THE CHANGER - Social Startup Guide 2015

Page 1

SOCIAL STARTUP GUIDE 20 15 PRESENTED IN COLLABORATION WITH

1


INTRO HOW DO I START MY OWN SOCIAL PROJECT OR BUSINESS? WHO’S WHO IN GERMANY’S SOCIAL STARTUP SECTOR? HOW DO I GET FUNDING FOR MY SOCIAL BUSINESS? IS CROWDFUNDING RIGHT FOR ME? WHAT ABOUT MARKETING ON A LOW BUDGET?

YOU’LL FIND THE ANSWERS TO THESE QUESTIONS, AND MORE, IN THE SOCIAL STARTUP GUIDE 2015. WE’VE ASSEMBLED OUR FAVORITE ARTICLES FROM THECHANGER.ORG INTO ONE ULTIMATE GUIDE. IN THIS GUIDE, YOU’LL MEET SOME OF GERMANY’S MOST EXCITING SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS AND FIND EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO GET YOUR OWN SOCIAL STARTUP OFF THE GROUND. CHANGE IT UP! –

THE CHANGER www.thechanger.org

THIS GUIDE WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY TENGELMANN SOCIAL VENTURES. TENGELMANN SOCIAL VENTURES IS A SOCIAL IMPACT INVESTOR THAT FOCUSE S ON FUNDING SOCIAL BUSINESSES AND SUPPORTING SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS. THEIR APPROACH, “SOCIAL IMPACT FIRST – FINANCIAL IMPACT SECOND”.

Copyright 2015 | The Changer

Design | ohboy-design.com


CONTENTS O4

PITCHING & FUNDRAISING GUIDE

08

INTERVIEW MIT ANNE-SOPHIE PAHL VON YOUVO

12

SOCIAL BUSINESS IN DEUTSCHLAND

16

TAKING A DEEP DIVE INTO YOUR CUSTOMERS’ LIVES

18

INTERVIEW WITH STEFAN WILHELM FROM DISCOVERING HANDS

22

INTERVIEW WITH LISA JASPERS OF FOLKDAYS

24

HOW TO GET FUNDING

28

FOUNDING A VEREIN

32

DIE GRÜNDUNG EINER GBR

34

HOT SEAT MIT FRANZISKA SCHAEFERMEYER

36

THE TRUTH ABOUT IMPACT INVESTING, FROM THE EXPERTS

40

10 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW B EFORE YOU START CROWDFUNDING

42

INTERVIEW MIT WALDEMAR ZEILER FROM EINHORN

44

EIN HAMBURGER KLEINUNTERNEHMER MIT GEWISSEN

46

NETWORKING FOR DUMMIES – WHY TO DO IT AND HOW TO DO IT

48

MARKETING ON A LOW BUDGET

52

INTERVIEW WITH ANNAMARIA OLSSON FROM GIVE SOMETHING BACK TO BERLIN

56

FÜNF STUDIENGÄNGE FÜR SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS IN DEUTSCHLAND

60

EIN BUSINESS, DAS ERST DANN ERFOLGREICH IST,

WENN WENIGER GEKAUFT WIRD

64

INTERVIEW MIT CHRISTINA VELDHOEN, STAR SOZIALUNTERNEHMERIN

66

5 PITCHING TIPPS FÜR SOZIALUNTERNEHMER, FUNDRAISER UND CAMPAIGNER

68

ONE YEAR AS A SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR – DO’S AND DON’TS

3


PITCHING AND FUNDRAISING GUIDE

PITCHING & F UNDR AISING GUIDE

IT SEEMS TO BE THE SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR’S LAMENT; THE OFFICIAL ANTHEM SUNG FAR AND WIDE – I NEED MONEY. TALK TO PRETTY MUCH ANY YOUNG SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR AND AT SOME POINT YOU’LL LAND ON THE SUBJECT OF FUNDING. SPECIFICALLY, HOW DO I GET FUNDING? It seems to be the social entrepreneur’s lament; the official anthem sung far and wide – I need money. Talk to pretty much any young social entrepreneur and at some point you’ll land on the subject of funding. Specifically, how do I get funding? Unfortunately there’s no easy answer to that question. But don’t stop reading! There are in fact very concrete ways you can improve your chances of identifying potential funding sources and securing that cash. A few weeks back, we were one of the lucky teams selected to participate in IT4Change, a program organized by PEP and Ashoka, that helps young social entrepreneurs realize their social impact. There we had the pleasure of hearing experts talk on everything from funding to PR and communications to visual storytelling. This article derives from one those workshops, originally presented by Ryan Little from the BMW Foundation Herbert Quandt. Ryan Little is a successful social entrepreneur himself, having founded two social businesses, CanadaHelps. org and StormFisher. He currently works as a project manager at the BMW Foundation (aka, he sees A LOT of pitches). In this article, you’ll learn how to tell your story and build relationships with funders to make your project a success. The first section will focus on fine-tuning your story and preparing your pitch. The second half will focus on how to identify funds and approach funders.


PART I – STORYTELLING AND PITCHING TELL A STORY Once upon a time… Everybody likes to hear a story – it’s a fun way to communicate information and (hopefully) there’s something more emotional that resonates with those hearing the story. Potential funders are no different. (They are in fact people – don’t forget this.) Done well, your story tells where you came from and where you want to go. It communicates your message, values and even your company strategy. Know your audience and tell your story in a way that speaks to them. The bottom line should always stay the same, but how you get there, or what you choose to emphasize, may change based on your audience. Tell the version of the story that interests them. “You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be very different.” – Emma Coats, Pixar Storyboard Artist

FIND AN ANGLE

where you’re going, even if it’s not where you actually are right now. Especially in the case of social projects and businesses, you many not have reach your desirable social impact yet, but you want to be clear on what you social impact will be. Convey why what you’re doing is important and why it’s relevant. Before going in, apply the ‘Grandmother Test’. Are you explaining your initiative in a way that your grandmother would understand it? If not, go back to the drawing board and rework it until you’ve passed the test. Give an example of a challenge you faced and how you overcame it. Your funders need to trust you. A lot of people like the idea of being an entrepreneur, you need to prove you really are one. Show examples of win-win cases – everyone wants to be a winner and everyone likes a feel good story Take out the tech. Seriously, most of the time you’ll just confuse people. If people want to know the details of how it works, they’ll ask.

“HOW DO I GET FUNDING?”

Even if you’re selling fair-trade paper clips, you need to find an angle that grabs people’s attention. Look beyond the surface and see where there might be an emotional connection for your users or funders. Once you’ve found it, start to build your angle around it. And don’t be afraid to show a bit of personality here.

MAKE IT HANG TOGETHER

A good pitch needs to follow a logical narrative. (Remember, it’s all part of the story.) The structure below should help you present information in a clear narrative. In fact, this can be excellent “homework” for anyone who wants to hone their message. With your own social business or project in mind, try filling in each section and viola, you’ll see your story come to life.

MAKE IT INTERESTING, APPEALING AND UNDERSTANDABLE

Background/Current Situation – set the scene, what is the status quo? How did we get there?

Remember, yours is not the first funding application people have seen – in fact, your potential funder probably looks at hundreds, if not thousands, of funding applications every year. Not to mention they also hear hundreds of pitches ever year. What does that mean? You’ve got to keep it interesting!! And that means grabbing their attention from the start. When pitching, here are some tips to keep in mind:

Trends, regulatory changes, changes in preferences/ awareness – what structured, attitudes, etc are changing now that are creating opportunities and support for what you are doing? (Tip: even better if you can prove it – use a quote from a reputable newspaper or magazine – that way people know it’s an issue that more people care about.

Go for the wow factor. Tell them something they don’t know and wouldn’t expect. Show your passion for the cause. If you don’t believe in it, why should they? Be clear on what your vision is, even if it’s not explicit in the pitch. You want to communicate

The “pain” – what is not working and needs to change? Your solution – What is the vision? How do you solve the pain/problem above?

5


PART II – FINDING FUNDING AND RELATIONSHIP BUILDING KNOW THE DIFFERENCE First things first, know what type of funding you’re looking for. Also keep in mind what sort of funding you’re even able to apply for – i.e. does your legal status allow you to collect donations? Here’s a quick rundown of the funding types and their general characteristics: Sponsorship Business relationship with benefits for both sides Marketing budget Donation Pure charity, tax- deductible CSR or foundation budget Investment Some type of return on investment (ROI), whether it be financial or impact related. To learn more about impact investing, check out this article. Crowdfunding $87,000 is raised through crowdfunding every hour. DING DING DING! But slow down, before you go running off to film your campaign video – do your research. It’s not as easy as it sounds and in fact, there’s LOTS of competition fighting over relatively little funding. To find out everything you know before you start crowdfunding – go here.

“KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE AND TELL YOUR STORY IN A WAY THAT SPEAKS TO THEM.”

General tip: The obvious funding sources will be the places that get the most requests. Think beyond national governments, EU funding and the like and cast your net a little wider.

FIND THE RIGHT FIT

RESOUR CES

Now that you’re sure what kind of funding you want, take it step a further. Start by assembling and maintaining a list of potential sources of funding. It doesn’t need to be fancy – a simple excel will do. Once you’ve gathered potential sources, check that your project is actually a good fit for each specific funding source. Look if they support projects like yours in terms of: Area of Interest, Geography, Grant Size, Organization Type, and project Stage. If you don’t fit – move on. There’s no point in applying for funding that you’re clearly not

eligible for. Do your research, and save everyone a lot of extra time and work. Look where else the donor is giving and for what sort of projects – ask yourself, do you see yourself fitting into their portfolio? If not, it might be a hard sell. How to do this? Look at the foundation and corporations annual reports to see how much money is being given and to whom. (This info can usually be found online with a little Googling.) Look at the language and tone used by both the donor AND the recipient organization and try to emulate it. You want to present yourself in a way that’s aligned to their mission and message. Use the “Good Neighbor” Ask yourself, can you make a case for how your project can complement one of the ones already being funded? Can you argue that together, you could really maximize impact?

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS Even though it might seem like you’re dealing with institutions (governments, corporations, foundations); remember, behind them is a person! So when there’s the option – make contact IN PERSON. If that doesn’t work, try the phone. And only then, when there’s no other option, use email. In our digital day in age, there’s still something to be said for face-to-face conversations, especially when you’re discussing sticky subjects like money and funding. Invest in and cultivate relationships with your potential funders – even if they pass this time around, they may support your next project. PLUS don’t just see $$$ when looking at them, they’re also valuable mentors, sparring partners and can provide other interesting contacts for you. To meet people, find out about what events are happening and stop by from time to time. (And if you need to polish up on your networking skills – go to page 46.)

THINK LIKE YOUR FUNDERS Your funders are investors, no matter how they measure return or what they hope to get out of it. They need to feel confident that their money is going to be spent in the right way. According to the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Claufield & Byers, there are four filters of risk assessment: Technology Risk Can it be built? How hard is it to build it? Can someone else easily build it once you’ve done the heavy lifting? (Not necessarily a bad thing.) Market Risk: Who else is doing it? How are you doing it differently? Does it meet a real need?


Will anyone use it? (A good way to find out is to apply the “Sidewalk Test”. Stop 20 random strangers on the street and explain them your idea in 30 seconds or less. If they understand it and would be willing to pay for it, you’ve got yourself a market.)

“ASKING FOR TOO LITTLE IS AS BAD AS ASKING FOR TOO MUCH.” 7

People Risk: How good is the team Is it the right team? (aka – diversify!) Financial Risk: What is the capital intensity? Is the ask enough/too much? Will follow-up funding be needed? Ask yourself these questions before sending off any funding applications or meeting any funders. Know your strengths and weaknesses, do you research and don’t let yourself be caught off guard.

FOCUS ON THE FINANCES Now that you’ve put the legwork, fine-tuned your story, identified funding sources and started building relationships, now comes the moment you’ve been preparing for. The ask. Getting the ask right is one of the main filters for funders, so make sure you’re asking for the right amount. Asking for too little is as bad as asking for too much.

Other tips: Be prepared to discuss who else you are seeking funds from. Expect that funders will talk to each other about your project, it’s a small (social finance) world and people are well-connected. That said, make sure your story is consistent. Pay attention to the restrictions – do you meet the requirements? Show how the funds will be used. Transparency is king. Pay attention to the project trap – many donors do not want to fund overhead costs (i.e. staff costs, rent, IT, etc.). They want to fund the PROJECT. Therefore make sure you’re selling the vision and the impact – not just the nitty-gritty. A good balance is to delegate 15-20% of the ask to overhead costs and with the remaining rest going into the project.

THE FOLLOW-UP You got lucky and hit gold? Awesome! Now make sure you know your reporting requirements and timelines, you don’t want to miss a deadline and risk losing that hardearned cash. Follow up and of course, say thank you!


INTERVIEW MIT ANNE-SOPHIE PAHL VON YOUVO IN UNSERER INTERVIEWSERIE SPRACHEN WIR MIT ANNE-SOPHIE PAHL VON YOUVO. YOUVO IST EINE ENGAGEMENTPLATTFORM FÜR JUNGE KREATIVE. HIER WERDEN KREATIVE KÖPFE MIT GEMEINNÜTZIGEN ORGANISATIONEN, DIE UNTERSTÜTZUNG BEI IHRER ÖFFENTLICHKEITSARBEIT BENÖTIGEN, ZUSAMMENGEBRACHT.

INTERVIEW: ANNE-SOPHIE PAH L

ERZÄHLT UNS EIN BISSCHEN VON YOUVO. WAS WAR DIE MOTIVATION DAHINTER EINE SOLCHE PLATTFORM ZU STARTEN? Die Idee für youvo entstand, nachdem Sebastian und Simon aus unserem Team während ihres Freiwilligendienstes in den USA ein Video und andere Fundraisingmaterialien für das Communitycenter erstellt hatten, in dem sie arbeiteten. Als Sebastian sein Studium in Berlin begann, wollte er sich gern wieder mit seinen Fähigkeiten engagieren, fand aber keine wirklich passenden Angebote. Durch ein Praxisprojekt an der Universität der Künste eröffnete sich die Möglichkeit für ihn und seine fünf KommilitonInnen, herauszufinden, ob es noch mehr jungen Menschen aus kreativen Studiengängen so ging – und siehe da: viele wollten sich mit ihren Fähigkeiten für einen guten Zweck einbringen, schreckten aber vor langfristigen Verpflichtungen, wie beispielsweise eine Mitgliedschaft in einem Verein, zurück. Als dann die Zusage vom EU Programm „Jugend in Aktion“ (Youth in Action) im Briefkasten lag, war klar, dass das Konzept, das an der Uni entstanden war, auch in die Tat umgesetzt werden würde.

P ho t o c re di t : S e bas t i an Sc hütz

WELCHES FEEDBACK HABT IHR VON NPOS ERHALTEN? Ich bin bei youvo.org für die Vermittlung verantwortlich und habe so täglich vor allem mit den Organisationen – die bei uns klassische Nonprofits aber auch Social Startups in der Gründungsphase sind – zu tun. Am Anfang wurden wir da fast überrannt und mussten erst testen, welche Art von Projekten sich unsere Community wünscht. Die Organisationen, die ihre Projekte über youvo.org ausschreiben, sind meist begeistert von den großartigen, motivierten jungen Menschen,


die sich auf die Projekte bewerben. Sie erkennen die tolle Wirkung, die professionelle Kommunikation für ihre Arbeit hat und fühlen sich durch den frischen Input oft bestärkt in ihrem eigenen Engagement. Wenn sie dann im nächsten Antrag die Möglichkeit haben, Designarbeit zu budgetieren, haben wir unser Ziel erreicht. WIE STEHT ES UM DIE KREATIVEN? ES GAB DISKUSSIONEN, OB EINE PLATTFORM WIE YOUVO BEZAHLTEN MÖGLICHKEITEN IN DIE QUERE KOMMT. WIE SIEHST DU DAS? Unsere Community hat uns von Anfang an überwältigt. Täglich melden sich neue Kreative auf youvo. org an und erstellen ein Profil – manchmal blättere ich da durch die Portfolios und bin einfach hin und weg.Was die Konkurrenz zu bezahlten Jobs angeht,haben wir ziemlich „strenge“ Regeln für Projekte, die über youvo veröffentlicht werden. Wir wollen unserer Community gern eine „Blase“ außerhalb von Marktzwängen und Wettbewerb bieten – ihre Arbeit wird oft genug viel zu gering geschätzt. Das heißt, dass niemand für die Schublade arbeiten soll, sondern alle Arbeiten auch in den Organisationen verwendet werden. Wir wollen gern sicherstellen, dass niemand ausgenutzt wird und die geleistete Arbeit immer gebührend wertgeschätzt wird. Auch ist uns wichtig, dass nur Aufgaben ausgeschrieben werden, die ohne ein Angebot wie youvo nicht umgesetzt werden könnten. Wir stellen sicher, dass youvo nicht als eine „kostenlose Alternative“ angesehen werden kann. Bei unseren Projekten geht es wirklich darum, Kommunikation dort zu ermöglichen, wo sonst die Mittel dazu fehlen.

IN JEDEM SEKTOR GIBT ES AUFS UND ABS WAS WAR BIS JETZT DEIN PERSÖNLICH GRÖSSTER ERFOLG? GAB ES AUCH RÜCKSCHLÄGE? Ich erlebe eigentlich fast jede Woche persönliche Erfolge – wenn ich begeistertes Feedback von den Organisationen bekomme á la „unsere Designerin ist ein Engel“ ;), wenn ich die tollen Ergebnisse zu sehen bekomme oder ab und zu sogar ein entstandener Flyer bei uns im Briefkasten landet. Auch das Feedback der kreativen Community wie z.B. von Max motiviert mich immer wieder – wenn mir jemand erzählt, wie er sich bei youvo das erste Mal ehrenamtlich engagiert hat, weiß ich, warum wir das alles machen. Mein größter persönlicher Erfolg war aber wohl, als ich eine kurzfristige Anfrage von einer Designerin aus unserer Community bekommen habe, die sich ein Projekt in Uganda wünschte, das sie unterstützen kann: Nach ein paar Mails rief mich einen Tag später Anna Vikky von 2aid. org an und erzählte, dass sie miteinander geskypt haben und sich auf die Zusammenarbeit freuen. Mein Wunsch, für jede und jeden das Traumprojekt zu finden, ist da wunderbar in Erfüllung gegangen und hier kann man sich schon einen ersten Teil der Zusammenarbeit anschauen. Natürlich gibt es auch Rückschläge bei einem so schnell wachsenden, rein ehrenamtlichen Projekt wie youvo: Wir haben uns lang um eine institutionelle finanzielle Förderung bemüht, um noch mehr Projekte ausschreiben und nachhaltiger wachsen zu können, aber als sogenannte „Intermediäre“ gibt es da leider nicht so viele Möglichkeiten.

„DER GRUNDGEDANKE VON YOUVO IST ES, MENSCHEN WEGE AUFZUZEIGEN, SICH MIT IHREN FÄHIGKEITEN FÜR SOZIALE UND GESELLSCHAFTSPOLITISCHE ANLIEGEN EINZUSETZEN UND SO SELBST ZUM „CHANGER“ ZU WERDEN.”

9


P ho to c r e d it: Se b a stian S ch ü tz

INTERVIEW: ANNE-SOPHIE PAH L

„EINS DER WICHTIGSTEN LEARNINGS BEI YOUVO WAR DIE ERKENNTNIS, DASS DAS TEAM ALLES IST. NUR MIT EINEM GUTEN TEAM, IN DEM JEDER SEINE AUFGABE KENNT UND DIE ZUSAMMENARBEIT SPASS MACHT, KANN MAN LANGFRISTIG EIN GRÖSSERES PROJEKT STEMMEN.” WIE FINANZIERT IHR EUCH? Ich studiere momentan noch und beziehe BaföG – heißt, der liebe Staat finanziert youvo irgendwie doch ;) Aber auch unsere Eltern sind da momentan eine große Unterstützung, weil youvo die Zeit eines sehr umfangreichen Nebenjobs frisst, ohne die Miete zu bezahlen… Wir arbeiten allerdings mit Hochdruck daran, dass sich das schnellstmöglich ändert. youvo finanziert sich bisher aus kleineren Fördergeldern, mit denen wir unsere Webdesignerin oder den Programmierer bezahlen – momentan haben wir ein Stipendium von Think Big #Pro, das uns ermöglicht, im Social Impact Lab in Berlin und Leipzig zu arbeiten.


WAS SIND DIE NÄCHSTEN SCHRITTE FOR YOUVO? Wie schon erwähnt, ist das liebe Geld ein immer wiederkehrendes Thema und wir erarbeiten gerade langfristige Finanzierungsstrategien. Um die größer werdenden Aufgaben bei youvo stemmen zu können, vergrößern wir gerade unser Team. Es ist ein sehr cooles Gefühl, die Begeisterung für ein Projekt mit neuen Menschen zu teilen. Von 10. bis 12. April findet unser erster großer Workshop in Paretz statt: Creative Spring, mit dessen Vorbereitung wir gerade alle Hände voll zu tun haben. Ansonsten kommt Mitte April unser erster Relaunch, mit dem unsere Plattform sehr viel offener und transparenter wird. Darauf freuen wir uns schon sehr!

„MEINER MEINUNG NACH IST ES ESSENTIELL, DASS DIE SOZIALE WIRKUNG – DER SOG. „SOCIAL IMPACT“ – NICHT HINTER FINANZIELLEN INTERESSEN VERSCHWINDET.”

WAS IST EIN ERFOLGREICHES SOCIAL BUSINESS FÜR DICH? Das ist gar nicht so einfach zu sagen. Ich habe durch youvo mittlerweile schon einige Social Startups kennengelernt und finde es großartig, dass Wirtschaft endlich auch außerhalb der „Berlin-Blase“ neu gedacht wird. Meiner Meinung nach ist es essentiell, dass die soziale Wirkung – der sog. „social impact“ – nicht hinter finanziellen Interessen verschwindet. Das passiert leider nicht selten, vor allem wenn aus kleinen ehrenamtlichen Projekten Unternehmen mit wirtschaftlichen Zwängen werden. Es wäre toll, wenn es in diesem Feld auch in der Öffentlichkeit größere Unterstützung gäbe. Ich finde Euer Engagement in diese Richtung super und dringend notwendig! BITTE TEILE DIE 3 TOP LEARNINGS MIT UNS – WAS WÜRDEST DU ANDEREN SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS EMPFEHLEN, WOVON ABRATEN? Eins der wichtigsten Learnings bei youvo war die Erkenntnis, dass das Team alles ist. Nur mit einem guten Team, in dem jeder seine Aufgabe kennt und die Zusammenarbeit Spaß macht, kann man langfristig ein größeres Projekt stemmen. Da wir dezentral arbeiten, geben wir uns Mühe, dass regelmäßig alle zusammenkommen und nehmen uns dann auch Zeit für gemeinsame Freizeitaktivitäten. Wir sind auch über youvo hinaus gut befreundet und mussten erst lernen, dass

es wichtig ist, auch mal nicht darüber zu reden, wenn wir uns sehen. ;) Ein weiterer wichtiger Punkt ist die Zielgruppenorientierung – wir haben von Anfang an unsere Community in die Entwicklung von youvo miteinbezogen – Was wünscht sie sich, was motiviert sie und was soll eine Plattform wie youvo.org bieten? Dafür ist es entscheidend, auch persönliche Gespräche zu führen – auch wenn das trocken klingt: quantitative und qualitative Forschung sind für eine Idee meiner Meinung nach der wichtigste Schritt auf dem Weg zum Erfolg. Das dritte Learning, das ich Social Entrepreneurs mit auf den Weg geben möchte, ist die Relevanz von Wissenstransfer. youvo wäre nicht so toll, wenn uns nicht zahlreiche Menschen beraten, Feedback zu unseren Ideen gegeben und uns unterstützt hätten. Konkurrenzgedanken sind in diesem Bereich völlig fehl am Platz. Jemand hatte die selbe Idee wie Du? Sprich mit ihm und vielleicht könnt Ihr gemeinsam viel besser Eure Ziele erreichen! WAS MACHT DICH ZUM CHANGER? Der Grundgedanke von youvo ist es, Menschen Wege aufzuzeigen, sich mit ihren Fähigkeiten für soziale und gesellschaftspolitische Anliegen einzusetzen und so selbst zum „Changer“ zu werden. Meine Aufgabe besteht darin, das niedrigschwellig zu ermöglichen und Menschen zusammenzubringen, die gemeinsam Großartiges erreichen können. Die Welt verändern – step by step. Oder wie unser beliebter Flyer sagt: I want to change the world! But I’m only good at Photoshop…

11


SOCIAL BUSINESS IN DEUTSCHLAND „SOCIAL BUSINESS IN DEUTSCHLAND IST DOCH EIGENTLICH NICHTS NEUES” „SOCIAL BUSINESS IN DEUTSCHLAND IST NOCH NICHT SOWEIT WIE IN ANDEREN LÄNDERN”

SOC IAL B USI NESS IN DEUTSCHLAND

SPRICH MIT DREI MENSCHEN IM GEMEINNÜTZIGEN SEKTOR, BEI DEN WOHLFAHRTSVERBÄNDEN ODER IN DER POLITIK UND DU WIRST GARANTIERT DREI GANZ UNTERSCHIEDLICHE ANSICHTEN ZU SOCIAL BUSINESS IN DEUTSCHLAND BEKOMMEN. SOCIAL BUSINESS HAT EINEN SCHWIERIGEN STANDPUNKT IN DEUTSCHLAND. Auf der einen Seite ist man stolz, dass es einen super funktionierenden Sozialstaat gibt, bestehend aus sechs riesigen Wohlfahrtsverbänden (die größte Organisation Caritas beschäftigt über 600,000 Menschen in Deutschland – viel mehr als jede Firma in der Privatwirtschaft), die im Auftrag der Regierung ein flächendeckendes Versorgungungssystem mit Kitas, Pflegeheimen, Inklusionsprojekten uvm. für die ganze Gesellschaft bereitstellen. Im Grunde sind diese Organisationen erfolgreiche Sozialunternehmen: sie leisten einen Service und werden dafür bezahlt. Jedoch agieren sie in einem nur halb-freien Markt und bekommen eine Finanzierung von der Regierung, die nur entfernt Leistungsorientiert ist. Also keine übliche Situation für ein Social Business, das auf dem freien Markt mit “normalen” Unternehmen agiert. Auf der anderen Seite gibt es definitiv weniger markttreue Social Businesses in Deutschland als in anderen westlichen Länder (z.B. USA und UK). Das liegt sicherlich daran, dass hier der Sozialstaat vieles übernimmt von dem, was in USA (und mittlerweile auch UK) nun von Sozialunternehmen geleistet werden muss. Es führt aber auch dahin, dass das soziale Innovationspotenzial in Deutschland etwas unterdrückt wird. Durch die bisherige Dominanz der Wohlfahrtsverbände gibt es auch noch keine Infrastruktur für große Risiko Investitionen. Darüber hinaus ist die Deutsche Start-up Welt und die Politik darum herum in Deutschland immer noch vorwiegend Profit-getrieben. D.h. schlaue Menschen mit einem Sinn für Business gründen vorwiegend profit-orientierte Unternehmen. In den USA haben große klassische Start-Up Inkubatoren wie Y-Combinator einen Platz für Sozialunternehmen… Solche Möglichkeiten bedeuten, dass Sozialunternehmen schnell skalieren können. Social Businesses in Deutschland müssen dagegen von vornherein ums Leben kämpfen.

SOCIAL BUSINESS IN DEUTSCHLAND: DIE WICHTIGSTEN AKTEURE Trotz allen Hürden gibt es auch in Deutschland viele Akteure (mittlerweile kommen auch die Wohlfahrtsverbände ins Rollen), die eine solche Infrastruktur für Social Business in Deutschland aufbauen. Wir haben für Dich die wichtigsten Akteure zusammengefasst.


ASHOKA Ashoka ist die erste und weltweit führende Organisation zur Förderung von Social Entrepreneurs. Die non-profit-Organisation wurde im Jahr 1980 von Bill Drayton in den USA gegründet und ist heute in über 70 Ländern aktiv. In Deutschland gibt es Ashoka als gemeinnützige GmbH seit 2003, als Ashoka nach mehr als 20jähriger Tätigkeit in Entwicklungs-, Schwellen- und Transformationsländern beschloss, auch in Westeuropa tätig zu werden. Ashoka Fellows sind weltweit das Herzstück unseres Netzwerks. Fast 3.000 Ashoka Fellows in über 80 Ländern sind aktiv, um unsere Gesellschaft zum Positiven zu verändern und auf ihrem Weg viele Menschen zu inspirieren selbst aktiv zu werden. Der erste deutsche Fellow wurde 2005 in das Netzwerk aufgenommen. Heute wirken in Deutschland bereits 51 Fellows in ganz verschiedenen Bereichen. Sie ermöglichen Langzeitarbeitslosen Existenzgründungen, stärken die Sozialkompetenzen von Kindern, Wirken dem Höfesterben entgegen, bringen Transparenz in die Demokratie und vieles mehr. Darüber hinaus haben sie ein Programm für junge Sozialunternehmer namens PEP. Das Programm Engagement mit Perspektive (PEP) richtet sich an Ehrenamtliche zwischen 16 und 27 Jahren, die für ihre vielversprechenden Projekte nachhaltige und wirkungsvolle Strukturen schaffen wollen.

„TROTZ ALLEN HÜRDEN GIBT ES AUCH IN DEUTSCHLAND VIELE AKTEURE (MITTLERWEILE KOMMEN AUCH DIE WOHLFAHRTSVERBÄNDE INS ROLLEN), DIE EINE SOLCHE INFRASTRUKTUR FÜR SOCIAL BUSINESS IN DEUTSCHLAND AUFBAUEN.”

13


SOCIAL IMPACT Social Impact ist eine Beratung und Inkubator für Sozialunternehmen in Deutschland. Viele der bekanntesten Sozialunternehmen Deutschlands saßen irgendwann mal in ihren Räumlichkeiten. Durch das Inkubator-Programm bekommt man zwar keine direkte Finanzierung aber dafür ein tolles Netzwerk, Zugang zu viel Erfahrung und Wissen, und Büroräume über 8 Monate. Es gibt aktuell Inkubatoren in Berlin, Leipzig, Hamburg, Frankfurt und Munich.

BONVENTURE BonVenture finanziert Sozialunternehmen im deutschsprachigen Raum mit sozialem Risikokapital. BonVenture ist selbst als Social Business strukturiert und beachtet bei allen Investitionen auch soziale und finanzielle Renditeaspekte. Im deutschsprachigen Raum hat BonVenture als erste Beteiligungsgesellschaft diesen Ansatz aufgegriffen und bietet seit 2003 Investoren die Möglichkeit, solche Unternehmungen zu unterstützen. Sie stärken auch neben Kapital mit

„EIN SOZIALES UND NACHHALTIGES UNTERNEHMEN GRÜNDEN UND DIE GEWINNE DIESES UNTERNEHMENS ZUR HÄLFTE ZU REINVESTIEREN – DAS VERSPRECHEN DIE UNTERZEICHNER DES ENTREPRENEUR’S PLEDGE.” Know-how und Kontakten, geben Orientierungshilfe beim Aufbau und Wachstum ihrer Organisation und befördern so die Entwicklung und Verbreitung innovativer Ideen. Investitionen ab ca. 300.000 EUR.

SOCIAL VENTURE FUND

SOC IAL B USI NESS IN DEUTSCHLAND

Der Social Venture Fund investiert in Sozialunternehmen, die innovative Antworten auf drängende soziale oder ökologische Fragen liefern. Das Ziel des Social Venture Fund: Investiertes Kapital zurück zu erhalten und für erneute Investitionen wieder verwendbar zu machen. So wird nur die Kraft des Kapitals, nicht jedoch das Kapital selbst für eine positive Veränderung eingesetzt. Die Ananda Ventures GmbH ist Initiatorin des ersten international investierenden Social Venture Capital Fonds in Deutschland. Sie wurde 2010 als Sozialunternehmen gegründet. Ziel der Gesellschaft ist es, mit unternehmerischer Energie und einem erfolgsorientierten Investmentansatz positiven gesellschaftlichen Wandel zu ermöglichen.

TENGELMANN SOCIAL VENTURES Tengelmann Social Ventures GmbH ist ein Social Impact Investor, der sich auf die Finanzierung von Social Businesses und auf die Unterstützung von Social Entrepreneurs fokussiert. Der Fokus ist auf Internet Startups und e-commerce und einige deren aktuellen Unternehmen sind Dot.Hiv und Coffee Circle.


VODAFONE STIFTUNG Die Förderschwerpunkte von der Vodafone Stiftung sind Bildungsprojekte und Sozialunternehmertum. Sie sind sehr wichtig in der Skalierung von Projekten wie Rock Your Life gewesen und unterstützen aktuell die Quinoa-Schule. Die Quinoa-Schule soll sozial benachteiligten Jugendlichen mehr Chancengerechtigkeit durch eine Aussicht auf Ausbildung und Bildungsaufstieg bieten. Ihre Sekundarschule hat im August 2014 in Berlin-Wedding eröffnet, wo aktuell ca. 68% der Jugendlichen in Hartz IV-Haushalten leben. 85% der Schülerinnen und Schüler einer 10. Klasse haben nach ihrem Abschluss keine berufliche Perspektive.

BERTELSMANN STIFTUNG Bertelsmann ist vor allem eine operative Stiftung, die aber riesig ist und sehr einflussreich. Sie machen viel Lobby und Advocacy im Bereich des Sozialunternehmertums und auch Impact Investing.

BMW STIFTUNG Die BMW Stiftung Herbert Quandt ist ebenfalls vor allem operativ tätig aber nimmt eine Schlüsselrolle ein im Bereich Social Business und Impact Investing. Ryan Little, selbst Sozialunternehmer, ist der wichtigste Ansprechpartner in diesem Bereich.

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AKADEMIE Die Social Entrepreneurship Akademie ist ein interdisziplinäres Projekt, welches eine Zusammenarbeit von allen Münchern Universitäten darstellt. Sie wollen Student/innen aus allen Bereichen – von Ingenieuren bis hin zu Ärzten und BWL-er – für das Thema Sozialunternehmertum sensibilisieren und begeistern. Sie bieten Seminare und Kurse wie das ZGI:Kompakt http://www. seakademie.de/bildung/qualifizierungsangebote.aspx

IMPACT HUB Impact Hub ist ein globales Netzwerk von co-working Spaces für Sozialunternehmer/innen und Freiberufler/innen mit einem sozialen Mehrwert. Aktuell gibt es ein Impact Hub in Berlin und in München. Die Mitgliedschaft fängt bei 20 EUR im Monat an. Spannende Veranstaltungen und eine sehr positive Energie sind einige der vielen Vorteile einer solchen Mitgliedschaft.

ENTREPRENEURS PLEDGE Ein soziales und nachhaltiges Unternehmen gründen und die Gewinne dieses Unternehmens zur Hälfte zu reinvestieren – das versprechen die Unterzeichner des Entrepreneur’s Pledge. Das Projekt wurde von Waldemar Zeiler und Philip Siefer in Berlin gestartet. Es soll mehr Aufmerksamkeit für soziale Aspekte und Fairness im Business erzeugen – aber auch skalierbare Unternehmen hervorbringen. Die Liste der bislang knapp 50 Unterzeichner enthält bekannte Gesichter. Die Mymuesli-Gründer Hubertus Bessau und Max Wittrock haben unterzeichnet, auch I-Potentials-Frontfrau Constanze Buchheim, die Helpling-Macher Benedikt Franke und Philip Huffmann, Lebenslauf.com-Gründer Thomas Bachem oder TeamEurope-Partner Kolja Hebenstreit.

15


TAKING A DEEP DIVE INTO YOUR CUSTOMER’S LIVES – HOW TO CONDUCT MARKET RESEARCH NICOLAS GUNKEL IS A RESEARCH CONSULTANT AND HAS CONDUCTED OPERATIONAL AND ETHNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH ON MHEALTH (MOBILE HEALTH) INITIATIVES THAT SUPPORT NUTRITION INTERV ENTIONS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. HE IS CURRENTLY BASED IN GERMANY. THESE LESSONS ON HOW TO CONDUCT MARKET RESEARCH WILL HELP YOU BE CERTAIN THAT YOUR SOCIAL BUSINESS PRODUCT HAS THE DESIRED IMPACT AND MAKES A REAL DIFFERENCE.

SOC IAL B USI NESS IN DEUTSCHLAND

Crawling backwards out of the minibus, I looked into the twelve puzzled faces of my fellow passengers. We had sat cramped together, along with three cackling hens, two toddlers and baskets full of market produce, during this journey from Malawi’s capital, Lilongwe to the rural outskirts of the city. Judging from the expression on their faces, they had rarely seen a foreigner who forwent taxi rides and then had to regularly disentangle his too long legs to prevent them from falling asleep. Working on a BOP (Bottom of the Pyramid) market research project for an Irish/Malawian social venture dedicated to eradicate malnutrition, my Malawian research assistant and I travelled into the villages every morning to learn about food customs and beliefs. While our fellow passengers couldn’t escape rubbing shoulders with us on the bus, we hoped such intimacy would evolve naturally as we sought to gain the trust of the village women we interviewed during the day. Earning the confidence of these women, so they would feel comfortable opening up and sharing their stories with us, proved to be the hardest nut to crack. Underneath their exterior shell of skepticism and reservation, we eventually found exceptional knowledge and generosity, both of which we probably would have missed out on had we not taken the time and effort to build real relationships with them. In our quest to get a richer understanding of our customers; their social fabric, their worries and ultimately their aspirations, we learned through experience what rules to respect and what we ourselves could expect from our stay.

I am absolutely convinced that these lessons are generalizable to any social entrepreneur or business that is truly interested in making a difference in the lives of current and future customers. Social businesses all fail their purpose, and fail their customers, if they don’t make a genuine effort to understand what ‘makes them tick’. Do you use any of the below six recommendations in your business yet?

TRY TO LIVE THE LIFE OF YOUR (FUTURE) CUSTOMER AT THE RISK OF MAKING A FOOL OF YOURSELF. If in anyway feasible, try to fully immerse yourself into the everyday life of your customer. Make a commitment to stay for longer, so you can accompany her through the daily routines. At first your presence will act as a filter on everything you will get to see: acts assumed to be undesirable or inappropriate will rarely surface – instead you will witness socially acceptable behaviors. As time passes, neighbors and friends will also get used to seeing you around and gradually lower their guard. Take a closer look, what behaviors emerge that had been shielded from you before? Are people really doing the things they claim after the first excitement of being observed has passed? Actually living in the same environment, eating the same food and buying the same items will offer you invaluable


impressions into the lives of your (future) customer. Getting laughs about the way you act is the best indicator that you seem to step out of the role and your behavior doesn’t match the prevailing norms. Then you need to probe deeper to see if your product or service also violates this ‘rule of the game’.

LET SOMEONE WHO IS RESPECTED IN THE COMMUNITY INTRODUCE YOU. The extent to which you can establish rapport with the people you engage with is hugely determined by the quality of your introduction. Obtaining support for your work from the local authority is a prerequisite, without it many people won’t even begin to speak to you. Such an introduction can open doors, but may also easily bias your independence, especially if you are seen as a spokesperson of the authority’s interests. Moreover, you have to proactively fight the fear that all information you obtain is being shared with someone else. In our case, we had to seek permission from the village chief, or his deputies, each time we wanted to interview someone under his sphere of influence. Bargaining over the conditions under which this could take place involved us making I clear that we didn’t want to speak to the chief’s friends and cronies. We assumed they would go great lengths to please the chief and paint an unrealistically bright picture of their lives.

DISCOVER THE ROLE OF YOUR (FUTURE) CUSTOMER IN THE COMMUNITY. Is your informant an opinion shaper, an outcast or a person who is secretly ridiculed by his peers? Such characterizations should be taken into consideration when evaluating what you’ve learnt from them. This will help you to make sense of any extreme observations and provides a first orientation for the follow-up, when you want to categorize customers into innovators, early adopters, laggards etc. However do note that asking direct questions about other people’s standing in the community usually raises suspicions about your intentions. (Though friendly and conversational local staff can help you decipher some of the hidden clues and look beyond first appearances.)

The grapevine will likely also reach you, even if you don’t specifically demonstrate your interest in it, as people start to inquire why they haven’t been selected for interviews but others have.

YES, THE CUSTOMER IS KING, BUT NOT ALMIGHTY. Whether it applies to the ‘correct’ use of a product or service, ‘accurate’ perceptions of your company or any other everyday activity that you think could be done better (faster, cheaper, nicer…), try to keep your notions of ‘how things should be’ to yourself. If your product is consistently used differently than intended, it looks as though you did a poor job anticipating how people would engage with it. If objectively-speaking, people spread wrong statements about what your company does for instance, you better begin taking this at face value before it gains even greater currency. Still, you are wise to question the customer’s behavior and in some cases, may even choose to dethrone the ‘customer king’. If you observe that she alone in being way off the mark, you may call her attention to it and suggest another approach.

ASK FOR CLARIFICATION AGAIN AND AGAIN. EVERY SINGLE TIME. AND THEN AGAIN. You won’t grasp it in its entirety the first time you hear it. Perhaps you also won’t the second or even the third time. Even if you think you understood, responses to certain questions can be extremely fluid, so that questions intended for clarification may prompt surprising results. Asking many questions again and again, in different forms, may come as a great challenge for someone who is afraid that this will make them look like a moron. But it is worth taking the risk!

PROMISE TO COME BACK. THEN COME BACK. Finally, the people that have helped you by generously granting you access into their lives will feel much more appreciated if you visit them again once your project has ended. By doing this, you demonstrate how important their contributions have been to you. Too many companies have walked away on this promise before you. Don’t be one of them.

17


INTERVIEW WITH STEFAN WILHELM FROM “DISCOVERING HANDS”

– HOW ONE STARTUP IS MAKING BREAST CANCER DETECTION BETTER AND CREATING EMPLOYMENT FOR THE BLIND

INTERVIEW: STEFAN WILHELM

„DISCOVERING HANDS” USES THE EXTRAORDINARILY WELL-TRAINED TACTILE SENSE OF BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED PEOPLE TO I MPROVE THE PALPATORY EXAMINATION FOR BREAST CANCER DETECTION (FOR ALL THE NON-DOCTORS OUT THERE, THAT’S THE BIT WHERE THE DOCTOR CHECKS YOUR BREASTS FOR LUMPS). IN DOING SO, THEY’VE CREATED A GLOBALLY UNIQUE FIELD OF EMPLOYMENT FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED, NOT “DESPITE THEIR DISABILITY”, BUT BECAUSE OF THEIR ABILITIES. JOIN US AS WE SPEAK WITH STEFAN WILHELM TO TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT THIS INNOVATIVE SOCIAL BUSINESS AND EXPLORE HIS WISHES FOR GERMANY’S SOCIAL STARTUP SECTOR.


TELL US ABOUT DISCOVERING HANDS, WHAT WAS THE MOTIVATION BEHIND STARTING IT? The gynaecologist and 2010 Ashoka Fellow Dr. Frank Hoffmann from Mülheim an der Ruhr had the idea behind discovering hands in 2006. He’d been a resident gynaecologist for over 20 years and simply wasn’t happy with the quality of the palpatory examination of his patient’s breasts. Since the public health care system doesn’t allow for more than a couple of minutes of examination per patient (due to budget constraints and therefore lack of time on the doctor’s side) and since there is no general nationwide standard (and thus no comparability) for the palpatory examination of the female breast in the framework of the general preventive care, Frank decided to try and develop his own, quality assured and standardized palpatory examination method. His intention was to offer more time and better quality to his patients for the best possible diagnosis, because he wasn’t comfortable with sending patients home after one or two minutes of palpation, having made a diagnosis of the breast or not. The idea to utilize the extraordinarily well trained tactile sense of blind and visually impaired people to improve the palpatory examination literally came to him one morning under the shower. He did some research and was really surprised that no one had the idea before him. And ended up creating a globally unique field of employment for our blind and visually impaired “Medical Tactile Examiners” (MTEs) not “despite their disability”, but because of their capabilities.

or mammogram. And we do not intend to replace this important part of medical diagnostics in any way. The reason for this is simple: The palpatory examination always comes first in the diagnostic process. And since the early detection of lumps in the breast helps to prevent possible tumors from growing and spreading metastases into the woman’s body, the best possible palpatory examination is imperative. If more lumps are found in the breast earlier, there is also a need to clarify these findings. This, in turn, makes the use of imaging techniques necessary. So there is actually a need for more technical devices rather than less. In a nutshell: the “discovering hands” make better what needs to be done anyway (palpatory examination) but is in no way a replacement for ultrasound or mammography. Another important detail: our MTEs never diagnose, they only assist the doctors, who employ them, by lending them their “discovering hands”.

“WE’VE CREATED GLOBALLY UNIQUE FIELD OF EMPLOYMENT FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED, NOT ‘DESPITE THEIR DISABILITY’, BUT BECAUSE OF THEIR CAPABILITIES.”

ARE DISCOVERING HANDS BETTER THAN MACHINES? COULD DISCOVERING HANDS REPLACE BREAST CANCER DETECTION MACHINES ALTOGETHER? Actually, there is no competition between the “discovering hands” and technical devices like sonogram

HOW DO THE BLIND OR VISUALLY IMPAIRED WOMEN REACT WHEN HEARING ABOUT THE CONCEPT? Most of them are thrilled by the idea. Especially because the focus lies on taking advantage of their capabilities, rather than only looking at what they can’t do. Also, our MTEs say that doing this job offers a meaningful activity in which they don’t compete with sighted people on the labor market. And they like helping people while improving healthcare and the perspective on “disability” in general. So they are “ambassadors of their own cause”, if you will. Of course, this job is not for everyone. There are people who dislike the idea of touching patients for a living or who don’t want to deal with the risk of cancer and possible findings on a daily basis. That’s why we conduct a 5-day assessment for MTE-candidates before admitting them to the 9-month course at one of our vocational training centers. It’s important for us to know that they have the tactile abilities as well as the

19


social and communication skills we need. Once we have clarified these details, they are ready to go and generally very happy with what they’re doing. WHAT HAS BEEN THE RESPONSE FROM THE OTHER STAKEHOLDERS? Overall, the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive from all sides. Not only because the Minister of Health of the Federal State of Northrhine-Westfalia, Barbara Steffens, is our patron, but just because the idea is so simple and ingenious at the same time. It just makes immediate intuitive sense. The public and private sector as well as NGOs, foundations and fellow social enterprises all agree with us. They think what we’re doing is a really good idea. On a local, national and international level. Obviously, dealing with the German health care system and professional rehabilitation authorities for people with disabilities is not an easy task. Bureauc­ ratic hurdles are high and there is some resistance in the medical community. We’re OK with that. Not everybody needs to like us, but most do. Also, most of the time we can get people on board if we are able to explain what we do in detail. Really, there is no loser to our game. All stakeholders involved benefit. I’m still looking for the hair in the soup.

YOU’RE A SOCIAL BUSINESS – HOW DO YOU FINANCE YOURSELVES AND HOW DO YOU MEASURE YOUR IMPACT? The business model is surprisingly uncomplex: For each examination the MTE needs haptic orientation stripes that are applied to the upper torso of the patient. They are equipped with little dots that help the MTE orientate, creating a kind of coordination system which enables her to palpate every square centimeter of the patient’s breast in three depths and allows her to document possible findings very precisely. Dr. Hoffmann invented these stripes and patented them – and our enterprise sells them. So with each examination, we get revenue: the standardized price for an examination in Germany is 46,50 EUR (the examination takes at least 30 minutes – so it’s a bargain). Out of these 46,50, 10 EUR go to discovering hands for the stripes. The rest of the revenue enables the MTE’s employer to finance her salary. The revenue we generate helps us market and roll out the model nationally and internationally. The beauty of this system is, that we increase the social impact we generate with each examination that is being carried out. So while we’re earning money, we’re also scaling: better early breast cancer detection, creating jobs for blind women and changing mindsets towards people with disabilities. An excellent motivation to carry on what we’re doing. Also, we’re currently rolling out internationally via a Social Franchise System. The first Franchise is Austria. There’s a different pricing model behind this idea, however.

INTERVIEW: STEFAN WILHELM

„REALLY, THERE IS NO LOSER TO OUR GAME. ALL STAKEHOLDERS INVOLVED BENEFIT. I’M STILL LOOKING FOR THE HAIR IN THE SOUP.”

EVERY SECTOR HAS ITS UPS AND DOWNS. WHAT WAS YOUR GREATEST SUCCESS OR ACCOMPLISHMENT UP UNTIL NOW? Obviously the 24 women for whom we generated employment are our greatest success. But also the expansion to Austria shows that the discovering hands system works. For Frank, becoming an Ashoka Fellow was definitely a pivotal moment, because Ashoka made him realize that he’s a social entrepreneur. He had no idea how to name what he was doing before… like most of the people with similar ideas.


WHAT WAS THE GREATEST CHALLENGE YOU FACED WITH DISCOVERING HANDS AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME IT? Our greatest challenge, by far, was (and still is) finding MTE-candidates in Germany. Although many people talk about discovering hands, we are still a very small initiative with an extremely small team. We haven’t managed to overcome this challenge yet, but we’re looking at a lot of potential on the international market. The German professional rehabilitation system is extremely complex and we are no experts in that field. So this remains difficult, but we’re currently working on solutions (that I cannot talk about here, because they’re still in the making). The potential for jobs is huge, nationally and internationally. Finding MTE-candidates isn’t, however. So if you have ideas or know anyone who might be interested, let us know! WHAT’S YOUR WISH FOR THE SOCIAL STARTUP SECTOR IN GERMANY? Three things: More and better hybrid financing possibilities (e.g. Social Impact Bonds) A legal framework that supports social enterprises according to their specific needs (also in terms of tax legislation, e.g. low profit enterprise) Progress in the definition and measurement of Social Impact (making it more feasible to use as a positive argument for Social Entrepreneurs).

WHAT ADVICE OR TIPS DO YOU HAVE FOR OTHERS STARTING THEIR OWN SOCIAL BUSINESS OR PROJECT? Run your ideas by as many people who have backgrounds that are as diverse as possible – and don’t trust your friend’s judgment. They like you too much to tell you that your idea won’t work. Wear your shoes a size too large: Pay attention to infrastructure and reporting details before you drown in documentation chaos and still work from your grandma’s living room. Choose well, who you accept pro bono support from. There are many people with lots of good will and tons of advice. Non of which helps your organization if they don’t understand exactly what you want. If it binds resources to explain it to them: don’t do it! WHAT MAKES YOU THE CHANGER? Excellent question. People have asked me many times why I work where I work under these conditions. I have a tentative answer: Trying to effectuate positive change in society is never easy and mostly frustrating. Keeping at it, going full throttle while taking existential risks – and feeling blessed while doing so. That makes me a Changer.

21


INTERVIEW WITH LISA JASPERS OF FOLKDAYS, “WE ARE CHANGING THE WAY PEOPLE THINK ABOUT FAIR FASHION” AS PART OF OU R SERIES INTERVIEWING SOME OF THE PEOPLE WE MEET WHO PARTICULARLY IMPRESS US WITH THEIR EXPERTISE AND PASSION FOR DOING SOMETHING MEANINGFUL WITH THEIR WORKING HOURS (AND WE MEET A LOT, SO THIS IS GOING TO BE A LONG SERIES) – THOSE WE LIKE TO REFER TO AS “THE CHANGERS” – WE INTERVIEWED LISA JASPERS, CO-FOUNDER OF FAIR FASHION LABEL, FOLKDAYS. LISA IS ONE OF THOSE SMART, OUTSTANDING WOMEN, WHO BROUGHT HER EXPERIENCE IN BOTH THE CHARITABLE AND BUSINESS WO RLDS TOGETHER TO CREATE A BUSINESS WHERE PROFIT, QUALITY, BEAUTY AND HUMAN RIGHTS ALL NUZZLE IN TOGETHER.

INTERVIEW: LISA JASPERS

P ho t o c r e di t : P aul Bla u

DID YOU ALWAYS WANT TO WORK IN THE SOCIAL SECTOR OR HAVE YOU EXPERIENCED OTHER SECTORS TOO? I have worked in the for-profit sector as well as the non-profit. Working in each sector clearly has advantages and disadvantages. But in the end I always knew that I wanted to do something that fulfils me. Something that aims at social change. This is why I founded Folkdays.com, an online shop for high quality fair trade accessories from around the world.

TELL US MORE ABOUT WHY YOU STARTED FOLKDAYS? After having worked in the development sector and having been to quite a lot of developing countries myself, I had the feeling that development aid is not a long term solution to poverty. Economic empowerment is- with our business we try to create something that is not based on charity but on business exchange. We buy high quality products from our artisans and they receive good money for good quality. Everything we sell on Folkdays is hand-made and thus individual. We are as far away from mass production as possible to give value to the idea of quality vs. quantity. Since we are especially interested in crafts, many of our artisans have skills that we also hope to protect by sourcing from them. DO YOU HAVE A ROLE MODEL? ANOTHER PERSON, COMPANY OR ORGANIZATION? We like businesses like Lemonaid/Charitea and Coffee Circle, because they managed to free the fair trade sector from its dusty image and build profitable brands that have a strong social and economic effect on people they aim at supporting.


„DON’T READ “HOW TO” BUSINESS BOOKS WRITTEN BY MEN WHO ARE MARRIED FOR THE THIRD TIME.”

23 IN EVERY SECTOR THERE ARE UPS AND DOWNS. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST ACCOMPLISHMENT WITH FOLKDAYS? That we managed to make enough money with our first season to buy new products from our producers and thus create not only a short term income source for them. Also we are proud to not have needed external investors, so we can decide on strategic company questions ourselves and set emphasis where we find necessary. PLEASE SHARE THE TOP FIVE LEARNINGS WITH US? WHAT WOULD YOU RECOMMEND OTHERS TO DO OR NOT DO? If you manage to survive without investors, try! If you spend your own money you will be more wise about a lot of decisions. Keep your financial planning in order. Treat the people you work with like you want to be treated. Don’t rely on people you can’t pay – always pay for services, even if it is only a small amount. Don’t read “how to” business books written by men who are married for the third time.

HOW DOES EARNING MONEY FIT INTO THE SOCIAL SECTOR IN YOUR OPINION? Making money with your social business is important, because only a profitable business can be a sustainable and successful one. But in my world there can’t be a hierarchy between profitability and social change. Both factors have to be equally important and, in every decision, weighted against each other. WHAT MAKES YOU THE CHANGER? With Folkdays, we show that fair trade and beauty do not exclude each other. Thus we change the way people think about fair fashion.


HOW TO GET FUNDING

HOW TO GET F UNDI NG

ARE YOU WONDERING HOW TO GET FUNDING FOR YOUR BERLIN-BASED SOCIAL BUSINESS ? THEN HOPEFULLY YOU’LL FIND SOME ANSWERS HERE! When starting a social business, emotions can run high. Not only because you really feel that your idea could change the world, but also because it is often difficult to identify how you can even fulfill your vision without having at least a little bit of financial support. Change is often not cheap. You might have to design and build a website, a prototype, employ a team, get marketing going and maybe even rent an office space. But how with little to no money? Don’t worry! Even though Germany still lags behind the U.S and UK when it comes to social investment, there are a few good possibilities to get funding for your idea.

1. FRIENDS AND FAMILY:

2. SCHOLARSHIPS:

If you are lucky enough to have friends and family that might be able to support your idea financially, you should definitely talk to them. Social entrepreneurs often forget to ask their closest network to support them financially. It is not shameful, if you believe in your idea – which you should, if you are thinking about starting a company – to ask your loved ones if they would like to invest in you. There are many different ways for this to be done professionally. Write up a contract covering everything both parties agreed on e.g. form of investment (loan, donation etc.) so you both have the security for later.

BEUTH HOCHSCHULE/ BUSINESS INNOVATION CENTER The Business Innovation Center (Gründerwerkstatt) offers 12-18 month long scholarships for tech-oriented ideas. This includes 4000 Euro/Month for two team members and free office space in Schöneberg. Requirements: - Have an idea with a highly technical aspect - Write a complete business plan (20 pages) - Fluency in German (the pitch will be in German - Willingness to take on a full-time commitment Usually there is a call for applications in October and March. For more information, please visit the Beuth website.


EXIST Exist offers three different forms of scholarships: a monthly stipend of up to 2,500 EUR; up to 5,000 EUR in coaching; or material expenses of up to 17,000 EUR for teams. Requirements: – An innovative, technical idea/ innovative education-based service – A team of not more than three people – A university “mentor”, who applies on your behalf or matriculation at a university yourself – You cannot have founded your business already Applications are accepted at all times. For more information, please visit the Exist website.

PEP- ASHOKA PEP offers part-time and full-time programs. The fulltime program is a one year scholarship that supports young people to develop their social businesses with max. 1200 Euros/month, as well as offering coaching through Ashoka, mentoring and further education. Requirements: - You should be between 16 and 27 years old - Your idea needs to be non-profit oriented - You should be living in Germany

SOCIAL IMPACT START (No financial support) Although it doesn’t offer funding directly, social impact start is an incubation program for social entrepreneurs in the early start-up phase. The program covers a period up to eight months and includes: – Access to networks; – Intros and matching with potential financing partners; – Professional assistance in writing applications for financial support -– Mentoring by SAP employees; – Coaching/courses – Desks in their co-working space in Kreuzberg.

Requirements: – You have a socially innovative idea that has not yet entered the market

– You can offer a full-time commitment – You have an entrepreneurial spirit

3. SOCIAL INVESTORS: BON VENTURE Bon Venture supports projects in the areas of social services, products, ecology and societal education and development. There are different financing models, but they will usually only invest above 200,000 EUR. Requirements: - The idea should solve a social/environmental problem - The project should be projected to be self-financing after the investment

SOCIAL VENTURE FUND Social Venture Fund supports social businesses that have already proven to be successful in their market and aim to expand. Requirements: – The ideas should have a clear social impact – There should be a sustainable business model in place – The business model should be scalable For more detailed information, visit their website.

CLIMATE- KIC ACCELERATOR Climate- KIC Accelerator accelerates development to help create investable business start-ups, with products or services delivered to the first client in about 12-18 months. The Climate- KIC Accelerator enables entrepreneurs to move through three stages: starting with an idea and finishing with a clean tech venture. Stage 1: Fundamentals (takes up to six months) Needed: a breakthrough idea related to new technology with a substantial climate impact. Team is working on business model Climate-KIC provides a business coach, access to a master class and up to 20,000 EUR

25


“THE CLIMATE- KIC ACCELERATOR ENABLES ENTREPRENEURS TO MOVE THROUGH THREE STAGES: STARTING WITH AN IDEA AND FINISHING WITH A CLEAN TECH VENTURE.” Stage 2: Validation Needed: Proof of concept- meeting 50 potential clients to verify business model Climate- KIC provides access to master classes, up to 25,000 EUR and the opportunity to enter venture competition. Coach will still be available Result: comprehensive business plan, financial model and customer research. Stage 3: Delivery Secure customers Look into scaling Meet investors Climate- KIC provides you with pitch training sessions and the opportunity to enter venture competition, as well as up to 50,000 EUR. For more detailed information, visit their website.

TENGELMANN SOCIAL VENTURES

HOW TO GET F UNDI NG

Tengelmann Social Ventures GmbH is a seed investor, investing in social businesses that are in the early stages. At the same time, growth investors maintain the possibility to support these social startups at a later phase, and continue to help them grow successfully. The focus lies on e-commerce and internet technologies that work with education, disability, and improving quality of life. They are also interested in offline social technology models. Requirements: – Idea should have a clear social impact- Business model in the fields of education, disability and/or improving quality of life – Full commitment by founders – Business model should be sustainable and not based on donations or CSR contributions

4. CROWDFUNDING: STARTNEXT


Startnext is one of the most used crowdfunding platforms for social startups in Germany. It’s also the largest crowdfunding community for creative projects in the German speaking area. Filmmakers, musicians, journalists, designers, artists, inventors, founders, and other creative people present their ideas on Startnext in order to fund them through the direct support of the crowd. Requirements: – Clear project goal – Funding goal – Crowdfunding video – Gifts for supporters There are LOTS of crowdfunding platforms out there, we recommend finding the one that best suits your industry. This is a great list of crowdfunding platforms, both in Germany and internationally. Visit http://www.crowdfunding.de/plattformen to find out more.

5. COMPETITIONS Depending on when you look, there are also quite a lot of competitions happening that might be relevant for your endeavor. Here is one that happens on an annual basis:

ACT FOR IMPACT Act for Impact is one of Germany’s largest funding competitions for social entrepreneurs in the area of education and integration. The Social Entrepreneurship Akademie and Vodafone Stiftung offer 51.000 Euros to get your social project started. Requirements: – Have an idea that has a clear social impact – Project should address the topic of education and integration of young people up to 25 years. The call for applications is usually around February. If you want to find out about the current winner, have a look at our interview with Philipp Knodel from AppCamps. For more information about the competition itself, visit the SEA website.

“ACT FOR IMPACT IS ONE OF GERMANY’S LARGEST FUNDING COMPETITIONS FOR SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS IN THE AREA OF EDUCATION AND INTEGRATION.”

27


FOUNDING A VEREIN: A PRACTICAL GUIDE FROM PERSONAL EXPERIENCE IF THINGS HAD TURNED OUT DIFFERENTLY BACK IN 2011, THE CHANGER MIGHT NEVER HAVE HAPPENED. IF, BACK THEN, THERE HAD ALREADY BEEN SOMETHING LIKE THE CHANGER TO HELP US GET IT OFF THE GROUND, YOU MIGHT NOW BE READING SOMETHING FRO M THE MIGREAT E.V.

The Changer isn’t our first baby. Back in those heady days, Nicole, Nadia and I had recently graduated from our Masters Programme and through both our academic experiences and our on-the-street experiences of early Twennies Kreuzberg and Neukölln, we decided something had to be done about “the integration problem” and everyday racism permeating the city. Knowing that Germany isn’t the only place to suffer these problems, we took inspiration from other countries and found a really cool visual campaign in the UK called I Love Migrants. We got in touch with the people who ran it and asked if they would mind if we set up something similar in Germany and they said “go for it”! So we did. Or at least we tried. Never having set up a charitable organisation before and with a limited professional network, we set about meeting, and planning and concept-writing. That bit was fun. We were full of optimism! We had a great idea, it was already tried and tested and it was tackling Germany’s biggest social problem. So what was to stop us? Bureaucracy, a lack of a relevant network and information and inaccessible funding. That’s what. Which meant that we never actually did anything useful to stem racism or make “migrants” no longer feel like foreigners in their own country. But what we did do, was to found a Verein. And of that we are proud. Because, people, it ain’t easy. So, since we founded The Changer to help people like our 2011 selves, to do good more easily, we have created a quick and practical

how-to guide to help you through this process, so that you won’t have to experience the same pain we did.

FOUNDING A VEREIN First things first, you should know this is not going to happen in a day. You should expect this whole process to last minimum 6 weeks, and if you are going for the charitable status probably longer. So plan accordingly, and accept that you will either have to wait or just plough on without the status. It’s annoying because it means you can’t really get funding – or at least nobody will be very willing to give it to you since you can’t give them a Spen-

FOUND ING A VEREIN

“FIRST THINGS FIRST, YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS IS NOT GOING TO HAPPEN IN A DAY.” denquittung (donation receipt which allows them to save taxes) and foundations want to see the papers. But on the other hand, we made the mistake of waiting too long and running out of steam, time and energy. It’s worth trying to figure out what smaller, low-cost activities you can do to keep you ticking over so you don’t get frustrated or out-oftouch from being consumed by paperwork. If you are not a German speaker you will definitely need one.


WHAT IS A VEREIN? It’s basically a club or society – literally it comes from the German meaning “people coming together”. It can be a sport club (in fact according to the statistics that is what it is most likely to be) but it is also the most common legal form for a charitable organisation. There isn’t really a direct translation in British or American English but for our purposes it’s the organisational structure you will need if you are starting a nonprofit. You can just create a Verein without having to go through the formalities of registering it and making into an e.V. (registered Verein) but then as members you are liable personally for any debts or other difficulties. Fine for a short term protest or small one-off event but if you are thinking about doing something bigger or longer term it is probably worthwhile going through the process of registering it, which is what the following is all about.

WHY FORM A VEREIN?

“AS A MEMBER OF A VEREIN, YOU ARE NOT PERSONALLY RESPONSIBLE IF THE VEREIN GETS INTO DEBT OR LEGAL DIFFICULTIES (UNLIKE A GBR).” WHY NOT? You can’t do it on your own… you need at least 7 other founding members who will do it with you.

As a member of a Verein, you are not personally responsible if the Verein gets into debt or legal difficulties (unlike a GbR).

It’s bureaucratic. You need to create a “Satzung” which has to fill quite a few criteria and pay a few visits to Ämter and obviously do things like tax returns (all of which becomes more complicated if you apply for the charitable status)

It is possible to register a Verein as “Gemeinnützig” giving you charitable status and all of the donation-related tax benefits that entails.

Making money can’t be the main aim of the Verein… you are allowed to but this is more like a by-product of your actual activities and aims.

It is quite cheap to found (no need for expensive legal fees).

How much does it cost? Notary fees (around 30 EUR) Registration Fee in the Vereinsregister (around 75 EUR) Total: Around 100 EUR

You don’t need any capital to get started.

29


HOW DOES IT WORK? 1. GET YOUR 7 FOUNDING MEMBERS TOGETHER 2. WRITE A “SATZUNG” (STATUTES) – this contains all the information about what the Verein is there for, how decisions are taken, becoming a member, member fees etc. Should follow a specific form and the Vereinszweck (mission) should be very clear. If you are planning on going for charitable status make sure you include all of the elements of the work you are planning to do, because the Finanzamt will check at the end of the year that you are doing what you said you would, and if you have been doing other stuff as well, they might take away your charitable status and make you pay taxes retrospectively. To help you we have included ours from back then, as lots of the formal stuff is applicable to all Vereine, so you can copy and adapt.

7. SEND ALL OF THE ABOVE TO THE AMTSGERICHT CHARLOTTENBURG (or your Notary will do it for you): Amtsgerichtsplatz 1 14057 Berlin Stadtplan Tel: +49 (0)30 90177 0 Fax: +49 (0)30 90177 447

8. WAIT FOR THE DOCUMENTATION – you will need this in order to open a bank account. (If you get the charitable status, some banks such as GLS waiver the banking fees) The Satzung (Statutes) The Satzung must contain the following elements:

3. GET TOGETHER WITH YOUR FOUNDING MEMBERS for your first meeting, vote for the Vorstand (between 1 and 7 people – we had 3) and sign the “Satzung”.

4. MAKE SURE TO KEEP NOTES AND CREATE MINUTES as the “Gründungsprotokoll” also needs to be attached and sent with the Satzung to the authorities.

5. IF YOU ARE PLANNING ON APPLYING FOR CHARITABLE STATUS, YOU SHOULD SEND YOUR SATZUNG TO THE RELEVANT FINANZAMT FIRST. They might want you to make some changes and you should do that before registering, otherwise you will have to pay to make changes once it is done. In Berlin the relevant Finanzamt is:

FOUND ING A VEREIN

Finanzamt für Körperschaften I Bredtschneiderstr. 5 14057 Berlin You can send it in or if you have specific questions, make an appointment and bring it with you. Allow up to six weeks before it is cleared (this is optimistic).

6. TAKE THE ABOVE DOCUMENTS, WITH THE REST OF THE VORSTAND, TO A NOTARY (we went here: http://www.robe.org/arbeitsgebiete/notariat/). Again you will need the Satzung, Minutes from first meeting including names of all members present, identity documents for all of the Vorstand).

Name of Verein (should be different to any other already in the register) Town/City where it is based Aim/Mission of the Verein How members can join or leave Membership fees Vorstand Information about when and how the yearly member meeting takes place In the Satzung, avoid mentioning anything about making money and if you are going for the charitable status, make sure you are very careful when writing your Vereinszwecke (mission) to ensure that these are very clearly “for the greater good”. Use ours to get an idea of what to put there (although yours will obviously need to be relevant to your planned work). That’s the long and short of it really. It might not sound like a lot, but we have tried to keep it simple. Definitely one to go for if you are planning to be dependent on donations. But if you don’t want to be dependent on donations, maybe it’s worth trying to think about other ways of monetising your idea and turning it into a social business. We hardly even knew there was such a thing back then, let alone that there was support available for people who wanted to found one.


PEP schenkt Dir Zeit für mehr Wirkung. Zur Lösung immer komplexerer gesellschaftlicher Herausforderungen sind wir auf das kreative Potenzial und den frischen Wind der jungen Generation angewiesen sind. PEP stärkt Sozialunternehmer in ihrer gesellschaftlichen Wirkung und schafft neue Perspektiven für ihr Engagement - denn Weltverändern ist mehr als ein Hobby.

PEP Stipendien - Zeit für Dein Projekt. Wir investieren in Deine Wirkung und decken Deine Lebenshaltungskosten, denn Geld für Sach- und Materialkosten bekommst Du auch woanders. Also mach Dein Projekt für ein Jahr zum Beruf!

31 PEP Wirkungsschmiede - Zeit für die richtigen Fragen. Unsere Peer-Community für Wirkungsbegeisterte: Eine Eventserie mit Training, Coaching & kollegialer Beratung rund um die Wirkungs-, Geschäfts- und Skalierungsmodelle Deines Projekts.

PEP Weiterbildungen - Zeit mit Experten & Peers. Kein Curriculum. Keine Theoriestunde. Wir bringen Dich mit Experten aus der Praxis zusammen. Melde Dich einfach für den passenden Workshop an und vernetze Dich mit anderen Changemakern.

www.engagement-mit-perspektive.de pep@ashoka.org www.engagement-mit-perspektive.de


DIE GRÜNDUNG EINER GBR – DER UNKOMPLIZIERTE START FÜR DEIN SOZIALUNTERNEHMEN WER EINE IDEE HAT UND GERNE EIN (SOZIAL) UNTERNEHMEN STARTEN MÖCHTE, MUSS SEHR SCHNELL DIE ERSTE WICHTIGE ENTSCHEIDUNG TREFFEN: WELCHE GESCHÄFTSFORM MACHT SINN? ES GIBT ZAHLREICHE, MÖGLICHE GESCHÄFTSFORMEN, DIE FÜR DEIN UNTERNEHMEN RICHTIG SEIN KÖNNTEN. VON GBR ZU GGMBH. IN DIESEM ARTIKEL DREHT SICH ALLES UM DIE GBR.

DIE GRÜNDUNG EI NER GB R

WAS IST EINE GBR? Eine GbR ist die einfachste Geschäftsform. Im Grunde hat man bereits dann eine GbR, wenn man mit einer oder zwei Personen beschließt eine Idee unternehmerisch umzusetzen. Die GbR, auch bekannt als Personengesellschaft, eignet sich für alle, die eine unkomplizierte Form der Partnerschaft wünschen. Ideal für Kleingewerbe, freie Berufe oder Arbeitsgemeinschaften. Auch wenn man keine besonderen Formalitäten benötigt und eine mündliche Vereinbarung zwischen den Geschäftspartnern eigentlich ausreicht, lohnt es sich einen schriftlichen Gesellschaftervertrag aufzusetzen, um Richtlinien und Vereinbarungen festzuhalten. Diese Geschäftsform benötig kein Mindestkapital. Da die GbR zu den Personengesellschaften gehört, haften die Gesellschafter stets mit dem eigenen Privatvermögen. Sonderregeln können jedoch im Gesellschaftervertrag festgehalten werden.


WIE GRÜNDET MAN EINE GBR? Eine GbR wird von mind. 2 Personen (Gesellschaftern) gegründet. Der Gesellschaftervertrag kann mündlich oder schriftlich festgehalten werden. Man kann sich für eine ganz einfache Vertragsform entscheiden oder größere personalisierte Veränderungen vornehmen, in diesem Falle sollte man dann allerdings einen Notar oder Rechtsanwalt fragen. Im Vertrag kann z.B drin stehen welche Entscheidungen gemeinschaftlich getroffen werden, welche Verantwortungen die jeweiligen Gesellschafterinnen tragen, wie hoch monatliche Privateinnahmen sein dürfen etc. Um zukünftige Konflikte im Gründerteam zu vermeiden, sollte der Vertrag so spezifisch und detailliert wie möglich sein.

Was uns nicht bewusst war ist, dass man eben auch den Phantasienamen eintragen lassen kann, also wenn Du das möchtest/ Du dran denkst kannst Du nach Euren Vor- und Nachnamen einfach noch -“Awesome Business” zufügen oder wie ihr eben heißen wollt.

„EINE GBR IST DIE EINFACHSTE GESCHÄFTSFORM. IM GRUNDE HAT MAN BEREITS DANN EINE GBR, WENN MAN MIT EINER ODER ZWEI PERSONEN BESCHLIESST EINE IDEE UNTERNEHMERISCH UMZUSETZEN.”

Wenn Du den Gesellschaftervertrag fertig hast und er von allen unterschrieben ist, dann kann entweder das ganze Team oder ein Vertreter mit der Vollmacht und Pass-Kopien aller Gesellschafter zum Gewerbeamt gehen (Welches Gewerbeamt für Dich zuständig ist, hängt von der Adresse Deines Unternehmens ab) und die GbR anmelden. Die Anmeldung kostet 26 Euro pro Person. Bitte beachten, dass Du eigentlich nach der Anmeldung beim Gewerbeamt einen Brief vom Finanzamt erhalten solltest mit der Steuernummer oder ein Formular, womit Du diese beantragen kannst- wir haben keines von beiden erhalten- wurden wohl vergessen und nun müssen wir natürlich extra beim Finanzamt vorbei. Unserer Erfahrung nach fängt man schnell mal an zu zittern, wenn es um bürokratische Angelegenheiten geht, die Angst irgendeines der tausenden Formulare zu vergessen begleitet wohl alle Gründer. Also kleiner Tipp: Wenn Du mal Panik hast, ruf einfach kurz bei der IHK an, die sind äußerst hilfreich. Hier die Nummer: 030 31510-600 Der Name einer GbR muss immer die Vor- und Familiennamen der Gesellschafter beinhalten. Man kann zusätzlich auch noch einen Branchen- oder Phantasienamen ergänzen. Am Ende des Namens steht dann GbR. Beispiel: Max Mustermann und Martina Plustermann GbR. Dieser Name muss natürlich auch auf allen Geschäftsdokumenten stehen.

WAS MUSS BEACHTET WERDEN? Wenn man eine GbR gegründet hat wird diese nicht ins Handelsregister eingetragen. Wenn man eine gewerbliche Tätigkeit mir der GbR ausüben möchte, muss sich jeder Gesellschafter (sieht oben) beim Gewerbeamt anmelden. In diesem Falle muss die GbR Gewerbesteuer zahlen. Wenn es sich um eine freiberufliche Tätigkeit handelt reicht es, wenn man beim Finanzamt einfach eine Steuernummer für die GbR beantragt, dazu kann man dieses Formular ausfüllen. In diesem Falle muss keine Gewerbesteuer gezahlt werden. In beiden Fällen sind die Gesellschafter einkommensteuerpflichtig.

„UM ZUKÜNFTIGE KONFLIKTE IM GRÜNDERTEAM ZU VERMEIDEN, SOLLTE DER VERTRAG SO SPEZIFISCH UND DETAILLIERT WIE MÖGLICH SEIN.”

33


HOT SEAT MIT FRANZISKA SCHAEFERMEYER, INVESTMENT MANAGER VON TENGELMANN SOCIAL VENTURES

INTERVIEW: FRANZI SKA SC HAEFER MEY ER

VOR EIN PAAR WOCHEN NAHMEN WI R AM IMPACT HUB THEMEPARK ZUM THEMA VENTURE CAPITAL VOR STARTUPS TEIL UND LERNTEN FRANZISKA SCHAEFERMEYER KENNEN. FRANZISKA IST INVESTMENT MANAGER BEI TENGELMANN VENTURES UND HAT DIE GRÜNDUNG EINES ZUSÄTZLICHEN FONDS FÜR DIE INVESTITION IN SOZIALUNTERNEHMEN BETREUT – TENGELMANN SOCIAL VENTURES. IM “HOT SEAT” INTERVIEW ERZÄHLT SIE UNS WAS SIE SICH VON ANDEREN VCS WÜNSCHEN WÜRDE UND WAS SIE GRÜNDERN EMPFIEHLT, DIE DARÜBER NACHDENKEN EINEN VC INS BOOT ZU HOLEN. ERFAHRE AUSSERDEM, WIE DU SELBER DIE MÖGLICHKEIT HAST, IHR DEINE FRAGEN ZU STELLEN.

FRANZISKA – DU HATTEST DIE CHANCE BEI TENGELMANN VENTURES EINE IMPACT INVESTING STRATEGIE AUFZUBAUEN. WIE KAM ES DAZU? 2011 investierten wir in Coffee Circle, weil wir schon damals die Idee von sozialen Unternehmen als sehr innovativ empfanden. Aufgrund der positiven Entwicklung und Resonanz, die wir mit Coffee Circle erhielten und bis heute erhalten, entstand bei uns die Idee, diese Aktivitäten weiter auszubauen. Ende 2012 wurde somit die Tengelmann Social Ventures GmbH gegründet mit dem Ziel Sozialunternehmen zu finanzieren und zu fördern. Unsere Mission lautet: Social Impact First, Financial Impact Second. WAS WAR BISHER DAS GRÖSSTE HIGHLIGHT? WAS WÜRDEST DU DIR WÜNSCHEN? Das Highlight ist, dass ich bei Tengelmann Ventures die Chance hatte eine Einheit zu gründen, die in Sozialunternehmen investiert. Das ist eine Besonderheit und in Deutschland auch der einzige VC, der beide Aktivitäten verfolgt. Ich würde mir wünschen, dass andere VCs auch diese Möglichkeit hätten oder dies in Betracht ziehen würden.


„MEIN PERSÖNLICHES ZIEL IST ES ABER DIE IMPACT INVESTING SZENE IN DEUTSCHLAND BEKANNTER ZU MACHEN.”

DU HAST SICHERLICH EINEN SEHR SPANNENDEN JOB – WAS WÜRDEST DU JEMANDEM RATEN, DER/DIE AUCH GERNE IMPACT INVESTING MACHEN WÜRDE? Auf jeden Fall sollte jeder, der Interesse hat, sich intensiv mit der Szene beschäftigen und sowohl viele Sozialunternehmer als auch Impact Investoren kennenlernen. Das Netzwerken ist hier sehr wichtig. Zu überlegen wäre auch sich z.B. in UK nach einem Job umzuschauen, da UK bezüglich Impact Investing viel weiter ist als Deutschland.

MITTLERWEILE KENNST DU DICH BESTENS IM BEREICH SOCIAL BUSINESS AUS UND WEISST WAS FUNKTIONIERT BZW, WAS NICHT FUNKTIONIERT. WAS IST FÜR DICH EIN BEISPIEL FÜR EIN ERFOLGREICHES SOCIAL BUSINESS UND WARUM? Ich möchte an dieser Stelle kein bestimmtes Social Business erwähnen, da „erfolgreich“ sehr stark von unterschiedlichen Definitionen abhängig ist. Selbstverständlich sind die drei Social Businesses (Coffee Circle, KIDDIFY und dotHIV), die Tengelmann Social Ventures im Portfolio hat, für mich in Deutschland Vorzeigemodelle. Weitere, die mich begeistert und inspiriert haben, sind u.a. folgende: TOMS, TerraCycle, oneworldfutbol.

WAS MACHT DICH ZUM “CHANGER”? Ob ich ein „Changer“ bin, kann ich schlecht beurteilen. Mein persönliches Ziel ist es aber die Impact Investing Szene in Deutschland bekannter zu machen. Dazu stehe ich im nahen Austausch mit vielen Gründern und spreche vereinzelt auf Events und Veranstaltungen. Leider wird mehr über das Impact Investing gesprochen als dass investiert wird. Deswegen ist mein Anspruch weitere Investments mit der Tengelmann Social Ventures zu tätigen. Unser Portfolio wird weiter wachsen. Es bleibt spannend. Alle 3 Monate kommt Franziska ins Changer HQ, um an unserer ersten “Office Hour” teilzunehmen. Was ist ein “Office Hour”? Franziska schenkt uns 2 Stunden Zeit, um all Eure Fragen zu Investment, VCs und Tengelmann zu beantworten in einem entspannten 1-to-1 Treffen. Vielleicht kannst Du sogar kurz pitchen! An alle NGOs und Sozialunternehmer… informiere Dich über das nächste Treffen auf thechanger.org und komme vorbei!

„UNSERE MISSION LAUTET: SOCIAL IMPACT FIRST, FINANCIAL IMPACT SECOND.” WAS WÜRDEST DU JEMANDEM RATEN DER/ DIE GRÜNDET UND SICH ÜBERLEGT, EINEN VC AN BORD ZU HOLEN? Ich würde jedem raten, der gerade gründet noch KEINEN VC an Bord zu holen. Die klassischen VCs möchten erst bestimmte Traction (erste Umsätze, steigende KPIs) sehen. Wenn jemand gerade gründen möchte, dann sollte der Gründer erst versuchen Business Angels für seine Idee und für sich gewinnen zu können. Dazu zählt die Überzeugungskraft des Gründers und die Passion für die Idee. Ein gutes Indiz ist, wenn der Gründer bereits schon mit eigenem Geld in seine Idee investiert hat.

35


THE TRUTH ABOUT IMPACT INVESTING, FROM THE EXPERTS WE RECENTLY HAD THE PLEASURE OF HEARING NINA CEJNAR, FOUNDER OF GOLDEN DEER, A SOCIAL INVESTMENT CONSULTANCY FIRM IN BERLIN, AND DIRK MÜLLER-REMUS, FOUNDER OF SOCIAL BUSINESS AUTICON, TALK ON THE SUBJECT OF IMPACT INVESTMENT. WE’VE PUT TOGETHER A SUMMARY OF SOME KEY POINTS FOR THOSE OF YOU CONSIDERING IMPACT INVESTMENT. A HUGE SHOUT OUT TO THE IMPACT HUB BERLIN FOR HOSTING SUCH A FANTASTIC AND INFORMATIVE DISCUSSION. (I’D HIGHLY RECOMMEND ATTENDING ONE OF THESE THEMEPARK EVENTS, AS IT’S THE PERFECT FORUM TO HAVE A FACE-TO-FACE DISCUSSION WITH EXPERT GUESTS AND GET ALL YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED.)

DISCLAIMER: THESE ARE OPINIONS AND LEARNINGS BASED ON INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCE.

THE TR UTH ABOUT IMPACT INVESTING

The marrying of the words impact and investment is still a slightly unexpected match in the financial world. What used to be a taboo is slowly becoming accepted by investors and financial institutions. That said, it’s not all rainbows and sunshine just yet. Just because we’re talking about impact investment, don’t think of it as a donation. It’s not. It’s still a classic investment and the investor still expects to make a gain, except here it’s on two levels: financial and social. In a sense, impact investors can perhaps be even more strict than classic investors, as social business is still deemed a higher “risk” area and the field is relatively new. The key is finding the balance between making profit and having a social impact. This balance isn’t always easy to achieve- usually you’ll find yourself leaning more towards one than the other. A big no-no here is going in with only a social mindset. Of course the goal is to have a social impact, but with an investor, you need to be a self-sustaining and profitable business and to do this, you need think from a business perspective. In many cases, impact investors have the same expectations as a “normal” investor. Impact doesn’t mean less profit; it means there’s a balance between both elements. What the right balance is, depends on your investor. Therefore expectation management is critical when you’re first getting to know each other. Ask yourself, do you want an “impact first” or “finance first” investor? The relationship between


an investor and entrepreneur is like a marriage, you’re bound together in the good and bad times. That said, choose carefully.

BEFORE THE FIRST DATE Do a background check. A good investor can be an invaluable mentor and provide you advice and an essential network. How much knowledge does an investor have in your field or industry? How much can they help you? Will they give you the right advice? Do they share the same values? This is critical when talking about impact investing, there needs to be a strong emotional connection between the investor and your social mission.

THE DATING STAGE Once in talks with an investor, be prepared to get naked. Investors will do a 360 degree review of your business and will want to talk to all stakeholders. Be prepared, have answers and don’t try to hide anything. This will only cause problems down the road. Be realistic about you want to achieve and don’t underestimate the importance of expectation management. Be careful what promises you make. If you over promise and don’t deliver, investors will get frustrated. Also important here is that you account enough time for this process, due diligence can be lengthy and make sure you’ve planned accordingly and started the process early enough.

“IN MANY CASES, SOCIAL IMPACT IS BEYOND QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENT. THIS CAN BE HARD TO SHOW YOUR INVESTOR, BUT YOU HAVE TO TRY.”

37


THE SERIOUS RELATIONSHIP Sometimes you and your investor will disagree. The art of an entrepreneur is to stand your ground. Remember, you know your company, your target audience, your mission- stick to your guns and don’t be afraid to take a risk, sometimes that’s where there’s the biggest pay off. That said, stay rational even in the tough moments. Don’t fall in love with an idea. Listen to others and don’t stand your ground just to save face. Your investor can provide invaluable advice, don’t ignore it.

OTHER IMPORTANT QUESTIONS:

PRIVATE: Private investors might be a little more relaxed in terms of their return on investment (ROI) but often won’t have additional money kicking around for a follow-up round. So if you need money quickly, they might not be able to help you. Pro: Often they’re more flexible and if they’re strongly emotionally connected to your social mission, they might put less emphasis on profit.

SHOULD YOU GO WITH A FUND OR A PRIVATE INVESTOR? FUNDS: Funds raise money beforehand and then have a pot of money with which to invest. Pro: Usually funds don’t spend all their money at once. Meaning if you burn all your cash and still aren’t breaking even, they can follow up with a second investment to help carry you over. (Obviously this isn’t an ideal situation, usually they’ll expect to see proof of concept before they’re ready to invest again. It’s hard to get money without showing that the concept works- meaning you’re making actual sales and even better, that your making repeated sales, which indicates customer satisfaction.)

Con: They can’t bail you out should you run into unexpected financial troubles. A solution here might be to raise more money than you think you’ll need initially, so that you don’t get into the red zone after your initial cash burn and before you start making money.

THE TR UTH ABOUT IMPACT INVESTING

“ONCE IN TALKS WITH AN INVESTOR, BE PREPARED TO GET NAKED.”

Con: Because a fund is essentially a big piggy bank full of different people’s money, they have pressure from the outside to get that money back. What does it mean? It’s means they’re generally stricter because they have investors pushing them and need to deliver. If you’re interested in going this route, the Social Venture Fund or Bonventure might be good places to look.

WHAT ABOUT AN EXIT?

Generally speaking, the goal of most investors is to have an exit. With social entrepreneurship this can get a little complicated, as it’s not always clear where the industry is. In many cases, the first round investor will expect to get out by selling their shares to another strategic investor or through a manager buyback. (i.e. the social businesses management will buy out the investor.) In other cases you might want to structure the deal as a loan rather than equity.

WHERE DOES IMPACT MEASUREMENT FIT INTO ALL THIS? In many cases, social impact is beyond quantitative measurement. This can be hard to show your investor, but you have to try. Don’t exclude numbers (investors love that stuff!) but do include the qualitative picture. Make this as accessible, emotional and short as possible. Tell the story in pictures and quotes and leave the novels to J.K. Rowling.


“YOU’LL NEED A BUSINESS PLAN. EVEN BETTER, YOU’VE DONE A PILOT AND CAN SHOW SOMETHING “REAL” AND NOT JUST A CONCEPT.” KEY STEPS TO GETTING INVESTMENT READY: 1. You’ll need a business plan. Even better, you’ve done a pilot and can show something “real” and not just a concept.

2. Develop your business model. Investors will look closely to see if your business model can cover all the costs.

3. Conduct market analysis. If you can find proof of concept in a different market, this can serve as a major confidence booster for potential investors.

4. Create a financial planning sheet for the next 5 years. Almost everyone knows that this is based on assumptions and that things hardly ever turn out as planned, but you still need to get an idea of where you EXPECT to stand.

5. Define what kind of capital you want. 6. Decide what kind of investor you want. What’s most important- knowledge, contacts, emotional fit, capital?

7. Create your pitch. Presentation is key. Highlight the key points- the easier it is to understand, the better your chances of getting an investment. 8. Find the right fit. Here it’s all about the chemistry. Don’t settle for the first suitor that comes your way, make sure the DNA aligns and it’s a good match.

39


10 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU START CROWDFUNDING THIS ARTICLE IS A SUMMARY OF AN EXPERT PANEL DISCUSSION THAT WAS HELD AT IMPACT HUB BERLIN. ON THE PANEL WERE CO-FOUNDER OF TOLLABOX, OLIVER BESTE, BASTIAN NEUMANN FROM FAIRNOPOLY, HARALD SCHOTTENLOHER OF FUNDEDBYME, KONRAD LAUTEN FROM INDIEGOGO AND CO-FOUNDER OF ORGINAL UNVERPACKT, MILENA LEBOWSKI. THINKING ABOUT STARTING A CROWDFUNDING CAMPAIGN? BEFORE YOU DO, READ THIS GUIDE TO AVOID THE COMMON PITFALLS OF CROWDFUNDING.

CHECK IF CROWDFUNDING IS EVEN RIGHT FOR YOU. Don’t underestimate the cost of crowdfunding, both in terms of

THE TR UTH ABOUT IMPACT INVESTING

human and financial resources. You never get money for free. Crowdfunding is a lot of work and expect to invest considerable time and money into creating a successful campaign. Also, don’t use crowdfunding as a last resort. If you’re in a high-risk industry or if you’re running out of cash and haven’t been able to get investors or people you know to support your project, don’t try to squeeze your last pennies out of the crowd.

PLAN PLAN PLAN.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT PLATFORM.

Over plan, even though you can’t really plan. It’s hard to know what to expect and difficult to anticipate what sort of reaction your campaign might get. If you’re one of the lucky ones and your campaign does go viral, you’ll need to be prepared to handle the press attention, answer phones and respond to your growing community. That said, plan each day and make sure you have people dedicated to managing your crowdfunding campaign once it’s live. Don’t assume the work is over once you’ve kicked off your campaign.

Spend time researching different platforms and choose the one that’s right for you. Are you doing crowdfunding or crowdinvesting? What is the main user group on the crowdfunding platform, are they your target group? Does the site specialize in a certain industry? What are the terms of the site? These are big questions you need to ask yourself before committing to a platform. Choose a site that fits your project and the industry you’re in.

CONSIDER THE NITTY-GRITTY. On that note, who’s going to respond to all the incoming mails and calls? How will you handle critical questions about your business model or project? In this case time really is money and you need to be able to manage things immediately as they come up.

GET LEGAL. Once you’ve decided on the platform, pay attention to the deal. This is especially critical for crowdinvesting where you might be liable for paying money back in the future. What are the terms? What percent does the platform take? When do you get the money? Don’t let yourself be in for a nasty surprise down the road. Do your research now and save yourself a lot of pain down the road.


LEARN FROM OTHERS.

GET EARLY ADOPTERS.

Take time to check out other successful campaigns and see what worked well for them. Watch their videos, pay attention to the script and let yourself get inspired. But also be realistic about what you can achieve with your resources. Adapt ideas in a way that fits your budget and your target group. And remember, it’s easier to raise money for an idea that touches a lot of people. Think about your messaging and how you can make your story relevant to as many people as possible.

Get your friends and people you know to invest right away. Once others see that people are investing, they’re likely to jump on board. (This goes back to the issue of establishing trust- people will trust a campaign that seems to be doing well.) Another big point here is that investors are likely to go on the site early on and judge a campaign based on first performance. If they see the campaign is performing well, they’ll be more likely to invest since it gives the impression that this is something the public/community really wants and is interested in.

BE ANNOYING. Be prepared to remind people again and again that they want to support you. Don’t feel bad. It may feel like you’re spamming but often people forget that they wanted to make a donation, so keep asking. At least 7 times.

BUILD TRUST AND TRANSPARENCY. People will give if they like the product, like you, and believe in the idea behind it. Being transparent and building trust with the crowd is critical for a successful campaign. People are less likely to give their money to something that seems sketchy. How will you spend the money? Who are you? This relates to the point above on being communicative and engaging with your community during the campaign. It’s important that you’re open and present during the campaign so that people trust you and your project. Here the press can be both a friend and foe. Getting positive press can boost your credibility and draw attention to what you’ve already accomplished. On the other hand, the press might jump on your weak points and can also have a damaging effect on your reputation.

“PEOPLE WILL GIVE IF THEY LIKE THE PRODUCT, LIKE YOU, AND BELIEVE IN THE IDEA BEHIND IT.” GET CREATIVE WITH YOUR REWARDS. Don’t have a fancy product or big budget for your rewards? Invite “big givers” to a home-cooked dinner. Offer something one-of-a-kind that fits your mission or service. Also remember that the rewards can be purchased after you crowdfund, so though you don’t need this initial capital, you’ll need to factor that in in terms of what you hope to earn.

41


INTERVIEW MIT WALDEMAR ZEILER: “FREI DENKEN KANN MAN BESSER, WENN MAN WENIGER VERPFLICHTUNGEN UND ABHÄNGIGKEITEN HAT.”

INTERVIEW: FRANZI SKA SC HAEFER MEY ER

IN DIESEM INTERVIEW DREHT SICH ALLES UM WALDEMAR ZEILER, SERIAL ENTREPRENEUR, GRÜNDER VON EINHORN UND ENTREPRENEUR’S PLEDGE. WALDEMAR UND SEIN TEAM ENTWICKELN ETWA S, WAS WIR ALLE BRAUCHEN, ETWAS WAS LEBEN RETTEN KANN, ETWAS ZUM ANFASSEN, EIN NATÜRLICHES PRODUKT. FINDE SELBST RAUS, WORUM ES SICH BEI EINHORN HANDELT…

DU HAST VORHER KLASSISCHE START-UPS GEGRÜNDET, UNTER ANDEREM MIT ROCKET INTERNET & TEAM EUROPE. WAS HAT DICH DAZU INSPIRIERT EIN SOZIALUNTERNEHMEN ZU GRÜNDEN? Ich habe mir 6 Monate Auszeit genommen nachdem ich das Ruder für meine letzte Gründung Digitale Seiten nach 3,5 Jahren Aufbauarbeit übergeben hatte. Für mich war das eine extreme Erfahrung, einfach mal ohne Plan in den Tag hineinzuleben und nach ca. 1-2 Monaten konnte ich dann tatsächlich abschalten. Erst dann war es mir möglich, mal neue Gedanken abseits der Berliner Start-up-Welt, zu spinnen. Backpacking durch Mittel- & Südamerika führt dich an vielen Plantagen vorbei und man kriegt einen Einblick in die Anbauweise vieler Rohstoffe für Lebensmittel, die man in unseren Supermärkten kaufen kann. Wenn man die Arbeitsbedingungen und den Umgang mit der Natur hautnah erlebt, hat das wenig mit den romantischen Fernsehspots für Kaffee oder Schokolade in Deutschland gemein. Ich fing an weitere Produkte meines täglichen Gebrauchs, vom Essen über Kleidung bis hin zu Kondomen, nach Nachhaltigkeit zu hinterfragen.

Fast überall fand ich eine direkte Verbindung zu den größten bestehenden gesellschaftlichen und ökologischen Herausforderungen unserer Zeit. Da hat mich mein Ehrgeiz gepackt und als Unternehmer wollte ich selbst herausfinden, ob man heutzutage überhaupt ein großes Unternehmen bauen kann, dass sowohl fair als auch nachhaltig mit allen Stakeholdern umgeht. Dass man das heutzutage Sozialunternehmen oder Social Entrepreneurship nennt, spricht schon Bände über den Zustand unserer Gesellschaft. WAS KANNST DU UNS ÜBER EINHORN VERRATEN? Seit dem letzten Wochenende ist das Produkt offiziell bekanntgegeben auf unserer neuen Webseite www. einhorn.my. Einfach den kurzen Teaser anschauen: Wir begeben uns mit einhorn auf eine Reise, um ein faires und nachhaltiges Kondom Stück für Stück möglich zu machen und zu beweisen, dass man auch mit fairstainable Produkten globalen und nachhaltigen Erfolg haben kann. Im Januar startet unsere Crowdfunding-Kampagne auf Startnext, die den Startschuss für die Produktion von einhorn ermöglicht.


zu gründen. Das Risiko ist es nicht wert, nicht nur ein Unternehmen an die Wand zu fahren, sondern auch eine gute Freundschaft. Außerdem muss man schon wahnsinnig Glück haben, dass ein Freund zufällig die richtigen Skills mitbringt für eine bestimmte Idee und sich bewusst ist, was unternehmerisches Risiko bedeutet. - Frei denken kann man besser, wenn man weniger Verpflichtungen und Abhängigkeiten in seinem Leben schafft. Hohe Lebenserhaltungskosten und viele Projekte fördern die Abhängigkeit von einem „sicheren“ Job oder anderen Erwerbsquellen und verschleiern den Blick auf wirklich disruptive Modelle. Diese zu finden, erfordert auch mal längere kreative Phasen ohne Einkommen und mit dem monatlichen Kostendruck einer fetten Wohnung und eines Porsche lässt sich das nicht lange aushalten. Monatelang nur mit einem Rucksack zu reisen ist definitiv ein gutes Training dafür. IN JEDEM SEKTOR GIBT ES AUFS UND ABS. WAS WAR BIS JETZT DEIN PERSÖNLICH GRÖSSTER ERFOLG? Ehrlich gesagt, bin ich am dankbarsten für die tollen & spannenden Menschen in meinem Umfeld. Es ist schon ein Privileg überall auf der Welt und vor allem in Berlin Menschen zu seinen Freunden zählen zu dürfen, die einen auf unterschiedlichste und teilweise verrückte Art und Weise persönlich bereichern. Diesen KPI kann ich jedem empfehlen ;)

WAS IST EIN BEISPIEL FÜR EIN ERFOLGREICHES SOZIALUNTERNEHMEN UND WARUM? Grundsätzlich lege ich hier dieselbe Messlatte an, wie für normale Unternehmen. Wenn ein Unternehmen so schnell wachsen kann wie Google, Facebook, Airbnb, Uber, Rocket Internet & co., dabei global denkt und die Marktführerschaft anstrebt, dann spricht man von Erfolg. Leider findet man dieses Denken im Social Entrepreneurship-Bereich sehr selten. Mit dem Entrepreneur’s Pledge (www.entrepreneurspledge.org) haben wir deswegen eine Initiative gegründet um erfolgreiche Gründer für Social Entrepreneurship zu begeistern und gemeinsam Social Entrepreneurship aus der Nische auf die Weltwirtschaftsbühne zu bringen. Ein mögliches Vorbild ist Wholefoods Markets aus den USA.

„MIT SO VIELEN UNTERSCHIEDLICHEN MENSCHEN ÜBER DIE EIGENE GESCHÄFTSIDEE SPRECHEN, WIE ES NUR GEHT. ”

BITTE TEILE AUCH DIE 5 TOP LEARNINGS MIT UNS – WAS WÜRDEST DU ANDEREN EMPFEHLEN, WOVON ABRATEN? - Mit so vielen unterschiedlichen Menschen über die eigene Geschäftsidee sprechen, wie es nur geht. Der Input für die Idee übersteigt bei weitem das Risiko, dass die Idee geklaut wird. - Abgleich der Interessen von möglichen Investoren mit den eigenen. Oft genug verfällt man der Versuchung, das Geld der erstbesten Investoren anzunehmen. Hier verhält es sich wie in einer Ehe. Heiraten geht super schnell, klappt es allerdings nicht, ist die Scheidung für beide Seiten mühsam und kräftezehrend. - Ich kann nicht empfehlen mit sehr guten Freunden

WAS MACHT DICH ZUM CHANGER? Bisher gar nichts. Es wird zu viel darüber geredet, wie man die Welt verbessern kann. Ich hoffe in ein paar Jahren eine unternehmerische Antwort geben zu können: mit messbarem Umsatz und Impact meines Unternehmens sowie zahlreichen Ausgründungen aus dem Entrepreneur’s Pledge.

43


EIN HAMBURGER KLEINUNTERNEHMER MIT GEWISSEN EIN ARTIKEL VON MARTEN RÖBEL ZUM THEMA: FERNAB VON PROFIT-ORIENTIERUNG. DAS UMZUGSUNTERNEHMEN HUUS-TU- HUUS ZEIGT, DASS GAR NICHT IMMER „SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP“ DRAUFSTEHEN MUSS, DAMIT SOZIALES DENKEN DRIN STECKT.

Kommode in zwei Teile zu zerlegen. Hinter der Kommode auf dem Boden glänzt es durch eine dicke Staubschicht. Es klackert, als Luetjens sich nach unten beugt und die bunten Murmeln aus dem Staub heraus sammelt. Scherben klirren. Oh, hier is’ mal auch ein Glas zerdeppert. Was dann alles so zum Vorschein kommt, ne?“ Vera Luetjens organisiert den Umzug für ihre 92-jährige Mutter. Diese wohnte bisher alleine in einer Zwei-Zimmer-Wohnung im zweiten Stock, in einem Haus ohne Fahrstuhl im Hamburger Norden. Anfang September ging es nicht mehr – sie zog ins Pflegeheim. Ein Mitarbeiter des Heims empfahl Luetjens das Umzugsunternehmen Huus-tu-Huus.

EIN HAMB URGER K LEINUNTERNEH MER MIT GEW ISSEN

VOM ZIVI ZUM PFLEGEBERATER

„WAS DANN ALLES SO ZUM VORSCHEIN KOMMT, NE?“ „Ah nee! Die sind ja alle dahinter gekullert. Ach Gott.“ Vera Luetjens wandert ruhelos durch die leere Wohnung. Auf dem letzten verbliebenen Stuhl, vor der Heizung in der Küche, hat sie es nicht lange ausgehalten. Sie geht von Raum zu Raum und betrachtet die leeren Wände, übrig gebliebenes Geschirr und Handtücher. Es scheint ihr nicht leicht zu fallen, ohne eine Aufgabe zuzuschauen. Luetjens ist 68 Jahre alt. Sie steht mit geradem Rücken, ordentlich gekleidet, die rote Halskette passend zum dezenten Make-up. Auf ihren Hamburger Dialekt ist sie eigentlich stolz, manchmal denkt sie aber auch, sie müsse sich dafür schämen, nicht Hochdeutsch zu sprechen. Jetzt steht sie, mit verschränkten Armen, in der Mitte des Wohnzimmers auf dem alten, dunkelroten, pakistanischen Teppich. Sie schaut Ulrich Aldinger-Rudloff zu, den sie „den Chef“ nennt. Er und sein Helfer sind dabei, eine

Ulrich Aldinger-Rudloff gründete das Ein-Mann-Unternehmen 2007. Er ist groß, schlank, hat ein offenes Gesicht. Aldinger-Rudloff ist 42 Jahre alt, geht aber als jünger durch. Er wirkt angenehm unaufgeregt, in dem was er tut. Ruft ihn sein Helfer aus dem anderen Zimmer – verärgert, weil etwas nicht funktioniert – sagt er ruhig: „Ja, ich komme“, stellt ab, was er gerade trägt, und macht sich auf den Weg nach nebenan. Aldinger-Rudloff wuchs in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern auf. Angeregt durch den Zivildienst in einem Pflegeheim studierte er ab 1997 Pflegewissenschaften in Hamburg. Nach dem Studium blieb er in der Stadt und begann für eine Krankenkasse zu arbeiten, im Bereich Pflegeversicherung. Dort machte er eine Ausbildung zum Pflegeberater. Er erklärt Pflegebedürftigen und ihren Angehörigen, welche Leistungen sie bekommen können.

AUF WUNSCH REGELT HUS-TU-HUUS DEN GESAMTEN UMZUG Ihm gefiel es gut, im direkten Kontakt mit den Menschen zu arbeiten. Aber etwas fehlte ihm. In der Krankenkasse fühlte er sich als „kleines Rad im großen Getriebe“. Er sah keine Möglichkeiten etwas zu verbessern und seine Ideen einzubringen. Außerdem wollte er wieder körper-


lich arbeiten, wie in seiner Studienzeit. Damals hatte er in einem Nebenjob Umzüge organisiert. Durch seine Arbeit bekommt Aldinger-Rudloff oft mit, dass ältere Menschen überfordert sind, wenn sie pflegebedürftig werden. Bei einem Umzug in ein Pflegeheim oder eine Einrichtung für betreutes Wohnen müssen sie sich um viele Dinge gleichzeitig kümmern: Ihren Haushalt auflösen, Pflegeanträge ausfüllen und bei Behörden und Banken die neue Adresse anmelden. Nicht alle haben Angehörige, die sie dabei unterstützen. Sie brauchen mehr Hilfe, als das bloße Transportieren und das Ab- und Aufbauen von Möbeln. Zudem bemerkte Aldinger-Rudloff, dass eine Möglichkeit zur Finanzierung des Wohnungswechsels häufig nicht genutzt wird: Die Pflegeversicherung fördert in bestimmten Fällen Umzüge in eine altersgerechte Wohnung oder eine Einrichtung für betreutes Wohnen. Mit bis zu 2557 Euro. Und zwar immer dann, wenn durch den Umzug ein Einzug ins Pflegeheim vermieden wird. Heimplätze sind für die Kasse teurer als häusliche Pflege. Deshalb unterstützt sie Umbauten in der eigenen Wohnung, um diese altersgerecht zu machen. Sie bezahlt aber auch den Umzug in eine Wohnung, die schon altersgerecht ist. „Viele wissen das gar nicht, auch viele aus der Branche nicht. Das war der Ansatzpunkt für mich zu gucken: Was gibt es in dem Bereich noch?“, sagt Aldinger-Rudloff. So entstand die Idee. Er reduzierte seine Arbeit bei der Krankenkasse auf eine halbe Stelle und gründete ein Umzugsunternehmen speziell für Senioren. „Da kann ich mein Wissen als Pflegeberater einbringen und auf der anderen Seite auch den Umzug gestalten.“ Wenn die Kunden das möchten, organisiert Aldinger-Rudloff fast alles: Er packt Umzugskisten ein und aus, montiert die Einrichtungen, entrümpelt und renoviert die alte Wohnung. Außerdem übernimmt er alle Formalitäten, wie Ummeldung, Adressänderung und Nachsendeauftrag.

EIN UMZUGSUNTERNEHMER, DER SICH ZEIT NIMMT Doch für drei Viertel seiner Kunden macht Aldinger-Rudloff gar nicht mehr als das, was auch ein normales Umzugsunternehmen anbietet. Die Menschen haben einen Partner oder Kinder, die sich um alles andere kümmern. Trotzdem hat Aldinger-Rudloff mehr Anfragen, also er annehmen kann. Die Leute empfehlen ihn gerne weiter. Woran liegt das? Vera Luetjens hat Erfahrung mit Umzügen: Zehn- oder elfmal wechselte sie in den letzten Jahrzehnten die Wohnung. Jetzt zum ersten Mal mit Huus-tu-Huus. „Mir ist nur aufgefallen, das war so stressfrei. Meine eigenen

Umzüge, also das war immer furchtbar stressig, die standen sehr unter Zeitdruck. Ganz zum Schluss waren die alle so genervt. Und das war bei Herrn Aldinger eben nicht so. Das war sehr angenehm.“ Vielleicht ist es das, was seine Kunden an Aldinger-Rudloff schätzen. Viele müssen sich von einem Großteil ihrer Besitztümer trennen, nach Jahrzehnten in einer Wohnung oder einem Haus. Manche Kommode wird dabei aussortiert, die schon im Schlafzimmer der Großeltern gestanden hat. Das können schwierige, und auch traurige Entscheidungen sein. Aldinger-Rudloff nimmt sich Zeit für die Menschen: Er ist bei jedem Umzug vom Anfang bis zum Ende dabei. Er macht die erste Besichtigung in der alten Wohnung, und zum Schluss hängt er in der neuen Wohnung die Bilder wieder an die Wand. „Das gehört irgendwie dazu: Ich find das wichtig, dass man eine gewisse Beziehung aufbaut. Um eben auch mitzukriegen, was den Kunden wichtig ist.“ Er selber schätzt den Kontakt mit der älteren Generation: „Das sind Leute, die sind super dankbar: Man fährt morgens hin, und wenn man abends fertig ist bedanken sie sich! Und freuen sich, obwohl es ja eigentlich ein unschöner Anlass ist, ins Pflegeheim zu ziehen, oder ins betreute Wohnen. Und das ist auch so meine Motivation das zu machen.“

LUETJENS LOB Der Umzug ist geschafft. Vera Luetjens ist zufrieden. „Nun hab ich aber auch ein Lob bekommen von dem Chef – ich hätte sehr gut vorbereitet.“ Sie lächelt und wird ein bisschen rot – über das Lob freut sie sich. Und wenn sie das nächste Mal umzieht? „Ja ich bin ja auch Seniorin, ich bin 68, ich bin ja noch keine 92, aber, letztendlich bin ich eine Seniorin. Ich werde wahrscheinlich wieder auf Herrn Aldinger zurückkommen.” Weil es so entspannt ist mit ihm. Das meiste wird sie wieder selber erledigen, die Kisten packen, herumräumen und beim Umzug ruhelos von Raum zu Raum wandern. Alles solange es noch geht. Ansonsten – kann das ja auch der Herr Aldinger machen. Der Autor Marten Röbel schreibt über Geschichten, bei denen er das Große im Kleinen findet. Dieser Artikel erschien ursprünglich in der taz.

45


NETWORKING FOR DUMMIES – WHY TO DO IT AND HOW TO DO IT

THE TR UTH ABOUT IMPACT INVESTING

IT’S BEEN A LONG DAY. YOU’RE TIRED AND HUNGRY AND YOU WERE IN THE MIDDLE OF SOMETHING SUPER IMPORTANT WHEN YOU REALIZED THE TIME AND RUSHED OFF TO THE EVENT YOU’D RSVP’D TO WEEKS AGO.

And now, there you are. Beer or Bionade in hand, business cards tucked in your pocket and ready to start making connections. Right? Well, not necessarily. Unless you’re one of the lucky ones for whom working a room comes naturally, networking can be an awkward and uncomfortable chore and if you are reading this, you’re probably the type of person who will be tempted to slip out the back and return to your trusty computer. Well, don’t! (Unless of course the event is REALLY boring – you have to know which battles to fight to win the war.) It could be a HUGE lost potential. Networking isn’t just about stocking up on business cards for your personal collection, it’s an opportunity for real knowledge exchange and a springboard for collaboration, which is likely to boost your organization’s impact and effectiveness in some way or other. Maybe you can also help others to do the same and ratchet up your karma points. Whatever happens, the golden rule applies 99% of the time: help comes from where you least expect it. And it won’t necessarily just

wander up to you. You’ve got to get out there and grab it. How can we expect to maximize our impact if everyone is working in their separate bubbles? How can we foster innovation if we’re all blinded by organizational tunnel vision? There are lots of fancy ways we could tackle these problems, but the simplest solution would be to start building a strong network that opens the door to collaboration and shared learning. The people you meet might not only be able to help you, but they will also push you forward. Have an idea? Get some feedback. They might challenge you or they might offer up new ideas. When done effectively, networking can be one of the most valuable investments of your time. Which is why we’ve rounded up some of our favorite tips to help you be a networking extraordinaire, regardless of whether you’re looking for a job or a strategic partner.


1. VOLUNTEER AT THE EVENT. If you have the problem of feeling a little lost at these events, this might be a perfect solution for you. By volunteering, you’ll have a clear role and purpose – plus you’ll be given lots of opportunities to talk to people without you even having to make the first step.

2. SHOW UP EARLY – sometimes the best moments are those quiet moments before the storm hits. If there are a few of you in the room, you’ll be “forced” to engage with one another. Plus there’s a good chance the organizers/speakers will be there early – this gives you a chance to hit them up in peace and quiet before they’re surrounded by swarms of people wanting to get an intro.

3. DON’T PITCH RIGHT OFF THE BAT. When you do get talking to somebody, ask easy questions and then LISTEN. Figure out their needs. Networking is a two-way street – think about how you can help them. If you’ve expressed genuine interest, they’ll be more likely to do the same.

4. SMILE. Nuff said. 5. SET A GOAL. Before the event, set a target number for how many people you’re going to try and chat with. Not every person will lead to a valuable long-term contact, but over time, you’ll get used to chatting with different people and who knows who might turn up next to you. That said, remember you don’t need to talk to everyone. If you have access to the list of attendants, identify a few people beforehand and seek them out.

6. WITH THAT IN MIND, GO IN WITH A CLEAR PURPOSE and idea of WHAT you want. Have a few questions in mind, for example, “what ideas do you have for me?” or “do you know anyone I should talk to?” Also prepare responses to similar questions that might be asked of you. Some of the most commonly asked questions are “how can I help you?” or “what are you looking for?” If you have a clear, articulate answer on how someone can help you, you’re more likely to get something out of it that you really want and need.

7. MOVE ON. For your own sake, and the sake of your talking partner and everyone else, don’t latch on for an entire evening.

Be respectful of everyone’s time and keep moving after 5 – 10 minutes. This will also help you make sure you get to talk to as many people as possible. Struggle to make the break? To avoid awkwardness, at a appropriate moment, just offer them your business card and suggest you organize a follow-up meeting to talk in more detail. Whether you do or not will be indication of what both of you believe you can get out of it, but at least that’s an issue for another day.

8. GO BEYOND YOUR COMMUNITY. You never know WHO might be relevant or provide an interesting contact. Plus the people outside of your immediate field or network might give you a much needed dose of fresh perspective regarding your project or problem. If you’re stuck, they might be able to help you the most.

9. MAKE THE FOLLOWUP MEANINGFUL. Send a bit of info or something that gives your mail a real added value for the other person. This way you go beyond the “nice to meet you last night” mail and make it clear you have something real to offer.

10. MAINTAIN YOUR NETWORK AND THE CONTACTS IN IT. Networking isn’t something you do once and then tick off your list. It’s something that should be incorporated into your work practices. Making the first contact is the first step, maintaining that contact and nurturing it into a fruitful exchange requires some ongoing work and commitment.

11. LAST BUT NOT LEAST, PRACTICE! Like anything, the more you do it, the easier it will get. We’ve been learning the ropes over the last few months and we still might not always practice what we preach, (I might have skipped an event to finish this article), but hey – everyone’s gotta start somewhere. If you’re itching to put these tips to the test, The Changer is hosting monthly Hangouts in Berlin, Hambrug and Munich. Check out the meetup group and stay informed. Join us for casual drinks, chats, and of course, some top-notch networking. See you there!

47


MARKETING ON A LOW BUDGET

MAR KETING ON A LOW B UDGET

SO, YOU’VE LANDED THE JOB OF YOUR DREAMS! YOU’VE STARTED AT A NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION THAT SUPPORTS A CAUSE YOU PASSIONATELY BELIEVE IN. THERE’S JUST ONE PRO BLEM: YOU NEED TO FIND A WHOLE LOT MORE PEOPLE TO SHARE YOUR PASSION IF YOU WANT TO MAKE EFFECTIVE CHANGE, AND YOU NEED TO DO IT ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET. IT’S AN ALL TOO COMMON PROBLEM ACROSS THE WHOLE SECTOR: HOW DO YOU GET A GREAT DEAL DONE ON A VERY SMALL BUDGET? SADLY, MARKETING YOUR ORGANISATION OR CAUSE IS NO EXCEPTION.

Non-profit organisations face unique challenges when it comes to marketing. They may lack staff with specific expertise or skills, have difficulties estimating human resources due to reliance on volunteer labour, have inconsistent funding sources, or want to concentrate on their main focus and not on marketing. There are also ethical, privacy and security considerations that need to be taken into account, depending on the organisation’s field of work. However, marketing is crucial to develop support networks of donors and volunteers, to raise awareness of important issues, to campaign for change and find support for petitions or crowdfunding endeavours, and to provide feedback to the community. There’s no easy way to achieve all of these aims, but there are relatively clever and effective methods you can

use. It’s important to play it smart and stay lean in your marketing efforts, and this means identifying efficient, low resource and/or time commitment ways to communicate with your target audience, community and supporters. To do this you need to make a realistic and conservative assessment of the resources you have available and how much you can achieve with them, but also be creative in how you put the resources you do have to work. For example, how do you make the best use of a volunteer who has only 1 or 2 hours a week to contribute? The aim of this article is to give you a quick overview of how you can approach developing a strategy that suits your organisation’s needs and resources for marketing on a low budget.


STEP ONE: IDENTIFY YOUR MAIN MESSAGE AND POINT OF INTEREST

STEP TWO: FIND YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE ONLINE AND OFFLINE

Marketing is all about communication and outreach. Before you can attract anyone else to your cause, you need to be very clear in your own mind on what the goals of your organisation are. You should be able to express this in three sentences or less:

Now it’s time to think about what audience you want to reach with your marketing efforts. You should consider what sorts of people are likely to be interested in your work. You should also think about what you want people to do after hearing your marketing message: Do you want them to volunteer their time, donate money, sign petitions or raise awareness by engaging with their networks? It can help to write a short paragraph describing one or two “ideal” supporters that you would like to reach. That way you can have them in mind when you are developing your marketing content.

1. What is the problem or current situation that needs changing? 2. What is the solution you are proposing? 3. What do you need from your listener to achieve that goal? It’s also important to refine your understanding of why people would be interested in your work. You may feel passionate about the issue, but others may lack the proper context to see its importance. Once you are clear on these ideas, it’s easier to stay “on message” in all your marketing attempts. It’s important to regularly repeat a clear, consistent and simple message if you want to cut through all the “noise” of the mainstream and social media. It also helps you avoid wasting time communicating ideas that aren’t relevant for your cause. It might help to write these key ideas down and have them visible in your office where staff can see it while drafting newsletter, social media posts or press releases.

Once you are clear about your audience, spend some time researching how you can find them online and offline. Social media is a great option, but it’s easy to get lost on big platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Research the demographics of different social networks and pick one or two to focus your efforts on. For example, if you have a lot of photos to share, you might consider Pinterest or Instagram as viable alternatives to Facebook – and pick Instagram if your audience was younger, Pinterest for a slightly older crowd. It’s also worthwhile to find blog or forum sites that are relevant to your field and approach the site owner to see if you can publish an article about your organisation or form a partnership in some other way in order to communicate with their audience. Their readership may be quite small and niche, but if they are highly focused it’s well worth your time. For example, if you run campaigns that focus on getting local people engaged in cleaning up parks and gardens, engaging with websites that cater to an audience of local people into outdoor activities, such as a running group, is a great place to start. Events are another great way to get your message out there, as is partnering with similar organisations and sharing information about both to each of your audiences.

49


STEP THREE: TAKE STOCK OF YOUR RESOURCES The next step is to assess what financial and human resources you have available to put into your marketing efforts. If you have a regular budget available, you can consider using avenues such as Google Adwords, Facebook advertising, banner advertising, or buying advertising space in email newsletters. Otherwise you will need to focus on non-paid channels such as social media posts, blogs, and email newsletters. There are also a number of free tools you can use, such as Dropbox or Google Drive for sharing content with your team, Hootsuite for scheduling your social media posts, or MailChimp for email newsletters. Decide which you will use and sign up for accounts where necessary. Many of these services offer free accounts that are limited in their functionality, but still very useful. Draw up a list of tasks that need to be completed and assign them to various people in your organisation or to volunteers. Try to break tasks down so they can be effectively managed with only a few hours of input each week. A sample list of tasks might include:

WRITING A SHORT ARTICLE ABOUT EACH EVENT YOU HOLD

MAR KETING ON A LOW B UDGET

anaging the email newsletter layout and being M responsible for organizing content aintaining a content repository on Dropbox, Google DriM ve or similar with material for social media posts (images, a writing style guide, etc.) Writing press releases ontacting blogs, websites and news outlets and C maintaining a spreadsheet of that information Photography Videography ocial media ambassadors – supporters who like and shaS re your social media activity regularly

At this point you should also take stock of any ethical considerations related to your field. If there are certain materials that should not be published, such as photos of clients or children, write down strict guidelines and make sure your whole team is aware of them.

“BEFORE YOU CAN ATTRACT ANYONE ELSE TO YOUR CAUSE, YOU NEED TO BE VERY CLEAR IN YOUR OWN MIND ON WHAT THE GOALS OF YOUR ORGANISATION ARE.” STEP FOUR: DEVELOP YOUR NETWORK AND COMMUNITY Once you are clear on your strategy and resources, it’s time to implement! The important thing is to be consistent in your marketing efforts – it’s better to publish less often, but regularly, to your blog, email newsletter and social media. Email newsletters are probably the most important tool. Regularly post links to your sign up form to gradually build your email list. This may feel “spammy”, but it is fine if people are interested and want to stay informed about what your organisation is doing. As a general rule, 80% of your posts should be informative (e.g. news, photos from events) and 20% should be promotional (e.g. “sign up to our email list”, “donate here”, “sign our petition”). While it can be time consuming to create all the “content” needed to feed the social media beast, try to incorporate it into your daily activities as much as possible, such as making the time to take a photo of any meetings or events you attend. Photos and video don’t need to be at a professional level – any photos are better than none. Sometimes simple shots made with a smartphone camera have the most reach because they give a genuine insight into your daily activities.


Another good technique is to repurpose other written materials you have, such as grant applications or training documents, into interesting information for your blog or newsletter. Remember, not everyone will know as much about the field as you, and it’s always great to share basic or background information. Include a mix of information about your organisation, related news (such as changes to the law), similar organisations, and specific requests such as to sign a petition. Don’t be afraid to repeat yourself – you need to cut through the noise with your message. If you have a specific campaign, such as a crowdfunding attempt, then you should let your regular supporters know it is coming up. Build interest and excitement, and let your closest supporters know when they need to share and pass on your information for the greatest impact. When your campaign is ready to start, post about it to your social networks and email contacts and publish blog, articles and press releases simultaneously to generate momentum.

“TAKE STOCK OF YOUR MARKETING EFFORTS REGULARLY.“

STEP FIVE: REVIEW AND REFINE YOUR STRATEGY It’s important to take stock of your marketing efforts regularly. If you’re on a tiny budget, this may only be once per year, however you should review the decisions you made about your message and audience, look at what steps you took, and determine which were effective and which weren’t. Try to keep some records of how your campaigns go – platforms such as MailChimp or Facebook Pages have good analytics tools to measure engagement in the form of likes or opened emails, for example. Don’t waste time pursuing methods that aren’t working for you – even if they seem to work for others. You might simply not have the time or resources to commit to making them work, or you might not have found the right network or communication channel for your audience. On the other hand, try to identify what was the key factor in successful campaigns, and attempt to replicate or improve on them. Don’t be afraid to experiment with new techniques, and most importantly, be genuine and have fun!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Melanie Thewlis is a co-founder of Little Web Giants, an online marketing and web development consultancy based in Berlin and Melbourne. She has a diverse range of professional experience working with not for profit organisations, including Friends of the Earth, UK Tar Sands Network, Stiftung Bürgermut, Humboldt University, Stadtbienen e.V. and Melbourne Montessori School. Melanie provides regular free of charge consulting sessions to the non-profit sector at Betterplace Stammtisch and Social Media Sprechstunde events.

51


INTERVIEW: ANNAMAR IA OLSSON

INTERVIEW WITH ANNAMARIA OLSSON, CO-FOUNDER OF GIVE SOMETHING BACK TO BERLIN: “IT’S REALLY CRUCIAL TO HANG IN THERE, WAIT AND CREATE YOUR MOMENT.”

WITH GIVE SOMETHING BACK TO BERLIN (GSBTB) TURNING ONE YEAR OLD ON THURSDAY, WE THOUGHT NOW WAS THE PERFECT TIME TO CATCH UP WITH GSBTB’S FOUNDER, ANNAMARIA OLSSON. THE IDEA BEHIND GSBTB IS SIMPLE, “TO GIVE SOMETHING BACK TO THE CITY WE LOVE AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WE ARE IN THE PROCESS OF CHANGING.” IN THE INTERVIEW, ANNAMARIA TELLS US WHY WOMEN SHOULDN’T BE AFRAID TO GET ANGRY, THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING FUN – EVEN WHEN TACKLING SERIOUS ISSUES – AND HOW SHE DECIDED TO BE PART OF THE SOLUTION IN ADDRESSING THE ISSUE OF GENTRIFICATION IN BERLIN.


WHAT WAS YOUR MOTIVATION FOR STARTING GIVE SOMETHING BACK TO BERLIN? Living in Berlin since 2008, and Neukölln since 2010, it was impossible not to feel the city’s rapid change and the following discussion about gentrification. Working as a journalist, I was covering the development of the creative scene, the (back then) booming start up scene and also the ”normal” Berlin politics with all its social problems and challenges of being ”poor but sexy”. Evenings I was, like most expats, out drinking, dining and dancing with my cosmopolitan friends. In the newspapers, there were daily reports on the post euro-crisis impact on young people’s lives all over Europe, often making them seek opportunity elsewhere and taking the chance that the EU offered them with free mobility. A few pages later there were stories on post-crisis money looking for a safe harbour in property, as well as reports on the frightening development of xenophobic and nationalistic ideas spreading across Europe, making people look with suspicion at old and new neighbours. Somehow all those things seem to be connected on a micro-scale in our own Berlin neighbourhoods. The new influx of people and the gentrification debate seem to make worlds drift apart and there were even posters with ”Touristen raus! ”, ”Spaniards go home!” or ”Hipsters not welcome!”. For many people, at least on an idea level, Berlin is a utopia where people can come together to create new ideas, cultures and ways of living. It now seemed to be the opposite. People started working against each other, looking for people to blame rather than solutions for the new situation and the new Europe. On a more individual level, after being in an environment among European and international migrants, it was also obvious that a lot of newcomers could feel a bit lost and alienated in their new ”Heimat”. Some of them had lived in the city for years and were indeed planning to stay but still didn’t have so many natural connections to society and their own neighbourhoods. Other newcomers wanted to get under the skin of their new city and country immediately. But how?

Seeing this group of new Berliners solely as a problem, did not make sense in so many ways. How could young, well-educated, highly-skilled people with experiences from all over the world be seen as a problem? And if, hypothetically, they actually were the problem, shouldn’t they then be a part of the solution? With Give Something Back To Berlin we wanted to create a tool for being a part of the “solution”. The idea was extremely simple. On a small scale, it was about suggesting us new Berliners to share our skills for a few hours with a local initiative or a social organization. To give something back to the city we love and the neighbourhoods we were in the process of changing.

“TO GIVE SOMETHING BACK TO THE CITY WE LOVE AND THE NEIGHBOURHOODS WE WERE IN THE PROCESS OF CHANGING.”

At the same time, it was a small attempt to make the ”old Berliners” know us better. Berlin and its many creative scenes have a unique and strong culture of sharing and collaborating. As a way of urban integration, we wanted to “export” some of that to our neighbourhoods to hopefully contribute to a more “positive” side of gentrification. On a larger scale, it was about connecting different scenes in the city and strengthening the overall social cohesion. Empowering the city and neighborhoods through making different worlds meet and making them work together for social causes.

53


YOU STARTED GIVE SOMETHING BACK TO BERLIN A YEAR AGO, WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST ACCOMPLISHMENT? Getting so many people involved! We could never have imagined that the interest would be so big! Every day we get amazing sign-ups from people coming from all over the world and in our first year we’ve had over 300 official sign-ups for people volunteering for the around 40 tasks/projects that we’ve offered so far. That makes 7.5 sign-ups per offered spot. Those numbers are also just the official website-sign ups, not counting in the unofficial synergy ones coming through

ON THAT NOTE, AFTER YOUR FIRST YEAR, WHAT ARE THREE LEARNINGS YOU WOULD PASS ON TO ASPIRING SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS? - Trust your “Bauchgefühl” and have patience. If you’re a real changer you (hopefully) know your theme/what you’re talking about and have a feeling in which directions things are (and should) be going. But not everybody has. It can take a lot of time and patience to establish your idea and convince people about your cause if you’re dealing with complex issues. As a real changer, you are often a bit “before” the mainstream with your ideas, analysis and solutions for things. It’s really crucial to hang in there, wait and create your moment. If you’re idea is good, it will for sure come! But you can’t convince everyone! If some people don’t understand, it doesn’t make your idea bad. Don’t waste your energy trying to convince too many people who are not even close to your planet, even if they are important. Go for closer planets and gravity might get them close anyways!

“ DON’T TRY TO BE THE SUPERHUMAN NEEDING TO KNOW AND DO EVERYTHING – BECAUSE YOU CAN’T AND SHOULDN’T!”

INTERVIEW: ANNAMAR IA OLSSON

friends of friends! We also got requests from Berlin start ups and players from the creative scene wanting to work with us and create collaborations and projects! That was exactly what we wanted – get people involved and connect different worlds! EVERY ENDEAVOR HAS ITS UPS AND DOWNS, WAS THERE EVER A LOW POINT? Yes. After a couple of months online, our team of three had worked crazy hard trying to meet demands without noticing that we grew far too big to be able to catch up. We wanted to channel all the people and the energy that was there but kind of forgot ourselves. As a result, a team member landed in the emergency room due to stress related causes. During that time, we really asked ourselves if it was all really worth it, even though it released so much great energy and engagement. Stress had made us prioritize wrongly, keeping us in a constant loop of doing, doing, doing- instead we should have sat down and really got an overview of the situation in order to make the right decisions. Like looking for proper funding… That, for instance, we didn’t look for more people to join the team at that point just doesn’t make sense when we look back at it today…

– Let people help you! Don’t try to be the superhuman needing to know and do everything – because you can’t and shouldn’t! There are people you know, so use your network! Most people want to help and are flattered when they can help out a good cause! Build a small storm trooper community around you that both believes in the cause/product and that can help make it grow! - Have fun! You’re most probably dealing with quite serious issues, but that doesn’t have to mean that either you or your target group want to be or are “serious” 24/7. Remember to have fun and then people, helpers ,and in the end money, will come. What you are selling in the end is “positive” ideas for a “negative” social problem – but then the “fun” part needs to be there! Be upset about the problem and serious about solving it, but have fun while creating the solutions (and enjoying life in general)!


Phot o cr ed it : K a lle K u i k k ani e m i

WHERE DO YOU SEE GIVE SOMETHING BACK TO BERLIN GOING IN THE FUTURE? WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE NEXT YEAR? The first year with GSBTB was really just the start because, until now, we did all this more or less completely without funding! With sustainable funding, we will be able to really kick-off with all the potential that is already there. We can further develop everything to become the broad platform for urban participation and social engagement that we have potential to be. In addition to locking down sustainable funding, our priority for the next year is to broaden our offers so we can meet demands and serve interests – so that the positive potential for the city doesn’t get lost. Today we have to turn down a lot of people who sign up because we can’t keep up with finding suitable projects for everyone – that feels so weird! We also want to focus on developing our own collaborative volunteering projects to ensure that the unique and creative potential of the newcomers really comes to fruition. Furthermore, we want to get started with some of the many ideas that we have on the table together with companies and players in the creative sector in order to develop projects that really make the different Berlin worlds meet, learn and share together!

YOU WORK A LOT WITH THE REFUGEE COMMUNITY IN BERLIN, WHAT HAS THE COMMUNITY’S RESPONSE BEEN TO YOU AND YOUR PROJECTS? The interest has been SO big from our people’s side! I don’t know if it’s because we are migrants ourselves as well (even though from a very different sort) or simply because the question is currently so important in the EU and rest of the world. Today we have four of our own weekly refugee projects running; one language project, one cooking project, one computer project and one music collaboration! A lot of new bonds have developed between different groups and people, we are going to continue developing these in 2014-2015. WHAT MAKES YOU THE CHANGER? I believe in inspiring people with ones actions and giving people courage and tools for doing and not just talking. I think we did that quite well with GSBTB. But I also believe in being angry! Many women are afraid of being angry due to fear of being seen as aggressive. But anger can be good if you are angry at society and not at yourself! It can take you a long way if you get some good tools and channel it the right way! I’m a strong plädoyer of women being more angry, haha.


5 STUDIENGÄNGE FÜR SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS IN DEUTSCHLAND – DIE UNI ÜBERSICHT

FÜNF STUD IENGÄNGE F ÜR SOCI AL ENTREPRENEURS

WENN DU THE CHANGER ÖFTER BESUCHST, DANN WEISST DU SICHERLICH, DASS WIR IMMER WIEDER INFORMELLE LERNMÖGLICHKEITEN ZUM THEMA SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP ANBIETEN. VON NETZWERKEVENTS ÜBER GRÜNDERCOACHINGS ZU ONLINE KURSEN, IST FÜR JEDEN- VOM ABSOLUTEN NEULING ZUM SOCIAL BUSINESS MANAGER MIT JAHRELANGER ERFAHRUNG- WAS DABEI. In diesem Artikel fokussieren wir uns auf die formellen Studiengänge der deutschen Universitäten und Hochschulen, die sich dem Thema Social Entrepreneurship widmen. Dies ist bestimmt noch keine vollständige Liste. Wir werden weiter daran arbeiten. Falls Du ein passendes Programm kennst, sag einfach Bescheid! Email an: be@thechanger.org

CENTER FOR SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT AN DER LEUPHANA UNIVERSITÄT LÜNEBURG Das Centre for Sustainability Management (CSM) der Leuphana Universität Lüneburg ist ein international tätiges Kompetenzzentrum zu Forschung, Lehre, wissenschaftlicher Weiterbildung und Transfer in den Bereichen: unternehmerisches Nachhaltigkeitsmanagement, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) und Social Entrepreneurship. Am CSM ist die Professur für Nachhaltigkeitsmanagement unter der Leitung von Prof. Dr. Stefan Schaltegger, die Juniorprofessur für Social Entrepreneurship (JProf. Dr. Jantje Halberstadt) sowie die Gastprofessur Management der Energiewende unter der Leitung von Prof. Dr. Erik G. Han-

sen angesiedelt. Neben Forschung, Publikation und Lehre bietet das Center for Sustainability Management auch ein Master Programm an.

MBA SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT IM FERNSTUDIUM Seit der Gründung 2003 ist das berufsbegleitende Weiterbildungsprogramm Sustainability Management einer der führenden „Green MBA“ weltweit. Vor allem aufgrund einer einzigartigen und optimalen Kombination aus Managementwissen, Persönlichkeitsentwicklung, Soft Skills und verantwortungsvoller Unternehmensführung. Durch vielfältige fachliche und überfachliche Studieninhalte erwirbst Du in dem Studium neben umfassenden Managementqualifikationen auch die zunehmend gefragte Fähigkeit, nachhaltige Entwicklung und unternehmerische Verantwortung zu managen. Der MBA qualifiziert damit die Studierenden für Führungspositionen und eröffnet neue Karrieremöglichkeiten. Bewerbungsschluss ist jedes Jahr der 30. September. Das Studium beginnt im darauffolgenden Frühjahr. Wir empfehlen diesen Studiengang besonders für Neu- und Quereinsteiger, und für die unter uns, die gerne ein eigenes Social Business gründen möchten.


EUROPEAN BUSINESS SCHOOL IN WIESBADEN FACHBEREICH SOCIAL BUSINESS Sozialunternehmen erzielen auf unternehmerische Art und Weise eine nachhaltige, positive soziale oder ökologische Wirkung. Sie vereinen Wertesysteme und Handlungslogiken aus verschiedenen Bereichen der Gesellschaft; dem öffentlichen, dem privaten und dem zivilgesellschaftlichen Sektor. Der Fachbereich Social Business widmet sich diesen Schnittstellen.

ELECTIVE MASTER MODULE SOCIAL BUSINESS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP Seit dem Wintersemester 2012 bietet der Fachbereich Social Business ein Mastermodul zum Them ‘Social Business and Social Entrepreneurship’ an. Jedes Jahr finden sich 30-40 Stundenten aus unterschiedlichen Fachrichtungen zusammen.

57


FÜNF STUD IENGÄNGE F ÜR SOCI AL ENTREPRENEURS

„DAS CENTRE FOR SUSTAINABILITY MANAGEMENT (CSM) DER LEUPHANA UNIVERSITÄT LÜNEBURG IST EIN INTERNATIONAL TÄTIGES KOMPETENZZENTRUM ZU FORSCHUNG, LEHRE, WISSENSCHAFTLICHER WEITERBILDUNG UND TRANSFER IN DEN BEREICHEN: UNTERNEHMERISCHES NACHHALTIGKEITSMANAGEMENT, CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR) UND SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP.”


SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AKADEMIE IN MÜNCHEN Die Social Entrepreneurship Akademie wurde 2010 als Netzwerk-Organisation der vier Münchner Hochschulen gegründet. Mit ihren drei Säulen bietet die Akademie derzeit in der Lehre ein Qualifizierungs-programm an, fördert gezielt soziale Gründungsprojekte und treibt den Aufbau eines breiten Netzwerks zur Verankerung von Social Entrepreneurship in unserer Gesellschaft voran. Die Zusammenarbeit mit den vier Münchner Hochschulen eröffnet exzellente Möglichkeiten in der Bildung und Forschung. Nicht ohne Grund liegt daher ein Schwerpunkt der Social Entrepreneurship Akademie in diesem Bereich. Das Lehrprogramm baut auf dem umfangreichen Wissen auf, das an den Hochschulen selbst vorhanden ist. Seit 2011 bieten sie mit dem Zertifikat „Gesellschaftliche Innovationen“ (ZGI) Privatpersonen eine studien- bzw. berufsbegleitende Ausbildung im Umfang von über zwei Jahren. Der ZGI:kompakt ist ein zweitägiger Intensivkurs für alle, die sich intensiv und interaktiv dem Thema annähern möchten. Zusätzlich gibt es jedes Jahr eine einwöchige Global Entrepreneurship Summer School, bei der die Teilnehmer nachhaltige Konzepte für gesellschaftliche Herausforderungen entwickeln. Außerdem bietet die Social Entrepreneurship Akademie regelmässige Workshops und Blockseminare zu verschiedenen Themenbereichen – wie Social Innovation, Social Entrepreneurship oder Nachhaltiges Wirtschaften – an.

„DIE SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AKADEMIE WURDE 2010 ALS NETZWERK-ORGANISATION DER VIER MÜNCHNER HOCHSCHULEN GEGRÜNDET.” BACHELOR MANAGEMENT SOZIALE INNOVATIONEN, HOCHSCHULE MÜNCHEN Die Hochschule München ist Bayerns größte Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaften und die zweitgrößte Deutschlands. Im Herzen einer der großen europäischen High-Tech- und Wirtschaftsmetropolen ist sie der konsequenten Ausrichtung auf die Praxis verpflichtet – in der Forschung, der Lehre und in der Weiterbildung. Der Studiengang Management Soziale Innovationen qualifiziert Fachkräfte, die soziale Innovationen anregen, begleiten, beteiligungsorientiert steuern und evaluieren können. Er vermittelt grundlegendes Fachwissen, um Innovationspotenziale ermitteln und einschätzen zu können. Es werden praxisnahe Handlungsstrategien erprobt, um die Diffusion neuer Lösungsansätze innerhalb bestehender oder zu gründender Organisationen zu forcieren. Schwerpunkte der wissenschaftlichen Methodenausbildung bilden die empirische Sozial- und Zukunftsforschung, Kommunikationswissenschaften, Soziologie, strategisches Management, Wissensorganisation, Social Entrepreneurship, Organisations- und Gemeinwesenentwicklung.

59


EIN BUSINESS, DAS ERST DANN ERFOLGREICH IST, WENN WENIGER GEKAUFT WIRD

EIN BUSINESS, D AS ERST D ANN ER FOLGR EI CH I ST, WENN WENIGER GEKAUFT WIRD

RIND. HUHN. SCHWEIN. Abendessen, wahrscheinlich. In Deutschland liegt der Pro-Kopf-Verbrauch von Fleisch bei durchschnittlich 60,2 kg im Jahr. Jedes Jahr isst der Durchschnittsdeutsche mehr als sein Durchschnittskörpergewicht in Fleisch. (Fleischatlas 2013) Es ist kein Geheimnis, dass wir Deutschen Fleisch lieben. Aber denkt man beim Genuss wirklich darüber nach, was man da isst? Oder was für eine wahnsinnige Industrie dahinter steckt? Schon alleine, dass in jedem tausendsten Schlachthof täglich 25 000 Schweine geschlachtet werden. Aber gut, das soll eigentlich nicht Thema dieses Artikels sein. Heute möchten wir lediglich über ein einziges Schwein reden. Und zwar Schwein 160. Für den letzten Artikel in unserer Serie mit Ben & Jerry’s über Sozialunternehmen, die mit Essen Gutes tun, wollten wir was ganz Besonderes machen. Wir wollten uns einem Thema annähern, das uns am Herzen liegt (wir sind hier bei The Changer letztendlich alle überzeugte Fleischesser, werden uns aber zunehmend darüber im Klaren, dass das mit dem täglichen Salami Brot nicht mehr lange gut gehen kann). Und wenn wir sagen “annähern”, meinen wir das auch wortwörtlich. Wir wollten nicht einfach darüber lesen oder mit den relevanten Personen telefonieren. Wir wollten hin. Wir wollten uns das selber anschauen. Also haben wir uns auf die Schweinesuche gemacht. Das Team von Meine Kleine Farm war natürlich der perfekte Begleiter dafür. Wer das Konzept nicht kennt, der wird staunen. Meine Kleine Farm, gegründet vor 4 Jahren von Dennis Buchmann als Teil seines Masterstudiums, hat es sich zum Ziel gesetzt, uns alle zu weniger Wurstkonsum zu animieren. Ihm war es aber klar, dass man Fleisch doch niemandem verbieten kann (wie es die Grünen versuchten) und predigen wollte er auch nicht (wie es Vege-

tarier oft versuchen). Er möchte die Fleischesser selbst zur Erkenntnis bringen, dass weniger eben mehr sein kann. Wie kommt man also am Besten an den Fleischesser? In dem man ihm leckeres Fleisch verkauft. Logisch, oder? Wie bringt man aber den Fleischesser gleichzeitig dazu, weniger Fleisch zu essen? Dennis’ Strategie: Man packt das Bild des Tiers auf die Verpackung. Und zwar nicht nur ein generisches Bild von irgendeinem Tier aus der industriellen Haltung, sondern eben genau von dem Tier, das in Fleischform vor einem auf dem Teller liegt. Ein Tier, das ein glückliches Leben auf einem “echten” Bio Bauernhof in der Nähe verbringen durfte. Somit ist das Fleisch zwar teurer, als bei Massenproduktion, aber dafür viel, viel leckerer. Und das Tier auf unserem Teller hat ein Gesicht. So werden wir dazu angeregt zweimal darüber nachzudenken, ob wir wirklich die billige Supermarktwurst kaufen oder nicht doch lieber zur bekannten, glücklichen Biosau von Meine Kleine Farm greifen. Wir essen somit weniger Fleisch, aber dafür sicherlich bewusster. Uns hat es aber nicht gereicht, die Bilder von den Tieren zu sehen. Wir wollten das Schwein persönlich kennenlernen. Also verabredeten wir uns mit Laura Kübke (Vize-Schwein) und Dennis beim Gutshof Hirschhaue am Rande vom Berlin. Dort hatten wir Gelegenheit auch Bauer Henrick Staar persönlich kennenzulernen, der genauso zufrieden und begeistert von seinem Job ist, wie Dennis und Laura und es beinahe schaffte, sogar uns Städter davon zu überzeugen selbst Schweinebauern zu werden. Glaubt uns: In einem so idyllischen Bauernhof würde eigentlich fast jeder arbeiten wollen. Hirsche und Schweine schnüffeln und springen über riesige Felder und Äcker. Hirsche? Ja, Hirsche. Das Ungewöhnliche ist, dass sich diese Bauernfamilie auf Wildtierhaltung spezialisiert, d.h. die Schweine sind auch


„SIE SETZEN SICH FÜR WENIGER FLEISCHKONSUM EIN, INDEM SIE FLEISCH VERKAUFEN.”

61


EIN BUSINESS, D AS ERST D ANN ER FOLGR EI CH I ST, WENN WENIGER GEKAUFT WIRD

„IHM WAR ES ABER KLAR, DASS MAN FLEISCH DOCH NIEMANDEM VERBIETEN KANN (WIE ES DIE GRÜNEN VERSUCHTEN) UND PREDIGEN WOLLTE ER AUCH NICHT (WIE ES VEGETARIER OFT VERSUCHEN). ER MÖCHTE DIE FLEISCHESSER SELBST ZUR ERKENNTNIS BRINGEN, DASS WENIGER EBEN MEHR SEIN KANN.”


mit Wildschweinen gekreuzt. Mit Bio Wild begann der Vater von Henrick nach der Wende, als die Landwirtschaft in Brandenburg zusammengebrochen war. Seitdem rotieren Hirsch, Schwein, Eiweißpflanzen, Kleesorten, Kräuter und lecker Kartoffeln in einem siebenjährigen Karussell des Lebens von Acker zu Acker, um möglichst effizient und schonend wirtschaften zu können. Und das Ganze ohne den Einsatz von künstlichen Düngemitteln. Tiere und Pflanze leben in symbiotischer Harmonie…. zumindest bis Henrick mit seiner Kamera aufs Feld kommt und Fotos vom Schwein macht und später der Vater mit dem Gewehr folgt, um die Harmonie des portraitierten dicken Schweinchens zu beenden.

„WIR ESSEN SOMIT WENIGER FLEISCH, ABER DAFÜR SICHERLICH BEWUSSTER.”

Als Wildtiere dürfen die Schweine eben auf dem Feld direkt erschossen werden. Somit müssen die Schweine nicht die Quälerei des Todestransports zum Schlachthof (oft Stunden entfernt) durchleben.

Im Mastbetrieb um die Ecke werden bis zu 30.000 junge Schweine am Tag geschlachtet. Bei Henrick lernen wir ca. 200 Schweine kennen, die alle in Familiengruppen gemeinsam auf dem Feld aufwachsen und bis zu zwei Jahre alt werden -viel älter als ein schnell hochgezüchtetes Supermarkt Schwein. Bei Meine Kleine Farm sind es nur 6-7 Schweine im Monat, die im Bearbeitungszentrum landen und zwar einzeln ausgesucht von den unterschiedlichen Bauern, mit denen sie zusammenarbeiten. Somit sind die Produkte entsprechend teurer, aber die Qualität des Fleisches deutlich höher. Meine kleine – aber feine – Farm.

Und so haben wir Schwein 160 kennengelernt. Glücklich lag sie im Schlamm herum. Schwein 160 wurde nämlich gerade fotografiert als wir ankamen. Sie wird wohl bald einem Wurstgeniesser Freude bereiten. Der Heldenmarkt steht vor der Tür und dafür werden leckere Wiener gebraucht. “Ach die willst Du für den Heldenmarkt. Die ist doch viel zu schön für Bockwurst. Guck sie doch mal an!” sagt Henrick mit einem verliebten Blick. Doch das Schicksal hat gesprochen. Meine Kleine Farm steht eben nicht für den Verzicht. Dennis und Laura sind genauso wie wir Wurstliebhaber. Jedoch haben sie mit einer der cleversten, abgedrehtesten Business Idee den Konsum auf den Kopf gestellt. Sie setzen sich für weniger Fleischkonsum ein, indem sie Fleisch verkaufen. Genial! Wie schön wäre es, wenn sich dieses Konzept durchsetzen würde: Komplette Transparenz und ein stärkeres Bewusstsein dafür, was es wirklich heißt, wenn ein Supermarkt z.B. 100g Hühnerfleisch für 24 Cent verkauft. Keiner muss komplett verzichten, aber wir alle können weniger und dafür hochwertigeres Fleisch essen. Und somit fahren wir glücklich und mit gefüllten Taschen – voll mit guter Salami – nach Berlin. Und sind wieder mal überzeugt davon, dass Sozialunternehmertum einfach mal verdammt cool ist. Geld machen ist doch easy. Geld machen und die Welt retten, das ist die Herausforderung unserer Generation!

63


INTERVIEW: CHRISTI NA VELDHOEN

CHRISTINA VELDHOEN, STAR SOZIALUNTERNEHMERIN, ROCKS HER LIFE: „ICH ENTSCHEIDE MICH JEDEN TAG AUFS NEUE FÜRS WACHSEIN” ALS TEIL UNSERER INTERVIEWSERIE MIT INSPIRIERENDEN SOZIALEN ODER GRÜNEN INNOVATOREN, SPRACHEN WIR MIT CHRISTINA VELDHOEN, EHEMALIGE GRÜNDERIN VON ROCK YOUR LIFE. SELBST NOCH STUDENTIN, GRÜNDETE SIE VOR 5 JAHREN MIT IHREM TEAM ROCK YOUR LIFE, EIN MENTORSHIP PROGRAMM ZWISCHEN STUDENTEN UND BENACHTEILIGTEN JUGENDLICHEN. RYL WUCHS SCHNELL ZU EINEM DER ERFOLGREICHSTEN SOCIAL BUSINESSES HERAN, GEWANN PREISE WIE START SOCIAL, ERHIELT UNTERSTÜTZUNG VON DER VODAFONE STIFTUNGEN UND BMW HERBERT QUANDT UND EROBERTE GANZ DEUTSCHLAND. WARUM SIE IHR ERFOLGREICHES STARTUP DENNOCH VERLASSEN HAT UND WAS SIE ALLEN SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS RATEN WÜRDE, KÖNNT IHR HIER LESEN… 1. CHRISTINA, DU BIST EINER DER WENIGEN GRÜNDER, DIE IHR ERFOLGREICHES SOCIAL BUSINESS VERLASSEN HABEN. WAS WAR DEINE MOTIVATION? Weitergehen! Weiterwachsen! Erkunden! Entdecken! Einen scheinbar sicheren, im Sinne von überschaubaren Rahmen verlassen, zugunsten von Unbekanntem, in den Augen vieler „Unsicherem”. Plus Raum für Neues in der Organisation zu machen, die ich einmal ins Leben gerufen hatte. Und: Loslassen

üben. Und herausfinden, wer und was ich bin, ohne diese meine zweite Haut, „meine“ Organisation. Außerdem heißt sie: ROCK YOUR LIFE!. Und das sollte auch oder sogar besonders für ihre Gründer gelten. Und sein Leben rockt man, so zumindest meine Erfahrung, am meisten, wenn man immer wieder Neues wagt. Anfang, Aufbau, Abschied, Neubeginn, all das sind eben Teile des Lebens, das gerockt werden will.


„ICH ENTSCHEIDE MICH JEDEN TAG AUFS NEUE FÜRS WACH-SEIN UND DAFÜR, MEINE WAHRHEIT IN JEDEM MOMENT AUSZUDRÜCKEN.” 2. IN JEDEM SEKTOR GIBT ES AUF UND ABS. WAS WAR BIS JETZT DEIN GRÖSSTER ERFOLG? Dass wir es geschafft haben, mit einer zunächst kleinen und einfachen Ideen über die Jahre Tausende von Menschen zu begeistern und zu mobilisieren und ihnen damit einen Platz in dem Ganzen zu eröffnen, in dem sie, jeder auf seine Art, ROCK YOUR LIFE! zu dem machen, was es ist. 3. B ITTE TEILE DEINE 5 TOP LEARNINGS IM BEZUG AUF GRÜNDUNG MIT UNS. WAS WÜRDEST DU ANDEREN EMPFEHLEN, WOVON ABRATEN? 1. Hört den Zweiflern und Kritikern zu – aber eigne dir ihre Meinung nicht an. Lerne bloß daraus, wo du vielleicht noch besser werden kannst und willst, und wo du klar sagen kannst: Das ist für mich so nicht wahr, danke für Ihre Meinung, tschüß. Wir machen dann mal weiter, anstatt zu zweifeln und zu kritisieren. 2. Werdet Euch klar darüber, welche Ressourcen und Expertise Ihr nicht in Eurem Team abdeckt und sucht sie Euch über Partner, Berater und Unterstützer von außen. Menschen LIEBEN es, sich mit dem einzubringen, worin sie richtig gut sind, wenn es für „eine gute Sache“ ist. 3. Sorge für ein sowohl fachlich als auch persönlich diverses Gründungsteam. 4. Eure Grundwerte und Eure Vision im Gründungsteam müssen übereinstimmen. Werdet Euch als Erstes an dieser Stelle glasklar. Die Vision wird sich verändern. Sprecht mindestens einmal im Jahr darüber und aktualisiert sie. 5. Fragt Euch alle paar Wochen selbst und gegenseitig: haben wir Freude an unserer Arbeit? Falls nicht: ändert, was Ihr ändern müsst, damit es wieder so wird. Seid ehrlich. Macht Euch klar, wer was gern UND gut macht und sucht Euch im Zweifel neue Leute, die genau das lieben, was Ihr nicht liebt. Wenn Euch die Arbeit auf Dauer keine Freude macht, hört damit auf und spielt woanders weiter.

4. ES GIBT HEISSE DISKUSSIONEN ZUM THEMA “GELD VERDIENEN IM SOZIALEN SEKTOR”. WAS IST DEINE MEINUNG DAZU? Wenn wir in „diesem Sektor“ lernen, mit Geld ebenso liebevoll umzugehen, wie mit der Sache und den Stakeholdern, denen wir uns mit unserer Arbeit widmen, dann können wir wirklich große Wirkung entfalten. Wenn nicht, bleiben wir im Mangel, am Existenzminimum – und beim Lamentieren. Die Entscheidung liegt bei uns – und der Schlüssel im Überwinden unserer negativen Bewertungen und Einstellungen gegenüber Geld und Kapital. Wir können lernen, die Logik und die Kraft des Kapitals und seiner Vermehrung dafür zu nutzen, noch mehr Gutes in der Welt zu bewegen – und dabei stets dafür sorgen, dass wir selbst die Fülle auf allen Ebenen verkörpern und leben. „Das System“ ist nur so lange unser Gegner, solange wir daran festhalten. Wir können uns auch entscheiden, hierin Energie zu entfesseln und zu entfalten, und zwar auch und gerade in Form von Geld.

„HÖRT DEN ZWEIFLERN UND KRITIKERN ZU – ABER EIGNE DIR IHRE MEINUNG NICHT AN.”

5. ALS LETZTE FRAGE, WAS MACHT DICH ZUM CHANGER? Weil ich alles, was ich mache, bewusst und aus meiner tiefsten Wahrheit und Wahrhaftigkeit heraus mache. Alles andere wäre Verrat an mir selbst und meiner Rolle in der Welt, wäre Bequemlichkeit, Angst, Anpassung, Müdigkeit. Ich entscheide mich jeden Tag aufs Neue fürs Wach-Sein und dafür, meine Wahrheit in jedem Moment auszudrücken. Ich stelle mir vor, dass unsere Welt recht anders aussähe, würden alle Menschen diesem inneren Kompass folgen. Und ich wünsche es mir und uns sehr.

65


5 PITCHING TIPPS FÜR SOZIALUNTERNEHMER, FUNDRAISER UND CAMPAIGNER

5 P ITCHING TIPPS FÜR SO ZI ALUNTERNEHMER , FUND RAISER UND CAMPAIGNER

WIE PITCHT MAN? WAS IST PITCHEN ÜBERHAUPT? Alle pitchen. Oder zumindest reden sie darüber. Pitch, pitchen, gepitcht. Wann Pitch zum Verb geworden ist, wissen wir auch nicht. Es kann auch zu unangenehmen Situationen führen, wenn man aus seiner Start-up Welt kurz rauskommt und mit den Eltern darüber redet, was man die Woche so gemacht hat. “Du hast was gemacht? Gebitcht? Warum das denn?” Na ja pitchen ist gleichzeitig eigentlich alles und nichts. Eigentlich IMMER wenn man über seine Firma, Organisation oder Produkt redet, pitcht man… pitchen ist im Endeffekt gleich: “verkaufen”. Fundraising ist “pitching” genauso wie Kampagnenarbeit und Community Outreach. Also gut “pitchen” zu können ist für jeden relevant – auch im gemeinnützigen Sektor.

„ERZÄHL ETWAS VON DEINER PERSÖNLICHEN GESCHICHTE. MAN SOLL VERSTEHEN, WAS DICH BEWEGT.”

Aber es gibt nichts schlimmeres als Menschen die beim Bier abends auf die Frage “Wie geht es Dir” anfangen Dir den “Hard-Sell” zu geben und die Folien auspacken. Bei einer “offiziellen” Pitch Situation, beim Investor z.B oder beim potenziellen Spender ist es gut, wenn man das Ganze etwas natürlich rüberbringen kann. Gerne Sachen auswendig lernen, aber so oft üben, dass es nicht mehr so automatisiert klingt. Und stelle Dir vor – auch wenn Du vorne auf der Bühne vor 500 Menschen stehst – dass Du ein Gespräch mit nur einer Person führst. So kommt man weg von einer steifen Präsentationsform und wird zu einer Person, der man gerne zuhört. Dieses Jahr haben wir viele Pitches gemacht und gesehen und obwohl wir alles andere als Expertinnen sind, gibt es definitiv einige Sachen, die immer wieder beim Pitch als positiv oder negativ auffallen. Diese wollten wir mit Dir teilen. Also hier unsere Top 5 Tipps für Pitching:


„REDE ÜBER HERAUSFORDERUNGEN ABER VERWANDEL SIE IN ETWAS POSITIVES, DAMIT ES KLAR IST, DASS DU EINE STRATEGIE HAST. DU MUSST ABER NICHT SO TUN, ALS WÜRDE ALLES PERFEKT LAUFEN. DAS KAUFT DIR KEINER AB.”

PITCHING TIPPS PITCHING TIPP 1: Erzähl etwas von Deiner persönlichen Geschichte. Man soll verstehen, was Dich bewegt.

PITCHING TIPP 2: Sei Leidenschaftlich und energetisch. Lauf zum Beispiel vorher schnell einmal ums Gebäude und hol Dir die Energie.

PITCHING TIPP 3: Sei möglichst konkret mit Marktforschung und Zahlen. Das zeigt, dass Du gut vorbereitet bist und mehr als „nur eine Idee” hast.

PITCHING TIPP 4: Rede über Herausforderungen aber verwandel sie in etwas Positives, damit es klar ist, dass Du eine Strategie hast. Du musst aber nicht so tun, als würde alles perfekt laufen. Das kauft Dir keiner ab.

PITCHING TIPP 5: Sei vorbereitet auf die Frage nach dem 5 Jahres Plan – ein 6-monatiger Plan reicht wahrscheinlich nicht aus.

67


ONE YEAR AS A SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR – DOS AND DON’TS BELIEVE IT OR NOT, IT’S BEEN ONE YEAR SINCE WE LAUNCHED THE CHANGER. IT’S BEEN A WILD RIDE, BUT WE’RE STILL STANDING. AND MAN, HAVE WE LEARNT SOME STUFF. SO NOW WE WE’D LIKE TO SHARE SOME OF THOSE THINGS WITH YOU, SINCE SO MAN Y OF YOU OF HAVE KINDLY SHARED YOUR LEARNINGS WITH US.

DO START AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE

ONE YEAR AS A SO CIAL ENTREPRENEUR

We originally had a LOT more planned for our site than what we ended up launching with. It was supposed to be an all-singing, all-dancing ruby-on-rails community platform with login, open-source database, web crawler, etc., etc. When our co-founder developer decided to leave us after two short weeks (money was an issue but we’ll come to that later), we switched to WordPress and scaled back our vision because we realised we would now have to pay freelance wages. We were gutted. But in hindsight it was actually one of the best things that ever happened to us. It actually meant we were much quicker and more agile. Without much invest, were able to establish a proof of concept and gain momentum that we definitely wouldn’t have had if we had waited another 6 months to get a site, which might have turned out buggy and probably wouldn’t have been what we wanted anyway.

(Having said that, although we were in love with WordPress for most of this year at some point we had a major falling out – when things started to get complicated between us – and we are probably breaking up pretty soon. WordPress isn’t marriage material, especially if you want some more advanced functionalities, but it does make for a great passionate and carefree fling).

DO YOUR RESEARCH Especially if you are building up a social enterprise, you should absolutely know your market, understand their needs and not make assumptions. It can be easy for people from the business sector to assume that they have all of the answers and to want to plan and execute social businesses in the same way that they have done other forms of business, but that is a mistake. Social businesses are for the most part considerably more complex than regular businesses due to their need to balance financial gain and social gain. There are usually a lot more stakeholders and you often can’t “trial and error” in the same way you might in another type of business. There are a lot of people who have been working for “traditional” NGOs for a long time and who are experts in their field. Do not ignore them, try to include them as much as possible.


DON’T BE PUT OFF Don’t expect all smiles and encouragement. We are not in the USA and we are not in the start-up sector. Just because you have a good idea doesn’t mean you can expect to hear, “Great, wonderful, how can I help you”. (Unfortunate, but true.) People working in the social sector seem to have become a bit jaded by lots of startups promising great results, thinking they know everything and then not staying the course. So they tend to be skeptical rather than encouraging. When faced with repeated skepticism, it’s hard not to feel put off (and sometimes downright pissed). But don’t be! Listen to what they have to say and find out why. Others might have already failed where you think you can succeed, learn from those mistakes. If you still think you can do it, then prove those naysayers wrong. Once you have something to show, people will be very encouraging. But the established Changers out there can be a tough crowd to start with.

DO NETWORK Don’t assume that help will come from your closest friends or people directly involved in the topic. Some of the best connections or ideas have come from people we barely know. Widen your circle. Actually none of us are real “networkers” but if there is one thing we have learned this year, it is the value of stepping over your shadow and getting out there. That is the reason we have events on The Changer to encourage more exchange between people. Some events and networks in Berlin and further afield which may be helpful:

– The Changer Hangout (once a month in Berlin, Hamburg and Munich) –Sustainability Drinks – Peace Innovation Lab – Social Impact Lab (Berlin, Hamburg and Munich plus Leipzig and Cologne) – betahaus – Hub:Raum – Rainmaking Loft – MakeSense – Cool Ideas Society – Vision Summit – Sensability (WHU student-run conference) – UPJ CSR Network plus Annual Conference – Impact Hub in Berlin and Munich

Not sure where to start? Check out our Networking for Dummies article on page 46.

DON’T ASSUME YOU WILL GET FUNDING We secured a basic scholarship-model funding in order to allow us to take the plunge and do it full time. However we always knew we would need a proper lump sum at some point (sooner rather than later) to fund real website development and scaling. We didn’t have the MOST promising business model, and we weren’t DIRECTLY helping children with a migrant background get a better education, so that pretty much knocked us out of the ballpark for 99% of business angels AND foundations. But we were kind of in denial about it. For the first 6 months we were absolutely convinced that it was just a matter of time before a foundation or social business angel came knocking on our door, desperate for the opportunity to invest in

69


ONE YEAR AS A SO CIAL ENTREPRENEUR

us. They didn’t. We did not plan for that. We ended up, as a result, making some serious compromises on stuff we shouldn’t have. Like development and staffing. Rather than realising that funding probably wasn’t going to happen for us and so making a change to our business model or introducing fundable projects, we stubbornly stuck to our guns and decided we would just keep bootstrapping. Actually, it looks like now – after a year – that might work out for us. But it was a big risk and around Christmas time, when the outlook was bleak and our funding was running out, we almost chucked in the towel.

DO REALISE THAT YOU MIGHT END UP RUNNING TWO (OR MORE) BUSINESSES As a result of this funding issue, much to our surprise we discovered that a lot of socially motivated start-ups end up running a for-profit entity in addition to their original business. WTF but true. For example, Marcell from Hero

Society does hip hop workshops in schools to engage those children who otherwise haven’t really found their place in society. He realised that these workshops had a huge impact but that schools and youth clubs he needed to be going to had only limited ability to pay for it. So he ALSO founded a consultancy, which runs similar workshops for companies to help with team-building and employee confidence. This is the way a lot of social enterprises are structured, with a for-profit and non-profit entity. It’s a road we are now exploring which we probably never would have considered at the beginning.

DON’T EXPLOIT YOURSELF OR OTHERS Well, you inevitably will to a certain extent but know what your limit is. We agreed at the beginning that we would live off a very small amount of money for maximum one year but that was it. We all agreed that if we weren’t in a position to earn more by that stage we would look for other jobs to finance ourselves. There is also no need to build a social enterprise on slave labour. Do not use your charitable status as an excuse for not paying (sometimes multiple) interns.


TAKE ADVANTAGE OF PROGRAMMES AVAILABLE FOR FUNDING YOURSELF AND EMPLOYEES: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Gründungszuschuss Arbeitsamt Innovationsassistent Erasmus Plus Europäische Freiwilligendienst

DO ENTER COMPETITIONS AND APPLY FOR STUFF Don’t assume you can, or should, do it alone. Getting involved in the Beuth Gründerwerkstatt, Act for Impact and IT4Change have definitely given us the hugest leaps forward in terms of access to funds and networks. Filling out those forms can be a pain but we have never regretted it. Even when you don’t win (which we usually didn’t) it is a way of building your network, getting great feedback and some much needed publicity.

HERE ARE SOME OF THE TOP COMPETITIONS AND PROGRAMMES GLOBALLY AND NATIONALLY: – HULT Prize: 1 Mill $ – changemakers.com: Various – Act for Impact: 40.000 € – Advocate Europe: 50.000 € – ASHOKA PEP Scholarship: 1 Year of Funding – Bist Du der Nächste Ben & Jerry’s: 10.000 € plus Crowdfunding – Climate KIC Green Garage – BPW Berlin-Brandenburg – DO School

DON’T UNDERESTIMATE THE VALUE OF A STRONG TEAM In the beginning, everyone told us we were crazy to be starting a business with friends. When they found out we also lived together, they nearly lost it. One year down the line, we’re still living together, drinking together and working together. But it wasn’t always easy. We had to leave our egos at the door (who could have guessed that we are all such control freaks?!). We had to get to know each other in a completely new light (often seriously under pressure in a way we hadn’t experienced

before). We had to find ways to communicate with one another where everyone felt comfortable. We discovered that sitting in an office all day, even with great friends, can actually be pretty boring when you all have a lot of work to do. We figured out through a lot of trial and error that although we all have similar educational backgrounds and skill sets (that’s a nice way of saying that we are all generalists) actually we do have particular strengths and weaknesses. Then we taught ourselves to structure our workload accordingly and not all try to do everything. We had to learn that negative feedback wasn’t personal. Because, as we had to keep reminding ourselves, we all had the same interest at heart – to make THE CHANGER the best it could be. We stuck to the rule (almost always!) that we were friends first and co-founders second, which pushed us to treat each other with more empathy, respect and sensitivity. The first year of a social startup is anything but stable, investing in a team that can help you withstand the ups and downs is invaluable – personally and professionally.

DO ENJOY THE RIDE Nobody said it was going to be easy. And it won’t be. It might not work out. That’s OK. But what we have realised over the last year is that it is an absolute privilege to be in a position to at least try and create something new, which might even make a difference – however small – to people’s lives. And it is a privilege to be able to make your own mistakes. So make them, learn from them and move on.

71


WITH THANKS TO ALL OF OUR FANTASTIC PARTNERS, ALL OF WHOM WILL MAKE YOUR LIVES AS SOCIAL STARTUPS EVEN BIGGER AND BETTER.

COOL IDEAS

SOCIETY

COOL IDEAS

SOCIETY

MADE POSSIBLE BY:


THE

CHANGER YOUR SOCIAL IMPACT CAREER. MADE EASIER. JOBS. EVENTS. NEWS.

Find your dream job in the social sector, access information for your social project or business and recruit top talent for your team. THE CHANGER is your resource for effective social change.

LET‘S MAKE DOING GOOD EASIER.

www.thechanger.org