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Swaddles to School A Resource Guide for Families with Children Birth - 5 Years


Precious Little One

Here Comes Baby! Labor pains began: Labor lasted: People at your birth:

Baby’s Arrival Name: Date: Time:

Hospital: Doctor:

Weight: Length:

Eye Color:

Hair Color:

On The Day I Was Born... World Leaders: In the News:

In Theaters Now: Best-sellers:

Popular Actors & Actresses: Popular TV Shows:

It Costs HOW Much??? Gas:

Milk:

Movie Ticket: Stamps:


My Firsts

Slept through the night: My first smile: I laughed out loud: I rolled all the way over: I can hold my head up:

I can sit up:

Watch Out! I’ve began crawling:

Holds Bottle:

I spoke my first word and it was:

First Tooth:

I took my first steps:

First Solid Foods:

First hair cut:


Looking for a Physician? The promise of good health starts with finding a great doctor. Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital’s physician referral line provides you and your family with one number to connect with excellent doctors in the area. We have more than 150 physicians on staff representing nearly 40 specialties. So whatever your family’s medical needs are, we’ve got you covered. We’ll even schedule your appointments! Don’t spend your valuable time searching for a doctor. Let us be your connection to care. Call today!

LakeCumberlandHospital.com • 800.424.DOCS (3627)

Providing care and service to 17 schools throughout South Central Kentucky! The Schoolhouse Mobile Care Unit provides a number of services at your child’s elementary, middle, or high school and works in collaboration with your school’s nurse to provide on-site care during regular school hours. Services include well child visits, physicals, immunizations and acute (sick) visits - all aimed at promoting healthier kids who are ready to learn. To learn more and to register your child with the mobile clinic visit:

LakeCumberlandHospital.com/Community/Schoolhouse

Another Healthcare Service from Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital


E DU CA TIO N a nd W O RKF O R CE DE V E LO P M E NT C ABI N E T G O V E RN O R’S O FF ICE O F E A RLY CH ILD H O O D

Andy Beshear Governor

Jacqueline Coleman

500 Mero Street, 5th Floor Phone 502-564-4440 Frankfort, KY 40601

Lieutenant Governor and Secretary

Josh Benton

Deputy Secretary

Linda Hampton

Executive Director

Dear Pulaski County Community Early Childhood Council, The Early Childhood Booklet is designed to empower Kentucky families, caregivers, and professionals who impact and shape the children of the Commonwealth. A solid early childhood foundation is critical for placing children on a path for future educational and lifelong success. From day one, a child’s brain begins forming connections with 90 percent of critical brain development occurring by age 5. Parents who read, sing and talk to their children foster a child’s ability to develop strong vocabularies, and become avid readers. Today’s children are tomorrow’s workforce, and the future of Kentucky greatly depends upon the healthy development of our children. Your investment to fostering early childhood education in your community is a key indication of your commitment to making a positive impact on children throughout the Commonwealth. Thank you for your commitment to educating the children of Kentucky. We look forward to continued success in your community. Together, We Believe in Kentucky Kids! Sincerely,

Holly Lafavers Project Manager


Your Baby at 2 Months Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by 2 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Babies Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

Begins to smile at people

Pays attention to faces

Can briefly calm himself (may bring hands to mouth and suck on hand)

Begins to follow things with eyes and recognize people at a distance

Tries to look at parent

Begins to act bored (cries, fussy) if activity doesn’t change

Language/Communication Coos, makes gurgling sounds Turns head toward sounds

Movement/Physical Development Can hold head up and begins to push up when lying on tummy Makes smoother movements with arms and legs

What You Can Do for Your 2-Month-Old: Cuddle, talk, and play with your baby during feeding, dressing, and bathing. Help your baby learn to calm herself. It’s okay for her to suck on her fingers. Begin to help your baby get into a routine, such as sleeping at night more than in the day, and have regular schedules. Getting in tune with your baby’s likes and dislikes can help you feel more comfortable and confident. Act excited and smile when your baby makes sounds. Copy your baby’s sounds sometimes, but also use clear language. Pay attention to your baby’s different cries so that you learn to know what he wants. Talk, read, and sing to your baby. Play peek-a-boo. Help your baby play peek-a-boo, too. Place a baby-safe mirror in your baby’s crib so she can look at herself. Look at pictures with your baby and talk about them. Lay your baby on his tummy when he is awake and put toys near him. Encourage your baby to lift his head by holding toys at eye level in front of him. Hold a toy or rattle above your baby’s head and encourage her to reach for it. Hold your baby upright with his feet on the floor. Sing or talk to your baby as he is upright.


Your Baby at 4 Months Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by 4 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Babies Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

Smiles spontaneously, especially at people

Lets you know if she is happy or sad

Likes to play with people and might cry when playing stops

Responds to affection Reaches for toy with one hand

Copies some movements and facial expressions, like smiling or frowning

Uses hands and eyes together, such as seeing a toy and reaching for it

Language/Communication

Follows moving things with eyes from side to side

Begins to babble

Watches faces closely

Babbles with expression and copies sounds he hears

Recognizes familiar people and things at a distance

Cries in different ways to show hunger, pain, or being tired

Movement/Physical Development Holds head steady, unsupported Pushes down on legs when feet are on a hard surface May be able to roll over from tummy to back Can hold a toy and shake it and swing at dangling toys Brings hands to mouth When lying on stomach, pushes up to elbows

What You Can Do for Your 4-Month-Old: Hold and talk to your baby; smile and be cheerful while you do. Set steady routines for sleeping and feeding. Pay close attention to what your baby likes and doesn’t like; you will know how best to meet his needs and what you can do to make your baby happy. Copy your baby’s sounds. Act excited and smile when your baby makes sounds. Have quiet play times when you read or sing to your baby. Give age-appropriate toys to play with, such as rattles or colorful pictures. Play games such as peek-a-boo. Provide safe opportunities for your baby to reach for toys and explore his surroundings. Put toys near your baby so that she can reach for them or kick her feet. Put toys or rattles in your baby’s hand and help him to hold them. Hold your baby upright with feet on the floor, and sing or talk to your baby as she “stands” with support.


Your Baby at 6 Months Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by 6 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Babies Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Knows familiar faces and begins to know if someone is a stranger Likes to play with others, especially parents Responds to other people’s emotions and often seems happy Likes to look at self in a mirror

Language/Communication

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving) Looks around at things nearby Brings things to mouth Shows curiosity about things and tries to get things that are out of reach Begins to pass things from one hand to the other

Movement/Physical Development Rolls over in both directions (front to back, back to front)

Responds to sounds by making sounds

Begins to sit without support

Strings vowels together when babbling (“ah,” “eh,” “oh”) and likes taking turns with parent while making sounds

When standing, supports weight on legs and might bounce

Responds to own name

Rocks back and forth, sometimes crawling backward before moving forward

Makes sounds to show joy and displeasure Begins to say consonant sounds (jabbering with “m,” “b”)

What You Can Do for Your 6-Month-Old: Play on the floor with your baby every day. Learn to read your baby’s moods. If he’s happy, keep doing what you are doing. If he’s upset, take a break and comfort your baby. Show your baby how to comfort herself when she’s upset. She may suck on her fingers to self soothe. Use “reciprocal” play—when he smiles, you smile; when he makes sounds, you copy them. Repeat your child’s sounds and say simple words with those sounds. For example, if your child says “bah,” say “bottle” or “book.” Read books to your child every day. Praise her when she babbles and “reads” too. When your baby looks at something, point to it and talk about it. When he drops a toy on the floor, pick it up and give it back. This game helps him learn cause and effect. Read colorful picture books to your baby. Point out new things to your baby and name them. Show your baby bright pictures in a magazine and name them. Hold your baby up while she sits or support her with pillows. Let her look around and give her toys to look at while she balances. Put your baby on his tummy or back and put toys just out of reach. Encourage him to roll over to reach the toys.


Your Baby at 9 Months Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by 9 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Babies Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

May be afraid of strangers

Watches the path of something as it falls

May be clingy with familiar adults

Looks for things he sees you hide

Has favorite toys

Plays peek-a-boo Puts things in her mouth

Language/Communication Understands “no”

Moves things smoothly from one hand to the other

Makes a lot of different sounds like “mamamama” and “bababababa”

Picks up things like cereal o’s between thumb and index finger

Copies sounds and gestures of others

Movement/Physical Development

Uses fingers to point at things

Stands, holding on Can get into sitting position Sits without support Pulls to stand Crawls

What You Can Do for Your 9-Month-Old: Pay attention to the way he reacts to new situations and people; try to continue to do things that make your baby happy and comfortable. As she moves around more, stay close so she knows that you are near. Continue with routines; they are especially important now. Play games with “my turn, your turn.” Say what you think your baby is feeling. For example, say, “You are so sad, let’s see if we can make you feel better.” Describe what your baby is looking at; for example, “red, round ball.” Talk about what your baby wants when he points at something. Copy your baby’s sounds and words. Ask for behaviors that you want. For example, instead of saying “don’t stand,” say “time to sit.” Teach cause-and-effect by rolling balls back and forth, pushing toy cars and trucks, and putting blocks in and out of a container. Play peek-a-boo and hide-and-seek. Read and talk to your baby. Provide lots of room for your baby to move and explore in a safe area. Put your baby close to things that she can pull up on safely. It’s time for developmental screening! At 9 months, your child is due for general developmental screening, as recommended for all children by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Ask the doctor about your child’s developmental screening.


Your Child at 1 Year Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by age 1. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Children Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

Is shy or nervous with strangers

Explores things in different ways, like shaking, banging, throwing

Cries when mom or dad leaves

Finds hidden things easily

Has favorite things and people

Looks at the right picture or thing when it’s named

Shows fear in some situations

Copies gestures

Hands you a book when he wants to hear a story

Starts to use things correctly; for example, drinks from a cup, brushes hair

Repeats sounds or actions to get attention Puts out arm or leg to help with dressing

Bangs two things together

Plays games such as “peek-a-boo” and “pat-a-cake”

Puts things in a container, takes things out of a container

Language/Communication

Lets things go without help

Responds to simple spoken requests

Pokes with index (pointer) finger

Uses simple gestures, like shaking head “no” or waving “bye-bye”

Follows simple directions like “pick up the toy”

Makes sounds with changes in tone (sounds more like speech)

Movement/Physical Development Gets to a sitting position without help

Says “mama” and “dada” and exclamations like “uh-oh!”

Pulls up to stand, walks holding on to furniture (“cruising”)

Tries to say words you say

May stand alone

May take a few steps without holding on

What You Can Do for Your 1-Year-Old: Give your child time to get to know a new caregiver. Bring a favorite toy, stuffed animal, or blanket to help comfort your child. In response to unwanted behaviors, say “no” firmly. Do not yell, spank, or give long explanations. A time out for 30 seconds to 1 minute might help redirect your child. Give your child lots of hugs, kisses, and praise for good behavior. Spend a lot more time encouraging wanted behaviors than punishing unwanted behaviors (4 times as much encouragement for wanted behaviors as redirection for unwanted behaviors). Talk to your child about what you’re doing. For example, “Mommy is washing your hands with a washcloth.” Read with your child every day. Have your child turn the pages. Take turns labeling pictures with your child. Build on what your child says or tries to say, or what he points to. If he points to a truck and says “t” or “truck,” say, “Yes, that’s a big, blue truck.” Give your child crayons and paper, and let your child draw freely. Show your child how to draw lines up and down and across the page. Praise your child when she tries to copy them. Play with blocks, shape sorters, and other toys that encourage your child to use his hands. Hide small toys and other things and have your child find them. Ask your child to label body parts or things you see while driving in the car. Sing songs with actions, like “The Itsy Bitsy Spider” and “Wheels on the Bus.” Help your child do the actions with you. Give your child pots and pans or a small musical instrument like a drum or cymbals. Encourage your child to make noise. Provide lots of safe places for your toddler to explore. (Toddler-proof your home. Lock away products for cleaning, laundry, lawn care, and car care. Use a safety gate and lock doors to the outside and the basement.) Give your child push toys like a wagon or “kiddie push car.”


Your Child at 18 Months (1 1/2 Yrs) Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by age 18 months. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Children Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

Likes to hand things to others as play

Knows what ordinary things are for; for example, telephone, brush, spoon

May have temper tantrums

Points to get the attention of others

May be afraid of strangers

Shows interest in a doll or stuffed animal by pretending to feed

Shows affection to familiar people Plays simple pretend, such as feeding a doll

Points to one body part

May cling to caregivers in new situations

Scribbles on his own

Points to show others something interesting

Can follow 1-step verbal commands without any gestures; for example, sits when you say “sit down”

Explores alone but with parent close by

Language/Communication

Movement/Physical Development

Says several single words

Walks alone

Says and shakes head “no”

May walk up steps and run

Points to show someone what he wants

Pulls toys while walking Can help undress herself Drinks from a cup Eats with a spoon

What You Can Do for Your 18-Month-Old: Provide a safe, loving environment. It’s important to be consistent and predictable. Praise good behaviors more than you punish bad behaviors (use only very brief time outs). Describe her emotions. For example, say, “You are happy when we read this book.” Encourage pretend play. Encourage empathy. For example, when he sees a child who is sad, encourage him to hug or pat the other child. Read books and talk about the pictures using simple words. Copy your child’s words. Use words that describe feelings and emotions. Use simple, clear phrases. Ask simple questions. Hide things under blankets and pillows and encourage him to find them. Play with blocks, balls, puzzles, books, and toys that teach cause and effect and problem solving. Provide toys that encourage pretend play; for example, dolls, play telephones. Name pictures in books and body parts. Provide safe areas for your child to walk and move around in. Provide toys that she can push or pull safely. Provide balls for her to kick, roll, and throw. Encourage him to drink from his cup and use a spoon, no matter how messy. Blow bubbles and let your child pop them.

It’s time for developmental screening! At 18 months, your child is due for general developmental screening and an autism screening, as recommended for all children by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Ask the doctor about your child’s developmental screening.


Your Child at 2 Years Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by age 2. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Children Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Copies others, especially adults and older children

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving) Finds things even when hidden under two or three covers

Gets excited when with other children

Begins to sort shapes and colors

Shows more and more independence

Completes sentences and rhymes in familiar books

Shows defiant behavior (doing what he has been told not to)

Plays simple make-believe games Builds towers of 4 or more blocks

Plays mainly beside other children, but is beginning to include other children, such as in chase games

Might use one hand more than the other Follows two-step instructions such as “Pick up your shoes and put them in the closet.”

Language/Communication Points to things or pictures when they are named Knows names of familiar people and body parts Says sentences with 2 to 4 words

Names items in a picture book such as a cat, bird, or dog

Movement/Physical Development

Follows simple instructions Repeats words overheard in conversation Points to things in a book

Stands on tiptoe Kicks a ball Begins to run Climbs onto and down from furniture without help Walks up and down stairs holding on

What You Can Do for Your 2-Year-Old: Encourage your child to help with simple chores at home, like sweeping and making dinner. Praise your child for being a good helper. At this age, children still play next to (not with) each other and don’t share well. For play dates, give the children lots of toys to play with. Watch the children closely and step in if they fight or argue. Give your child attention and praise when he follows instructions. Limit attention for defiant behavior. Spend a lot more time praising good behaviors than punishing bad ones. Teach your child to identify and say body parts, animals, and other common things. Do not correct your child when he says words incorrectly. Rather, say it correctly. For example, “That is a ball.” Encourage your child to say a word instead of pointing. If your child can’t say the whole word (“milk”), give her the first sound (“m”) to help. Over time, you can prompt your child to say the whole sentence — “I want milk.” Hide your child’s toys around the room and let him find them. Help your child do puzzles with shapes, colors, or farm animals. Name each piece when your child puts it in place. Encourage your child to play with blocks. Take turns building towers and knocking them down. Do art projects with your child using crayons, paint, and paper. Describe what your child makes and hang it on the wall or refrigerator. Ask your child to help you open doors and drawers and turn pages in a book or magazine. Once your child walks well, ask her to carry small things for you. Kick a ball back and forth with your child. When your child is good at that, encourage him to run and kick. Take your child to the park to run and climb on equipment or walk on nature trails. Watch your child closely. It’s time for developmental screening! At 2 years, your child is due for general developmental screening and an autism screening, as recommended for all children by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Ask the doctor about your child’s developmental screening.


Your Child at 3 Years Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by age 3. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Children Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Copies adults and friends

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving) Can work toys with buttons, levers, and moving parts

Shows affection for friends without prompting

Plays make-believe with dolls, animals, and people

Takes turns in games

Does puzzles with 3 or 4 pieces

Shows concern for a crying friend

Understands what “two” means

Understands the idea of “mine” and “his” or “hers”

Copies a circle with pencil or crayon

Shows a wide range of emotions

Turns book pages one at a time

Separates easily from mom and dad

Builds towers of more than 6 blocks

May get upset with major changes in routine

Screws and unscrews jar lids or turns door handle

Dresses and undresses self

Movement/Physical Development

Language/Communication

Climbs well

Follows instructions with 2 or 3 steps

Runs easily

Can name most familiar things

Pedals a tricycle (3-wheel bike)

Understands words like “in,” “on,” and “under”

Walks up and down stairs, one foot on each step

Says first name, age, and sex Names a friend Says words like “I,” “me,” “we,” and “you” and some plurals (cars, dogs, cats) Talks well enough for strangers to understand most of the time Carries on a conversation using 2 to 3 sentences

What You Can Do for Your 3-Year-Old: Go to play groups with your child or other places where there are other children, to encourage getting along with others. Work with your child to solve the problem when he is upset. Talk about your child’s emotions. For example, say, “I can tell you feel mad because you threw the puzzle piece.” Encourage your child to identify feelings in books. Set rules and limits for your child, and stick to them. If your child breaks a rule, give him a time out for 30 seconds to 1 minute in a chair or in his room. Praise your child for following the rules. Give your child instructions with 2 or 3 steps. For example, “Go to your room and get your shoes and coat.” Read to your child every day. Ask your child to point to things in the pictures and repeat words after you. Give your child an “activity box” with paper, crayons, and coloring books. Color and draw lines and shapes with your child. Play matching games. Ask your child to find objects in books or around the house that are the same. Play counting games. Count body parts, stairs, and other things you use or see every day. Hold your child’s hand going up and down stairs. When she can go up and down easily, encourage her to use the railing. Play outside with your child. Go to the park or hiking trail. Allow your child to play freely and without structured activities.


Your Child at 4 Years Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by age 4. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Children Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

Enjoys doing new things

Names some colors and some numbers

Plays “Mom” and “Dad”

Understands the idea of counting

Is more and more creative with make-believe play

Starts to understand time

Would rather play with other children than by himself

Remembers parts of a story

Cooperates with other children

Understands the idea of “same” and “different”

Often can’t tell what’s real and what’s make-believe

Draws a person with 2 to 4 body parts

Talks about what she likes and what she is interested in

Uses scissors Starts to copy some capital letters Plays board or card games

Language/Communication Knows some basic rules of grammar, such as correctly using “he” and “she” Sings a song or says a poem from memory such as the “Itsy Bitsy Spider” or the “Wheels on the Bus” Tells stories

Tells you what he thinks is going to happen next in a book

Movement/Physical Development Hops and stands on one foot up to 2 seconds Catches a bounced ball most of the time Pours, cuts with supervision, and mashes own food

Can say first and last name

What You Can Do for Your 4-Year-Old: Play make-believe with your child. Let her be the leader and copy what she is doing. Suggest your child pretend play an upcoming event that might make him nervous, like going to preschool or staying overnight at a grandparent’s house. Give your child simple choices whenever you can. Let your child choose what to wear, play, or eat for a snack. Limit choices to 2 or 3. During play dates, let your child solve her own problems with friends, but be nearby to help out if needed. Encourage your child to use words, share toys, and take turns playing games of one another’s choice. Give your child toys to build imagination, like dress-up clothes, kitchen sets, and blocks. Use good grammar when speaking to your child. Instead of “Mommy wants you to come here,” say, “I want you to come here.” Use words like “first,” “second,” and “finally” when talking about everyday activities. This will help your child learn about sequence of events. Take time to answer your child’s “why” questions. If you don’t know the answer, say “I don’t know,” or help your child find the answer in a book, on the Internet, or from another adult. When you read with your child, ask him to tell you what happened in the story as you go. Say colors in books, pictures, and things at home. Count common items, like the number of snack crackers, stairs, or toy trains. Teach your child to play outdoor games like tag, follow the leader, and duck, duck, goose. Play your child’s favorite music and dance with your child. Take turns copying each other’s moves.


Your Child at 5 Years Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her development. Check the milestones your child has reached by age 5. Take this with you and talk with your child’s doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached and what to expect next.

What Most Children Do by this Age: Social/Emotional

Cognitive (learning, thinking, problem-solving)

Wants to please friends

Counts 10 or more things

Wants to be like friends

Can draw a person with at least 6 body parts

More likely to agree with rules

Can print some letters or numbers

Likes to sing, dance, and act

Copies a triangle and other geometric shapes

Is aware of gender

Knows about things used every day, like money and food

Can tell what’s real and what’s make-believe Shows more independence (for example, may visit a next-door neighbor by himself [adult supervision is still needed]) Is sometimes demanding and sometimes very cooperative

Language/Communication Speaks very clearly

Tells a simple story using full sentences

Movement/Physical Development Stands on one foot for 10 seconds or longer Hops; may be able to skip Can do a somersault Uses a fork and spoon and sometimes a table knife Can use the toilet on her own Swings and climbs

Uses future tense; for example, “Grandma will be here.” Says name and address

What You Can Do for Your 5-Year-Old: Continue to arrange play dates, trips to the park, or play groups. Give your child more freedom to choose activities to play with friends, and let your child work out problems on her own. Your child might start to talk back or use profanity (swear words) as a way to feel independent. Do not give a lot of attention to this talk, other than a brief time out. Instead, praise your child when he asks for things nicely and calmly takes “no” for an answer. This is a good time to talk to your child about safe touch. No one should touch “private parts” except doctors or nurses during an exam or parents when they are trying to keep the child clean. Teach your child her address and phone number. When reading to your child, ask him to predict what will happen next in the story. Encourage your child to “read” by looking at the pictures and telling the story. Teach your child time concepts like morning, afternoon, evening, today, tomorrow, and yesterday. Start teaching the days of the week. Explore your child’s interests in your community. For example, if your child loves animals, visit the zoo or petting farm. Go to the library or look on the Internet to learn about these topics. Keep a handy box of crayons, paper, paint, child scissors, and paste. Encourage your child to draw and make art projects with different supplies. Play with toys that encourage your child to put things together. Teach your child how to pump her legs back and forth on a swing. Help your child climb on the monkey bars. Go on walks with your child, do a scavenger hunt in your neighborhood or park, help him ride a bike with training wheels (wearing a helmet).


You Know Your Child Best DON'T WAIT. Acting early can make a real difference!

Tell your child’s doctor or nurse if you notice any of these signs of possible developmental delay and ask for a developmental screening. If you or the doctor is still concerned 1. Ask for a referral to a specialist and, 2. Call your state or territory’s early intervention program to find out if your child can get services to help. Learn more and find the number at cdc.gov/FindEI. For more information, go to cdc.gov/Concerned. Act early if you have concerns about the way your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, or moves, or if your child:

2-Month-Old: Is missing milestones

Doesn’t smile at people

Doesn’t respond to loud sounds

Doesn’t bring hands to mouth

Doesn’t watch things as they move

Can’t hold head up when pushing up when on tummy

4-Month-Old: Is missing milestones

Doesn’t bring things to mouth

Doesn’t watch things as they move

Doesn’t push down with legs when feet are placed on a hard surface.

Doesn’t smile at people Can’t hold head steady

Has trouble moving one or both eyes in all directions

Doesn’t coo or make sounds

6-Month-Old: Is missing milestones

Doesn’t make vowel sounds (“ah”, “eh”, “oh”)

Doesn’t try to get things that are in reach

Doesn’t roll over in either direction

Shows no affection for caregivers

Doesn’t laugh or make squealing sounds

Doesn’t respond to sounds around him

Seems very stiff, with tight muscles

Has difficulty getting things to mouth

Seems very floppy, like a rag doll

Doesn’t bring things to mouth

9-Month-Old: Is missing milestones

Doesn’t respond to own name

Doesn’t bear weight on legs with support

Doesn’t seem to recognize familiar people

Doesn’t sit with help

Doesn’t look where you point

Doesn’t babble (“mama”, “baba”, “dada”)

Doesn’t transfer toys from one hand to the other

Doesn’t play any games involving back-and-forth play

1-Year-Old: Is missing milestones

Doesn’t say single words like “mama” or “dada”

Doesn’t crawl

Doesn’t learn gestures like waving or shaking head

Can’t stand when supported

Doesn’t point to things

Doesn’t search for things that she sees you hide.

Loses skills he once had

18-Month-Old: Is missing milestones

Doesn’t gain new words

Doesn’t point to show things to others

Doesn’t have at least 6 words

Can’t walk

Doesn’t notice or mind when a caregiver leaves or returns

Doesn’t know what familiar things are for

Loses skills he once had

Doesn’t copy others


Your Child at 3 Years Help Your Child Learn and Grow

2-Year-Old:

Is missing milestones

Doesn’t follow simple instructions

Doesn’t use 2-word phrases (for example, “drink milk”)

Doesn’t walk steadily

Doesn’t know what to do with common things, like a Loses skills she once had Child’s Name Child’s Age Today’s Date brush, phone, fork, spoon You can help your child learn and grow. Talk, read, sing, and play together every day. Doesn’t actions and words Below copy are some activities to enjoy with your 2-year-old child today.

Milestones matter! How your child plays, learns, speaks, acts, and moves offers important clues about his or her 3-Year-Old: development. Check the milestones your child has reached by age 3. Take this with you and talk with your child’s

Is missing milestones Doesn’t and understand doctor at every well-child visit about the milestones your child has reached what to simple expect instructions next. Falls down a lot or has trouble with stairs

Doesn’t play pretend or make-believe

What Children Do by this Age: Movement/Physical Drools Most or has very unclear speech Doesn’t want to play with other children or with toys Development What You Can Do for Your 2-Year-Old: o Doesn’t Climbs well Can’t work simple toys (such as peg boards, simple make eye contact Social/Emotional puzzles, turning handle)

o Copies adults and friends Doesn’t speak in sentences o Shows for friends without prompting Encourage your child to help with simple chores at oaffection o Takes turns in games home, like sweeping and making dinner. Praise your o Shows concern forbeing a crying friend child for a good helper. missing milestones oIs Understands the idea of “mine” and “his” or “hers” oCan’t Shows range emotions Atinthis age, of children still play next to (not with) each oa wide jump place o Separatesother easilyand from mom andwell. dad For play dates, give the don’t share scribbling oHas Maytrouble get upset withlots major changes routine children of toys to playin with. Watch the children oShows Dresses undresses selfin if they fight closely andinstep or argue. noand interest interactive games or make-believe

4-Year-Old:

Ignores other children or doesn’t respond to people

o Give your child attention and praise when he follows Language/Communication outside the family

o Runs easily Loses skills he once had o Pedals a tricycle (3-wheel bike) o up and down stairs, one on each step or Help your child do puzzles withfoot shapes, colors, o Walks farm animals. Name each piece when your child puts it in place. Can’t retell a favorite story

You Know Your Child Best.

Encourage your3-part child tocommands play with blocks. Take turns oDoesn’t follow Act building early if you have concerns about the down. way your child plays, towers and knocking them learns, speaks, acts, or moves, or if and your child: Doesn’t understand “same” “different” Do art projects with your child using crayons, paint, o oDoesn’t Is missing milestones use “me” and “you” correctly and paper. Describe what your child makes o Falls down a lot or has trouble with stairs and Speaks unclearly on thevery wallunclear or refrigerator. o hang Droolsit or has speech Loses skills he once o Can’t work simple toys had (such as peg boards, simple puzzles, o Ask your child to help you open doors and drawers turning handle) and turn pages in a book or magazine. o Doesn’t speak in sentences o Once Doesn’t understand simple your child walks well,instructions ask her to carry small o play a variety of games and activities oDoesn’t Doesn’tfor play pretend or make-believe things you.

instructions. Limit attention for defiant behavior. o Follows instructions with 2 or 3 steps Spend a lot more time praising Resists dressing, sleeping, and usinggood thebehaviors toilet than o Can namepunishing most familiar things bad ones. o Understands words like “in,” “on,” and “under” o Says o first Teach name, your age, child and sex to identify and say body parts, Is missing milestones o Names a friend animals, and other common things. oCan’t Doesn’t want to and play with children or with toys oDoesn’t Says words likea“I,” “me,” “we,”ofand “you” and some plurals show wide range emotions give first last other name Kick a ball back and forth with your child. When your o o Doesn’t make eye contact Docats) not correct your child when he says words (cars,o dogs, Shows extreme behavior (unusually fearful, aggressive, Doesn’t use plurals or past tense child is good at that, encourage him toproperly run and kick. saytoitunderstand correctly. For example, o Loses skills he once had o Talks wellincorrectly. enough for Rather, strangers most of the time shy or sad) is a ball.” using 2 to 3 sentences Doesn’t talk about daily activities or experiences o Carries on“That a conversation TellTake youryour child’s nurse if you any of childdoctor to the or park to run and notice climb on o Unusually withdrawn and not active these signsdraw oforpossible developmental delay and ask for Doesn’t pictures equipment walk on nature trails. Watch your your child to say a word instead of o Encourage Cognitive (learning, problem-solving) a developmental screening. Is easily distracted, hasthinking, trouble focusing on one activity child brush closely.teeth, pointing. If your child can’t say the whole word Can’t wash and dry hands, or get undressed more 5 minutes oforCan workthan toys with buttons, levers, moving parts If without you or thehelp doctor is still concerned (“milk”), give her the firstand sound (“m”) to help. oDoesn’t Plays make-believe dolls, animals, andchild people respond towith people, or responds only superficially Over time, you can prompt your to say the 1. Askskills for a referral to ahad specialist and, Loses he once o Does puzzles with 3 or 4 pieces whole sentence — “I want milk.” 2. Call any local public elementary school for a free Can’t tell what’s real and what’s make-believe o Understands what “two” means evaluation to find out if your child can get services to help. o Copiesoa circle with child’s pencil toys or crayon Hide your around the room and let him For more information, go to cdc.gov/Concerned. o Turns bookfind pages one at a time them. o Builds towers of more than 6 blocks from CARING jar FORlids YOURor BABY AND YOUNG BIRTH TO AGE 5, Fifth Edition, edited by Steven Shelov and Tanya Remer Altmann © 1991, 1993, 1998, 2004, 2009 by the American o Milestones Screwsadapted and unscrews turns door CHILD: handle

5-Year-Old:

DON’T WAIT.

Academy of Pediatrics and BRIGHT FUTURES: GUIDELINES FOR HEALTH SUPERVISION OF INFANTS, CHILDREN, AND ADOLESCENTS, Third Edition, edited by Joseph Hagan, Jr., Judith S. Shaw, and Paula M. Duncan, 2008, Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Acting early can make a real difference!

This milestone checklist is not a substitute for a standardized, validated developmental screening tool.

www.cdc.gov/ActEarly 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) www.cdc.gov/ActEarly | 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636)

Learn the Signs. Act Early. Learn the Signs. Act Early.


QUALITY WITH CARE QUALITY CARE multidisciplinary, Total Pediatric Therapy is aWITH high quality, QUALITY WITH CARE outpatient therapy clinicisfor We multidisciplinary, provide OT, SLP, Total Pediatric Therapy a children. high quality, QUALITY WITHquality, CARE Total Pediatric Therapy is high multidisciplinary, PT, and mental health outpatient therapy clinicservices. forachildren. We provide OT, SLP, QUALITY WITH CARE outpatient therapy clinicservices. forachildren. We provide OT, SLP, PT, and mental health Total Pediatric Therapy is high quality, multidisciplinary, PT, and mental health At Total Pediatrics, we strive to provide quality with care. Weservices. an outpatient pediatric private Total Pediatric Therapy isare a high quality, multidisciplinary, outpatient therapy clinic for children. We provide OT, SLP, practice who offers a wide variety of services such as Occupational Therapy, Speech-Language At Total Pediatrics, we strive to provide quality with care. Weservices. are children. an outpatient outpatient therapy clinic for Wepediatric provideprivate OT, SLP, PT, and mental health Therapy, Physical Therapy and partnered behavioral health services. Our staff is passionate about At Total Pediatrics, wewide strive to provide quality withas care. We are anTherapy, outpatientSpeech-Language pediatric private practice who offers a variety of services such Occupational PT, and mental health services.

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OT can provide feeding, handwriting visual motorofintegration, adapting to new routines, trying new foods and textures and more! address of challenges suchwho as processing disorders, aintervention multitudeanofarray populations and diagnoses. Occupational can for a variety of children may be struggling with self-care/independence, and activities ofsensory daily living. OTTherapy can provide feeding, handwriting skills, visual motor integration, address antoarray challenges such sensory processing adapting new routines, newas foods and anddisorders, more! intervention for aof variety oftrying children who may betextures struggling with If you are concerned with your child’shandwriting speech-language skills or self-care/independence, and activities of daily living. OT can provide feeding, skills, visual motor integration, adapting to new routines, trying new foods and textures and more! swallowing efficiency, Total Pediatrics is the place for you! Our intervention for a varietyand of children mayliving. be struggling self-care/independence, activities of daily OT can with provide If you are concerned with your child’s speech-language skills or who Speech-Language Pathologist, Cheyenne Chaney, CF-SLP, is adapting new routines, trying foods textures and intervention for a variety children who mayand be struggling withmore! swallowing efficiency,with Total Pediatrics istothe place for of you! Ourornew If you are concerned your child’s speech-language skills equipped to provide treatment regarding lack routines, of verbal trying new foods and textures and more! adapting to new Speech-Language Pathologist, Cheyenne Chaney, CF-SLP, is swallowing efficiency, Total Pediatrics is the place for you! Our communication, expressive andchild’s receptive language If you are concerned with your speech-language skills equipped to providePathologist, treatment regarding lack of verbal Speech-Language Cheyenne Chaney, CF-SLP, isor delays/disorders, AAC intervention, social pragmatics, pediatric swallowing Total Pediatrics is lack the place for you! Our Ifcommunication, you are concerned with your child’s speech-language skills or expressive and receptive language equipped to efficiency, provide treatment regarding of verbal dysphagia and swallowing ability. Play-based intervention is Speech-Language Pathologist, Cheyenne Chaney, CF-SLP, is swallowing efficiency, Total Pediatrics is thelanguage place for you! Ouran delays/disorders, AAC intervention, social pragmatics, pediatric communication, expressive and receptive essential component to increase a child’s language skills and equipped to provide treatment regarding of verbal Speech-Language Pathologist, Cheyenne Chaney, CF-SLP, dysphagia and swallowing ability. Play-based intervention isisan delays/disorders, AAC intervention, sociallack pragmatics, pediatric development. Give us a call if this is an area of concern for your communication, expressive and receptive language equipped to provide treatment regarding lack ofintervention verbal essential component to increase aPlay-based child’s language skills and dysphagia and swallowing ability. is an child, contact us and let usand help! delays/disorders, AAC social pragmatics, pediatric communication, expressive receptive language development. Give ustoaintervention, call if this an area of concern for your essential component increase aischild’s language skills and dysphagia and swallowing ability. Play-based intervention an delays/disorders, AAC intervention, social pragmatics, pediatric child, contact us anduslet development. Give a us callhelp! if this is an area of concern forisyour Total Peds also provides Physical Therapy Services with Laura Pope, essential component to increase a child’s language skillsisand dysphagia and swallowing intervention an child, contact us and let usability. help! Play-based PT McAlpin, PTA. therapy can address gross development. Give us a call if this isand an Hannah area of provides concern for yourPhysical essential component to increase a child’s language skills and Total Peds also Physical Therapy Services with Laura Pope, motor delays/difficulties and with diagnoses such as orthopedic child, contactGive us and us ifhelp! development. us aletcall this isand anPeds area of concern for your PT Hannah McAlpin, PTA. Physical therapy can with address gross Total also provides Physical Therapy Services Laura Pope, injuries, Torticollis, Spina Bifida, Cerebral Palsy, as well as adaptive child, contact us and let us help! motor and withPhysical diagnoses suchcan as orthopedic PT anddelays/difficulties Hannah McAlpin, PTA. therapy address gross equipment training. Total Peds also provides Physical Therapy Services withasLaura Pope, injuries, Torticollis, Spinaand Bifida, Palsy, adaptive motor delays/difficulties withCerebral diagnoses suchas aswell orthopedic PT and Hannah McAlpin, PTA. 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CCAMPIS

Child Care Access Means Parents in School

C C A P M S I

Supporting SCC student-parents in starting and completing their postsecondary education by providing child care assistance to eligible students. For more information or assistance with the application please contact: Katie Bertram, CCAMPIS Program Coordinator Somerset Community College 808 Monticello Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-677-8306 katie.bertram@kctcs.edu


God’s Food Pantry in Somerset has been continuously providing supplemental food to families in need in Pulaski County since 1982. Today, God’s Food Pantry is the largest serving food pantry in a 50 county region. With a multitude of programs and compassionate hearts, they provide as much help as they can to friends and neighbors in need. God’s Food Pantry - 119 S. Central Avenue Somerset, KY 42501 - 606-679-8560 - Gfp8560@gmail.com Open Monday – Friday 10:00am – 2:30pm - Closed Holidays

God’s Food Pantry Programs at a Glance: Pantry Program – Cart of groceries including staples, perishables, nonperishables and extras. • Intended for anyone in Pulaski County who needs supplemental food assistance • Individuals and families may be served once every 40 days (per address)

Sack Lunch Program Available to individuals who have an immediate need to eat and have already used other available sources of assistance • One per person per day • No documentation required

Senior (CSFP) Program – Box of commodities, mostly nonperishables. • Intended for individuals over 60 years old- Must preregister • Boxes distributed monthly (480 boxes available) • One senior person per address may participate • Can be used in addition to the Pantry Program

Community Meal Program • Available to anyone who needs a hot meal. • Presbyterian Church on the 2nd and last Mondays of the month at 200 N. Vine Street from 6pm-7pm. • First United Methodist Church every Wednesday at 99 S. Central Avenue with Fellowship at 4pm and a meal at 5pm.

Requirements for Pantry and Senior Programs listed above: • Must live in Pulaski County • Must be income eligible • Able to provide proper documentation: 1. Identification for each person 2. Utility bill or lease 3. Proof of income for entire household Diaper Program Low cost diaper program for those with self-declared need. The typical cost to diaper a baby for an entire month is around $28. Diapers available for purchase during regular business hours. Cash only please. Homeless Program Administered to individuals who are unable to provide documentation of address or those living in hotels or other temporary lodging • Homeless may be served once every 14 days • Must show identification

Community Food Distribution Available to ANYONE who can use what is being offered. God’s Food Pantry is sometimes blessed with an abundance of perishables. When that happens, the pantry does a “pop up” food distribution in the front parking lot. Items outside are available to anyone who has a need with no qualification requirements or paperwork needed. This typically happens 30-50 times per year and is announced on our Facebook page when food is available. Volunteer Program God’s Food Pantry welcomes community members needing to do volunteer hours for many programs including KTAP, SMART, Drug Court and SCSEP as well as court ordered volunteer hours. They also welcome community volunteers who wish to make a positive impact on the world around them.


Mental Illness: Not Limited to Teens and Adults A category of people that often get left out of the Mental Illness/Awareness discussion is Early Childhood aged children (birth to age 5). At times, this age group gets overlooked due to confusion over whether concerning emotions/behaviors are indeed a sign of Mental Illness, or are normal childhood behaviors. And with the lacking verbalization abilities that are associated with much younger children, there is not often a mode for the child to express their concerns. It is important to know what to look for that might cause concern for children in this age range. And it is also very important to recognize that there are developmentally appropriate behaviors for children from birth to age 5; the behavioral warning signs listed in this document are those that would be seen as excessive and concerning for this age-range of children. When researching some potential warning signs for Mental Illness in Children, www.mayoclinic.org offered a great bulleted list as outlined below: Mood Changes Look for feelings of sadness or withdrawal that last at least 2 weeks or severe mood swings that cause problems in relationships at home, in the community or in school Intense Feelings Be aware of feelings of overwhelming fear for no reason—sometimes with a racing heart or fast breathing—or worries or fears that are intense enough to interfere with daily activities Behavioral Changes These include drastic changes in behavior or personality, as well as dangerous or out-of-control behavior. Fighting frequently, using weapons and expressing a desire to badly hurt others are also warning signs. Difficulty Concentrating Look for signs of trouble focusing or sitting still (in excess of developmentally appropriate energy shown by young children), both of which might lead to poor performance in school. Unexplained Weight Loss A sudden loss of appetite, frequent vomiting or use of laxatives might indicate an eating disorder or an anxiety related response. Physical Symptoms Compared with adults, children with a mental health struggle might develop headaches and stomachaches rather than sadness or anxiety. Physical Harm Sometimes a mental health condition leads to self-injury, also called self-harm. This is the act of deliberately harming your own body, such as cutting, scratching, hitting, biting or burning yourself. Children with a mental health concern also might develop suicidal thoughts or attempt suicide. If you are concerned about your child’s mental health, consult with your child’s doctor. Describe that concerning behavior to the doctor, along with any relevant concerns coming from community partners, school staff, family friends and other family members.

Group Services

• Anger Management Groups • Play Therapy Groups • Parent Education/Support Groups • Social Skills Groups

Specialized Services

Individual Services

• Mental Health Screenings and Assessments • Targeted Case Management • Individual Therapy • Collateral/Family Therapy • Mental Health Evaluations

• Phoenix Wellness/Phoenix Race Team • Autism Services • Clinical Supervision for Licensed Professional Counselor Associates • Play Therapy Supervision for individuals working on RPT or RPT-S credentials • Tele-Psychiatry: Assessments, Psychiatric Evaluations and On-Going Medication Management Services in collaboration with The Ridge • Total Pediatrics: a collaborative project between Total Rehab and Phoenix Preferred Care


Preparing for Kindergarten In Kentucky, School Readiness means that a child enters school ready to engage in and benefit from early learning experiences that best promote the child’s success. The journey to kindergarten begins at birth. In the first five years of life, 90% of the brain is developed. This critical window lays the foundation for a child’s developmental and emotional health that leads to school success. The school readiness definition outlines the five developmental domains children can aspire to have prior to kindergarten. While these skills are desired, the only eligibility requirement for kindergarten enrollment in Kentucky is to meet the legal age requirement to enter public school. Families, early care and education providers, school staff and community partners must work together to provide environments and developmental experiences that promote growth to ensure that all children in Kentucky enter school ready and excited to learn.

What Does School Readiness Look Like? In Kentucky, families, schools, communities and the Commonwealth work together to assure children possess the foundation to succeed in school Children: • Need a general knowledge and curiosity of the world, things, events, and people; • Exposure to print; • Experiences with developmentally appropriate hands-on learning; • Motivation and engagement with learning tasks; • Experience in the arts including music, visual art, and dramatic play; • Possess effective social, emotional, and interpersonal skills; • Socialization to group norms such as will be expected in the school and classroom setting; • Have developed the ability to communicate effectively; and • Require any physical or health barriers to be addressed including screening and correction for vision, hearing, and other health-related issues. Families: • Understand they are their child’s first teacher, nurturing and stimulating their child’s development; • Provide safe and financially stable homes; • Wellness awareness including nutrition and exercise; and • Access to information on how to advocate for their child’s learning and development.

Professionals & Schools: • Expect all children to achieve at high levels; • Ensure qualified and competent educators trained to work with young children in early childhood settings; • Support for appropriate professional development for high-quality teachers; • Assure effective transitions at all key points to include home to school, child care to school, preschool to kindergarten • Provide developmentally appropriate primary programs; • Emphasis on effective parent/family involvement; • Assist child care providers with training and implementation of “Building a Strong Foundation for School Success” including the Kentucky Early Childhood Standards; and • Preschool and kindergarten teachers mentoring with child care workers Communities: • Provide access to high quality, affordable early care and education programs; • Ensure a safe and healthy environment for families; • Assure access to prevention and intervention services; • Provide opportunities for lifelong learning for parents (especially the undereducated); • Wrap-around child care services for working parents; and • Collaboration and alliance of agencies to better prepare children for school readiness. The following are examples of agencies that should be involved: • Child care providers • Head Start • Universities and colleges • Local Early Childhood Councils • School districts • Preschool teachers • Kindergarten teachers • Family Resource Centers • Special Education • Public Libraries


Kentucky All STARS What It Is Studies show children in high-quality early learning program environments develop better math, language and social skills sooner. Kentucky All STARS is Kentucky’s expanded five-star quality rating and improvement system for type I, type II and certified family child care homes. All STARS level one is achieved by meeting regulatory requirements. STARS level two is achieved by completing a set of required domains and standards. STARS levels three through five feature a range of criteria providers must meet in order to move up the rating scale. While there are required general criteria for these three-STARS levels, program can choose from a menu of standards to fulfill requirements. To receive a level-3 rating or higher, programs also must participate in an environmental observation visit by a Cabinetapproved rater. More information on the requirements for each All STARS level can be found below. The unified All STARS system serves all early care and education programs including child care centers, Head Start and public preschool. Quality ratings for all type I, type II and certified family child care homes are administered by the Division of Child Care of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services. All STARS providers are encouraged to review the administrative regulation 922 KAR 2:270 for guidance and understanding of the operational policies and procedures governing the All STAR program. Families seeking All STARS rated providers can view quality ratings and additional details such as physical address, ages served and subsidy acceptance in the Benefind Child Care Provider Search.

Parent Information Please tell us if you need assistance because you do not speak English or have a disability. Free language assistance and/or other aids and services are available upon request. To receive free interpreter services, call 1-866-291- 8931. What does a Kentucky All STARS rating mean for your child? STAR rated centers and family child care homes are showing their commitment to quality by participating in Kentucky All STARS.

• Kentucky All STARS domains and standards are based on quality indicators: Family and Community Engagement, Classroom and Instructional Quality, Staff Qualifications and Professional Development and Administrative and Leadership Practices. • Any provider participating at a Level 3 or higher has completed an evaluation of the program using a nationally standardized tool, the Environmental Rating Scale (ERS). (by Harms, Cryer and Clifford) • All STARS providers have access to technical assistance coaches who provide guidance in the areas of health and safety, quality improvement, professional development and training.

What difference does quality make? • Better parent-child relationships • Greater thinking skills • Better attention skills • Enhanced academic performance • Better relationship with peers • Greater chance for finishing school and attending college What’s in a STAR? All participants in Kentucky All STARS meet specific indicators of quality. Below are the requirements for each STARS level. All STARS Quality Ratings for all active Licensed Type I and II child care programs and Certified Family Child Care Homes can be found in the Benefind Child Care Provider Search.


All STARS Levels All STARS Level 1

All child care providers with a regular or preliminary license in good standing are automatically enrolled at a Level 1. Programs with a preliminary license must remain at a Level 1.

All STARS Level 2

The following standards are required for Level 2 providers:

• 50 percent of teaching staff have professional learning activities in developmental screening. • Complete an environmental self-assessment using a valid and reliable tool appropriate for ages/settings of children served. • Program/site administrator /director receives 10 hours of professional learning in curriculum, instructional practices and/or teaching and learning OR has an approved early childhood credential or degree. • 50 percent of teaching staff receives 10 hours of professional learning in curriculum, instructional practices and/or teaching and learning OR have an approved early childhood credential or degree.

No additional points are required for a Level 2 rating.

All STARS Level 3

The following standards are required for Level 3 providers:

• All required standards as outlined for Level 2 • Participate in an environmental observation on a valid and reliable tool. No minimum required score.

In addition to the required standards, providers can select from the Standards of Quality to compile 21-30 points to complete the Level 3 Quality Rating: • 8 points from Classroom and Instructional Quality • 2 points from Family and Community Engagement • 2 points from Staff Qualifications and Professional Development • 2 points from Administrative and Leadership Practices • At least 7 points from any domain

All STARS Level 4

The following standards are required for Level 4 providers:

• All required standards as outlined for Level 2 • Participate in an environmental observation on a valid and reliable tool. Must have a minimum score of 4.0 in all rated classrooms.

In addition to the required standards, providers can select from the Standards of Quality to compile 31-40 points required to complete the Level 4 Quality Rating: • 8 points from Classroom and Instructional Quality • 2 points from Family and Community Engagement • 2 points from Staff Qualifications and Professional Development • 2 points from Administrative and Leadership Practices • At least 17 points from any domain

All STARS Level 5

The following standards are required for Level 5 providers:

• All required standards as outlined for Level 2 • Participate in an environmental observation on a valid an reliable tool. Must have a minimum score of 5.0 in all rated classrooms.

In addition to the required standards, providers can select from the Standards of Quality to compile 41-50 points required to complete the Level 5 Quality Rating: • 8 points from Classroom and Instructional Quality • 2 points from Family and Community Engagement • 2 points from Staff Qualifications and Professional Development • 2 points from Administrative and Leadership Practices • At least 27 points from any domain Level 5 providers are considered Highest Quality. They are eligible for initial, annual, and subsidy enrollment monetary incentives while funding is available.

If you have questions about Kentucky All STARS, please email the Division of Child Care at kyallstars@ky.gov or call toll free (844) 209-2657.


STAR Rated Licensed / Certified Childcare Providers Serving Ages: Infant to School Aged STAR ratings are accurate as of December 6th, 2019

The number of stars indicates the provider’s current STAR rating: Indicates that the provider may accept the Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) Subsidy: 3 Sisters and the Mom Daycare 60 Rowena Drive Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 802-2848 More information available on Facebook

P. J.’s Primary Care Center, Inc. #1 327 Clifty Street Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 679-6912 pjsdaycareofsomerset.com

Becky’s Babies 185 Amy Lane Nancy, KY, 42544

P.J.’s Primary Care Center #2 315 Mclin Road Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 679-0565 pjsdaycareofsomerset.com

$

$ $

Bright Beginnings Child Care Center 4705 South Highway 27 Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 678-8185 More information available on Facebook

Pulaski County Migrant Head Start Center 500 Chandler Street Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 451-2095 headstartprogram.us/city/ky-somerset

Children’s Learning Tree 44 Venture Way Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 679-0084 More information available on Facebook

Sandy’s Home Provider 801 Keeney Rd Science Hill, KY, 42553 (606) 423-2853

Kids Care Child Development Center 9734 W. Hwy 80 Nancy, KY, 42544 (606) 636-4444 More information available on Facebook

The Ark Childcare Center Corporation 41 Jordan’s Way Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 677-2045 More information available on Facebook

Kids Kastle II 420 Monticello Street Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 678-7529 More information available on Facebook

$

The Ark Childcare Center #2 67 Parkers Mill Road Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 219-2807 More information available on Facebook

Linda’s Child Care 100 Errin Drive Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 451-7980

$

The Children’s House 309 Park Avenue Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 676-0057 More information available on Facebook

$ $ $

$

$

$ $

Little Oaks Academy 2060 Oak Hill Road Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 678-2081 More information available on Facebook

Tree Top Toddlers Childcare Center 300 West Hwy 635 Science Hill, KY, 42553 (606) 423-3683 More information available on Facebook

Memorial Childcare Center 222 Langdon Street Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 678-4100 pulaski.net/13/home

Wendy’s Wonderland III 4996 S. Hwy 27 Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 451-0080

$

$

$

$

$


STAR Rated Licensed / Certified Childcare Providers Serving Ages: Toddler to School Aged STAR ratings are accurate as of December 6th, 2019

The number of stars indicates the provider’s current STAR rating: Indicates that the provider may accept the Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) Subsidy: Day Play Child Care Center 104 North Starview Drive Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 679-5844

Somerset Christian School 815 Grand Central Blvd Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 451-1600 somersetchristian.com

Dunbar Intergenerational Center / Head Start 255 South Maple Street Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 679-3496 headstartprogram.us/city/ky-somerset

Somerset School Age Child Care Program 305 College St. Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 679-6193

Science Hill Head Start 349 West Highway 635 Science Hill, KY, 42553 (606) 423-3515 headstartprogram.us/city/ky-somerset

Southern Head Start Center 285 Enterprise Drive Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 676-9187 headstartprogram.us/city/ky-somerset

Somerset Christian School 815 Grand Central Blvd Somerset, KY, 42503 (606) 451-1600 somersetchristian.com

St. Patrick Pre-School 206 West Columbia Street Somerset, KY, 42501 (606) 678-7116

$

Public Preschools Hopkins Elementary Preschool 210 May St. Somerset, KY 42501 606-678-8707 somerset.k12.ky.us

Pulaski County Preschool / Memorial Education Center 222 Langdon Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-678-0158 pulaski.net/13/home Science Hill Preschool 6007 North Hwy 27 Science Hill, KY 42553 606-423-3341 science.k12.ky.us

$

$

Grandparent Support Group Are you raising a grandchild in your home? If so, you are invited to attend our monthly support group. We have programs and speakers designed for grandparents and a free lunch provided. Meetings are held at the Pulaski County Public Library (304 S Main Street) at 12:00 pm. If you would like more information, including dates of the meetings, please call Keli Nelson at 606-679-7824 or your Family Resource Youth Services Center at your child’s school. This free service is provided by the Family Resource and Youth Services Centers of Pulaski County, Somerset and Science Hill Schools. Family Resource Youth Services Center contact information is located later in this booklet.


Somerset Mental Health, PSC is a behavior health group that was formed to serve families and children in the Lake Cumberland and surrounding areas at the time of crisis. Many children in today's world experience stressful events. They are presented with painful events, such as the loss of a loved one, abuse, ravages of drugs and alcohol. SMH, PSC's team of professionals have decades of experience helping children and families manage these crises. Our experience has shown us that a team approach to mental health issues helps to expedite relief and improve stressful situations. Please review our website and if you have any questions, please contact us at the information provided.

Child, adolescent, and adult individual counseling Group counseling Family therapy Psychological testing Psycho-educational testing Emotional & behavioral problems Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Competency issues Anxiety Traumatic experiences Depression Academic delays Relaxation/meditation Oppositional/defiant behaviors Women issues Trauma assessment Juvenile psycho-sexual assessment

Case Management is used to provide the point of entry into the Supports for Community Living (SCL) program. The case manager works with the individual and others identified by the consumer, i.e. family, providers, to develop and monitor the Plan of Care (POC) by utilizing person-centered processes with an emphasis on empowerment, community inclusion, health and safety assurances, and the use of informal supports (non-paid persons). Behavior Support: Behavior support is the use of positive behavioral planning in the development and systematic application of techniques and strategies to influence or change behavior in a desired way, which includes evaluation of the participant’s behavior using a functional analysis assessment approach, development of a behavioral support plan, training staff regarding the implementation of the behavior support plan and monitoring the participant’s progress for needed revisions.


Pulaski County Public Library 304 S. Main St. Somerset, KY 42501 Children’s Services Children's Services Librarian: Presley Adams Children's Services include a variety of programs and materials for children from birth to age 12. Storytimes Storytime classes for Babies, Toddlers, and Preschool age children are offered weekly on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. School Age Programs Monthly school age programs include American Girl, STEAM, PRIDE Club and Love on a Leash. In addition to these programs we also offer an annual Summer Reading Program.

Contact Us or Visit! 606-679-8401 pulaskipubliclibrary.org     Email: pulaski.library@pulaskilibrary.com Fax: 606-679-1779 Director: Charlotte Keeney

Hours of Service: Monday - Friday  9:00 am - 7:00 pm Saturday  9:00 am - 5:00 pm Sunday  Closed

Contact the Children’s Department for details and visit our Facebook page for updates.

Teen Services Teen Services Librarian: Shawn Spaw Our Teen Department is stocked with not only Young Adult books and other materials, but a wide selection of video games for teens to play. In addition, exciting programs are available for teens ages 13 through 19 that occur each month.  Programs include book discussions, video game tournaments, crafts, a summer reading program and much more.   Contact the Teen Department or visit our Facebook page to learn more about our current activities.

Follow us on Facebook: Children's Library at the Pulaski County Public Library & PCPL Teen


Visit one of our four branch locations, or schedule a visit from the bookmobile

Reference Services The Library's Reference Department is available daily to assist you with any of your research needs. The reference department is located on the main floor.  Quick questions can be answered over the phone . Additional resources including research databases and foreign language instruction are available for free from home via our website.

Branch Library Hours of Service: Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm Tuesday, Thursday: 12:00 pm-7:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am-12:00 pm Sunday: CLOSED BURNSIDE BRANCH 85 EAST FRENCH AVENUE - BURNSIDE, KY 42519 Phone: 606-561-5287      Email: burnside.library@pulaskilibrary.com

Passports Stop by the Library and get your Passport! No appointment necessary! Book-A-Librarian Contact us for login assistance to get started. Need computer help?  Contact us to Book-A-Librarian for help with specific computer usage issues.

NANCY BRANCH MILL SPRINGS PLAZA NANCY - KY 42544 Phone: 606-636-4241   Email: nancy.library@pulaskilibrary.com

Adult Programming

BOOKMOBILE Inquire at main library: 304 S. Main Street - Somerset, KY 42501 Email: bookmobile.library@pulaskilibrary.com

Pulaski County Imagination Library

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Our mission is to deliver one high quality, age-appropriate, free book per month to Pulaski County children ages birth through 5. Launched in 2013, the Pulaski County Imagination Library has provided over 68,000 books to children in Pulaski County, Kentucky, supporting early literacy and inspiring the love of reading in our youngest citizens.

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Pulaski County Public Library

SHOPVILLE BRANCH 144 SHOPVILLE ROAD - SOMERSET, KY 42503 Phone: 606-274-1671      Email: shopville.library@pulaskilibrary.com

Reference Services

pulaskipubliclibrary.org

The Library's Reference Department is available daily to assist you with any of your research needs. The reference department is located on the main floor.  Quick questions can be answered over the phone . Additional resources including research databases and foreign language instruction are available for free from home via our website.

606-679-8401

Adult Programming

Contact Us or Visit!

Adult programs at the library include book discussion groups, crafts, fitness programs, and a monthly Lunch Bunch.

Contact our adult programmer or check out the library’s Facebook page for more information.

Contact Us or Visit!

606-679-8401

pulaskipubliclibrary.org

Pulaski County

Contact our adult programmer or check out the library’s Facebook page for more information.

Passports Stop by the Library and get your Passport! No appointment necessary! Book-A-Librarian Contact us for login assistance to get started. Need computer help?  Contact us to Book-A-Librarian for help with specific computer usage issues.

SCIENCE HILL BRANCH 215 MAIN STREET - SCIENCE HILL, KY 42553 Phone: 606-423-4221  Email: sciencehill.library@pulaskilibrary.com

Adult programs at the library include book discussion groups, crafts, fitness programs, and a monthly Lunch Bunch.


Teacher Supports eveled Mini-Books Teachers are busy. From lesson plans for every subject If you give the tools, they’ll finish the job. With them more than 2,000 mini-books to assessments, classroom to choose from, teachers can tools, Scholastic Teachables delivers the highest quality management subcontent plans and the FREE instantly create a tools classroom library teachers most effective instructional to support in their to access at search home or on and forms—we’ve got everything the go. All you need is your precisely leveled for their students. for reliable, authentic, and proven classroom covered. (And it’s easy toresources. find!) library card number!

Printables, Lessons, Teacher Supports Mini-Books, and More! Leveled Mini-Books

ed Learning Collections www.pulaskipubliclibrary.org/resources

ck Packs keep skills sharp.

Teachers are busy. From The Pulaski County Community Early Childhood Council is sponsoring plans for every subject Scholastic Teachables database through lesson the Pulaski County Library.

With more than 2,000 mini-books to assessments, classroom to choose from, teachers can All you need to access this is a library card, Call us at 679-8401 for plans Our more than 200 Leveled management tools, sub information on how instantly to access create this valuable resource. a classroom library Learning Collections provideand utilize and forms—we’ve got everything precisely for their students. Resources and activities for grades Preleveled K-8th grade teachers with ready-to-go covered. (And it’s easy to find!) Thousands of resources hand-picked differentiated skill are and activityby teachers with teacher created lesson plans, worksheets, and activities. Save hours of prep time with a treasure trove of ready to go lessons sheets to support each level of and activities for every grade, subject and skill level. learner in their classroom. Printable activities for any subject: math, science, reading comprehension, STEM, writing, and

have age- and level-appropriate exercises to keep hool or over holiday, spring, and summer vacations!

ription includes monthly, thematic, and summer packs Leveled Mini-Books Leveled Learning Collections beyond. ide hands-on educational activities all year long. Child customized: below level, at level, or above level. A great resource for teachers, home school, and parents who want to help supplement learning.

With more than 2,000 mini-books choose from, teachers can nding 2–5 hours of their planningOur time more than 200toLeveled instantly create a classroom library al content.”—The Learning Council, 2017 Learning Collections provide precisely leveled for their students. teachers with ready-to-go differentiated skill and activity sheets to support each level of learner in their classroom.

Leveled Learning Collections

ACCESS THIS FROM

Monthly and Thematic Packs

ers report spending 2–5HTTPS://PULASKIPUBLICLIBRARY.ORG/RESOURCES hours of their planningOur time more than 200 Leveled ching for digital content.” —The Learning , 2017 Learning provide This database is available inside theCouncil Library at each branch and is Collections also available outside the lar activities! Include timely send-home activities. Library to anyone with a Library card number.

teachers with ready-to-go differentiated skilltheand activity To access OUTSIDE the Library, input your library card number after clicking Teachables link on the library resource page. sheets to support each level of To access INSIDE the Library, go to the Teachable link on the library resource page and click on learner in their classroom. the link below that corresponds to your current branch location: Main, Burnside, Nancy, Science Hill, or Shopville.


Pulaski County Parents as Teachers

Being a parent is hard work! How can you help your children develop, learn, and grow to realize their full potential? Parents as Teachers helps families understand child development and connects you to the resources you need. This free program offers personal visits customized for the needs of your family. The Parents as Teachers program through Pulaski County Board of Education has been named a Blue Ribbon program, meaning it is recognized as being an exemplary program affiliate, delivering high-quality services to children and families.

Customized to Specifically Benefit Your Family: Since this is your child and your family, you set the agenda for each personal visit. Your personal parent educator is there to provide well-researched information to help you make good parenting decisions, and to provide concrete support for you in times of need. During each visit we will work with you to look at your child’s development and discuss the parenting challenges you are facing. We will explore the family dynamics impacting your child’s development, and your parenting values and decisions. We will also help you to build strong protective factors to keep you, your child and your family healthy, strong and resilient. Children who participate in this program are healthier, score higher on kindergarten readiness tests, are better problem solvers, and are more advanced in language and social development. Parents who participate in this program are more involved in their child’s education, connect to their children through play and reading time, and are more confident in their role as a parent.

Additional Benefits:

• Group connections help to link you to other parents so you can learn and support each other. • Regular screenings will make sure your child is healthy, safe and developing on track. • Need a special resource? Your parent educator will make the introduction and connect you!

How to Enroll: Pulaski County Parents as Teachers is a program of the Pulaski County Board of Education. Any family living in Pulaski County and has children prenatal to kindergarten entry can enroll for free. Call 606-679-1123 or 606-678-4100 or email carrie.altmaier@pulaski.kyschools.us or donnelrainwater2@pulaski.kyschools.us


familyfriendly eyecare for all ages & stages

dr. jennifer b. compton optometrist degree in child & family studies significant experience with pediatric patients and patients with differing abilities toddler mom

Eye Examinations for Children are Recommended at: 6 months of age 3 years of age 5 years of age If you've missed one, don't fret...call now! 80% of a child's learning is through vision. Make sure your child's eyes and vision are developing appropriately to insure a successful future.

bridget compton, age 3 actual patient

S OME RS E T V I S I O N C EN T ER 709 E . M T. VE R N ON S TR E E T, S U I T E 1 S O ME RS E T, K E N TU C K Y 4 2 5 0 1 60 6 - 6 7 9 -5 1 7 7


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Family Resource and Youth Services Centers Mission Statement: To enhance students' ability to succeed in school by developing and sustaining partnerships that promote: Early learning and successful transition to school; Academic achievement and well-being; and Graduation and transition into adult life. *Contact your school for more information. Burnside Elementary Family Resource Center 606-561-3679 kelley.mounce@pulaski.kyschools.us

Pulaski County High School Youth Services Center 606-676-0164 julena.edwards@pulaski.kyschools.us

Eubank Elementary Family Resource Center 606-379-6222 kelly.leigh@pulaski.kyschools.us

Pulaski Elementary Family Resource Center 606-678-0590 and 606-678-4713 jill.goff@pulaski.kyschools.us

Hopkins Elementary Family Resource Center 606-679-6686 kelly.crow@somerset.kyschools.us

Science Hill Schools Family Resource Youth Services Center 606-423-9631 tim.leigh@scincehill.kyschools.us

Meece Middle School Youth Services Center 606-679-6686 kelly.crow@somerset.kyschools.us

Shopville Elementary Family Resource Center 606-274-4266 jordan.smallwood@pulaski.kyschools.us

Nancy Elementary Family Resource Center 606-636-4389 tamsen.ryan@pulaski.kyschools.us

Somerset High School Youth Services Center 606-679-8689 jennifer.johnson@somerset.kyschools.us

Northern Elementary Family Resource Center 606-423-1021 beth.rowlands@pulaski.kyschools.us

Southern Elementary Family Resource Center 606-677-0229 susan.cross@pulaski.kyschools.us

Northern Middle Youth Services Center 606-679-7824 keli.nelson@pulaski.kyschools.us

Southern Middle Youth Services Center 606-679-6855 teresa.roberts@pulaski.kyschools.us

Oak Hill Elementary Family Resource Center 606-676-0534 amy.cress@pulaski.kyschools.us

Southwestern High School Youth Services Center 606-451-8803 jessica.masten@pulaski.kyschools.us

The Center's Marketing One-Stop-Shop proudly provided the graphic design services for the production of this resource guide as well as PCCECC's new website. Contact us at lglover@centertech.com or 606-677-6001 to see how we can help promote your business or non-profit.


Work & Education CCAMPIS Childcare Assistance SCC, Student Commons North Room 208 808 Monticello St. Somerset, KY 42501 606-677-8306 katie.bertram@kctcs.edu https://somerset.kctcs.edu/current-students/ academic-resources/ccampis/

Project B.E.A.M. SCC 808 Monticello St. Somerset, KY 42501 606-451-6872 somerset.kctcs.edu/community/project_beam.aspx

Kentucky Career Center 410 E Mt. Vernon Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-677-4124 karenm@lcadd.org http://apps.kcc.ky.gov/career/Unemployment.aspx

Pulaski County Skills U SCC, Meece Hall 132E 808 Monticello St Somerset, KY 42501 606-451-6689 danna.barnett@kctcs.edu More information available on Facebook

Foster Care Services Benchmark Family Services 671 W Hwy 80 Somerset, KY 42503 606-451-9534 benchmarkfamilyservices.org/benchmarkoffice-locations/somerset-office/

NECCO 4341 S Hwy 27 Somerset, KY 42501 606-772-1030 necco.org

CASA of Southern Kentucky 100 N Main St, Suite 301 Somerset, KY 42502 606-425-5000

SAFY of Kentucky 3540 S Hwy 27 Suite 4 Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-1815 safy.org

Legal Services AppalReD Legal Aid 108 College Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-7313 ardfky.org

Pulaski County Attorney 103 S Maple Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-4449 or 606-679-4440

Sunrise Children's Services 225 Hwy 2227 Somerset, KY 42503 606-677-1008 pcrabtree@sunrise.org sunrise.org


Medical Services Cabinet for Health and Family Services Medicaid / KCHIP 650 N Main Street Somerset, KY 42501 855-306-8959 or 606-677-4103 https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dcbs/dfs

Somerset Vision Center Jennifer Compton, Optometrist 709 E Mt. Verson Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-5177 More information available on Facebook

Hospice of Lake Cumberland 100 Parkway Drive Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-4389 hospicelc.org

Somerset Pediatric and Adolescent Associates 350 Langdon Street Somerset, KY 42503 606-678-8155 somersetpediatrics.com

Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital 305 Langdon Street Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-7441 lakecumberlandhospital.com

Total Pediatrics 175 Medpark West Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-1761 More information available on Facebook

Lake Cumberland Medical Associates 350 Hospital Way Somerset, KY 42503 606-451-2600 More information available on Facebook

VA Outpatient Clinic 300 Medpark Drive Somerset, KY 42503 606-676-0786 va.gov

Dental Services Brandi Prather, DMD Pediatric Dentistry 47 Sarah's Lane Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-5437 More information available on Facebook Children's Dentistry 143 Bogle Office Park Drive #A, Somerset, KY 42503 606-802-7891 More information available on Facebook

Lake Cumberland Pediatric Dentistry 100 Hardin Lane, Suite A, Somerset, KY 42503 606-425-5504 lakecumberlandpediatricdentistry.com


Mental & Behavioral Health

Adanta 113 Hardin Ln Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-6251 adanta.org

Mindsight Behavioral Health 600 Monticello Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-401-2966 mindsightbehavioral.com/somerset-ky

Applied Behavioral Advancements 105 College Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-677-2636 aba-llc.com

Phoenix Preferred Care 480 University Drive #7A Somerset, KY 42503 606-451-9379 shanaroseppc@gmail.com bethanystaggppc@gmail.com phoenixpreferredcare.com and Facebook at Phoenix Wellness Inc.

Brighter Futures Therapy Center 303 Second Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-677-1166 pgibsonproject@gmail.com brighterfuturestherapycenter.com Catalyst Behavioral Health 321 Ringgold Road Somerset, KY 42503 606-451-1936 catalystbh.com ETHAS 149 Enterprise Drive Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-6995 ethaas.org Intrust Healthcare 401 Bogle Street, Suite 102 Somerset, 42503 606-676-0638 intrust-healthcare.com Life Springs, PLLC 465 S. HWY 27, Suite 2 Somerset, 42501 606-802-2880 life-springs.com

Quest Counseling LLC 600 Clifty Street, Suite 2, Somerset, KY 42503 606-678-0026 More information available on Facebook Somerset Mental Health 149 Enterprise Drive Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-6995 somersetmentalhealth.com The Kid Spot Center, LLC 200 Tower Circle Somerset, KY 42503 606-416-5139 thekidspotcenter.com Wellsprings Wellness 200 Belmont Drive Somerset, KY 42501 606-687-2038 wellspringswellness.com

Special Needs Housing New Vista 2441 S Hwy 27 Somerset, KY 42501 606-677-4068 bluegrass.org

The Moore Complex 130 Floyd Street, Ste 100 Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-6509 adanta.org


Resources / Support

AIM Pregnancy Support 111 S Church Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-678-0335 michelle@aimpregnancycenterofsomerset.com aimpregnancycenterofsomerset.com American Red Cross 1450 Newtown Pike Lexington, KY 40511 859-253-1331 redcross.org/local/kentucky/about-us/locations/bluegrassarea-chapter Autism Support Team of Pulaski County 209 Clifty Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-875-1978 or 606-219-3252 astofpc@gmail.com More information available on Facebook Benefind Easily access public assistance benefits and information 24/7 through an online application and account. Programs: SNAP, KTAP, Medicaid, CCAP, KI-HPP benefind.ky.gov Cabinet for Health and Family Services - Child Care 275 E Main Street 3C-F, Frankfort, KY 40621 502-564-2524 chfs.ky.gov

Cabinet for Health and Family Services Protection and Permanency 67 Eagle Creek Drive Somerset, KY 42503 606-677-4086 chfs.ky.gov First Steps 259 Parkers Mill Somerset, 42501 606-678-2821 More information available on Facebook at First Steps Early Childhood Intervention Grandparent Support Group Supported by the Family Resource Centers at local schools 606-679-7824 Kentucky Commission for Children with Special Needs 401 Bogle Street Ste 104 Somerset, KY 42503 606-677-4120 https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/ccshcn Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities 502-564-4527 Kentucky's HANDS Pulaski Co Health Dept 45 Roberts Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-4416 ext 2273 www.lcdhd.org

Lake Cumberland Community Action Agency Inc 23 Industry Drive Jamestown, KY 42629 270-343-4600 lynda.wilkerson@lc-caa.org lc-caa.org Lake Cumberland District Health Department Breast Feeding Support 45 Roberts Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-4416 or 1-800-928-4416 ext 2625 lcdhd.org/services/parenting/breastfeeding/wic-breastfeeding/ March of Dimes (859) 402-1710 More information available on Facebook Parents as Teachers - Pulaski County P O Box 1055 Somerset, KY 42502 606-679-1123 lori.hall@pulaski.kyschools.us Potentials, Inc 4821 S Hwy 27, Unit A Somerset, KY 42503 606-305-2933 potentials.ct@gmail.com Pulaski County Alzheimer's Disease Respite Center 125 East University Drive Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-9310 pcalzcenter@gmail.com More information available on Facebook Pulaski County Extension & 4H Youth Development 28 Parkway Drive Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-6361 elovett@uky.edu or jennifer_cole@uky.edu pulaski.ca.uky.edu Pulaski County Migrant Program 500 Chandler Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-1123 or 606-451-1475 Pulaski County Public Library 304 S Main Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-8401 pulaskipubliclibrary.org Reach for the Stars Case Management 434 Hotchkiss Street Campbellsville, KY 42718 270-789-0015 More information available on Facebook United Way of South Central Kentucky 208 E Mt. Vernon Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-2974 uwscky@hpyeraction.net uwky.org


Basic Needs: Food, Clothing, Safety, Shelter, Transportation ABA Gives 105 College Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-219-4556 More information available on Facebook Bethany House PO Box 864 Somerset, KY 42502 606-679-1553 phone, 800-755-2017 crisis Cabinet for Health and Family Services SNAP Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program 650 N Main Street Somerset, KY 42501 855-306-8959 or 606-677-4103 https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dcbs/dfs God's Food Pantry 119 S Central Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-8560 More information available on Facebook God's Helping Hands 1223 Pine Hill Road Somerset, KY 42503 606-274-4575 More information available on Facebook Good Samaritan 6320 S Hwy 27 Somerset, KY 42503 606-561-9389 More information available on Facebook at Good Samaritan Thrift Store Housing Authority of Somerset 400 Hail Knob Rd Somerset, KY 42503 606-679-1332 info@hasomerset.org hasomerset.org Lake Cumberland Cupboard There are various cupboards located in Pulaski County More information available on Facebook Lake Cumberland District Health Department - WIC 45 Roberts Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-4416 lcdhd.org/services/parenting/wic

Living Bread Soup Kitchen 163 Cotter Avenue Somerset, KY 42501 606-379-6270 livingbreadsk@yahoo.com More information available on Facebook Northern Pulaski Food Ministry 105 Fraley Court Eubank, KY 42567 606-379-2122 office@eubankbaptist.org eubankbaptist.org Over My Head 150 Turner Street Somerset, KY 42503 606-451-8859 overmyheadsomerset@gmail.com overmyhead.org Project 58:10 102 Bourne Avenue Somerset, KY 42501 606-305-2425 project5810.org Pulaski Emergency Relief Ministries 118 Southport Drive Somerset, KY 42501 606-678-8153 perm@windstream.net RTEC 100 Main Street Mt Vernon, KY 40456 800-321-7832 rtec@kih.net ridertec.org St. Mildred Outreach and Clothing Center 203 South Central Ave Somerset, KY 42501 606-678-5051 saintmildred.com


Substance Abuse Resources Bridgeway Institute 807 Monticello St. Somerset, KY 42501 833-462-3457 bridgewaywellnessgroup.com Crossroads Treatment Center 607 Clifty St. Somerset, KY 42503 606-485-4730 https://www.crossroadstreatmentcenters.com/ opiate-treatment-centers/kentucky/somerset/ Gratitude Adjustment 9245 Hwy 80 Nancy, KY 42544 606-288-0013 cfox@gratitudeadjustment.org More information available on Facebook

KY-Moms Maternal Assistance Towards Recovery (MATR) Program 130 Southern School Road Somerset, KY 42501 606-679-9425 ext 2371 or 2275 awheeldon@adanta.org or gbaker@adanta.org adanta.org Lake Cumberland Area Drug Task Force 606-679-5034 More information available on Facebook Rural Health Opioid Program (RHOP) 606-679-4416 ext 2285 lcdhd.org/services/substance-abuse-services/ rural-health-opioid-program-rhop SkyHope 77 Union Street Somerset, KY 42501 606-425-4787 adanta.org

Need help finding treatment? Visit findhelpnowky.org or call 1-833-8KY-HELP

The Rural Health Opioid Program (RHOP) mission is to improve quality of life for individuals at-risk for opioid use disorder (OUD) by building a foundation for our clients to remain sober and reach their potential through a holistic approach. RHOP offers case management services to those who live in the Lake Cumberland area at risk for OUD.


Pulaski County Community Early Childhood Council The Pulaski County Community Early Childhood Council’s mission is to improve the quality of life for all children birth to age 5 in Pulaski County through initiatives on early care, school readiness, and strengthening families. We care, we prepare. PCCECC strives to accomplish that goal through family learning events, professional and family trainings, and outreach, all at no cost to Pulaski County residents. As a community entity, the Pulaski County Council promotes the efforts of the Governor’s Office of Early Childhood. During the 2000 legislative session, House Bill 706 was unanimously passed in both chambers of the Kentucky Legislature. At that time, it was the most comprehensive package of early childhood legislation in the nation addressing the needs of the whole child, which include: health care, family assistance, high quality education, and community involvement. In addition, it committed 25% of the Kentucky Tobacco Settlement Fund annually to support early childhood programs. To ensure the best early care and education for our youngest citizens and to reach the long-term goals set forth by the KIDS NOW Initiative, local communities needed to take action. One of the strategies identified by the Early Childhood Task Force (1999) to help support this outcome was the creation of state and local partnerships to support services designed to meet the locally identified needs of children and families. This strategy became the foundation for the creation of the CECCs. CECCs were designed to encourage local communities to establish and strengthen relationships, promote collaboration and coordination between early care and education providers, schools and the community as a whole, and involve individuals from a crosssection of the community who can foster efforts to improve outcomes for young children and families. CECCs use new and existing relationships within communities to build and sustain supports for early childhood development and learning. Pulaski County is proud to participate in this important initiative through the Pulaski County Community Early Childhood Council.

Learn more at wecareweprepare.com or visit us on Facebook. If your organization is interested in being listed as a resource on our website or in future resource guides, please contact us at pulaskicountyCECC@gmail.com.


NON-PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID SOMERSET KY PERMIT NO. 299

2292 South Highway 27 Suite 300 Somerset, KY 42501

Important Phone Numbers Police, Fire, Medical, and other Emergencies 911 Suicide Hotline 988 Adanta Crisis/Suicide Prevention Hotline - Pulaski Co. 800-633-5599 Cabinet for Health and Family Services 606-677-4086 Child Abuse Hotline 877-597-2331 Elder Abuse Council 606-679-7421 Family Court Judge 606-677-4186 Health Department 606-679-4416 Legal Aid 606-679-7313 Poison Control 800-222-1222 Pulaski County Board of Education 606-679-1123 Pulaski County Sheriff 606-678-5145 Kentucky State Police 606-878-6622 Science Hill Board of Education 606-423-3341 Somerset Board of Education 606-678-4721 Somerset City Police 606-678-5176 Suicide Prevention Hotline (National) 800-273-8255 Spouse Abuse Hotline 800-544-2022 Rape Crisis Hotline 800-656-4673

This resource guide is provided by:

pulaskicountyCECC@gmail.com wecareweprepare.com

Pulaski County Community Early Childhood Council thanks Commercial Printing and Mail Solutions for their assistance in making this resource guide possible.

Profile for The Center for Rural Development

PCCECC Booklet  

PCCECC Booklet