Retail Advertising: (512) 471-1865 joanw@mail.utexas.edu

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The Texan strives to present all information fairly, accurately and completely. If we have made an error, let us know about it. Call (512) 232-2217 or e-mail managingeditor@dailytexanonline.com.

COPYRIGHT Copyright 2012 Texas Student Media. All articles, photographs and graphics, both in the print and online editions, are the property of Texas Student Media and may not be reproduced or republished in part or in whole without written permission.

TOMORROW’S WEATHER High

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Red pandas playing in the snow.

influence political activity, employees are free to participate in the political system,” Doolittle said. The School of Law, which had 117 faculty members as of 2011, making it the fifth largest college in terms of professors, had the second highest amount of contributions, totaling $191,359. The Cockrell School of Engineering was third, contributing $144,185 between its 245 professors. Other colleges or schools with a high number of faculty contributions include the College of Natural Sciences with $139,840 from 556 professors, the McCombs School of Business with $59,042 from 153 professors and the College of Education with $32,241 from 178 professors. Faculty contributions have steadily increased over the past five years and spiked in 2011 and 2012. Faculty members also tend to donate more to federal candidates and PACs than to state candidates or PACs. Faculty members also contributed regularly to presidential and congressional races — contributing $46,662 to presidential candidates

and individuals running for U.S. Senate in 2012, according to opensecrets. org, which is operated by the Center for Responsive Politics. President Barack Obama received $46,346 in contributions from faculty members. Republican candidate Mitt Romney received $4,650. Despite the overwhelming preference for giving to Democratic committees and candidates, representatives of UT Democratic and Republican student political groups said personal political preferences don’t necessarily translate to bias in the classroom. Leslie Tisdale, president of University Democrats said she believes political contributions made by faculty should not dictate their objectivity in

the classroom. “I, as a student, contribute my time because I don’t have much money,” she said. “[Professors] might not have that much time so they contribute in other ways.” Danny Zeng, College Republicans communications director, said it is usual for professors to donate to Democratic candidates but political affiliation does not always transfer into the classroom. “I don’t think they are professors who are specifically biased, but it is a more systemic kind of bias — a more professional bias, per say,” Zeng said. Zeng said political ideologies might structure course material to cover specific topics and teaching methodologies, but allowing broad discussion in the classroom can truncate biases.

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Business and Advertising

(512) 471-1865 | advertise@texasstudentmedia.com Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jalah Goette Business Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lori Hamilton Advertising Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CJ Salgado Broadcast & Events Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carter Goss Campus & National Sales Associate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Bowerman Event Coordinator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lindsey Hollingsworth Student Advertising Manager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Morgan Haenchen Student Assistant Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ted Moreland Student Acct. Execs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Hunter Chitwood, Zach Congdon, Jake Dworkis, Ivan Meza, Rohan Needel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trevor Nelson, Diego Palmas, Paola Reyes, Ted Sniderman, Stephanie Vajda Student Lead Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gabby Garza, Jennifer Howton Student Office Assistant/Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona Senior Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Felimon Hernandez Junior Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Jacqui Bontke, Sara Gonzales, Bailey Sullivan Special Editions/Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abby Johnston Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daniel Hublein

The Daily Texan (USPS 146-440), a student newspaper at The University of Texas at Austin, is published by Texas Student Media, 2500 Whitis Ave., Austin, TX 78705. The Daily Texan is published daily, Monday through Friday, during the regular academic year and is published once weekly during the summer semester. The Daily Texan does not publish during academic breaks, most Federal Holidays and exam periods. Periodical Postage Paid at Austin, TX 78710. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Daily Texan, P.O. Box D, Austin, TX 78713. News contributions will be accepted by telephone (471-4591), or at the editorial office (Texas Student Media Building 2.122). For local and national display advertising, call 471-1865. classified display advertising, call 471-1865. For classified word advertising, call 471-5244. Entire contents copyright 2012 Texas Student Media.

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declaration allowed the contractor to amend the existing labor contract to include changes such as lower wages for new drivers and higher health insurance premiums. Dan Dawson, vice president of marketing and communication for Capital Metro, said UT shuttles would not be affected by the strike because McDonald Transit does not operate the shuttle service. The vote comes a week before Austin hosts Formula 1 racing, an event that will require the city’s public transportation system to accommodate an influx of tourists. Dawson said the union’s

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Permanent Staff

Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carly Coen, Tiffany Hinman, Jordan Rudner Multimedia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Maria Arrellaga, HaiPei Han, Ricky Llamas Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nick Cremona, Nitya Duran, Jori Epstein, Rachel Wenzlaff, Matt Warden Columnist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Patrick St. Pierre Life&Arts Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olivia Arena, Bobby Blanchard, Lindsey Chenner, Faith Ann Ruszkowski Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bobby Blanchard, Meital Boim, Andrew Huygen Comic Artists. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alyssa Creagh, Kaz Frankiewitz, Holly Hansel, Anne Katrine T Haris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Shaun Lane, Forrest Lybrand, Lauren Moore, Lindsay Rojas, Denny Taylor Illustrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shaun Lane Web Staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hannah Peacock, Tyler Reinhart

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This issue of The Daily Texan is valued at $1.25

Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Susannah Jacob Associate Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Drew Finke, Pete Stroud, Edgar Walters Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Aleksander Chan Associate Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trey Scott Digital Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayley Fick News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Stottlemyre Associate News Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Boze, Samantha Katsounas, Allie Koletcha Senior Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Bobby Blanchard, Joshua Fechter, Lazaro Hernandez, David Maly, Alexa Ura Enterprise Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Audrey White Enterprise Reporters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrew Messamore, Megan Strickland Copy Desk Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kristine Reyna Associate Copy Desk Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riley Brands, Amyna Dosani, Sherry Hu, Luis San Miguel Editorial Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Nile Miller Design Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicole Collins Senior Designers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Omar Longoria, Jack Mitts Special Projects Designer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Natasha Smith Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lawrence Peart Associate Photo Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elisabeth Dillon, Andrew Torrey Senior Photographers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pu Ying Huang, Zachary Strain, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fanny Trang, Marisa Vasquez Multimedia Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona Associate Multimedia Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Andrea Macias Senior Videographers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oluwademilade Adejuyigbe, Thomas Allison, Shila Farahani, Lawrence Peart Life&Arts Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kelsey McKinney Associate Life&Arts Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jorge Corona, Sarah-Grace Sweeney Senior Life&Arts Writer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Hannah Smothers, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ricky Stein, Alex Williams, Laura Wright Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christian Corona Senior Sports Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lauren Giudice, Chris Hummer, Sara Beth Purdy, Rachel Thompson, Wes Maulsby Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ao Meng Associate Comics Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riki Tsuji Web Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ghayde Ghraowi Associate Web Editor, Social Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Sanchez Associate Web Editors, Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Helen Fernandez, Omar Longoria Administrative Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Albert Cheng Editorial Adviser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Doug Warren

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Articles about Darrell K Royal’s death appeared in the Austin-American Statesman, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Daily Texan and more than a dozen other publications. Darrell K Royal served as head coach of the Longhorn football team from 1956 until 1976. His record as head coach is 167-47-5, a school record that remains unbroken. At Saturday’s game against Iowa State the Longhorns ran the first play from wishbone, a formation introduced to college football by Darrell K Royal in 1968, and gained 47 yards with the play. The Longhorns won the game 33-7. There will be a public memorial for Darrell K Royal at noon Tuesday in the Frank Erwin Center’s basketball arena. He will be buried privately in the Texas State Cemetery in East Austin, an honor reserved for “legendary Texans who have made the state what it is today.”

vote authorizes a potential strike but does not guarantee that workers will strike. Dawson said he does not know how the bus service would be affected because it is not clear how many drivers plan to strike. He said Capital Metro would use drivers from two other contractors, Veolia Transportation and First Transit, to staff routes designated as top priority if the union calls a strike. “We are hoping that everything will go well and it will not come to that,” Dawson said. In a statement Friday, Linda Watson, Capital Metro president and CEO, said Capital Metro has established plans to deal with a possible driver shortage during the Formula 1 U.S. Grand Prix, but that the strike would affect service on fixed routes. “Regarding Formula 1, we are disappointed that the union has called for a strike authorization, especially given the level of coordinated planning that has occurred during the past several months to ensure that enhanced services could be provided for the benefit of the community and visitors alike,” Watson said. McDonald Transit, a Fort Worth-based company, began operating 44 of Capital Metro’s routes in August. McDonald and the union have been negotiating a new collective bargaining contract since July. McDonald Transit president Robert Babbitt said he would not comment on the situation because his company is still negotiating with the union. Jay Wyatt, president of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1091, did not return calls for comment by press time. In a statement Friday, Mike Martinez, chair of Capital Metro’s board of directors, said the union previously approved of Capital Metro’s current labor structure and that its action could jeopardize Capital Metro’s ability to serve the Austin area. “Strikes should be utilized as a last effort after discussions break down, not a first knee-jerk reaction before all other options are considered,” Martinez said. “It is my hope that the members of ATU continue their amazing service and remain at the bargaining table with McDonald in order to resolve remaining issues.”


Monday, November 12, 2012

NEWS BRIEFLY

Syrian opposition reaches unity deal DOHA, Qatar — Syrian anti-government groups struck a deal Sunday under intense international pressure to form a new opposition leadership that will include representatives from the country’s disparate factions fighting to topple President Bashar Assad’s regime, activists said. The opposition has been deeply divided for months despite the relentless bloodshed in Syria and repeated calls from their Western and Arab supporters to create a cohesive and representative leadership that could present a single conduit for foreign aid. The agreement, reached Sunday after more than a week of meetings in the Qatari capital of Doha, could boost efforts to secure international support that will be crucial in the war to oust Assad.

2013 austerity budget approved by Greece ATHENS, Greece — Greek lawmakers approved the country’s 2013 austerity budget early Monday, an essential step in Greece’s efforts to persuade its international creditors to unblock a vital rescue loan installment without which the country will go bankrupt. The budget passed by a 167128 vote in the 300-member Parliament. It came days after a separate bill of deep spending cuts and tax hikes for the next two years squeaked through with a narrow majority following severe disagreements among the three parties in the governing coalition. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras pledged that the spending cuts will be the last Greeks have to endure. — Compiled from Associated Press reports

World & Nation 3

Luis San Miguel, Wire Editor

CIA director resigns in wake of affair By Adam Goldman, Anne Flaherty & Kimberly Dozier Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Members of Congress said Sunday they want to know more details about the FBI investigation that revealed an extramarital affair between ex-CIA director David Petraeus and his biographer, questioning when the retired general popped up in the FBI inquiry, whether national security was compromised and why they weren’t told sooner. “We received no advanced notice. It was like a lightning bolt,” said Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, who heads the Senate Intelligence Committee. The FBI was investigating harassing emails sent by Petraeus biographer and girlfriend Paula Broadwell to a second woman. That probe of Broadwell’s emails revealed the affair between Broadwell and Petraeus. The FBI contacted Petraeus and other intelligence officials, and director of National Intelligence James Clapper asked Petraeus to resign. A senior U.S. military official identified the second woman as Jill Kelley, 37, who lives in Tampa, Fla., and serves as a social liaison to the military’s Joint Special Operations Command. A U.S. official said the coalition countries represented at the military’s Central Command in Tampa gave Kelley an appreciation certificate on which she was referred to as an “honorary ambassador” to the coalition, but she has no official status. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Kelley is known to drop the “honorary” part and refer to herself as an ambassador.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais | Associated Press In this June 29, 2012 file photo, Gen. David Petraeus testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington.

The military official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to publicly discuss the investigation, said Kelley had received harassing emails from Broadwell, which led the FBI to examine her email account and eventually discover her relationship with Petraeus. A former associate of Petraeus confirmed the target of the emails was Kelley, but said there was no affair between the two, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss the retired general’s private life. The associate, who has been in touch with Petraeus since his resignation, says Kelley and her husband were longtime friends

of Petraeus and wife, Holly. Petraeus resigned while lawmakers still had questions about the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. Consulate and CIA base in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans, including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens. Lawmakers said it’s possible that Petraeus will still be asked to appear on Capitol Hill to testify about what he knew about the U.S. response to that incident. Rep. Peter King, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, said the circumstances of the FBI probe smacked of a cover-up by the White House. “It seems this (the investigation) has been going on for

several months and, yet, now it appears that they’re saying that the FBI didn’t realize until Election Day that General Petraeus was involved. It just doesn’t add up,” said King, R-N.Y. Petraeus, 60, quit Friday after acknowledging an extramarital relationship. He has been married 38 years to Holly Petraeus, with whom he has two adult children, including a son who led an infantry platoon in Afghanistan as an Army lieutenant. Broadwell, a 40-year-old graduate of the U.S. Military Academy and an Army Reserve officer, is married with two young sons. Attempts to reach Kelley

and Broadwell were not immediately successful. Petraeus’ affair with Broadwell will be the subject of meetings Wednesday involving congressional intelligence committee leaders, FBI deputy director Sean Joyce and CIA deputy director Michael Morell. Petraeus had been scheduled to appear before the committees on Thursday to testify on what the CIA knew and what the agency told the White House before, during and after the attack in Benghazi. Republicans and some Democrats have questioned the U.S. response and protection of diplomats stationed overseas.

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Opinion 4

Monday, November 12, 2012

VIEWPOINT

Editor-in-Chief Susannah Jacob

Your vote counts (Prop. 3 helps) By Ann Beeson Guest Columnist

While most voters were focused on the presidential election last Tuesday, two landmark propositions passed here in Austin that will forever change elections in the city. The first was Proposition 2, which moved municipal elections from May to November. The second was Proposition 3, which will end at-large representation on the Austin City Council and replace it with 10 geographic districts, allowing citizens to elect city leaders who represent their neighborhoods and interests. Together, these propositions may be just the shot needed to engage more students in all levels of government. Here are the facts: Despite predictions that fewer young people would vote in this election, the youth vote remained steady at 50 percent for the 2012 national election. In battleground states, the youth vote was as high as 58 percent and was decisive to the outcome in Ohio, Florida, Virginia and Pennsylvania. In contrast, youth voter turnout in Texas remained one of the lowest in the nation, at only 39 percent. But even that number looks rosy when compared to shockingly low voter turnout in Austin city elections. Only 10 percent of voters elected our mayor and City Council last May, with a tiny fraction of citizens aged 18-29 participating. That means fewer than 50,000 voters chose our leaders in a city with over 800,000 residents — and we’re the fastest growing city in the country. There are many reasons why voter turnout in Austin is low, both in national and local elections. Many potential voters — including many UT students — feel their vote doesn’t count, that elected officials don’t represent their interests and that money dilutes their voice in politics,

among other concerns. We need to address all of these issues. Though Propositions 2 and 3 are certainly no silver bullet, students have always been much more likely to vote in November than in May, and now they’ll have the opportunity to elect local officials that represent their interests. The new City Council districts will give areas with large student populations a greater voice on the council. An independent commission will be established to draw the districts, requiring representation from a large, qualified and diverse pool of applicants — including one position that will be reserved for a student. Depending on how the districts are drawn, the new plan may make it easier for a student to run for City Council. UT Student Government rightly endorsed the 10-1 plan, and many students were involved as organizers to get it passed. It’s particularly critical for more Latino, black and Asian students to get active. Racial segregation is still prevalent in Austin, the legacy of a 1928 city plan that forced AfricanAmerican and Hispanic residents to move east. Mirroring the persistent pattern in the general population, the majority of Asian and white undergraduates living off campus resides in West Campus, while most Hispanic and black undergraduates live in East Riverside. According to a Daily Texan analysis of the 2010 census, 47 percent of college-age Hispanics lived in the Riverside area, and 9 percent of black students. With lingering racial tensions around campus, we need representatives in local government who will listen and help develop solutions. At the national level, Latinos flexed their voting power on Tuesday, with over 70 percent casting their ballots for President Obama. As the country grows increasingly diverse, it’s critical that voters everywhere reflect that diversity. In Austin, Latinos, blacks, Asians and other non-white students can have a decisive impact on whether our city

GALLERY

Millennials are the largest voting bloc in America and the most ethnically diverse and politically progressive in our nation’s history!

— Katy Waters, UT student and Planned Parenthood organizer.

celebrates or overlooks our diversity. The potential is obvious. As UT student and Planned Parenthood organizer Katy Waters proclaimed at a recent community forum, “Millennials are the largest voting bloc in America and the most ethnically diverse and politically progressive in our nation’s history!” Why should local issues matter to UT students, many of whom have no plans to stay in Austin after graduation? Because you live here now, and a great number of decisions that affect your quality of life are made locally. The number and route of buses that get you to school or work and how much it costs to park if you drive. The quality of your children’s schools. The availability of medical care. The number of jobs available to help you pay your student loans. And if those issues don’t speak to you, just consider your reaction if City Council were to require local bars and music clubs to close at midnight. Exercising your power as a citizen while you’re a student can become a lifelong practice. A vibrant, representative democracy — in Austin and nationally — depends on it. Beeson is a senior fellow and lecturer at the Annette Strauss Center for Civic Life in UT’s College of Communications, where she is spearheading a year-long news and public dialogue series with KUT and KLRU, “Why Bother? Engaging Texans in Democracy Today.”

What to Watch: November 12 - 16 Every Monday, we provide a list of the top three opinion-worthy events to expect during the coming week.

1

William Ramsey Clark, the 66th U.S. attorney general who supervised the drafting of the 1968 Civil Rights Act, will deliver a lecture titled “From Civil Rights to Human Rights” Monday at noon in the law school’s Eidman Courtroom, TNH 2.306.

2

Kamiar and Arash Alaie, two Iranian HIV/AIDS doctors who worked for more than two years in Iran’s Evin prison, will speak on campus about Omid Kokabee, the Iranian UT physics graduate student who was detained over the 2010 winter break and sentenced to 10 years in the same prison. The talk will take place Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in ACES 2.302.

3

On Wednesday, Frank Rich and Fran Lebowitz will discuss the 2012 presidential election in Bass Concert Hall at 8:00 p.m. Tickets cost between $10-42. Both speakers are well-known American essayists.

A&M’s football program raises the bar By Patrick St. Pierre Daily Texan Columnist

On Saturday, hours after our Longhorns, led by David Ash’s passing and a number of offensive plays honoring the late Darrell K Royal, posted a statement win over the Cyclones of Iowa State, the Aggie War Hymn blasted over the PA system in buildings throughout the Texas A&M campus. I was standing in the A&M recreational sports complex, cringing at the music and what it marked: A&M’s upset win over then-top-ranked Alabama. Yes, though it pains me to do so, I’m writing about A&M football. It’s been almost a year now since Case McCoy led our offense down Kyle Field in the last minutes of the fourth quarter to a 40-yard game-winning field goal by Justin Tucker. For Texas, it was a perfect ending to the 118-year rivalry. And if we never play A&M again, we’ll have the image of Tucker being hoisted onto his teammates’ shoulders to remember fondly. Since then, there has been plenty of taunting on the part of the student bodies of both UT and A&M that escalated into Aggie fans vandalizing signs on the 40 Acres and Texas fans

defacing an A&M billboard. Graffiti on our campus recently stirred the pot with statements like, “MISS US YET?” and “SEC!” As a diehard UT football fan, I try to stand firm behind our team in any provocation between the two football programs. But it’s becoming difficult to do so. That win a year ago was meant to be the last whipping we issued the Aggies before they became the newest punching bag in the vaunted SEC football society. After all, their football program’s resume aligned them with the Kentuckys and Vanderbilts of the SEC, perennial bottom feeders. But judging by the war hymn that blasted in my ears, it’s a message no one told to Johnny Football. Johnny Manziel, a redshirt freshman known to the Aggie faithful as Johnny Football, is doing his part and then some to stake a spot for his team among the SEC elite. His dazzling display of athleticism and mature game intuition confounded even the stout Alabama defense. And as any SEC coach or player will tell you, rolling over the Crimson Tide takes work. What exactly does this mean for the third-longest rivalry in the history of college football, which is now one year extinct? Well, for starters, we should take pride in the history of the Lone Star Showdown. It is, after all, history now. And

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Opinions expressed in The Daily Texan are those of the editor, the Editorial Board or the writer of the article. They are not necessarily those of the UT administration, the Board of Regents or the Texas Student Media Board of Operating Trustees.

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It’s a hard truth to accept, but A&M’s is the eminent football program in the state of Texas. Rather than mouthing off with “lemme-at-‘em” talk, let’s celebrate our own program’s accomplishments.

at 76-37-5 in favor of our Longhorns, it’s one of the most one-sided major rivalries. Plus, we will forever enjoy the decisive 2011 win that ended the tradition. But, sobering though it is, we shouldn’t participate in any jawing about taking on today’s A&M squad. Although we share the same 8-2 record, their two losses were by a combined eight points to our forty-five. They’ve played five nationally-ranked programs to our three. And they have Johnny Football (soon to be trademarked). It’s a hard truth to accept, but A&M’s is the eminent football program in the state of Texas. Rather than mouthing off with “lemme-at-‘em” talk, let’s shore up our focus and celebrate our own program’s accomplishments as we try to reclaim the throne as Texas’ top football team. St. Pierre is an English junior from Austin.

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NEWS 5 Monday, November 12, 2012

News

5

CITY

CAMPUS

UT student veterans introduce challenges By Tiffany Hinman

Maria Arrellaga | Daily Texan Staff A veteran passes out American flags from a float at the Veterans Day Parade Sunday morning.

Austin honors veterans at parade By Carly Coen

. t Travis county residents estood in silent anticipation eSunday as the nation’s colors ywere presented at the start eof Austin’s annual Veterans dDay parade. r Nearly 2,000 people of all -ages attended this year’s parade, ,which started at the Ann Richdards Congress Avenue Bridge nand ended at the State Capitol. The celebration recognized ev-ery branch of the military with da salute and a short description ”and paid special tribute to Vietnam War veterans. , Percy Richardson, a lVietnam War veteran who ,attended the parade, said -the turnout for the past hfew years has consistently e . ePOLICE e

amazed him. Richardson said he is glad so many average citizens recognize the sacrifice he and his peers made for their country so long ago. He said he is proud of the future generation for honoring the memories of veterans. “It’s an honor to have everyone notice something I did with my life,” Richardson said. “Just to be associated with such fine military men — that’s an honor.” The downtown parade concluded its journey on Capitol grounds with musical performances, prayer and another tribute to Vietnam veterans and the military branches of the U.S. Eugene Miravete, a sophomore at Westlake High

School, was presented with an award for patriotic writing at the ceremony. Miravete said veterans should feel they are the most important people on Veterans Day, but they deserve more than just one day of respect. “I am one of the few people [in the world] that gets to say they are American,” Miravete said. “More people should be proud that they are.” Freshman Jose Lopez Jr., who attended the presentations held after the parade, said it was eerie how quiet the crowd was. Lopez said he could tell just by standing in the crowd that everyone had respect for all the veterans. “The tribute to veterans from Vietnam really seemed to hit the audience hard,”

I am one of the few people [in the world] that gets to say they are American. More people should be proud that they are. — Eugene Miravete,

Westlake High School sophomore

Lopez said. “We should always honor those who served and gave selflessly to their country and those who continue to give today.”

Student veterans come to UT with different histories, experiences and knowledge than traditional students, according to officials and students who spoke at UT’s first symposium on the topic. Every day, veterans reconcile their predisposed military mindsets with their identities as students, Audrey Sorrells, associate dean of students, said. Sorrels said research conducted over a period of years by faculty, staff and counselors in the Department of Mental Health Services and Student Veteran Services led to the symposium. “Each veteran entering college must learn how to become a student veteran,” Sorrells said. “They must learn to find ways in settings where most of their peers have never gone. We hope we can work to build opportunities and bridge the military and college cultures in ways that support their talents, skills and leadership.” The symposium featured speakers who discussed veterans’ needs, finding student identities while being veterans and the contributions student veterans make to UT. During the symposium, history junior Keith Huffaker, who served in Iraq from 2003 to 2004, said there are many differences between the average student and student veterans. Huffaker incurred an injury while on duty, and now uses a wheel chair. He said besides his injury, personal responsibility has been the most notable

APD chief receives praise, criticism for actions

, e

By David Maly

Art Acevedo, chief of -the Austin Police Departtment, was met with praise eand protest Sunday night fas he received an award for shis efforts to make the city

more peaceful. t The Institute for Inter-faith Dialogue, a national lnonprofit organization es.tablished after 9/11 to pronmote peace, hosted their aAnnual Friendship and Diaglogue Dinner Sunday night.

Along with audience and -expert panelist discussions don peace, the event featured na ceremony to give Acevedo sthe organization’s annual gPeace Award.

Güner Arslan, co-foundter of the organization, said tAcevedo was chosen for the taward because of his efforts yto promote unity in the

Austin area. , “He reached out to our fcommunity, the Muslim, the -Turkish community,” Arslan -said. “His doors are always -open whenever we need rsomething. We have had a nfew scares in the past few l e

d t e

years where we thought we needed police protection and just a phone call to him or an email to him was enough to get his attention.” Outside the Hilton hotel in downtown Austin, protestors from the Peaceful Streets Project, an Austinbased grassroots organization that promotes police accountability, picketed in protest of Acevedo receiving the award. Several members of Peaceful Streets also attended the dinner in protest. Antonio Buehler, founder of the project, said its members wanted to send a message to Acevedo. “We’re just being present, letting him know that we plan to hold him accountable,” Buehler said. Peaceful Streets Project member Kit O’Connell said roughy 25 people came out to protest the event. He said their criticisms include Acevedo’s “quickness” in defending animal and human deaths caused by Austin police officers in recent years, the recently enacted “Public Order

Becca Gamache | Daily Texan Staff Peaceful Streets Project member Heather Kindrick discusses the protest against Police Chief Art Acevedo winning the 2012 IID Peace Award with a passerby.

Initiative,” which has led to the ticketing and arrest of hundreds of homeless people throughout the city and Austin police infiltration of the Occupy movement earlier this year. “Acevedo turns a blind eye to police violence and police brutality and now he is being given a peace award,”

O’Connell said. Acevedo said his efforts over the past five years have led to greater public trust in the police department, promoting peace in the process. “I believe in transparency, and I believe in engagement,” Acevedo said. “I really feel that a leader that

is known to the community builds trust.” Arslan said, overall, he thought the protesters made a notable impact on the event, but in a positive way. “That’s one of the goals of the institute, to bring together people that generally don’t come together,” Arslan said. “We got them talking.”

Forum examines U.S. electorate through election results

For most of the country, n the 2012 presidential elech tion served its primary pur- pose — determining who will be the president for the next four years. For analysts and political scientists, the election serves as a source of data that can provide insight into the American electorate. Examining voting behaviors was the goal of the New Politics Forum’s 2012 Post-Election Debriefing Conference, a series of TED Talk-style speeches and panel discussions hosted by the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Life Friday. Talia Jomini Stroud, asso-

ciate professor of communication studies and assistant director of the institute, said media consumers increasingly insulate themselves with news marketed toward their specific partisan beliefs. “When we look at the news media, we don’t look with a blank slate,” Stroud said. “Our partisanship colors the way in which we view the media. A consequence of that is if you lean to the political left or the right, putatively neutral news media seems a bit biased in favor of the opposition.” According to a study by Pew Research Center released two weeks before the election, cable news television and the Internet were the No. 1 and No. 3

NEWS BRIEFLY Court to hear case on Voting Rights Act

CAMPUS

By Jordan Rudner

difference he has seen between traditional students and student veterans. “Military personnel hold accountability for their actions versus the average student,” Huffaker said. “I would not say the average student does not care, but military personnel are very goal oriented and have a sense of direction. They know they are here for a degree and that is the goal.” Tania Nesser, a geography and international relations junior and student veteran who spoke at the symposium, said the University lacks the mentorship she was used to in the military. Nesser said she normally does not selfidentify as a veteran in the classroom, but she offers advice from her experiences to the peers who know about her past. “In the military when somebody outranks you and sees something in you, they seek you out and question your goals,” Nesser said. “Here with classes of 200 and 300 students, professors and TAs do not have time, and the students are not getting mentored like I got in the military. If I can mentor someone else, I feel like I am helping out.” According to the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, 1.7 million veterans live in Texas, and 250,000 of these veterans are eligible for education assistance services. Only 40,000 veterans in Texas use these services, which include the Post-9/11 GI Bill. The bill provides up to 36 months of financial support for education to individuals who have served 90 days of active duty after Sept. 10, 2001.

sources for campaign news. In contrast, in 2000, the top three sources were local and national news and local newspapers. Stroud said this shift toward more individually-tailored information gathering contributed to increased perception of the media as polarized. Stroud also said a cultural consensus of media bias is often perpetuated by politicians and pop culture, itself. Stroud said former Vice President Dick Cheney implied that The New York Times has a liberal bias. Cheney said the newspaper prevented the administration from effectively fighting the war on terror. Stroud used another example of a popular author Sarah Des-

sen dividing people into “Fox viewers and CNN viewers” in one of her books. Sylvia Manzano, a senior project manager with datagathering firm Latino Decisions, said because of the increasing Latino population in the electorate, both major parties will increase their efforts to win Latino voters. She cited statistics tabulated by her firm, which said approximately 75 percent of the national Latino electorate voted for President Barack Obama. In Texas, her firm’s data shows 70 percent of Latino voters chose Obama. Given the increasing Latino population in Texas, Manzano addressed specu-

lation that Texas might become a blue state, which she said is still unlikely to happen without significant Democratic effort. “First, Texas would have to turn purple,” she said. The focus on the importance of demographics carried over into a panel discussion featuring Politico national politics editor Charles Mahtesian, PBS NewsHour political editor Christina Bellantoni, political commentator Will Cain and Obama campaign pollster Cornell Belcher. “The big secret weapon of the Obama campaign was the census,” Belcher said. “Our electorate hasn’t been growing whiter for two decades now.”

The U.S. Supreme Court announced Friday that it will hear another case challenging the constitutionality of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a key measure of the Civil Rights Movement that has been used to defend the rights of minority voters as recently as the last election cycle. The Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case Shelby County v. Holder, an Alabama case that claims states and municipalities with special restrictions under Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act have made sufficient progress and should no longer be required to comply with these restrictions. Section 5 requires states and municipalities that have a history of discrimination to have any changes to their voting laws approved by the U.S. Justice Department or certain federal courts, but has been using the same formula to determine which areas should receive these restrictions since 1965. Since 1965, Congress has not changed the list of jurisdictions covered by Section 5. Section 5 of the act, set in 1965 and originally scheduled to expire in 1970, has been reauthorized four times by Congress. It is set to expire next in 2031. Nine states, Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia, and other municipalities are affected by the Section 5 restrictions. The act has been applied recently by the Justice Department in Texas to block the passage of voter ID laws and to challenge redistricting. The Supreme Court last declared Section 5 constitutional in 1966.

— David Maly


6 SPTS

Sports 6

Monday, November 12, 2012

TEXAS

Christian Corona, Sports Editor

IOWA STATE

VS.

SIDELINE NFL

Horns dominate Cyclones

COWBOYS

EAGLES

Complete game propels Texas past overmatched ISU

TEXANS

BEARS

By Lauren Giudice The Longhorns wore Darrell K Royal’s initials on their helmets to honor the former coach who died Wednesday. Flags flew at half-mast and it was a somber day at the stadium named after him. But the way that Texas played was also a tribute to Royal. Despite struggling in early games this season, the Longhorns found their rhythm on both sides of the ball and defeated Iowa State 33-7. The Texas offense was balanced throughout the game thanks to a dominant offensive line. David Ash had a good game, going 25-of-31 with two touchdowns and 364 yards, a career high. He completed his first 11 passes. “Our job was to try to spread them out a little bit by putting the ball on the outside and utilizing the wide receivers,” co-offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin said. “They’re a very difficult team to run the ball on consistently so you have to mix it up, and that’s what we did tonight.”

49ERS

RAMS

NBA CAVALIERS

THUNDER

Lawrence Peart | Daily Texan Staff Quandre Diggs, Cedric Reed and Adrian Phillips bring down Iowa State’s Jerome Tiller on Saturday afternoon. The Longhorns put together their most complete game of the season with 609 yards of total offense while holding the Cyclones to 277 yards.

Mike Davis has become Ash’s go-to target; both Davis and Jaxon Shipley stepped up and combined for 250 receiving yards. Running back Malcolm Brown played for the first

time in six games, but Joe Bergeron and Johnathan Gray retained their ownership of the backfield. Bergeron had 86 yards and Gray had 75 yards and two touchdowns. The offense had

609 yards of total offense. Texas began the game by honoring Royal, lining up Royal’s wishbone formation. Ash pitched the ball to Shipley, who threw it to back to Ash, who threw it to tight

end Greg Daniels for a 47yard gain. “All the coaches said, ‘It’s Wednesday, and we don’t have [a tribute to Royal].

ISU continues on page 7

Shipley, Davis key to offense why texas won

stock up Jaxon Shipley: Early in the season the sophomore wide receiver was Ash’s favorite target, but as the season has worn on, Shipley has seen less and less of the ball. That changed against Iowa State. Shipley caught eight balls for 137 yards, the first time he’s gone over 100 yards all season. Actually, he had more yards Saturday then he did in the past four games combined.

stock down Anthony Fera: Fera transferred in from Penn State to solidify Texas’ kicking position after Justin Tucker graduated. And with two games remaining he hasn’t done much. Fera missed the first four games of the season with a groin injury and hasn’t played much better since. He’s only 1-of-3 on the year and was benched after a missed field goal in the second quarter. He was replaced by Jordan, who went 2-of-2 in the game.

quarter by quarter First: The Longhorns made a fitting tribute to Darrell K Royal, lining up in the wishbone on the first play of the game. But they scored touchdowns on their next two possessions. The first came on a five-yard Johnathan Gray run, and the second on 61-yard touchdown pass to Mike Davis. Second: Texas’ offense slowed down a bit, scoring only on a pass to Barrett Matthews, but an Anthony Fera field goal attempt was blocked. The defense allowed its only touchdown of the game in the quarter, when the Cyclones scored with just 41 seconds remaining in the half. Third: This was the slowest moving quarter. Only three points were scored on a field goal by Nick Jordan, who replaced Fera as the place kicker. Neither offense had much success moving the ball. Fourth: The Longhorns iced the game in this frame. Texas had the ball for just under 12 minutes of the quarter as the rushing attack imposed its will. Case McCoy also saw some snaps in relief of Ash late in the game, throwing for 23 yards. Sophomore Jaxon Shipley makes a catch against Iowa State on Saturday afternoon. Shipley had 137 yards on eight receptions . After several games of inactivity, Shipley turned in a convincing performance. Lawrence Peart Daily Texan Staff

47: The number of yards Texas’ opening play from scrimmage went, as the Longhorns lined up in the wishbone in honor of Royal. 38:12: Texas’ time of possession in the game. The Longhorns held the ball for 64 percent of the contest. 364: Number of passing yards Ash had Saturday, a career high. 7: Davis’ rank on the Longhorns all-time receiving yards list after his 113-yard performance.

what’s next Texas will get a bye week before it plays TCU on Thanksgiving. The week off should allow the players to get healthy and allow the coaches to add more wrinkles to the playbook. TCU heads into the game at 6-4, and will also come off a bye. TCU features a stingy defense and a running quarterback in Trevone Boykin, who will challenge Texas’ run defense. —Chris Hummer

The Big 12 is the only conference still undefeated in both men’s and women’s college basketball, with an opening weekend record of 21-0.

TOP TWEET Quandre Diggs @qdiggs6

“Great TEAM win!! Thanks to all the veterans!! and #ShoutOut to #LonghornNation for the support!!!”

by the numbers

The Longhorns played their best overall game in conference play. The offense was explosive en route to 609 yards, and David Ash was excellent. He completed 81 percent of his passes, throwing for 364 yards and a pair of touchdowns. The Longhorn rushing attack was also potent, pounding a stout Iowa State front seven for 222 yards on the ground. Texas’ defense also put on its best display since the non-conference schedule. The Longhorns held the Cyclones to only 277 yards of offense and seven points. “I’m slowly gaining confidence,” defensive end Alex Okafor said. “We are getting better game-by-game. We still have a long way to go. But slowly but surely, we are getting better at the run defense.”

Did you know?

Elisabeth Dillon | Daily Texan Staff The Longhorns line up in Darrell K Royal’s wishbone formation to start the game. David Ash threw for 47 yards with this play.

Horns honor Royal with wishbone play By Christian Corona Sports Editor

Everyone knew the Longhorns were running a play out of the wishbone in their first play from scrimmage. No one thought it would be a play like this. With his unit backed up inside its 10-yard line, cooffensive coordinator Bryan Harsin put a 21st century twist on the formation that the late Darrell K Royal used to help Texas capture three national titles during his legendary 20-year tenure as the Longhorns’ head football coach. David Ash motioned fullback Ryan Roberson to his right before the snap and tossed the ball to receiver Jaxon Shipley, who lined up as a running back off-set behind Roberson. Shipley threw it from one side of the end zone to the other back to Ash, who hit a wide open Greg Daniels for a 47-yard gain. “Coach [Royal] said, ‘When you throw a pass, three things can happen, and two of them are bad,’” head coach Mack Brown said. “So I thought if you throw it twice, that means two good things can happen. That was the only way I could figure out how to make it work.” A perfect tribute to Royal, who died last Wednesday, when Brown said he

Coach [Royal] said, ‘When you throw a pass, three things can happen, and two of them are bad.’ So I thought if you throw it twice, that means two good things can happen. — Head coach Mack Brown

“just sat down on the floor and cried.” But it wasn’t just his team’s opening play that honored Royal, the program’s alltime winningest football coach. The Longhorns went on to pummel an overwhelmed Iowa State team that embarrassed them in Austin two years ago — a 33-7 victory reminiscent of many from the Royal era. Ash threw for two touchdowns and a careerhigh 364 yards, his second straight stellar performance since his struggles against Kansas. Texas’ running game was productive and its defense put on a display that would leave Royal smiling. Royal once described linebacker Tommy Nobis as someone who would “laugh and jump right in the slop for you.” That’s what the

DKR continues on page 7

SPORTS BRIEFLY Texas football wins weekly CFPA awards

Three Longhorns earned honors from the College Football Performance Awards (CFPA) for their work Saturday against Iowa State. Quarterback David Ash claimed an honorable mention for Quarterback of the Week thanks to a 364-yard, two touchdown effort against the Cyclones. Ash is now ninth in the Texas record books for career passing yards with 3,433 yards. Tight end Greg Daniels claimed an honorable mention for Tight End of the Week. Daniels caught Ash’s 47 yard pass out of the Wishbone formation on Texas’ opening play honoring DKR. Safety Josh Turner picked up the third recognition — another honorable mention for Defensive Back of the Week. Against Iowa State, Turner posted four tackles, two solo, and came away with one interception. —Sara Beth Purdy

BCS Standings 1. Kansas State 2. Oregon 3. Notre Dame 4. Alabama 5. Georgia 12. Oklahoma 15. Texas 23. Texas Tech 25. Oklahoma St.


SPTS/CLASS 7

sports

Monday, November 12, 2012

7

MEN’S BASKETBALL

McClellan leads Horns, stays perfect at the line By Nick Cremona

Fanny Trang | Daily Texan Staff Sophomore Sheldon McClellan takes a shot against Fresno State last Friday night in the Longhorns’ season opener. McClellan led Texas with 20 points while going 14-for-14 at the free throw line.

Horns edge Bulldogs in season opener By Christian Corona It wasn’t easy. It wasn’t pretty. But Texas is 1-0. Sheldon McClellan scored 18 of his game-high 20 points in the second half as the Longhorns squeaked past Fresno State, 55-53,in their season opener at the Frank Erwin Center Friday night. The Longhorns shot just 36.7 percent from the field and recorded only three assists but were able to avoid losing their first season opener since 2001. Any sluggishness they displayed could be attributed to the fact that they have not had a day off in nearly a week. “We’re a tired team right now and it’s my fault,” head coach Rick Barnes said. “We’ve had to remake ourselves a little bit with Myck [Kabongo]’s situation and Jaylen [Bond] going down ... This is our sixth straight

day. In the last eight or nine years, we’ve never practiced more than three days in a row.” Playing without Kabongo, the team’s star point guard, and sophomore forward Bond, Texas was left with only three available scholarship players that had played college basketball before. One of them, sophomore forward Jonathan Holmes, grabbed a game-high 14 rebounds. Another, McCllelan was 14-for-14 from the free throw line, the most attempts from the charity stripe without a miss in school history. “My outside shot wasn’t falling and Coach [Barnes] called some plays for me to get around the rim,” McClellan said. “I just kept being in attack mode and kept my confidence up by getting to the free throw line.” Kabongo was held out of the game as the NCAA

continues to investigate whether he received impermissible benefits from an agent during the off-season, and Bond missed the opener with an ankle injury he suffered during practice earlier in the week. Without them, Texas never led Fresno State by more than five points. Freshmen accounted for 19 of the 25 points scored by the Longhorns in the first half. Javan Felix, starting in place of Kabongo, led the way in the first 20 minutes with eight points and seven rebounds before halftime. But he slowed down in the second half, shooting just 1-of-7 from the floor and committing three turnovers. “I think we got tentative,” Barnes said. “We weren’t attacking the defense. We were just dribbling with no purpose. Javan got tired. Because of that, we didn’t get our offense going the way

extended her free throws streak to 30-straight. In a 72-52 drubbing of Hofstra University in the closing game, Enempkpali continued her impressive play, recording another double-double with 26 points and 10 rebounds. The sophomore was later named the MVP of the tournament. Fussell again provided key support, finishing with 18 points and nine rebounds on her way to being named to the AllTournament team. In addition to Enemkpali’s and Fussell’s dominance, freshmen Empress Davenport, Celina Rodrigo, Brady Sanders and Imani McGee-Stafford all recorded their first career buckets for the Longhorns.

Nneka Enemkpali Sophomore forward

Senior Nadia Taylor recorded her first career minutes for Texas, grabbing a rebound in four minutes against Hofstra. Leaders have emerged and Aston can stay content as the Longhorns take their 2-0 start into their home opener against Jackson State Nov. 20.

men’s tennis recap |nitya duran This past week marked the end of the fall season for tennis as the USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Championships took place in Flushing, N.Y. Senior Longhorn Daniel Whitehead fell in the first round of the singles main draw on Thursday to CalBerkeley’s Ben McLachlan, and also fell to Florida’s Florent Diep in the first round of the singles consolation bracket Friday morning.

Longhorn doubles team Chris Camillone and David Holiner entered the tournament last minute for Texas as another team was unable to make the trip. Camillone and Holiner had a first roundbye, but outlasted North Florida’s Moritz Buerchner/ Norbert Nemcsek (8-5) in the second round. The team then fell in the next round to the eventual bracket-winners No. 2 Duke’s Henrique Cunha/Raphael Hemmeler.

something like that ... I think, whether I realized it or not at the time, Coach Royal filled a void in my life when I lost my dad and my granddad four months before I came here. He’s just been such a great friend.” Texas dedicated everything it could to Royal — the first play from scrimmage, the de-

So what are we going to do?’ So these crazy young coaches come back to me with a double-reverse pass,” Brown said. The Longhorns didn’t score on the drive, but the first quarter gave the Longhorns a big advantage. Texas went up by two scores after a five-yard touchdown run by Gray and a 61yard touchdown pass from Ash to Davis. In the second quarter, Ash hit Barrett Matthews for a three-yard touchdown on the tight end’s first reception of the season. Brown was happy with the defense’s play in the game, but was not pleased with the timing of Iowa State’s touchdown. Quarterback Steele Jantz found wide receiver Quenton Bundrage for a 14-yard touchdown with 41 seconds

RECORD continues from page 1

Daniel Whitehead Senior

DKR continues from page 6 Longhorns did this weekend, limiting the Cyclones to a lone touchdown in the final minute of the first half and 64 yards on five second-half drives. “When I got up Wednesday morning and found out that we’d lost Coach [Royal], I just wasn’t ready for it,” Brown said. “I should have anticipated

Date: Monday Time: 7 p.m. On air: LHN

year, Texas knew it would struggle to score points. McClellan averaged 11.3 points per game last season, but as head coach Rick Barnes has pointed out on more than one occasion, he sometimes hesitates to shoot and consequently squanders scoring opportunities. “He’s got to shoot those shots,” said Barnes. “Our biggest problem is he doesn’t shoot it enough. We kept telling him that he was going to make more of those.” As this season progresses, McClellan must take advantage of open looks and have an attack-first mentality in order to set the tone for the Longhorns’ offense. Whereas the team would rely on consistent scoring from J’Covan Brown last year, the load will have to be spread more efficiently this season. McClellan possesses all the attributes of a natural scorer and can be as explosive a player as anyone in the nation. What’s been missing is that certain something that elevates him to a level beyond being just a scorer and makes him a team leader. Some might argue that even Brown never reached that level. But after showing some serious grit in the late stages against the Bulldogs, McClellan may be closer to securing a role as a go-to guy for Texas. “Looking at the whole game, I think we have a lot of work to do,” sophomore forward Jonathan Holmes said. “The way we work, I think we’ll get it done.”

ISU continues from page 6

women’s basketball recap |matt warden Two games down, and Karen Aston has already cracked a smile. The Women’s Basketball team emerged from the WBI Tip Off Classic with two wins this weekend. The weekend marked a series of firsts for a squad that seems poised for big things this season. In the opening game against a tough St. John’s squad, the Longhorns edged out a 70-60 victory behind Nneka Enemkpali’s first career double-double. Enemkpali finished the game with a career high 25 points and 12 rebounds. After being named to the Wooden Award Preseason Top 30 List early Friday, junior Chassidy Fussell lived up to the billing, adding 23 points of her own. She also

we wanted to get it going.” The game was tied 11 times, the last being when the Longhorns and Bulldogs — coached by former Texas assistant Rodney Terry — were knotted up at 48 with 2:14 remaining in the second half. McClellan hit two pairs of free throws on the Longhorns’ next two possessions to give them a 52-48 lead. After Fresno State hit two free throws to cut Texas’ advantage to two points, Felix badly missed a floater close to the basket, a shot he hit several times in the first half. The Bulldogs’ Kevin Olekaibe, with his team trailing, 52-50, airballed a threepointer before McClellan hit two more free throws to put the game away. “We’re not going to blow anyone out,” McClellan said. “They came out here and played hard. We just stayed together as a team and grinded it out at the end.”

On the surface, Texas’ 5553 win over Fresno State in its season opener was a stodgy, sloppy game that very well could have ended in disappointment for the Longhorns. But dig a little deeper than the box score and you’ll find a brazen performance from one of the Longhorns’ leaders. With the game tied at 48 points late in the second half, the Longhorns were in need of help on offense. Shots were not falling, turnovers were abundant and overtime seemed imminent. The only option Texas had left was to do what it had been doing all game in hope of a different outcome. The Longhorns continued to feed guard Sheldon McClellan the ball, and he finally was able to force defenders to guard him around the rim. McClellan was able to draw fouls on successive possessions late in the game, sending him to the charity stripe where he would score six points in the game’s final two minutes. Still just a sophomore, McClellan turned in a 20-point performance that enabled Texas to sustain a collective second half scoring slump and slip past the upsetminded Bulldogs. McClellan’s 21st doubledigit showing of his young career hardly came in a conventional manner. After a dismal first half shooting the ball, McClellan continued to have issues after the intermission. He would finish 3-of-10 from the field, but his perfect 14-of-14 night at the free-throw line became the driving component to the Longhorns’ eventual win. Down two starters and its leading scorer from last

Coppin State at Texas

cals on the helmets and the logo at midfield, numerous festivities and even a fourthquarter rendition of “Wabash Cannonball.” It would have been impossible to honor Royal and the legacy he built over decades in just a few days. But the way the Longhorns played Saturday came close.

in December. “It’s a big reason why a lot of players come here, because they can contend for a national championship year in and year out,” Elliott said of the Longhorn’s success so far this year. “We’ve been close, we need to get a little lucky, we need to stay healthy but I like the demeanor of our team.” The match at Kansas marked only the second time all season the Longhorns had to battle from a 2-1 deficit to win a game. Junior outside hitter Bailey Webster led the Longhorn’s offensive attack with 17 kills, three digs and a .250 hitting clip. Fellow outside hitter All-American Haley Eckerman registered 16 kills, though she contributed a team-high 10 errors

left in the half to make the score 20-7. Texas’ defense continued its solid play and held the Cyclones to 277 yards; they were three of 12 on thirddown conversions. The Texas offense went 8-for-14 on third downs. “To me, the game was about third down,” said defensive coordinator Manny Diaz. “They couldn’t get us off the field and they couldn’t stay on the field when it got to third down.” The biggest play the defense allowed was a 23-yard pass from Jantz to Chris Young. Cornerback Carrington Byndom caught his third interception of the season and Josh Turner also had one at the end of the game. Defensive end Alex Okafor had nine tackles. Nick Jordan replaced

Anthony Fera at kicker and scored a 37-yard field goal for the only points of the third quarter. With the help of the field position gained after an incredible 38-yard catch by Jaxon Shipley that deflected off Iowa State’s cornerback, Gray scored his second touchdown of the game on a 13-yard run. Jordan concluded scoring in the game with a 25-yard field goal with 1:23 left in the fourth quarter. Texas now holds a fourgame winning streak heading into its bye week. This game was more than just getting Texas its eighth win. “We really needed to win this game, not only for us but for [Royal],” Shipley said. “We needed to dedicate this game to him and I think that played a key part and really motivated us.”

against the Jayhawks. For Kansas, junior middle blocker Caroline Jarmoc led with 18 kills and a .306 hitting clip. The Jayhawks jumped to a fast 0-1 match lead with a 20-25 set victory over the Longhorns. The Longhorns weren’t able to overcome a slow start and never led in the first set. Webster was able to erase a five point 8-13 deficit and brought the set to within two, but the Longhorns succumbed to errors and gave the set to Kansas. Sophomore Khat Bell led the second set for the Longhorns and evened the match with a 25-15 set to victory. She registered six kills and one block. Freshman Molly McCage also contributed in the set with three kills and a block. Set three went to Kansas with several offensive runs lead by Jarmoc. With Texas leading 14-13, a 2-8 run by the Jayhawks put them

back on track to take the 22-25 victory. Set four went well for the Longhorns as they registered eight blocks to even the score 2-2 with a 25-16 victory. Webster went on a rampage and logged five kills and two blocks with Hannah Allison coming out with 12 assists. In the fifth set, the Longhorns relied on the abilities of Eckerman and Allison and several Jayhawk errors to keep the score in favor of Texas. Kansas kept the score close, but Eckerman nailed a service ace followed by a kill by Webster to get the 15-12 victory. “We need to keep improving. We can still improve a lot over the next month,” Elliott said. “Our players know that. I’m really proud of the way they’re going through preparing this season. They’ve been a lot of fun to coach. I’m excited for the direction that they’re heading.”


Life & Arts

8

Monday, November 12, 2012

Art exhibit utilizes photography to capture painful war traumas By Ramit Plushnick-Masti Associated Press

HOUSTON — It was a moment Nina Berman did not expect to capture when she entered an Illinois wedding studio in 2006. She knew Tyler Ziegel had been horribly injured, his face mutilated beyond recognition by a suicide bombing in the Iraq War. She knew he was marrying his pretty high school sweetheart, perfect in a white, voluminous dress. It was their expressions that were surprising. “People don’t think this war has any impact on Americans? Well here it is,” Berman says of the image of a somber bride staring blankly, unsmiling at the camera, her war-ravaged groom alongside her, his head down. “This was even more shocking because we’re used to this kind of over-the-top joy that feels a little put on, and then you see this picture where they look like survivors of something really serious,” Berman added.

BONES

continues from page 10 Psychology senior Brianna Herold, Hallmark’s student and the project manager for the UT installation, noted that while time consuming, the project affects everyone it touches. “Whatever the outcome may be of our total bones or the amount of bones that make it to D.C. in the spring, anyone who has been involved in the project in any form has been affected and inspired,” Herold said. For Zhang, the effect of the project is already noticeable. “Before I started on this project, my level of awareness

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The photograph that won a first place prize in the World Press Photos Award contest will stand out from other battlefield images in an exhibit “WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath” that debuted Sunday — Veterans Day — in the Houston Museum of Fine Arts. From there, the exhibit will travel to The Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles, the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington and The Brooklyn Museum in Brooklyn, N.Y. The exhibit was painstakingly built by co-curators Anne Wilkes Tucker and Will Michels after the museum purchased a print of the famous picture of the raising of the flag at Iwo Jima, taken Feb. 23, 1945, by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal. The curators decided the museum didn’t have enough conflict photos, Tucker said, and in 2004, the pair began traveling around the country and the world in search of pictures. Over nearly eight years and

after viewing more than 1 million pictures, Tucker and Michels created an exhibit that includes 480 objects, including photo albums, original magazines and old cameras, by 280 photographers from 26 countries. Some are well-known — such as the Rosenthal’s picture and another AP photograph, of a naked girl running from a napalm attack during the Vietnam War taken in 1972 by Huynh Cong “Nick” Ut. Others, such as the Incinerated Iraqi, of a man’s burned body seen through the shattered windshield of his car, will be new to most viewers. “The point of all the photographs is that when a conflict occurs, it lingers,” Tucker said. The pictures hang on stark gray walls, and some are in small rooms with warning signs at the entrance designed to allow visitors to decide whether they want to view images that can be brutal in their honesty. “It’s something that we did to that man. Americans did it,

about these genocides and conflicts was at a much lower level, I knew that these atrocities existed in certain countries, but I didn’t know which specific countries and to what extent,” Zhang said. “Through the process of working on this project, I learned more about how people around the world are suffering from these kinds of events and how much they need our help.” For One Million Bones, the aim of these installations is als to make a significant contribution toward enacting positive change as well. For each bone made, One Million Bones, in collaboration with Students Rebuild and the Bezos Family Foundation, donates $1, until they reach $500,000, to the CARE

foundation, which works in the Congo and Sudan to enact change. When the bones are laid down this Tuesday at 11 a.m., primetime for students rushing to classes, Hallmark hopes students take the time to stop and participate as well. “When we did this the first time, many people joined in and participated spontaneously. I hope that will happen here,” Hallmark said. “The bones are powerful in large numbers, both visually and symbolically. I hope that students who participate that day have the opportunity to see how art can be a vehicle for social justice as well as the symbol of the bone moving us toward a future of change.”

Pat Sullivan | Associated Press In this Thursday photo, photographer Don McCullin poses in front of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts’ sign promoting the new War/Photography exhibit.

we did it intentionally and it’s a haunting picture,” Michels said of the image of the burned Iraqi that hangs inside one of the rooms. In some images, such as Don McCullin’s picture of a U.S. Marine throwing a grenade at a North Vietnamese soldier in Hue, it is clear the photographer was in danger when immortalizing the moment.

NORMAL are told in a journalistic style. Schwartz quotes emails and jotted-down dialogue. His wife, who helped him with the book, spent weeks writing memories that Schwartz says he would never have thought to include. And though much of the book is sad, it does posses a sense of wit. At one point, Schwartz writes, “It gets better for [parents] too ... besides, somebody’s gotta pay for the hair dye.” Though the memoir is centered around Joseph’s suicide attempt, the book is more hopeful than depressing. It does get bet-

Looking at his image, McCullin recalled deciding to travel to Hue instead of Khe Sahn, as he had initially planned. “It was the best decision I ever made,” he said, smiling slightly as he looked at the picture, explaining that he took a risk by standing behind the Marine. Berman didn’t see the conflicts unfold. Instead, she wait-

continues from page 10 ter, for both Joseph and his parents. As the book ends, Joseph has found his place in high school, regularly attends the Gay-Straight Alliance Club meetings and sessions at the Gay Center in Manhattan and no longer has depression. The road is not always easy, but in Joseph’s case it is manageable. The final chapter, written by Joseph, is the entirety of a children’s book he wrote for class called “Leo, the Oddly Normal Boy,” which is about a boy who likes a boy. It is a cute and an endearing way to end the memoir. Lacking

CLASSIFIEDS THE DAILY TEXAN

ed for the wounded to come home, seeking to tell a story about war’s aftermath. In 2004 she published a book called “Purple Hearts” that includes photographs taken over nine months of 20 different people. All were photographed at home, not in hospitals where, she said, “there’s this expectation that this will all work out fine.”

more content directly from Joseph is the memoir’s sole weak point. Though Schwartz regularly quotes his son, he might have considered allowing his son to contribute more to his own narrative. But perhaps Joseph is still a little young for that. “Oddly Normal” is a book any gay parent, gay child or ally to the LGBTQ community will thoroughly enjoy. The memoir advocates for acceptance through the story of one boy who represents a much larger group and an important, pressing human issue.

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COMICS 9

Comics

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develops 10 What says “Miss America” on Miss America 14 “Grand” instrument 15 Samoan capital 16 Duo + one 17 Cent 18 Casual pants 20 Ocean bottoms 22 Depart 23 Fishing line holder 24 Names like Billy the Kid 26 Vehicle with a compactor 30 Ingredient in a McDonald’s Quarter Pounder 31 Recreational walk 32 Traffic problem

39 Items checked by T.S.A. agents

63 Skedaddles … or what 18-, 40 Rugmaking 26-, 42- and apparatus 53-Across all have 41 Target, as with a gun 42 Where one might witness a hit and run? 45 Opposite of rejects

48 Winnie-the-___ 49 Find, as a missing person 50 Atomic bomb unit 53 Fishing gear holder 56 Stop, as a stream

58 “What ___ be done?”

C O R R E C T

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N E V E R A R N E L C C I

1 Online store offering 2 Knots

3 Roadway division

4 University of Michigan’s home

5 Small source of protein

6 Walk like a duck 7 Magnum ___

8 Fraction of an hr.

9 Valise 59 Made a rug, e.g. 10 What a meteor 60 Pig sounds looks like in the sky

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE I M P A L A S

DOWN

N O T T E Y F O R N A T E E N D S M U W H O I D I O R S R N E S I D S P E S H A S C A R C O M T R A L L Y E L L E D U L A T I P E R S P

L O T T S S O N D E A N I

L A L I E T H I N G R A N C E S E L S S O O T S C U S E E A T E D E M D S A W S S L A H A B R I E N U R E N I M A L G M I N D R A N T S

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11

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Puzzle by Dave Sarpola

28 Spanish 47 Desert plants 40 Place to pin a waterways tiny flag 50 Transport 29 Hitchhiker’s digit 41 Numerous 51 Prefix with 42 Summon 32 Iwo ___ 11 Zones directional 43 Peaks 33 Eve’s mate 12 One working out 52 Zap 44 Item resting on 34 Ration (out) the lumps? 54 Ram’s mate andirons 13 Garden watering 36 Price 45 Room just under 55 The “B” of aids 37 Masses of fish B.S.A. a roof eggs 19 Wonderland girl 46 Stock market 57 Letter add-ons, 38 Leave lickety21 Neural activity disaster for short split measure, for For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit short 24 Desertlike

25 Book between Mark and John 26 Asian desert

27 “And giving ___, up the chimney he rose”

card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

DAILYTEXANCOMICS@GMAIL.COM


Monday, November 12, 2012

Life & Arts 10

Kelsey McKinney, Life & Arts Editor

Editors Note: The Record is a biweekly segment dedicated to featuring the people and traditions that make The University of Texas such a distinct place.

By Lindsey Cherner The walls are covered with swatches of old fabric, creating an endless checkerboard effect surrounding the thousands of costumes that suffocate the store. Customers squeeze through throngs of tutus, masks and vintage pieces new to both the store and its 64-year-old owner, Jenna Radtke, as they shop through the collection that has amassed over the past 28 years. “You’ll do things in a costume that you would never normally do,” Radtke said. “You’ll dance crazier, and like no one’s watching. It’s in all of us. All anyone needs to know is just to be who you are and see if we have anything that can decorate it.” Lucy in Disguise, a costume emporium named after Radtke’s border collie she dressed in rhinestones, was originally two stores. Over the years, the dividing wall was removed creating the nearly 8,000 square foot space costume haven that has occupied the land since its opening April 1, 1984. Radtke recalls being unable to stop her tears that day, as the collection she opened the store with, a combination of vintage costumes and accessories, was her own and she didn’t want to sell any of it. “I was a very organized hoarder,” Radtke said. “They say you’re not a hoarder if you can find everything you have, and I’ve always been able to find everything I have. I’ve always organized the chaos. I’m a hoarder of great things. I still am, and I still can’t leave it alone.” Radtke was forced to move

Costume design by Walter Young | Photo by Andrea Macias-Jimenez | Daily Texan Staff Lucy in Disguise owner Jenna Radtke poses with her employees, surrounded by the hundreds of costumes the famed store has to offer. Offering students and Austinites an immense array of costuming choices, Lucy in Disguise has become a staple of the South Congress landmark.

with her family every six months beginning in the third grade for her father’s business. Consequently, the only child had to learn to adapt over and over again to the culture of her homes across the southwest. She was driven to be popular and one of her ways of being cool was the way she dressed and her carefree attitude. Halloween was always a favorite holiday of hers, a night she remembers as weeks worth of effort that would culminate in up to $9,000 worth of cash after entering as many costume contests as she could in one night. “That’s what Halloween was to me, getting the best costume and then trying to make it pay me back for all of my time,” Radtke said. Clad in her typical attire of a gold embroidered robe she

had cut into a blouse, jeweled peace earrings and a light smoke banana clip hairpiece that blended into her smoky curls, Radtke fits the mold of the girl she said she had grown into during the “hippie, psychedelic times,” even with age. When she first started the store she wanted to make all of the costumes herself, or at a minimum, only have oneof-a-kind costumes available. However, the creative costumes she still pines after in garage sales and attics just aren’t what her clients come to her store for. Currently her store is comprised of 25 percent unique pieces while the rest of the costumes are mass-produced. “I think the world is less creative, not all of the world, but the straight world, the housewife world, and that’s a lot of

BOOK REVIEW | ‘ODDLY NORMAL’

our business,” Radtke said. Two of Radtke’s longtime employees and current managers, married couple Rio Jennings and Fernie Renteria, help keep her business model in check and facilitate the everyday workings of the store. “She’s a very savvy business woman,” Jennings said. “I can’t even begin to see the vision she sees — the way she put’s the panels on the walls and the things you learn from her.” Jennings and Renteria have been working for Radtke for more than seven years and have seen first-hand the way she has adapted over time to accept more mainstream costumes in her store to allow for the store’s continued growth. They characterize her as an Austin icon with a signature hippie look.

“I think she lets you know who she is right off of the bat,” Renteria said. “She’s very much a what-you-seeis-what-you’re-going-to-get kind of person.” Radtke strongly believes trends and those who try to create them are tasteless. She has always encouraged having an open mind, especially when searching for the perfect costume. “I do this for love, the love of the junk. You would have to love it to pick through it in an old attic filled of dirt and usually someplace un-air conditioned. It’s like what they say, dig through the shit to find the pony. That’s what I love to do,” Radtke said. Currently Radtke spends a majority of her time doing her other two jobs: flipping

ART Clay bones made by UT students and community members will be on display this Tuesday in the South Mall. The bones were made for the project One Million Bones which promotes awareness of genocide in Africa.

Memoir tells sexuality struggle By Bobby Blanchard There are not a lot ofbooks that explore a child’s coming out story from the eyes of his parents, but with parental love and a journalistic style, “Oddly Normal: One Family’s Struggle to Help Their Teenage Son Come to Terms with His Sexuality” tells the story about a father’s and mother’s uphill battle to help their son realize and accept his sexuality. In the memoir, UT alumnus John Schwartz chronicles his son’s, Joseph, early childhood, young adolescence and current teenage years. Joseph received a series of different mental diagnoses and often had trouble in his younger school years, issues his parents believed came from a phenomena Schwartz describes as “minority stress,” or pressure felt by people who belong to often unaccepted minority groups. The story is not a happy one, as much of the memoir is a narrative building up to Joseph’s suicide attempt in 2009. It should be noted that this is not a self-help book or a step-by-step guide on how to raise and help a LGBTQ child, and Schwartz makes that clear. Rather, it is an inspirational story about how Joseph’s parents struggled and tried to help their son. Acceptance from his parents was never Joseph’s problem. Schwartz writes that from a young age, he

Oddly Normal Author: John Schwartz Publisher: Gotham Books Pages: 304

houses and hosting weddings at her venue Casa Rio De Colores in Williamson county. She still enjoys going on the hunt for great stuff, wherever that may lead her, and continuing the legacy she began back when her hair was of the colorful variety and she wore red cowboy boots and short shorts, a “typical south Austin crazy.” “The same things still inspire me, and that’s what your mother never tells you, that when you get to be almost 65-years-old you’re still exactly the same person you were,” Radtke said. “Maybe you give your time to different things, but basically you don’t change. You have a few more aches and pains. I just had to figure out how to dress.”

Photo courtesy of Jenny Nguyen

“It gets better for [parents] too ... besides, somebody’s gotta pay for the hair dye.” — Oddly Normal by John Schwartz

and his wife thought their youngest of three might be gay and they assembled what they called a “League of Gay Uncles” to go to for advice. It was not his home life he struggled with. Instead, Joseph struggled with coming out at school to his peers and coming to terms with his sexuality himself. Furthermore, Schwartz argues that Joseph’s middle and elementary schools were unprepared and did not want to deal with a gay student. “I feel like the school would rather he had autism than be gay,” Jeanne Schwartz, Joseph’s mother and John’s wife, comments at one point. But the book is more than a linear narrative of events through Joseph’s childhood. Schwartz, a national

correspondent for The New York Times, quotes research, statistics about mental illnesses and officials. He presents data that suggests gay teens may be more likely to suffer depression, but he also points out the data and study is still inconclusive. This, along with other factual and academic anecdotes, makes this book more effective than a traditional memoir. Joseph is not necessarily a special case and there are teenagers all across the world who are suffering through similar problems. And not all of them are lucky enough to have accepting parents like Joseph has. Even the more memoirfocused parts of the book

NORMAL continues on page 8

Clay art to symbolize genocide By Faith Ann Ruszkowski UT students and their collaborators will lie 6,500 to 7,000 clay bones on the grass of the South Mall Tuesday. The area usually populated by students studying in the sun will be transformed into a symbolic graveyard of sorts as handmade bones are laid down as part of the national art activism project One Million Bones. Started by artist Naomi Natale in New Mexico, the UT installation of clay bones is only the latest in a string of nationwide “One Million Bones” projects that span from New Orleans to New Jersey. One Million Bones is a collaborative art endeavor that aims to promote awareness of genocide and daily atrocities occurring in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan, Somalia and Burma. Ultimately, the bones made by UT students will be combined with more than 900,000 other

bones in Washington D.C. as part of the largest One Million Bones exhibit in 2013. Through the sheer number of bones present on the South Mall, the UT exhibit hopes to serve as a visible reminder of the staggering loss of life within these African communities. “The bones symbolize that beneath every person’s skin, we’re all the same, and also helps us to remember victims and survivors from these atrocities while representing hope for the future at the same time,” education junior Julie Zhang said. Zhang, who estimates she has made approximately 400 bones, is one of eight students in Kara Hallmark’s visual art studies service-learning course that are responsible for putting together the event. As part of the class, these students have organized bone-making sessions on campus and as well as sessions with elementary school students, museums and professors at Southwestern and Temple Colleges.

Hallmark, the course instructor, was hired by Natale as the Central Texas state coordinator for the project after helping graduate student Matthew Remington organize the first One Million Bones display in Austin at the state capitol last spring. The role art could play in promoting social justice intrigued Hallmark, who had previous experience with service-learning in the K-12 system. “A project like this will create within you a deeper sense of connection with the situation,” Hallmark said. “Art has a way of doing that. It’s that visceral experience in conjunction with knowledge, stories, photographs and video.” While an intriguing idea in practice, making 10,000 bones for social justice is no easy feat. Hallmark said that in addition to meeting for six hours every week, most students spend countless hours outside of class making bones.

BONES continues on page 8


The Daily Texan 2012-11-12