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artsVoice

NSW curriculum journal for Creative Arts 7-12


artsVoice NOVEMBER 2013

Learning and Leadership - Secondary Education NSW Department of Education and Communities

7-12

artsVoice is a curriculum journal to support the implementation of Creative Arts curriculum for Years 7-12 in NSW public schools.

artsVoice

Cover image

Published NOVEMBER 2013

Del Kathryn Barton studies by Year 7 Visual Arts student Lake Munmorah High School Submission: Jody Robinson (Head Teacher)

Any product and event information included in artsVoice from providers that are external to the NSW Department of Education and Communities are correct at the time of publication and are to be used at the reader’s discretion. The inclusion of product and event information is not an endorsement by the Department.

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artsVoice NOVEMBER 2013

SECONDARY EDUCATION LEARNING AND LEADERSHIP CONTACT DETAILS Rach Kirsten is the Creative Arts Advisor for Secondary Education in the NSW Department of Education and Communities. In this role she coordinates Creative Arts curriculum and professional learning services to teachers in the Department to enhance the implementation of dance drama, music and visual arts in Years 7-12. She also provides advice on state and national initiatives and policies and the implications for the teaching and learning of Creative Arts subjects in NSW public schools.

Rach Kirsten Creative Arts Advisor, Years 7-12 Learning and Leadership - Secondary Education Locked Bag 53 Darlinghurst NSW 1300 T 02 9244 5255 E rach.kirsten@det.nsw.edu.au

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artsVoice

NOVEMBER 2013

artsVoice SUBSCRIBE

Subscribe to artsVoice to receive direct notification of new issues, and to download, comment and share with your colleagues. How to subscribe through issuu (free account): 1. Go to the artsVoice profile page on issuu http://issuu.com/thearts.curriculum 2. Click FOLLOW 3. Follow the prompts to create a free account with issuu.

CONTRIBUTE

If you are a secondary teacher in a NSW public school, you are invited to make a submission to artsVoice in the following areas.

practice

• • •

collaboration

research

approaches to arts practice in your classroom or faculty case studies of experimental or innovative use of technology in arts curriculum original photography of student performances, exhibitions or work samples (student release forms must be obtained)

case studies or outcomes from collaborating with colleagues in your local network, community of schools or with an artist/arts organisation

• •

papers you have presented at conferences reflections/analysis of current arts education research

To express interest, email a short proposal to Rach Kirsten at rach.kirsten@det.nsw.edu.au CLOSING DATE for Term 1, 2014 proposals: 20 January 2014

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INSIDE 8

Cry no more: Dance Stage 6 Course Prescriptions - Higher School Certificate 2015-2017

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Goodbye Ruby: Drama Stage 6 Course Prescriptions - Higher School Certificate 2015-2017

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Depth of learning: Approaches to visual arts programming at Lake Munmorah High School

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Accessible theatre: Belvoir’s Theatre Enrichment program

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From your SOM: Supervisors of Marking share insights about the 2013 HSC practical examinations

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19th Biennale of Sydney: Excursion bookings now open

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The transformative power of theatre is what I noticed most when listening to the individual stories of theatre-lovers when attending the Belvoir and Public Education Foundation partnership launch of the Theatre Enrichment program last term. Theatre Enrichment is a fabulous Belvoir program for Stage 6 Drama and English students. You may have seen my post on Facebook featuring photos of drama teachers Amanda Clark from Evans High School and Meg Day from John Edmondson High School, who spoke about the impact of the program at their schools. This edition, Cathy Hunt from Belvoir, provides an outline of how the program has increased theatre access for NSW public schools, and the impact of the program in schools to date. Recently, the Board of Studies NSW released Dance and Drama Stage 6 Course Prescriptions 2015-2017. So, soon it will be time to say goodbye to Jardi Tancat (dance) and Ruby Moon (drama) with next year being the last year of implementation for the current prescriptions in both courses. A brief overview of the new prescriptions is included on pages 8-9, and professional learning opportunities for the new Course Prescriptions to be offered in 2014 will be released soon. With the conclusion of HSC exams, I thought it would be a timely opportunity to invite the Supervisors of Marking (SOM) for each of the four Creative Arts HSC practical exams to write a short article on their insights relating to the practical HSC examinations in 2013. This presents a rare

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opportunity to read their thoughts before the release of the official Notes from the Marking Centre. Many thanks to each SOM for their time in writing for artsVoice - especially at this busy time of year. This edition, I am also delighted to be showcasing approaches to programming from Lake Munmorah High School. Jody Robinson, shares some of the the work of her faculty - a semester long program for Year 7 visual arts with a range of stunning work samples (artsVoice cover image included!). Bookings are now open for the HSC showcases. If you are planning to take groups of students to Callback, OnStage, Encore or ARTEXPRESS in early 2014, I encourage you to seek some of the inspiring arts opportunities that may coincide with your visit. Many arts organisations/companies have recently released their 2014 education programs. And finally, sincere best wishes to colleagues in areas that have been affected by the recent bushfires. I am amazed by the individual stories I have heard from teachers in these areas. On behalf of arts teachers across the state, our thoughts have been with you and your communities. Wishing everyone a safe and happy Christmas season, and I look forward to continuing to work with you next year. Rach Kirsten Creative Arts Advisor, Years 7-12

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CONTRIBUTORS

Jody Robinson Lake Munmorah High School

Cathy Hunt Education Resources and Regional Access, Belvoir

Jody has been the Head Teacher, Creative and Performing Arts at Lake Munmorah High School for seven years. She is as an experienced classroom art teacher teaching in the public education system for the past 18 years.

Cathy has worked for Belvoir since 2008, currently as Education Resources & Regional Access. Previously she ran the Premier’s Spelling Bee for the Arts Unit, NSW Department of Education & Communities. After first class Honours in English Literature and Theatre & Film at UNSW, Cathy undertook postgraduate studies on a Commonwealth Scholarship at the University of York, UK.

Jody also lecturers in Art Education at the University of Newcastle, which keeps her current with the dynamic changes and innovations in arts education, assessment, programming and planning. She has dedicated her career to education after first dipping her toe in media and advertising, when working at The Newcastle Herald for three years when first leaving school. She has found teaching to be immensely rewarding and satisfying and her interest beyond the classroom in interior design has seen her work featured in The Design Files, Australia's leading home design blog.

She is also a director & dramaturg. With Bec Allen, she formed independent theatre company The Impending Room. For The Impending Room she directed Dangerous Lenses (2013 Melbourne Fringe Fest / 2012 Old 505 Theatre) & Judith (Bondi Pavilion Theatre 2011). For Belvoir, Cathy recently completed a directing secondment with Leticia Cáceres on Miss Julie and in December 2012 directed a short version of their As You Like It in the Art Gallery of NSW. She co-directed Still (Old 505) a reading of How to Curse for atyp & a reading of Jessica Tuckwell’s play Tiny Remarkable Bramble.

Jody is a passionate art educator and advocate for the arts, and strongly believes in the significance of creative and performing arts in the lives of young people. With key strengths of creativity, problem solving, perseverance, collaboration and dedication highly regarded by employers and business, she believes these skills are nurtured and celebrated in the arts more than in any other area of education.

Cathy completed a dramaturgy internship with Playwriting Australia in 2012.

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CRY NO MORE Dance Stage 6 Course Prescriptions Higher School Certificate 2015-2017 The inclusion of an Australian work and the revision of eras provide opportunities for an increasing study of contemporary dance practice.

appreciation study and Sarabande is often seen as a companion work to Fallen Angels, which has previously been a prescribed work for Stage 6. The seminal work in Major Study Appreciation is The Appartement (2000) by Mats Ek, which will replace Ghost Dances (1981) by Christopher Bruce. The revision of eras in Major Study Appreciation now requires students to study significant developments in dance from either the 1960’s 1980s or 1990 - present. These changes focus on the work of significant female choreographers Pina Bausch and Twyla Tharp or contemporary choreographers Akram Khan and Ohad Naharin.

The new Dance Stage 6 Course Prescriptions 2015-2017 are now published on the Board of Studies NSW website. The Course Prescriptions are for implementation 2015-2017. Teachers will continue to implement the current 2012-2014 course prescriptions in 2014. All of the works, eras and artists in the dance prescriptions have changed, providing a welcome opportunity for renewal of teaching and learning programs. The most recent Course Prescriptions developed for 2010–2012 were extended until the conclusion of the 2014 HSC, and so have been prescribed for five years. The following is a summary of the changes to be implemented from 2015.

The Department’s support in 2014 to build capacity for the new prescriptions will be outlined in early 2014. The new prescriptions provide a starting point for renewed discussion and research. I hope you enjoy discussing the new works and artists with colleagues, researching new eras and the initial stages of planning for new teaching and learning programs.

Core Appreciation introduces two new works for study - Fine Line (2003) by Australian choreographer Sue Healey and Sarabande (1995) by Jiri Kylian. Fine Line places an Australian work at the centre of the core

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Rach Kirsten Creative Arts Advisor, Years 7-12

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GOODBYE RUBY Drama Stage 6 Course Prescriptions Higher School Certificate 2015-2017 Ruby Moon - shall we farewell thee?

The new topics support a more focussed study of contemporary theatre, and introduce multidiscipline theatre, more closely aligning HSC study with 21st century theatre practice

The new Stage 6 Drama Course Prescriptions 2015-2017 are now published on the Board of Studies NSW website. The Course Prescriptions are for implementation 2015-2017. The following is a summary of the main changes. The Stage 6 Drama Course Prescriptions 2015– 2017 include the revision of the Group Performance topic list, the Individual Project text list and the revision of three of the nine topics, with minor changes to a further two topics.

The rubrics have been slightly revised to emphasise experiential learning.

Topics removed from the current course prescriptions are Irish Drama, Brecht and Site Specific Theatre. These topics are replaced by Multi-Discipline Theatre, Significant Plays of the 20th Century and Japanese Traditional and Contemporary Theatre.

The Department’s support in 2014 to build capacity for the new prescriptions will be outlined in early 2014.

The Individual Project text list has been completely revised. Three texts in Contemporary Australian Theatre Practice have been changed. In Verbatim Theatre one text has been moved to a new topic (Significant Plays of the 20th Century), and three texts have been revised. One additional practitioner and two new texts have been added to Approaches to Acting. One text has been moved from Approaches to Acting to Japanese Traditional and Contemporary Theatre.

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Until then, I hope you enjoy discussing the new topics and texts with colleagues, and the initial stages of planning (and budgeting) for new teaching and learning programs. Ruby, we may not farewell thee yet... your transformative power may well see you become the hook for Year 10 or Year 11.

Rach Kirsten Creative Arts Advisor, Years 7-12

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DEPTH OF LEARNING Approaches to visual arts programming at Lake Munmorah High School

Del Kathryn Barton studies by Year 7 Visual Arts students, Lake Munmorah High School

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By Jody Robinson

artsVoice

NOVEMBER 2013

At Lake Munmorah High School, we aim to be flexible and responsive in our programming so that current events in the art world can be reflected in our units where possible. It is not uncommon for our programs to diverge and be adapted according to a key event such as an exhibition, death of a famous artist or a controversy.

The focus for this unit was essentially a case study of Del Kathryn Barton as a female, Australian artist of high regard and acclaim. The unit was designed in response to two events.

It is important for our faculty to always push the work through to resolution. We see completed work as a direct reflection of our teaching, and we aim for students to develop perseverance and to demonstrate commitment. As a result, our units tend to be semester in length as opposed to ten weeks or a term. We feel it enriches the art experience and allows for greater depth of learning with theory, art analysis and emersion in techniques of artmaking.

Firstly, the visit of Del Kathryn Barton to Newcastle Regional Gallery for the launch of her illustrated book, The Nightingale and the Rose. My art intern at the time - Rory Davis (who is now on an extended casual block of teaching with us at Lake Munmorah HS), attended the artist talk and purchased the beautiful book as a resource. And secondly, the announcement that Del Kathryn Barton had won the Archibald Prize. The key skill-set we want students to develop through this unit include:

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The classroom teacher for this Year 7 unit is Leisha Young, who is an experienced and skilled art teacher and an excellent practitioner. She consistently produces outstanding, resolved work with her classes.

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media experimentation through the introduction of mixed-media and fine art materials such as progresso, ink, biro, felt marker and layering media attention to detail through appropriation and observational drawing resolution of work through to an exhibition.

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Year 7 Visual Arts students - Del Kathryn Barton studies, works in progress Lake Munmorah High School

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Working towards exhibition of student work is fundamental to our art department. We regularly display selected work and hold an annual Art Open Day for families and the broader community to access our learning spaces and to view a wide range of work. Exhibiting work allows for positive pressure to perform, and lifts standards. We are always aiming for high quality, and find self-confidence is enhanced as students work in what we believe to be a culture where excellence is celebrated and rewarded. Students are also expected to learn to frame and mount their work, write artist statements and participate in running the exhibitions - including giving tours. We have a number of small student gallery spaces established around the school, each managed, hung and coordinated by students. In my role as a lecturer and tutor for the Education Faculty at The University of Newcastle, I use our student work to teach assessment, feedback and marking. The Year 7 works in the

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Del Kathryn Barton study were recently used to develop skills in beginning-teacher training, particularly the design of marking rubrics and advice about how to structure quality feedback. My school role as Head Teacher CAPA for the past seven years often intersects with my university work. I have found it is an excellent way to maintain my knowledge of contemporary art practice and trends in the art world, as well as embracing best practice and approaches to art education. I try to embed these experiences into my faculty and visa versa. Lake Munmorah HS has an impressive Visual Arts faculty with a range of teachers who differ in their experiences and areas of specialisation. As a result, our numbers for elective classes have experienced sustained growth over time, and our figures for gender equity contradict state data for male vs female student participation in the arts. In fact, we currently have a number of elective Visual Arts classes where numbers of male students are equal to or

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Del Kathryn Barton studies by Year 7 Visual Arts student, Lake Munmorah High School

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greater than those of female students. My work with the university has also increased opportunities for practicum and intern students throughout the year. During their time in our faculty, we actively seek their participation at our school. They bring with them a wealth of energy and diverse abilities to add to our programs and teaching. Additionally, we have a volunteer program allowing members of the community, artists and university students to work with students. Our visual arts programs change each year. They are updated and adapted constantly, to keep things fresh for the staff and to maintain currency with our resources and content. I am also very fortunate to have a highly collaborative and talented team who are always willing to

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tackle interesting and new approaches to teaching, to introduce new programs or take on large scale projects.

Jody Robinson Head Teacher, Creative and Performing Arts Lake Munmorah High School Jody is an experienced HSC marker, mentor of beginning teachers and the recipient of a National Quality Teaching Award. She is also an independent curator and special event coordinator. She is the original codesigner and co-curator of the Hunter and Central Coast 'First Class' exhibition, establishing the well-respected annual showcase of regional HSC works with renowned art educator Dr Kath Grushka.

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ACCESSIBLE THEATRE Belvoir’s Theatre Enrichment program

Coonabarabran High School students outside the theatre after Summer of the 17th Doll Image credit: Cathy Hunt

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By Cathy Hunt

It’s almost the end of one (very full) school year and there are already stirrings to fill up the next one as teachers begin to plan curriculum-linked engagement activities to get their students inspired. One successful arts engagement program you might not be aware of - and still have a chance to get your school involved in for 2014, is Belvoir’s Theatre Enrichment program. This program is unique because it removes all obstacles to students experiencing theatre. It was conceived by Education Manager Jane May (who started as a drama teacher in Western Sydney) as a response to the startling lack of live theatre experiences for the students she was teaching, simply because of lack of money. Once Jane had the chance, she implemented her idea. Theatre Enrichment allows students to see professional theatre free of charge. A preliminary workshop prepares the students to view the work, and gives insights to both the production and the production elements used to make theatre in general. A few weeks after the workshop, we return to the school for a follow-up forum with an actor (or other creative), which allows students think through their experience and consider careers in theatre.

Great Lakes College students participate in a costume activity to prepare them for viewing Angels in America Image credit: Cathy Hunt

travel to Sydney, beyond the time commitments of teachers to organise and liaise with Belvoir. The rewards for students and teachers involved are immense. “It was accessible as it was free for them. Many of our students would never get to something like this.” Teacher - Kempsey High School

“This has been one of the best theatre programs I have experienced through school, it allows the students to not just watch but have a ‘hands on’ experience and feel connected to the performance and theatre.”

Around 300 students from approximately ten schools participate annually. Schools who have previously been involved, include Albion Park High School, Ardlethan Central School, Ballina High School, Braidwood Central School, Coffs Harbour Senior College, Chifley College Senior Campus, Coonabarabran High School, Coolamon Central School, Evans High School, Eden Marine High School, Jamieson High School, John Edmondson High School, Macksville High School, Mulwaree High School, Oberon High School,

Teacher - Chester Hill High School

Belvoir has been offering our sought-after Theatre Enrichment program to government schools in Western Sydney and Regional NSW for the past four years. There is no cost to the participating school - including regional schools needing to

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Oxley High School, Rooty Hill High School, Shoalhaven High School and Temora High School.

many people could work effectively in a small space. This play was amazing, really challenged my thinking of theatre.”

“Both Year 9 and Year 11 have asked in various forms: "Will we get to work with Belvoir again next year Miss? We had so much fun with them/ learnt a lot/ did things I 'd never thought I could do!/ I nearly cried Miss - I didn't know acting could really do that "

Student - Chifley College Senior Campus This Heaven

Teacher - John Edmondson High School Gwen in Purgatory

Belvoir productions students have seen through the Theatre Enrichment program include classics like Angels in America, Cat on A Hot Tin Roof and Summer of the 17th Doll, as well as new Australian plays including Babyteeth, Gwen in Purgatory, Neighbourhood Watch and This Heaven. “The thing I learnt that will most help me to understand a play in the future is the workshop before the play.” Student - Oberon High School

In a pre-show session of This Heaven, which is set in Mount Druitt, students from Chifley College Senior Campus (also in Mount Druitt), participated in an activity using dialogue from the play. One student said jokingly – ‘That sounds like it’s from round here’ and they were stunned to hear the play they were going to see was set in their own suburb and written by someone who’d grown up in the area. The play itself - highly contemporary and relevant, and challenging with unusual staging and some non-naturalistic dialogue, completely caught hold of the students’ imaginations when they saw it. “The things I learnt to help me understand a play in the future are the way the actors used such a small set for so many scenes, how so

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When This Heaven playwright Nakkiah Lui visited Year 11 Drama at Rooty Hill High School after they had viewed the work, three students had already started writing their own scripts and beset her with questions, showing how engaged they had become with the process of playwriting. After seeing the play and meeting Nakkiah, the drama teacher at Rooty Hill High School has observed that her students have gained more confidence and now experiment with complex plotlines and shocking an audience through their own work. They are also keen to experiment with creating theatre in small theatre spaces. Since the start of this program, a range of playwrights including Tommy Murphy (Gwen in Purgatory), Rita Kalnejais (Babyteeth), Lally Katz (Neighbourhood Watch) and Nakkiah Lui (This Heaven) have visited schools in Sydney and Regional NSW as the final step in this three-part series of theatre experiences. Rita Kalnejais reflected with thoughtful students from Chifley College Senior Campus in 2012, about how seeing her play Babyteeth had affected them, and how she had drawn on powerful experiences from her own life in writing it. Often students who participate, particularly regional students have never seen a play before. Their drama teachers struggle to access strong examples of contemporary performance so that they can refer to examples of contemporary staging. “For many it was their first experience of live theatre. It opened their eyes to a whole new

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Coolamon Central School students outside Belvoir St Theatre after seeing Angels in America Image credit: Cathy Hunt

world of creative experiences. They have talked a lot about the play.”

accepted in the world, or they should be.” Student - Coolamon Central School Angels in America

Teacher - Coolamon Central School Angels in America

We support drama teachers by giving all students the opportunity to respond to stimulating and groundbreaking theatre. The students seize the chance and get a taste for more. Students who initially found the themes about sexuality in Angels in America Part 1 confronting, ended up pestering their teachers to bring them back to see Part 2. “I think that what the director wanted us to understand about the world was that gay people are the same as anyone else and that everyone is

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Cathy Hunt Education Resources and Regional Access, Belvoir

Visit Belvoir’s website to learn more about the program: http://belvoir.com.au/education/theatre-enrichment/ Enquire by emailing education@belvoir.com.au or phoning (02) 8396 6222. The Public Education Foundation has partnered with Belvoir since 2013 to raise funds for this program.

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FROM YOUR SOM Supervisors of Marking share insights about the 2013 HSC practical examinations

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DANCE

The Dance Stage 6 Major Study - Dance and Technology Option: Film and Video, requires students to create a dance film between four and six minutes in duration, using the elements of dance for two or three dancers, visual and aural elements and film and editing techniques for the final cut. DanceForms is the choreographic software recommended for the Dance Stage 6 Major Study - Dance and Technology Option: Choreographing the Virtual Body. Students are required to create and choreograph a ‘Work’ between four and six minutes in duration for two to three dancers using the computer-based animation software.

Maybe dance and technology is too hard! Too hard for the teachers to teach or too hard for the students to take on, we may never know. Technology and dance are often viewed as being a part of the realm of the unknown. The “too hard basket”. Creativity gone wild!

Using technology can be an exciting teaching and learning method in any classroom setting, especially dance. Technology can be incorporated into class work and assessment tasks from Year 7 to Year 12 in many ways, giving students the opportunity to explore and document the recording of movement in and around various settings. A digital dance process diary is a great way of introducing technology into on-going classwork for any year group. This allows students to record their movement and compositional progress over a period of time.

The fusion of technology and dance is developing. Together. Rapidly. Current examples of dance and film in the digital age have emerged from companies such as DV8 Physical Theatre, The Physical TV Company, Chunky Move and Sydney Dance Company to name a few. The technology component is a viable option for techsavvy students who have an aptitude for composition and know their way proficiently around their computer and software and/or

Supervisor of Marking HSC Dance Practical

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camera. Software is becoming easier and easier to use and equipment is readily available.

The number of dance HSC students choosing the technology component for their major work is relatively small in comparison to the Performance and Composition components. Teachers may ask why this is so, when technology is so prevalent in the lives of our students and the scope for creativity is so vast.

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See also: • FAQs - Dance practical examinations • 2013 written examination paper • Notes from the Marking Centre • Assessment and reporting in Dance

Dance and Technology There is no denying it. We live in a digital age, whether we like to admit it or not. Our students are saturated by technology, relish in it and find it hard to function without it. Teachers are either swept up by the techno-storm, embracing the constant changes or they are left out in the cold. Modern dance, as we know it, is evolving and technology is well and truly embedded in this evolution.

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DRAMA Making and performing Group and Individual Performances

General comments

Intelligent, innovative, truthful performances stand out and engage audiences and markers.

This year we celebrated the 20th HSC Drama Performance Examination. We marked the occasion with a cake cutting and addresses at the marking centre from all the past HSC Drama SOMs. What was apparent, as we heard the story of the HSC Drama marking operation, is the stability and robustness of the marking criteria and process. Theatre and performance and indeed all art is a dynamic practice that is always endeavouring to innovatively and truthfully reflect ourselves and our stories. Theatre practitioners are always looking for fresh and original ways to powerfully express truth to audiences. If we are not evolving our teaching and preparation of our students to embrace and reflect this and we are still teaching the course in the same way, then we are doing a significant disservice to our students.

We must expose our students to excellence in professional theatre whilst encouraging them to value their own voice and ideas. This can be particularly challenging to those of us who work in isolated and arts-starved regional areas. However, we must continue to strive to do what we can to bring excellent theatre experiences to our students in whatever ways we can. OnStage, the showcase of exemplar Group Performances and Individual Projects, provides this by selecting works that demonstrate high achievement in the three marking criteria and that are also examples of a wide variety of theatrical approaches. I’ve often heard teachers speak of there being an OnStage formula. There is no such thing. There is effective or ineffective theatre making. The marking criteria reward intelligent choices that create powerful theatre. This should be the focus of teaching for the Group and Individual Performances of our students. Not imitation, but intelligent innovation is the key.

Seeing the same IPs performed in the same way year after year and many lesser versions of OnStage performances ineffectually imitated is not the best way to guide and support our students to strive for making intelligent, innovative, truthful and effective theatre.

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See also: • FAQs - HSC Drama practical examinations • 2013 written examination paper • Notes from the Marking Centre • Assessment and reporting in Drama

The following is a summary of some of the advice of our Senior Markers on how best to prepare students for this examination in both the Group and Individual Performance.

Individual project: performance The individual performance is a complete theatrical statement for the stage. The process of developing the performance requires the student to be not only an actor but also a director and dramaturge. This ability to analyse material is central to all Individual Projects as expressed in all the Individual Projects’ marking criteria. A successful individual performance demonstrates a student’s understanding of the dramatic and theatrical demands and context of the piece. The Individual Performance is firstly a project that exercises a student’s ability to analyse and interpret dramatic material and craft and develop it into a single theatrical work of integrity. A sophisticated performance is shaped by a student’s directorial choices as they create a coherent dramatic and theatrical experience which effectively and powerfully engages their audience.

Group performance The group performance must be an entirely original group-devised piece of theatre. Live performance is a dynamic medium. Students should perform their piece for an audience before the examination to ensure they are aware of audience responses to their work and that their work, when performed with audience reaction, will not run over time and be stopped. This is also important to ensure that the intention and dramatic meaning of the performance is clear and powerfully effective to an audience. Successful performances encompass engaging stories presented in engaging and theatrical ways. Thus performance style, conventions, form, structure, dramatic elements and theatrical choices must complement and enhance the content of the performance.

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Supervisor of Marking HSC Drama Practical

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MUSIC 1 & MUSIC 2 Tips from the SOM in preparation for Music Practical Examination The following suggestions for the ease of running of performance exams will enable teachers to enjoy the day and support their students. 1.

2.

3.

4.

Organise order of candidates and order of repertoire for each candidate to maximise smooth running of the exam which in turn, will ensure that candidates are not anxious.

Access the BOS website and in particular ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ which has recently been added.

5.

The rules that govern the exam are set by the Board of Studies NSW (BOS) and it is important that a request is made as soon as candidates have chosen their performances if they fall outside of the norm. The BOS needs to be notified if, for example, candidates present instruments that are not considered the norm, such as, turntables, an instrument of another culture, beatboxing etc. Candidates will be marked based on the marking guidelines provided.

Organise a complete walk-through of the examination day with all candidates as per the exam timetable so that students are aware of the procedure and process. Ensure all students involved in each performance know that they are to leave the room when not required.

6.

If at all possible, have an actual run through of the examination day. This will make sure that candidates are fully aware of the stamina, equipment and personnel required for the day. More often than not, due to time restraints, students do not play their entire program in a given time period which places candidates at a disadvantage. Students need to be familiar with the time allocated, and the need to perform all pieces and present their musicology viva within a given time frame.

7.

Have all equipment set up so that all students can access and use it efficiently and effectively. At times, candidates are faced with new equipment to use for their exam and this can add unnecessary anxiety to the exam situation, so make sure

Ensure you have checked paperwork carefully so that you have allocated the correct time to each candidate based on their elective options. Note that there is a 15 minute set up time for examiners at the start of the day at a new centre and another 15 minutes allocated at the end of the day for packing up and paperwork. Do not forget to factor in morning and afternoon tea breaks and a lunch break. If the exam goes over more than one day, then there is NO set up time given on the second day.

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See also: • FAQs - Music 1, Music 2 and Music Extension HSC performance • 2013 written examination paper • Notes from the Marking Centre • Assessment and reporting in Music 1 • Assessment and reporting in Music 2

candidates are familiar with the equipment and have had a practice run with it. Make sure that all backings or audio examples for musicology viva voce are on an approved device (NOT A MOBILE PHONE). 8.

9.

If using a backing track, add a lead-in of about 30 seconds so that the candidate can start playback and feel composed prior to commencing performance. Ensure they have rehearsed this. Ensure all appropriate forms are completed accurately, signed by teacher and candidate and have been copied. It is a good idea to have two folders (one for each examiner) ready with all candidates’ forms so that examiners can commence their paperwork during the set up time.

13.

Let other students know at an assembly what will be happening on the day, mention areas to avoid and if any gates or blocks will be closed.

14.

Organise a space for candidates to use and stay together as a group on the day, like a ‘green room’.

15.

Have a box ready to collect ALL MOBILE PHONES. Entering an examination room with a mobile phone is a breach of subject rules and candidates may be penalised. This rule also applies to accompanists etc.

16.

Put signs up around the examination area to let others know to minimise noise and that the examination space is not to be entered.

10.

Prepare a Master Folder with copies of student’s sheet music and forms as a backup.

17.

If finishing examinations after school hours, check that someone is available to lock up the school. i.e cleaners, General Assistant.

11.

Mention to candidates that they might like to consider what they will wear, remembering that some schools insist on uniform, others allow candidates to wear something of their own choice. If the latter is the case, candidates need to be dressed appropriately and comfortably, taking into account their seating and playing position.

18.

Display copies of the examination timetable in several places where students and accompanists can check running times.

19.

Allow enough desk space and chairs in the event of a Senior Marker being present at the exam.

20.

With all these suggestions in place, relax and enjoy the day!

12.

Ask a colleague to organise morning tea/ afternoon tea & lunch for examiners.

Supervisor of Marking HSC Music Practical

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artsVoice

NOVEMBER 2013

VISUAL ARTS Tips for students In 2013 visual arts students across NSW have continued to explore a diverse range of approaches to the body of work. The most popular expressive form is painting while there has been a notable increase this year in drawing and sculpture as expressive forms.

Can the Frames and Conceptual Framework really help me? Many successful students clearly use these areas of the syllabus as a strategy to discover ways that could extend their ideas and the conceptual possibilities for their body of work.

The integration and influence of digital technology also remains at the forefront of considerable numbers of bodies of work. Many submissions across all the expressive forms included elements such as photographs, photobooks, DVDs and time-based forms, to support the intentions of the work.

Can the study of artists really help me? A strong, engaged study of relevant artists and their practice, along with contemporary issues and ideas in the artworld, is usually evident in a successful body of work. Should I submit my Visual Arts Process Diary with the body of work? No, the diary is not required for the purposes of assigning your exam mark. It may however be requested if the processes undertaken in your body of work require clarification.

Responses to the Body of Work Students should remember there are infinite possibilities in the journey that completes a body of work and there is no one way that is considered more important than another.

Do I need an artists statement? This should be carefully considered as in most cases a statement is unnecessary for a body of work. If an artist’s statement is submitted, it should not be a summary of the artmaking processes used to make the body of work. Students should consider how a statement is integral to the body of work.

The following questions and answers may be useful for your students to consider. One artwork or a series works? A single body of work is just as acceptable as a range of works. The body of work will be considered as a demonstration of the student’s knowledge, engagement and understanding of practice.

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Do I really need to look at the subject rules for Visual Arts? Yes, all students should be aware of the limits for size, weight, duration, and dangerous and

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See also: • Visual Arts HSC - FAQs • 2013 written examination paper • Notes from the Marking Centre • Assessment and reporting in Visual Arts

prohibited materials. Artworks which ignore these requirements are not able to achieve the same marks as those submissions that work within the course requirements. It should also be remembered that food products such as confectionary, rice, beans, liquids along with all items made of glass including glass bottles and glass light bulbs are prohibited materials. Other other items that could be considered contentious should be discussed with the Head Teacher or Principal.

Can I use a live website as part of my body of work? No, students are not permitted to submit works that can only be viewed online. This includes works that include QR codes and apps. All interactive works must be copied to a disc to enable viewing. A USB storage device is also permissible for viewing. Do I need to frame or mount images in my body of work? Framing is not a requirement for the presentation of the body of work. It is your artmaking which is being assessed, not gallery-style framing. Images such as photographs and drawings should not be presented behind acrylic surfaces. It is appropriate that some photomedia and graphic works are mounted to assist in preserving and limiting any possible damage that may occur to surfaces.

How do I select the right expressive form for my body of work? There are 12 expressive forms nominated in the Visual Arts Stage 6 syllabus. Students should always select the expressive form that has been their primary artmaking interest or focus. How many works should I submit in my body of work? The Visual Arts Stage 6 syllabus outlines the importance of the selection of works for submission. When selecting works, students should carefully consider how each work demonstrates their knowledge, intentions and understanding of practice. Your teacher can assist you in refining these choices to ensure that they do not merely reiterate the imagery and meanings of other pieces.

Where should I go to get accurate information for my Body of Work? Aside from your teachers, the Board of Studies NSW can provide essential information to assist students in getting started. Documents and information such as the Visual Arts Stage 6 syllabus, Notes From the Marking Centre and Assessment and Reporting in Visual Arts are located on the Board of Studies NSW website (refer to links at the top of this page).

Should I enclose layout instructions for my Body of Work? Instructions for displaying multiple panel works in order of display to indicate the intentions more clearly are helpful. A picture, diagram or photograph indicating how the work is intended to be displayed is suitable.

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Supervisor of Marking HSC Visual Arts Practical

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NOVEMBER 2013

19th BIENNALE OF SYDNEY excursion bookings now open The Biennale of Sydney is delighted to provide free travel on the Biennale Ferry for booked school groups. To qualify for free travel, all school groups must reserve their seats prior to the excursion date. Schools who have not booked prior to their visit are not guaranteed a place on the ferry and may miss out.

About the Biennale of Sydney The Biennale of Sydney is Australia's largest contemporary visual arts festival. Held every two years across multiple venues in Sydney, the Biennale is a three-month exhibition, with an accompanying program of artist talks, forums, guided tours and family days – all free to the public.

Book an excursion to the 19th Biennale of Sydney at Cockatoo Island by visiting 19bos.com.

The 19th Biennale of Sydney will run from 21 March – 9 June 2014.

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