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Christian

WINTER 2021

WATERFOWLER PRESERVING OUR CHRISTIAN AND WATERFOWLING HERITAGE | THECWA.ORG

CONVERSATION WITH A CHAMPION GRILLED DUCK WITH SWEET-HOT BBQ SAUCE

BENEFITS OF USING SILHOUETTE DECOYS


TA BL E of C ONT EN TS THE HISTORY OF CWA

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CONVERSATION WITH A CHAMPION

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WORLD DUCK CALLING CHAMPION BRAD ALLEN

FINDING SUCCESS ON BIG PUBLIC WATER

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ARKANSAS TOP TEN COLLECTABLE DUCK CALLS

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ACCORDING TO AVID DUCK CALL COLLECTOR AND AUTHOR MIKE LEWIS FROM HIS BOOK TITLED “CALLING THE WILD”

BENEFITS OF USING SILHOUETTE DECOYS

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SHOOTING TIPS

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GRILLED DUCK WITH SWEET-HOT BBQ SAUCE

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YOUNG PUP vs TEENAGE PUP

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THE BLIND BAG: SOUL GEAR FOR WATERFOWLERS

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BELONG, BELIEVE, BECOME

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SENIOR EDITORS Tim & Rachelle Sallee Tara Sallee Brittany Banks CREATIVE DESIGN & EDITING

Vance Klemple

COVER PAGE PHOTO

Tom Martineau

CONTACT INFO INFO@THECWA.ORG 479.957.3033

PHOTO BY STEVE OEHLENSCHLAGER CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

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T HE HI STO RY O F CWA

“Preserving Our Christian and Waterfowling Heritage” The Christian Waterfowlers Association was formed by Tim and Rachelle Sallee in September of 2009. However, the idea for the CWA originated back in 2002 while on a duck hunt with his brother Anthony Sallee on the banks of the Arkansas River. Tim was first introduced waterfowling while serving as a youth minister in Fort Smith, Ark. almost thirty-three years ago. One of his youth members demonstrated using a duck call during a “Gong Show” talent night. He was fascinated with the call and after inquiring about the call and duck hunting was invited to go on a hunt by the youth and his older brother.

Since that time the CWA has launched close to fifty chapters in fifteen states and continues to add new chapters each month. Chapters meet monthly for food, fellowship, pro-tips, devotion and an invitation to know Christ. Chapters also hold various youth hunting, conservation, and CWA Hunts for Hereos events.

The hunt experience was incredible, with awesome weather and the perfect sunrise. Right after daybreak about fifteen mallards flew over our backs and circled back with their wings cupped and feet down. “Take Em,” yelled the youth, as Tim raised his gun to shoot. He was so moved by seeing ducks decoy, that he shot three times and did not hit one duck.

The CWA also hosts an annual benefit banquet. In 2019 the CWA celebrated its 10th Annual International Waterfowl Festival & Outdoor Expo. Over the past ten years, thousands have attended from nineteen states and Canada, with many accepting Christ during the two day event. The event features many competitions Including the CWA International Duck and Goose Calling Competition, Duck Waterfowler’s Trap Shooting Competition, 3D Archery Competition and Wild Waterfowl Cook-off Competition. Other activities included our Blue Wings Youth Kidz Zone featuring a fishing derby, seminars, Outreach/Fundraiser Dinner, Sportsman’s Chapel, concerts and more.

However, a few weeks later on his second hunt he bagged his first ever mallard and was hooked on duck hunting for life. Tim then introduced waterfowling to his older brother Mark Sallee, his younger brother Anthony Sallee and Mark’s sons Mitchell and Matthew. He always looked forward to spending time in the duck blind with his family and friends each year.

In 2012 the CWA held its first Blue Wings Youth Waterfowl Hunting Event during the Oklahoma youth waterfowl hunt. After receiving requests to organize a Wounded Veteran’s Duck Hunt, the first ever CWA Wounded Veteran’s Waterfowl event took place in January of 2014 at the Crooked Slough Hunting club in east Arkansas.

Anthony moved to Nashville, Tenn. in the 1980’s and early 1990’s to play bass for the Christian band “White Heart.” He went on to play for Michael W. Smith, Amy Grant and Matthew West to name a few. While taking a break from the road, he traveled back home to spend time with family as well as spend time in the duck blind.

Since the beginning of CWA, hundreds of lives have been impacted by the Gospel of Christ. We invite you to join the Christian Waterfowlers Association today in preserving our Christian, waterfowling heritage. To become a member visit www.thecwa.org or call 479-957-3033 for more information.

While on a hunt in 2002, Tim and Anthony first brought up the idea combining a passion for Christ with the passion for waterfowling, as well as the idea of a Fellowship of Christian Athletes for waterfowlers, but the idea didn’t get much further than Anthony designing a sample logo or two. After hosting a Wild Game Dinner in September of 2009, Tim saw firsthand the impact of bringing sportsmen together for fellowship and introducing them to Christ. The idea for CWA resurfaced. After much prayer and consideration, he felt it was time move forward with the launching of the CWA website and forum as well as crafting the CWA mission statement: “Preserving Our Christian and Waterfowling Heritage” 3

CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

(The Christian Waterfowlers Association is incorporated in Arkansas as a non-profit religious organization. The Christian Waterfowlers Association is also registered with the IRS as a 501 (C)(3)non-profit religious organization. All donations are tax deductible except for any gift items and magazine received with your support membership)

CWA Founders Tim & Rachelle Sallee

Tim Sallee (Left) Anthony Sallee (Right)


NEW

SNOW S K INNY DE C OYS

WWW.TA N GLEFREE.COM PHOTO : DUSTIN ETHEREDGE


PHOTO BY STEVE OEHLENSCHLAGER


C ONVERSAT I ON W IT H A CH AM P IO N WORLD DUCK CALLING CHAMPION BRAD ALLEN

CWA: How and when were you first introduced to waterfowling? Brad: My father took me duck hunting when I was 6 years old. I think I started begging to go a year or two earlier than that and he finally just got tired of hearing me whine about it. CWA: What is your favorite location for hunting ducks and why? (River, field, flooded timber etc.) Brad: My favorite place to hunt is still Cache River where I grew up. Being on that river just feels like home. There is nothing like Arkansas flooded timber. I love seeing the mallards splash down right in front of us. My passion is watching them respond to a call. Shooting is just a bonus. I could leave my gun at home and enjoy it just as much.

won my first in 2010. I call that my decade of disappointment. I guess I finally had success because I was just too hardheaded to quit. CWA: Do you feel that it was more difficult or easier winning the second and third championship than the first? Brad: Each championship was very difficult because I was competing against the best duck callers in the world. I listen to many of those guys and I find myself becoming a fan and admiring their ability. I must say that my toughest win was my last in 2013. My good friend, and now fellow World’s Champion, David St. John, and I had to have 3 tie breaking rounds in addition to the 3 required rounds. We set a record for the longest contest in history in excess of 6 hours!

CWA: What or who inspired you to get into competition calling? Brad: I saw my first duck calling competition in 1998 at the World’s Contest at Stuttgart. It became a yearly father and son trip for us. I never thought about actually competing because I knew that the guys I heard on that stage were far better than me. When I was in graduate school at the University of Central Arkansas, I decided that I would actually try my hand at comp calling. I went to the contest at Stuttgart in 1997 and watched Rick Dunn win the title. I found out that he was a call maker and spoke to him about getting a call and learning the game. He was very gracious with his time and got me started in competition. I was blessed to have Rick and 3 other men that I consider mentors; Trey Crawford, the late Butch Richenback, and Bernie Boyle. All of these men were World Champion callers. I owe the success I have enjoyed to them. CWA: How long did you compete in contests before winning the World Duck Calling Championship?

CWA: Share a little about the main difference between competition calling and calling from the duck blind.

Brad: I lost the World’s Championship contest 10 times before I finally

Brad: Competition calling is about showing off your mastery of a

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CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS


duck call. You are pushing it to its limit for 90 seconds in each routine. Many people like to scoff at competitive calling because it is different from the realistic calling that you actually use in the duck blind. It is louder and more aggressive. However, I can assure you that competitive callers know the difference, and can easily operate a hunting call effectively. The hours spent trying to perfect a competitive routine have made me a much better hunter. Competitive calling has taught me to control my air to a degree that allows me to make a wide variety of sounds and subtle nuances that help bring the decoys to life and live mallards into the spread. CWA: How did your decision to start making duck calls come about? Brad: I started making calls after my second championship. I had several calls that I liked, but always wished that there was something just a little different to them. Making calls gave me the opportunity to create the calls I had always wanted. It also

calling as a platform to share your faith. Brad: My relationship with Christ is my everything. I can’t imagine the hopelessness that exists for those who do not know Christ and have not accepted His gift of salvation. I truly can’t. He is my hope, my redeemer, and honestly my best friend. I am grateful that something as crazy as duck calling has given me a platform to share my faith and testimony at local events such as wildlife suppers and men’s groups. It was truly an honor to speak at the CWA banquet a few years ago. It has also given me the opportunity to reach out to friends and customers in our shop from time to time.

Brad Allen Elite Duck Calls Searcy, AR

allows me to give that capability to fellow hunters, which is very rewarding. CWA: Talk about your Christian faith and how you have been able use

eliteduckcalls.com CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

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KEVIN HUTCHESON 479.601.1299


FINDI NG SU CCE SS O N B IG P U B L IC WATE R BY AARON ADAMS

Don’t we all dream of a place of our own during duck season? We can wake up around 5am, get on our ATV, and head out to our favorite blind equipped with a bathroom, lights, and a cook stove. We can get breakfast started while our buddies set up all the decoys, guns, and blind bags. Then, right at shoot- ing hours, the mallards begin to fall in the hole in perfect groups, and we limit out on all greens by 8am. Perfect morning, huh? Unfortunately, this is not the duck hunting life most of us have. Oh, we might get an invite to such a place now and then, but for most of us, it takes a lot of work and knowledge to get the success we all desire, but if you are willing to put forth the effort, success can be found, even consistently. Now, of course, ducks must be present in the area. This is not a magic formula. The first and most important step (but usually the most missed) is to find the ducks. Scout, scout, scout! You must find where the ducks want to be. Too many hunters go to the same area that worked in the past (much like bass fishing), and expect the ducks just to come to them. Yes, ducks are social birds and can be drawn to your decoys and calls, but if you are not where they want to be (and that is usually where there is food), your chances of success diminish greatly. I know this seems elementary, but this is the number one mistake public hunters make. Now, it can be the hardest step, because not everyone has flexible schedules, but find a hunting buddy that can help. Teach your buddies how to run your duck boat and put them to work. Finding ducks the day before your hunt is the biggest key, so scout, scout, scout! When you find your spot (you might know what I am about to say), you must go out there and hold it. Make sure you read all local water regulations about camping, etc., but you must be the first one out there. It is very likely you are not the only one that found the hole, so claim your spot. Your hunting party should share the burden from hunt to hunt, but if you want to shoot ducks, this is a must. Now it is time to put your best foot forward for a good morning hunt. Hide and hide good! Don’t waste all of your work and time to just flare all the ducks by sticking out of the reeds or bushes. If allowed, gather local grass, reeds, bushes, and limbs, and make a good, thick blind. If hunting out of your boat blind,

no problem. Just make sure to make your boat look just like the bank line. Put local brush on the sides, in front, on the backside, etc. Put Real Grass or some other cover in between each hunter on top of the boat. Don’t allow an easy look inside the boat from a duck flying over. Our hunting party just made this change a couple of seasons ago, and it made a huge difference. I highly recommend layout blinds when possible. Not many hunters use layouts on big water banks, but if you do, you will not be disappointed. When it comes to decoys, C and J patterns are usually the best, because you will almost always have wind on big water, but on those occasional calm days, two pods are a good choice. When it comes to two pods, we prefer one small group of widgeons or gadwall decoys, and a larger group of mallard decoys. By the time ducks get to us in Oklahoma, they have seen so many groups of two equal pods. We do use spinning decoys, but we always have remotes. Spinners are great to get their attention, but when they come to take a closer look, we like to shut them off, speak softly with our calls, and bring ‘em down. As far as calling, it is not like the timber of South Arkansas. You can be aggressive, but only on the turns and when the ducks are heading away. If they are heading your way, finesse calling (as mentioned above), or no calling at all is the best option. Ducks on big water are fighting the wind and using their sense of sight much more than their sense of hearing, so that is why hiding and decoy spread tops calling on the priority list. Now everything is in place. You’ve found the ducks. You’ve saved your spot. You’ve set up the perfect J, and you’re calling like a champ. What’s left? Don’t miss! And, of course, be safe, have fun, appreciate the company, and give thanks to our Creator for all He has given us.

Aaron Adams Adams Insurance & Financial Springdale, AR CWA Executive Board Member

AdamsinsuranceFinancial.com CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

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PHOTO BY ISAAC NEALE


A R KANSAS TO P TE N CO L L E CTAB L E D U CK CA L L S ACCORDING TO AVID DUCK CALL COLLECTOR AND AUTHOR MIKE LEWIS FROM HIS BOOK TITLED “CALLING THE WILD”

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J.T. BECKHART

BILLY STARKS

E.A. FAIFER

IRA GREEN FERGUSON

G.D KINNEY

(1864-1922)

(1940-2020)

(1872-UNKNOWN)

(1879-1954)

(1877-1939)

Big Lake, AR

Stuttgart, AR

Clarendon, AR

Hamburg, AR

Memphis and Hughes, AR

JOHN JOLLY

CHICK MAJOR

JOHN HENRY NORRIS

O.K. “POP” PICKLE

JO WILLINGHAM

(1904-1989)

(1896-1974)

(1878-1960)

(1884-1965)

(1887-1972)

Pine Bluff/W. Memphis, AR

Stuttgart, AR

Weiner, AR

Otwell, AR

Pine Bluff, AR

CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS


BENEFI TS OF U SIN G SIL H O U E T T E D E COYS BY AL FALKENSTEIN “BIG AL”

Silhouette decoys are regaining their popularity once again for various reasons. The number one reason is that they work! Other reasons or benefits are that they are affordable, and can be easily transported to the hunt location. I’ve included more information about silhouettes below.

IT’S NOT THE SILO’S: At times I hear of someone who used silhouettes and had a bad experience right off the bat. In most cases, I can assure you the issue was not because of the silo’s. Later in the season, birds are wary. Your ability to hide is the first key to success on a hunt. That includes hiding a shine on your face, or a dog that is visible, etc. Poor calling or a decoy bag left out in the spread, etc. could also be reasons why the birds did not finish.

Have a great day in the field, and enjoy God’s blessings!

MORE IS BETTER: Since you need to turn the silo’s in various directions to make them effective, more is better than less quantity wise. GOOD SPACING: Don’t crowd the silo’s too much when you set them up. 6 ft. apart is the minimum spacing for setups. MIXING DECOY TYPES: You certainly can mix full bodies or shells with silo’s. It’s best to set your silo’s spread apart first, then come back and put your full bodies or shells in key areas. The silo’s should take up the bulk of the spread, with the full bodies or shells acting as the icing on the cake! THE ART OF SETTING THE SPREAD: Silo’s require a bit of thought prior to just setting them into the ground. Think of covering all angles of approaching birds when setting the spread. Convey that to those helping with the setup as well. Also make sure to push the stakes down deep. A lot of hunters don’t do that and the silo’s blow over easily. THINK OF GROUPS: Don’t set your silo spread in one big blob! Break your spread out into several groups instead. Run at least 2 to 3 large groups of decoys, along with pairs, or small groups of 3-4, on the outskirts of your spread. This gives more finishing options, and will also cause the birds to work your spread for a bit longer to find that perfect landing zone.

Al Falkenstein “ Big AL” Big Al’s Decoys USA Norton, OH

www.bigalsdecoys.com CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

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SHO OT IN G T IP S BY STEVE GOULD

It can be rather frustrating when you pull the trigger of your shotgun and your intended target flies off into the distance. Whether hunting fall flocks or crushing clay targets, everyone would like to shoot their shotguns a little better. Apply the following tips and put them to practice, and you are sure to be bagging more birds and crushing more clays.

DON’T FIGHT YOUR EYES It all starts with the eyes, because it is really hard to hit flying targets when your eyes are working against you. Make sure you know which eye is your dominant eye. If you are not shooting with your dominant eye over the gun, you are always going to be fighting against your eyes. If you happen to be cross-dominant, meaning your dominant hand and eye are opposite, consider switching the side you shoot from. Okay okay, I can already hear some of you saying that’s not an option. If you choose not to switch sides, you can do something simple like placing a piece of scotch tape over the lens of your glasses on your dominant eye, which will force your non-dominant eye to take over and will make a difference in how well you shoot. This is a much better option than closing one eye. When you close one eye, you are losing some of your depth perception and ability to judge speed, and that’s huge.

alignment. When the eye is not perfectly aligned, you will not shoot where you are looking. During the offseason, take an unloaded gun and practice mounting it in your home. This is a great way to get more consistent mounts which will certainly lead to more accurate shots. Once you have put in the repetitions, remember a solid mount is only good if you keep your head welded to the gun. Resist the urge to lift your head to peak at those birds, a floating head is a great way to guarantee you miss the shot high. WHERE YOUR FOCUS GOES, YOUR SHOTGUN FLOWS It is really, really hard to hit a target that your focus is not on. The visual field of view of our eyes spans approximately 120 degrees, but most of that is peripheral vision. The area of our eyes that can see high levels of detail is only about 6 degrees. Like many sports, shooting a shotgun is largely about hand-eye coordination. Your hands will not move the gun to the right spot if your focus is in the wrong place. It’s not good enough to see the bird or target you are shooting at, you must be acutely focused on your intended target. This is why you might shoot at the whole flock, but not hit a single bird. Many people also make the mistake of shooting a shotgun like a rifle, with the sights in focus and their intended target out of focus. If your head and eye are in the right position on the gun, completely ignore the sights and focus on your target. These tips may seem simple, but most often, ignoring these pieces of advice are what leads to missed shots. I believe life is a lot like shooting a shotgun. If you ever want to hit your life targets, you must have a clear vision and a laser focus. I like to save the best for last, and my best tip of all is to fix your eyes on Jesus, the pioneer and perfecter of faith.

Steve Gould Professional Exhibition Shooter

PRACTICE YOUR MOUNT Now that you are not fighting against your dominant eye, you must make sure that when you mount, your eye is in perfect position; looking straight down the rib of the shotgun. Again, this is a simple concept, but in the heat of the moment, so many people mount their shotgun and their eye is not in perfect 19

CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

gouldbrothers.com


GRAND REFUGE 2.0™ ZIP-FRONT WADER

Multi-climate, insulated bootfoot camo chest wader with a patented removable zippered liner system for complete versatility and adaptive comfort in all weather conditions.

• Removable zip-in/out 120-gram insulated liner • Heavy-duty, abrasion resistant nylon in the shin, knee and seat are • 4-ply polyester upper • Zippered flip out security pocket • 2 fleece lined hand warmer pockets • 2 oversized storage pockets on chest • Adjustable elastic suspenders with quick release buckles • Adjustable wading belt with locking buckle • 1,600-gram Thinsulate™ boot with cleated outsole • T-Zip® waterproof zipper for easy on and off


GRILLED DUCKS WITH SWEET-HOT BBQ SAUCE

Scott Leysath The Sporting Chef

INGREDIENTS

HOW TO FIX

1. Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and pepper and sautÊ for 5 – 7 minutes or until onions are translucent. Add garlic and brown sugar and cook for 2 minutes more. Stir in remaining ingredients and simmer for 30 minutes over low heat.

4 ducks halved

2 tbsp olive oil

Salt and pepper

BBQ Sauce

1/4 cup vegetable oil

1/2 cup onion finely chopped

1/4 cup green bell pepper finely chopped

4 garlic cloves minced

1/3 cup brown sugar

1 cup ketchup

1 tbsp cider vinegar

1 tsp Tabasco or more

2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce

1/2 tsp liquid smoke

2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

2. Rub duck halves with olive oil, salt and pepper. Grill over white-hot coals until medium-rare. Just before serving, baste with barbecue sauce.

CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

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YOUNG P UP vs T E E N AG E P U P BY KEVIN ERDMIER

Picture this: your trusty dog, Max, is getting older, and you are thinking about getting a new puppy. First of all, there’s only one Max. No other pet on Earth can replace him. He was the one dog we have all had or want to have. He might not be a Field Trial Champion, but, in your opinion, he is better. Max fits your family, and when the time comes to get another pet, you want to make sure that they do too. One question that families usually ask is, “Do we get a puppy, or a dog that is coming out of the puppy stage?” Each family must make a decision of what works best for them. The purpose of this short article is to compare and contrast young vs. older puppies for sporting dogs. The very obvious first pro for young puppies is that they are cute. The expression “puppy dog eyes” exists for a reason! In the first few days, they are also getting acclimated to their new environment, which can mean a lot of napping (on their part, not yours). Another pro for getting a smaller puppy is that they will know that you are their family from a very young age. Now for the dreaded list of cons… Usually by day three or four, the newness (even though they are still cute when they are sleeping) starts to wear off. You’ve probably cleaned up accidents, stayed up nights letting them out for potty breaks, and run interference when they were chewing on your spouse’s shoes. After the clean up, you have to start training. Training is not limited to learning where to use the bathroom, but also includes socialization. You want your pet to be used to the members of your family and the people you see regularly. You want them to know how to act if you take them to the park, the pet store, or for a walk around the neighborhood. If you want your dog to be your hunting companion, there is extra training on top of all of that. To sum it all up, there are major advantages to having a puppy of a young age. The only con is that you have to be ready to roll your sleeves up and put in the work that it takes to make them a happy, healthy, and functioning member of your family. With an older puppy, you might get lucky and miss the potty training, the accidents, the hours of clean up and training, but you could also miss the special moments of bonding and the “aha” moments in training. What you get is an older pup that is ready to bond with your family and go hunting. Usually these pups are more costly than their younger counterparts, because they have had many hours of hard work and dedication poured 23

CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

into them. Another advantage to getting an older puppy is that you know what you are getting. You can see the puppy work in the field and see how obedient they are. They also give you a better idea of how they will look once grown. It is crucial to consider what is best for your family and work life when deciding younger vs. older pup. Do you have time for training, vet visits (these are more frequent in younger pups, but necessary with dogs of any age), and clean up? Do you function well on little sleep? Budget is also an important factor to take into consideration. You will pay much more for an older pup that has already completed various trainings, received shots, and is through the stage that is the most time-consuming. How much time do you have and how much is your time worth? Either way, the newest member of your family will be worth it all!

Kevin Erdmier Southern Pine Kennel Blackshear, GA

southernpinekennel.com


Blue Wings is our initiative to teach and engage young people with the great recreation that is waterfowl hunting. We all have a call to pass on the knowledge and heritage of our pasttime to the next generation. At the Christian Waterfowlers Association, we do that through our Blue Wings events.


THE BLIND BAG: SOUL GE

BY TIM S

“There’s been a change of plans” are not the words that any waterfowler likes to hear before gearing up for a hunt. There have been many times over the years that I was excited about an upcoming hunt, only to have a major winter storm come in and make it nearly impossible to travel to our hunting area. Even though I live in Arkansas, I live in the northwest corner of the state, and usually have to drive 100 miles or so to the area where we usually hunt. Instead of receiving precipitation in the form of snow in the winter, we usually have a combination of freezing rain and sleet, making our roads extremely hazardous to drive on. Back when I first starting hunting, I remember a time of planning a hunt on a Saturday morning when a winter storm moved into the area, and receiving the phone call, along with the words that I knew I would not want to hear; “there has been a change of plans.” However, what was disappointing for a day, later turned into an incredible hunt of a lifetime. A few days later, roads were improved enough to travel, and I was able to hunt in a slough with snow covered banks. The winter storm had pushed a great number of fresh ducks down from the north. Right before legal shooting time, ducks began to circle and land in our decoys. In no time, we had our limit, but remained to see the show of ducks continuing to land in our spread. There’s nothing quite like seeing greenheads against a canvas of pure white snow. What initially started as a time of disappointment due to a change of plans, later turned into a better plan with the perfect timing and harvest of ducks.

Mary is understandably confused and disturbed, and questions him asking: “How will this be, since I am a virgin?” Gabriel answered: “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; therefore the child to be born will be called holy—the Son of God…” oh, and by the way, “nothing will be impossible with God.” (Luke 1:35-37 ESV) Mary goes from planning a wedding to trying to figure out just how she’s going to tell her fiancé that she is pregnant, when they both know the baby is not his. You may be thinking, wow what a privilege to give birth to the Messiah, the Savior of the world, to be chosen as the mother of Jesus. How in the world could she possibly say no? While it’s easy for us to have this opinion because we already know the end of the story, put yourself in Mary’s shoes for a moment. Is anyone really going to believe her story, that her child was conceived of the Holy Spirit? Talk about a scandal. Unlike in today’s society, Mary would have been accused of fornication and likely stoned for the presumed affair. Yet knowing that saying yes to God would no doubt involve great risk, her response was, “I am the servant of the Lord; let it be to me according to your word.” (Luke 1:38 ESV)

As I am writing this, it is a few weeks before Christmas. I think back to the first Christmas when Mary and Joseph experienced a change in their plans.

Think about Joseph for a moment and what he must have thought when he heard the news from Mary. Think about how he would have had to live with the gossip and slander about Mary for the rest of his life.

Think of Mary; she was not planning to be pregnant, but was planning to get married. While she was planning for a wedding, God had a change of plans. God had a better plan.

We read in Matthew 1:19, “Because Joseph her husband was faithful to the law, and yet did not want to expose her to public disgrace, he had in mind to divorce her quietly.

We pick up the story in Luke where the angel Gabriel appears to her in the little town of Nazareth and tells her, “Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High… and of his kingdom there will be no end.” (Luke 1:30-33 ESV)

20 But after he had considered this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, ‘Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because what is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. 21 She will give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.’

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CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

PHOTO BY RED SHUTTER MEDIA


EAR FOR WATERFOWLERS

SALLEE

22 All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet: 23 ‘The virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, and they will call him Immanuel’ (which means ‘God with us’). 24 When Joseph woke up, he did what the angel of the Lord had commanded him and took Mary home as his wife. 25 But he did not consummate their marriage until she gave birth to a son. And he gave him the name Jesus.” Just like Joseph and Mary, we are faced with the same question when God changes our plans: Can I trust God with the outcome if I submit myself to His purpose?

3. KNOW THAT NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE WITH GOD! Finally, what the prophets foretold and the angel proclaimed, that nothing is impossible with God, came to pass as the virgin Mary gave birth to a baby boy, the Messiah who they named Jesus. When God changes your plans, you can take comfort in knowing that His plans for your future are far greater than any of your fears. __________________________________________________

Both Joseph and Mary submitted to God’s will and purpose for their lives.

__________________________________________________

1. SUBMIT TO GOD AND HIS PURPOSE I’m reminded of the scripture Proverbs 19:21: “You can make many plans, but the LORD’s purpose will prevail.” Mary and Joseph had made plans that were safe, but God’s plan was risky; the kind that required them to place their complete faith and trust in.

Always remember that nothing you ever face will be impossible with God!

__________________________________________________

2. TRUST GOD WITH ALL YOUR HEART Proverbs 3:5 says, “Trust in the LORD with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding.” You may not understand it, but instead of trying to figure everything out, such as how a virgin can become pregnant, take God at His Word and trust Him with all of your heart, even when it doesn’t make sense.

Tim Sallee CWA - Founder Northwest Arkansas

theCWA.org CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

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BE LO NG , B E L IE VE , B E CO M E BY CHUCK McALISTER

Waterfowl have 3 basic needs that an effective waterfowl hunter will use to their advantage. In the same way, you and I have similar needs. WATERFOWL 1 To Belong Waterfowl are not lone creatures. They travel in flocks. That is why the skilled use of decoys is a vital part of attracting waterfowl. 2 To Believe Waterfowl instinctively know that safety is found in realizing the absolute truth about whatever situation they are facing. They must believe that they are safe. That is why camouflage and concealment done well are so important in effective waterfowl hunting. 3 To Become Like all creatures, waterfowl are motivated to survive, to become what they were meant to be. They will find the places on their migratory route that affords them the best opportunity to meet their need for food to ensure their survival. That is why site selection is vital to have a successful hunt.

HUMANITY 1 To Belong No man is an island. We need to love and be loved. We need relationships. 2 To Believe In our day of information overload, many people live confused lives wondering what is and is not true. It is a basic need for us to know the truth. Our soul craves it. 3 To Become We want to survive, but we also want more. We want to thrive. We are driven to become who we were meant to be, someone whose life matters.

People will succumb to a substance, betray a friend, work themselves to exhaustion, or embrace the latest and greatest just to move a little closer to possibly resolving these cravings. The irony is that there is nothing we can do to meet these needs in our own lives. Our Creator placed these cravings in us, and only He can satisfy them. They are there to draw us into His embrace. 29

CHRISTIAN WATERFOWLERS

Jesus provided us with the answer to our dilemma when He stated, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.“ John 14:6 Only in Jesus do we find “the way” to unconditional love, we belong to His family; “the truth” we can believe; and the opportunity to become, to have “the life” that we were created to have, the life that counts. How do we come to Jesus so that we can have the peace of having our deepest desires satisfied? Jesus said, “Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him…” Rev 3:20 These desires are lodged in our hearts. Jesus, at your invitation, will come into your heart and satisfy these cravings. He will give you peace. You can invite Him into your heart today by simply praying this prayer: “Jesus, I need You. Please forgive me for the mistakes that I have made as I have attempted to satisfy the longings of my soul apart from You. I admit that I have sinned against You. Please forgive me. I surrender my life to You and invite You to come live in my heart. Thank you, Jesus, for saving me.” If you prayed that, and you meant it with all your heart, you are on the road to recovery. Welcome to the family of God. Jesus has brought you to the Father today. The cravings of your soul will now be satisfied… FOREVER!

Chuck McAlister Founder Adventure Bound Outdoor TV Program Founder Promise of Hope Ministries Board Member CWA


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2021 Christian Waterfowler Magazine - Winter Issue  

2021 Christian Waterfowler Magazine - Winter Issue  

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