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Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula: An AfroFutures Syllabus

The CultSTATUS Arts Haven, in collaboration with The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History.


Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula


Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula: An AfroFutures Syllabus

Curated & Presented By The CultSTATUS Arts Haven

Hosted on November 2nd 2016 at The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History


Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula speculates re: Black Women and Girls as the nebulae for Black Progress. It imagines altering timelines of reality: WE as mystic/spiritual talisman to the past. WE as umbilical cord to our future. WE as SuperMassiveBlackHole portal to forever. What happens when we assist in our own Birth? ----------------------------------


ABOUT THE WOMEN: Founded by Constance SHERESE Collier-Mercado A Black Woman Writer/Artist and self-proclaimed “Anthropologist of the Arts” in search of all the culture she can get … The CultSTATUS Arts Haven is a multidisciplinary cultural & creative petri-dish which seeks to provide a safe space for the connection {and intersection} of writers, artists, wanderers, social instigators, scientists, activists, educators, and other critical thinkers rooted in a desire to elevate the African Diaspora and uplift Communities of Color. This radical arts clinic works to foster an holistic environment of Immersion & Experimentation with a commitment to achieving social equity from the chaos.

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Decades before the Auburn Avenue Research Library opened, its core collection was formed at the Auburn Branch of the Carnegie Library of Atlanta … The one-story red-brick building, located at 333 Auburn Avenue, officially opened July 25, 1921, becoming Atlanta's first public library branch for African Americans. From 1921 until the branch closed in 1959, numerous women of color managed and administered the facility and provided educational and community programming. Among them were Alice Dugged Cary and Annie L. McPheeters, who was responsible for much of the development of the core collection, known as the Negro History Collection, in size and significance. Anchoring the west end of the Sweet Auburn historic district, the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History opened May 1994 in Atlanta. A special library of the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System (A-FPLS), it is the first public library in the Southeast to offer specialized reference and archival collections dedicated to the study and research of African American culture and history and of other peoples of African descent. In 2001 the library received a Governor's Award in the Humanities.


ABOUT THE EVENT: From The Producer Curated and Presented by The CultSTATUS Arts Haven, this one-night-only convening, hosted by The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, uses a woman centered approach to give an overview of AfroFuturism in Art and Literature. What is AfroFuturism? How have its roots spread in Atlanta? Who were the women that played an instrumental role in its development? Where are we potentially going within the genre? Is there room for a political/subversive nature also? These ideas and more are discussed in a series of excerpt readings and panel discussion on the evening of Wednesday, November 2nd 2016.

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From The Venue In collaboration with The CultSTATUS Arts Haven, the Auburn Avenue Research Library hosts Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula: An AfroFutures Syllabus. This community dialogue explores the conceptual presence of Africana Womanist philosophy and Black Feminist theory in the art and literature of contemporary Afrofuturism. Via a series of excerpt readings and a communal panel discussion, it examines how Afrofuturism is defined; the role of black women in its ongoing development as an artistic genre; and its socio-political relevance as cultural activism.


INTRODUCTION: Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula. This AfroFutures Syllabus has had many lives. Many iterations over the past year. First, I envisioned simply a movement. A single interpretive dance to honor The Kinfolk and imagine a possible Future. But I am not a classically trained dancer and the future seemed too vast to weigh down with the burden of just one reality. I put it aside for a time. I am an artist and a wordsmith, though. So the future returned to me in pieces over several months. Sometimes in lyrics to songs by the likes of Macy Gray, Janelle Monae, and Waking Astronomer. Other times, in lines of my own poetry and visual art. Most often, throughout the almost non-stop traumas to the collective Black psyche over the summer. I have repeatedly found healing and peace in the creative responses of Black Women. And a thought occurred to me that if healing exists in the works of Black Women via our #BlackGirlMagic and #Lemonade and #SayHerName and Spelman Museum's #BeYourOwnMuse campaign, then maybe something more than just healing 'in the now', but power and progress in the Future were also tied up in Black Women's Wombs. Across not just the field of Dance. Or Literature - where many acknowledge that Afrofuturism was first born. But, maybe across all disciplines. In the form of not just the literal children we bear, but the feats of individuality and personal growth we give life to. I am a multidisciplinary artist, so this idea fit with the way I think, in general, and I wanted to share that with this city. You will find that this syllabus is especially interested in Deep Future interpretations of these ideas. So, I created Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula. And the concept of ‘What happens when we #AssistInOurOwnBirth. With contributions from the Atlanta community itself. But, maybe I should back up a step. What really is Afrofuturism? How do we define it? Cultural critic Mark Dery is credited with first coining the term ‘Afrofuturism’ in response to a 1994 series of interviews he conducted with Africana Studies professor Tricia Rose, musician Greg Tate, and popular Science Fiction writer Samuel R. Delaney. The interview and corresponding essay are in my opinion, clueless at best; smug, condescending, and more than a little patronizing at worst. But, the term Afrofuturism has stuck … more or less. “Speculative fiction that treats African-American themes and addresses African-American concerns in the context of twentieth-century technoculture … might, for want of a better term, be called ‘Afrofuturism.’ ”


That’s it. That is Afrofuturism, as it was initially conceived. And, yes, the term has stuck for the most part. But, you know I couldn’t just leave it at that, right? I prefer the term ‘AfroFutures,’ for several reasons, some of which I explained in a September 22nd Facebook post written back when Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula was still planned as a week-long festival - and which I’ve highlighted at the end of this introductory statement. But, author, Ytasha L. Womack does an even better job of filling in the gaps left by that original definition when she describes Afrofuturism as: “… the growing artistic movement and critiques that followed narratives of people of African descent in a sci-fi, futuristic treaties. Afrofuturists seek to inspire and forge a stronger self-identity and respect for humanity by encouraging enthusiasts to reexamine their environments and reimagine the future in a cross cultural context … The aesthetic includes the music, visual art, literature, film, critical essays and other mediums dedicated to futuristic explorations primarily through the arts. Works range in theme and story lines but they are typically characterized by compelling insights, both cosmetic and analytical into black identity in the Americas, Caribbean, Latin America, and Africa and beyond.”

My hope is that, with this syllabus, you will hone in on your own definitions/wordings which highlight Black women’s contributions to the genre while offering an even greater level of plurality to its implications. Perhaps, even lining up in some ways with a more revolutionary mindset, similar to that of Octavia’s Brood co-editors Walidah Imarisha and Adrienne Maree Brown: “Whenever we try to envision a world without war, without violence, without prisons, without capitalism, we are engaging in an exercise of speculative fiction. Organizers and activists struggle tirelessly to create and envision another world, or many other worlds, just as science fiction does … We believe that radical science fiction is actually better termed visionary fiction because it pulls from real life experience, inequalities and movement building to create innovative ways of understanding the world around us, paint visions of new worlds that could be, and teach us new ways of interacting with one another. Visionary fiction engages our imaginations and hearts, and guides our hands as organizers.”

An understanding which links past and future. Spans the breadth and width of the African Diaspora. Bridges the entirety of every possible alternate Afro-universe extending from every decision or non-decision the collective Black consciousness has ever made. And, expertly navigates all of it, like two pigtailed little Black girls playing a never-ending game of doubledutch hopscotch across the stars. With that ‘Black-girl-nebula’ in mind, most of the literary references in this syllabus are confined to the works of Black women writers, with the music and artwork entries remaining open to both genders. However, there are a few noted exceptions, in the form of those male writers whose works were part of what inspired me to begin this project in the first place … or


whose names were listed as the editor for a speculative fiction anthology that included too many great submissions to be excluded. From the conjure woman folktales of Charles W. Chesnutt to the Hoodoo woman grandmother in Nalo Hopkinson’s Brown Girl in the Ring, ultimately, this syllabus is less about keeping the men out and more about creating a space to honor the many beautiful, beautiful Black women contributors to the genre and our numerous AfroFuture(s). I hope you will enjoy exploring them with me.

Constance SHERESE Collier-Mercado, Writer/Artist & Founder at The CultSTATUS Arts Haven

-------------------September 22nd, 2016

"Why Black Speculation Re: Our AfroFutures Is So Much More Than Just a Fun Pastime." (1 of Infinite) Alton Sterling was murdered on July 5th of this year. Philando Castile, on the 6th. In the wake of their deaths, it took us over a week to even begin to process the oppressive weight of grief we were feeling. When we finally returned to social media - and this community – we shared with all of you our own insecurities about how we could possibly do something that would actually matter in proportion to all that was wrong in our world. We found solace in Black Womanhood. Personally, within the vision of some of our own projects and initiatives - like our HooDoula/Voo-Doula AfroFutures Festival. But, more profoundly, within the wisdom of women like Alice Walker, the founders of Black Lives Matter, Audre Lorde, and the all-birthing nebulae of the Universe. We promised we would share some of that inspiration with you all. And, today, we will. But, we're also going to share some of our trauma. Because, in the aftermath of two more Black Futures being snuffed out - Terence Crutcher and Keith Lamont Scott - finding the strength to share our vulnerability yet again has taken every ounce of willpower we have. We are exhausted. I, Constance SHERESE, am exhausted from the constant barrage of abuse. I would gladly curl into a ball of self-protection and quietly weep for all that is stolen from us on a daily basis. And, sometimes that is a necessary moment to have. And, yet. If the mission of The CultSTATUS Arts Haven is to be "a multidisciplinary cultural & creative petri-dish which ... provide[s] a safe space for the connection {and intersection} of ... critical


thinkers rooted in a desire to elevate the African Diaspora and uplift Communities of Color" then we need to BE that safe space - live and breathe that safe space for others too. It can be so much easier to vent in the relative anonymity of our homes or a private Facebook page. Opening up those feeling in a place of community is much more daunting. But, Black culture is rooted in that very 'Umoja' sense of community. It is what heals us. And that is part of why AfroFutures Festivals, and the Atlanta Black Theatre Festival, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, and even Black Twitter are so vital. They're not just a fun experience or night out. (Although we do know how to turn up when need be!) But, they are a people's way of screaming and laughing and crying and acting a damn fool and loving our way to a better tomorrow. We are revolutionary in community. So, for the indefinite future we are going to spend some time unpacking the many variations on the AfroFutures of our people as we see it. Specifically, the 13 bullet pointed Deep Future concepts we listed on our Call for Submissions to this year's inaugural AfroFutures Festival. These ideas are important to us because they speak to the best and worst - the fullness - of both the Black past AND future. First up: WELLNESS. Because we're really feeling like shit right now. ~ cS, The Founder


CONTENTS: I.

Birthing Wellness: Black Midwifery & Doula Traditions During Times of Trauma

II.

Hoodoo/Voodoo Women: Healers, Mysticism, Clairvoyance, & Tarot

III.

Black Faith: Spirituality & Religion

IV.

Nation-Birthing as Black Progress: Hagar/Ishmael vs. Sarah/Isaac ---------------

V. VI. VII. VIII.

Rape Culture, Abortion, Womanism, & Feminism Self-Determination: Liberation, Rebellion, & Mental Health Intersectionality & Allyship: Njinga Mbande to Black Lives Matter Dystopia as Diaspora: Displaced or Developing? ---------------

IX.

X.

Gender Roles/Norms: Matriarchy, Sexuality, & Black Queer Ascendancy Black Wealth as Womanhood: Suga Momma/Big Momma/Baby Momma ---------------

XI.

XII.

The Black Twitter Phenomenon: Afro-Millennial Language & Communication as Innovation Oral Tradition & Trickster Tales ---------------


XIII.

Black disABILITY Culture ---------------

XIV. XV.

Playlist Prospectus Visual & Performance Art -*-


Birthing Wellness: Black Midwifery & Doula Traditions in Times of Trauma


The New Moon’s Arms

Nalo Hopkinson

Hard Times Require Furious Dancing

Alice Walker

Being Full of Light, Insubstantial

Linda Addison

No God but Ghosts: Poems

Mai’a Williams

Revolutionary Petunias and Other Poems

Alice Walker

Birthing Justice: Black Women, Pregnancy and Childbirth

Alicia D. Bonaparte & Julia Chinyere Oparah

Radical Doula Guide: A Political Primer for Full-Spectrum Pregnancy and Childbirth Support

Miriam Zoila Perez

* International Center for Traditional Childbearing - https://ictcmidwives.org/ *

Shafia M. Monroe

*Resource Website – Not A Book*


Hoodoo/Voodoo Women: Healers, Mysticism, Clairvoyance, & Tarot


Hoodoo You Love: Poetry and Art …

Renee Stout

The Good House

Tananarive Due

Brown Girl in the Ring

Nalo Hopkinson

Redwood and Wildfire

Andrea Hairston

Long Juju Man

Nnedi Okorafor

Mojo: Conjure Stories

Nalo Hopkinson

Shadowshaper

Daniel Jose Older

Dark Matter: Reading the Bones

Sheree Thomas

Wee Winnie Witch’s Skinny

Virginia Hamilton

Devil’s Dance

Gisele Pineau

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

Maryse Conde

Saltwater Healing: A Myth Memoir and Poems

Angelique V. Nixon

Tell My Horse

Zora Neale Hurston

Pendulums and Protection

A. Bernette

The Conjure Woman

Charles Waddell Chesnutt

*http://kalungaavenue.tumblr.com/ *

Madame Omi Kongo

*http://vudutarot.tumblr.com/ *

Monroe Rodriguez Singh

*http://guerrillamamamedicine.tumblr.com/ *

Mai’a Williams

*Resource Websites – Not A Book*


Black Faith: Spirituality & Religion


Parable of the Sower

Octavia Butler

The Sanctified Church

Zora Neale Hurston

Lagoon

Nnedi Okorafor

In The Beginning: Creation Stories From Around the World

Virginia Hamilton

Parable of the Talents

Octavia Butler

Justice and Her Brothers (Justice Trilogy)

Virginia Hamilton

The Drifting of Spirits

Gisele Pineau

Moses, Man of the Mountain

Zora Neale Hurston

The Opposite House

Helen Oyeyemi

The Killing Moon (Dreamblood Series)

N. K. Jemisin

Òrìşà Devotion as World Religion: The Globalization of Yorùbá Religious Culture

Jacob K. Olupona & Terry Rey

Our Lady of Class Struggle

Terry Rey

Pataki

Obafemi Origunwa, MA


Nation-Birthing as Black Progress: Hagar/Ishmael vs. Sarah/Isaac


Dawn (Lilith’s Brood)

Octavia Butler

Tree of Life: A Novel of the Caribbean

Maryse Conde

Jonah’s Gourd Vine: A Novel

Zora Neale Hurston

The Best of All Possible Worlds

Karen Lord

Clay’s Ark (Patternist Series)

Octavia Butler

Image Credit: Constance SHERESE Collier-Mercado

© 2014


Rape Culture, Abortion, Womanism, & Feminism


Beloved

Toni Morrison

Wild Seed (Patternist Series)

Octavia Butler

Midnight Robber

Nalo Hopkinson

Womanism: The Dynamics of the Contemporary Black Female Novel in English

Chikwenye Okonjo Ogunyemi

Who Fears Death

Nnedi Okorafor

Report from Planet Midnight

Nalo Hopkinson

Sisterfire: Black Womanist Fiction & Poetry

Charlotte Watson Sherman

Spill: Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity

Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Zami: A New Spelling of My Name

Audre Lorde

In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose

Alice Walker

Deals With the Devil: And Other Reasons to Riot

Pearl Cleage

Africana Womanism: Reclaiming Ourselves

Clenora Hudson-Weems

Black Feminist Thought

Patricia Hill Collins


Self-Determination: Liberation, Rebellion, & Mental Health


The Shadowed Sun (Dreamblood Series)

N. K. Jemisin

Mind of my Mind (Patternist Series)

Octavia Butler

The Between

Tananarive Due

Binti

Nnedi Okorafor

The Chaos

Nalo Hopkinson

Consumed, Reduced to Beautiful Gray Ashes

Linda Addison

The Book of Phoenix

Nnedi Okorafor

(Prequel to “Who Fears Death”)

Monsters and Other Silent Creatures

Mai’a Williams

Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories From Social Justice Movements

Adrienne Maree Brown & Walidah Imarisha

The Story of the Cannibal Woman

Maryse Conde

Macadam Dreams

Gisele Pineau

Three Strong Women

Marie Ndiaye

Self-Portrait in Green

Marie Ndiaye

So Long A Letter

Mariama Ba

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Zora Neale Hurston

The Black Unicorn: Poems

Audre Lorde

The Color Purple

Alice Walker

Shadow Walker

L. A. Banks

Juniper’s Whitening & Victimese: Two Modern Plays

Helen Oyeyemi


Intersectionality & Allyship: Njinga Mbande to Black Lives Matter


Imago (Lilith’s Brood)

Octavia Butler

The Gathering (Justice Trilogy)

Virginia Hamilton

Survivor (Patternist Series)

Octavia Butler

A Taste of Eternity: A Novel

Gisele Pineau

All My Friends

Marie Ndiaye

Climbing PoeTree

Alixa Garcia & Naima Penniman

What Sunny Saw in the Flames/ Akata Witch

Nnedi Okorafor

Sister Outsider

Audre Lorde

Chosen

A. Bernette

On Intersectionality: The Essential Writings of Kimberle Crenshaw

Kimberle Williams Crenshaw

Crossed: The Karma Crusades

A. Bernette

* #VisionForBlackLives Policy Demands Booklet - https://policy.m4bl.org/downloads/ *

Multiple Contributors

*Resource Document – Not A Book*


Dystopia as Diaspora: Displaced or Developing?


Adulthood Rites (Lilith’s Brood)

Octavia Butler

Haiti Noir

Edwidge Danticat

The Salt Roads

Nalo Hopkinson

Mindscape

Andrea Hairston

Everfair: A Novel

Nisi Shawl

Dustland (Justice Trilogy)

Virginia Hamilton

Patternmaster (Patternist Series)

Octavia Butler

Between Two Worlds

Simone Schwarz-Bart

Kabu Kabu

Nnedi Okorafor

Dark Dreams I, II, III

Brandon Massey

Ink

Sabrina Vourvoulias

See Now Then

Jamaica Kincaid

The Temple of My Familiar

Alice Walker

A Stranger in Olondria

Sofia Samatar

Resisting Paradise: Tourism, Diaspora

Angelique V. Nixon

and Sexuality in Caribbean Culture

Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora

Sheree Thomas


Gender Roles/Norms: Matriarchy, Sexuality, & Black Queer Ascendancy


Boy, Snow, Bird

Helen Oyeyemi

The Gilda Stories

Jewelle Gomez

Ancient, Ancient

Kiini Ibura Salaam

Don’t Explain

Jewelle Gomez

When the World Wounds

Kiini Ibura Salaam

Rise of the Rain Queen

Fiona Zedde

Revolutionary Mothering:

Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Love on the Front Lines

We Can Learn to Mother Ourselves:

China Martens & Mai’a Williams

Alexis Pauline Gumbs

The Queer Survival of Black Feminism

Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power

Audre Lorde

By The Light of My Father’s Smile: A Story of Requited Love, Crossing Over and the Sexual Healing of the Soul

Alice Walker


Black Wealth as Womanhood: Suga Momma/Big Momma/Baby Momma


The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (The Inheritance Trilogy)

N. K. Jemisin

Will Do Magic for Small Change

Andrea Hairston

The Girl Who Spun Gold

Virginia Hamilton

Ladivine

Marie Ndiaye

Everyday Use

Alice Walker

The Broken Kingdoms (The Inheritance Trilogy)

N. K. Jemisin

A Raisin in the Sun

Lorraine Hansberry

Racing the Dark

Alaya Dawn Johnson

The Winged Histories

Sofia Samatar

Orleans

Sherri L. Smith

Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History

Rose Fox and Daniel Jose Older (M)

The Kingdom of Gods (The Inheritance Trilogy)

N. K. Jemisin

I Just Wanna Testify

Pearl Cleage

Longing to Tell: Black Women Talk About Sexuality and Intimacy

Tricia Rose


The Black Twitter Phenomenon: Afro-Millennial Language & Communication as Innovation

Original Image Credit: Eliot Elisofon Š 1970


Geek Wisdom: The Sacred Teachings of Nerd Culture

N. K. Jemisin, Eric San Juan, and Genevieve Valentine

What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours

Helen Oyeyemi

Love is the Drug

Alaya Dawn Johnson

Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy Culture

Ytasha L. Womack

Lonely Stardust: Two Plays, a Speech, and Eight Essays

Andrea Hairston

The Summer Prince

Alaya Dawn Johnson

The Galaxy Game

Karen Lord

Smoketown: A Novel

Tenea D. Johnson

Black Noise: Rap Music and Black Culture in Contemporary America

Tricia Rose

Black Quantum Futurism: Theory & Practice

Rasheedah Phillips


Oral Tradition & Trickster Tales


Tar Baby

Toni Morrison

Chicken in the Kitchen

Nnedi Okorafor

Oral Tradition: Selected Poems, Old & New

Jewelle Gomez

Whisper from the Cotton Tree Root

Nalo Hopkinson

Zahrah the Windseeker

Nnedi Okorafor

Filter House

Nisi Shawl

The People Could Fly

Virginia Hamilton

Her Stories

Virginia Hamilton

The All Jahdu Storybook

Virginia Hamilton

Every Tongue Got to Confess

Zora Neale Hurston

Redemption in Indigo

Karen Lord

The Icarus Girl

Helen Oyeyemi


Black disABILITY Culture


Bleeding Violet

Dia Reeves

The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth Series)

N. K. Jemisin

The Evening and the Morning and the Night

Octavia Butler

Sister Mine

Nalo Hopkinson

The Obelisk Gate (The Broken Earth Series)

N. K. Jemisin

*National Black Disability Coalition – www.BlackDisability.org *

Jane Dunhamn

Image Credit: Constance SHERESE Collier-Mercado

*Resource Website – Not A Book*

© 2015


Playlist Prospectus


Visual & Performance Art

Image Credit: Constance SHERESE Collier-Mercado

© 2015


Visual Art/Ceramics - TactileMatter.com

Kenesha Sneed

Exhibition(s) - Subjective Cosmology and The Pasts They Brought With Them

Sanford Biggers

Exhibition – The Ecstasy of St. Kara, New Work

Kara Walker

Exhibition(s) – Black White and Blend

Betye Saar

Exhibition – Chisholm’s Reverb

Rodney McMillian

Exhibition - Do I Look Like a Lady?

Mickalene Thomas

Exhibition - Afrofuturism: Black Science Fiction

Frances Bodomo, Wangechi Mutu, Akosua Adoma Owusu Adebukola Buki Bodunrin Ezra Claytan Daniels Martine Syms Saya Woolfalk

Exhibition – La Limpia Project

Wendy Phillips

Exhibition - The Freedom Principle: Experiments in Art & Music, 1965 to Now

Intergenerational Group Show

Exhibition - Brides of Anansi

Xenobia Bailey, Sonya Clark, Januwa Moja, Senga Nengudi, Nnenna Okore, Joyce J. Scott, Adejoke Tugbiyele, Saya Woolfalk

Exhibition – The Kitchen Table Series

Carrie Mae Weems

Exhibition - DO or DIE: Affect, Ritual, Resistance

Fahamu Pecou

Exhibition/Book – Tales of the Conjure Woman

Renee Stout/Fatima Mayield

Exhibition – Soundsuits

Nick Cave

Exhibition – Improvisational Gestures

Senga Nengudi


Art Series – Sacred Geometry

Renee Cox

Art Series – White Noise

Bethany Collins

Art Series – The Fair Game Project

Shanequa Gay

Art Series – Wool

Crystal Marshall

Art Series – Contraption

Fabian Williams

Art Series – Before We Blast Off

Michi Meku

Painting – Portals

Njideka Akunyili Crosby

Interpretive Dance - Their Eyes Were Watching God

Dianne McIntyre

Interpretive Dance – Post Up Series

T. Lang Dance

Noteworthy Names Grace Kisa Yinka Shonibare Shinique Smith Dawn Boyd Williams Kimberly Drew Selana Allen Marcella Muhammad Moor Mother Goddess Julie Mehretu Juliana Huxtable Bazaar Noir - Atlanta


Profile for The CultSTATUS Arts Haven

Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula: An AfroFutures Syllabus  

Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula speculates re: Black Women and Girls as the nebulae for Black Progress. It imagines altering timelines of reality: WE a...

Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula: An AfroFutures Syllabus  

Hoo-Doula/Voo-Doula speculates re: Black Women and Girls as the nebulae for Black Progress. It imagines altering timelines of reality: WE a...