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Official

Publication

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of

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the

Australasian

A

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Corrosion

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Association

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www.corrosion.com.au

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Vol 36 No 1, February 2011 ISSN 1326-1932

Inside this Issue: Corrosion & Prevention 2010 Review Project Profile: Dymocks building, Sydney – repairing and conserving a heritage listed façade suffering from corrosion Project Profile: George Street’s bridge for future generations University Profile: University of Adelaide Research Paper: Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: Global Phenomena, Local Mechanisms Research Paper: Behaviour of Stainless Steel 316L in a Marine Mixed Culture containing Sulphate Reducing and Iron Reducing Bacteria

1


&

Corrosion Engineers

Metallurgy & Materials Consulting SPECIALISING IN: • Examination of corrosion failures • Identification of fracture causes • Investigation of manufacturing problems • Insurance & litigation investigations • Simulated corrosion testing • Materials selection • Materials testing • Material characterisation W: www.incospec.com.au P: 1300 721 029 E: peter.kentish@incospec.com.au

PROTECTING YOUR ASSETS

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ISSN 1326-1932 Published by the Australasian Corrosion Association Inc. ABN: 66 214 557 257 Publications Director Mohammad Ali – GHD, MAli@ghd.com.au Editor Brian Cherry – Monash University, Brian.Cherry@monash.edu Associate Editors Research: Bruce Hinton – Monash University, bruce.hinton@monash.edu Professional Practice: Willie Mandeno – Opus International Consultants, Willie.Mandeno@opus.co.nz News: Ian Booth – Australasian Corrosion Association, ibooth@corrosion.com.au Reviewers Andy Atrens – University of Queensland Nick Birbilis – Monash University Lex Edmond – Monash University Harvey Flitt – Queensland University of Technology Maria Forsyth – Monash University Rob Francis – Aurecon Australia Warren Green – Vinsi Partners Doug John – Curtin University of Technology Graeme Kelly – Corrotec Services Nick Laycock – STOS Grant McAdam – Defence Science and Technology Organisation David Nicholas – Nicholas Corrosion John Robinson – Mount Townsend Solutions Paul Schweinsburg – Queensland University of Technology Raman Singh – Monash University Graham Sussex – Sussex Material Solutions Tony Trueman – Defence Science and Technology Organisation Geoffrey Will – Queensland University of Technology David Young – University of New South Wales Advertising Sales Wesley Fawaz - wesley.fawaz@corrosion.com.au Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Subscription Print Version: ISSN 1326-1932 Subscription rates to non members: Within Australia: A$72.60, incl GST, single copies A$16.50, incl GST Outside Australia: A$77, excl GST posted airmail, single copies A$22 incl GST On-Line Version: ISSN 1446-6848 Subscription rates to non members: A$22 incl GST The views expressed in Corrosion & Materials are those of the individual authors and are not necessarily those of the ACA. Publication of advertisements does not imply endorsement by the ACA. Copyright of all published materials is retained by the ACA but it may be quoted with due reference. Australasian Corrosion Association Inc PO Box 112, Kerrimuir Vic 3129, Australia Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Email: aca@corrosion.com.au Internet: www.corrosion.com.au President: Ian MacLeod Chief Executive Officer: Ian Booth Operations Chairman: John Grapiglia Finance Director: Paul Vince Senior Vice President: Peter Dove Junior Vice President: Allan Sterling Immediate Past President: Roman Dankiw Technical Director: Graham Sussex Education Director: Geoffrey Will Membership Director: Fred Salome Communications Director: Bryan Pike Publications Director: Mohammad Ali Newcastle Representative: TBA New Zealand Representative: John Duncan Branches & Divisions Auckland Division: Sean Ryder 64 9 261 1400 61 2 4954 2329 Newcastle: Bill Livingstone 61 2 9736 3911 New South Wales: Fred Salome 61 7 3821 0202 Queensland: Cathy Sterling 61 8 8267 4744 South Australia: Alex Shepherd 61 3 6335 4786 Tasmania: Bryan Pike 64 27 671 2278 Taranaki Division: Ron Berry 64 4 473 3124 Wellington Division: Alistair MacKenzie 61 0 433 251 728 Western Australia: Ben Coleman 61 3 9885 5305 Victoria: John Tanti Technical Groups Concrete Structures & Buildings: Frédéric Blin 61 3 9653 8406 61 3 9890 3096 Cathodic Protection: Bruce Ackland 61 3 9905 4919 Research: Nick Birbilis 61 2 9385 4322 Research: David Young 61 8 9456 0344 Mining Industry: Peter Farinha 61 400 522 944 Coatings: David Hopkins 61 402 684 165 Refining & Processing Industry: Fikry Barouky 61 419 816 783 Water & Water Teatment: David Mavros 61 3 9495 6566 Welding, Joining & Corrosion: Graham Sussex Young Corrosion Professionals: Erwin Gamboa 61 8 8303 5473 www.corrosion.com.au

4 » President’s Message 5 » ACA 2011 Training Calendar 6 » Chief Executive Officer's Message 7 » 2011 ACA Events Calendar 8 » Letter to the Editor 10 » News 15 » ACA Standards Update 20 » Corrosion & Prevention 2010 Review  pdates to the ACA technologist and technician 36 » U certification program 38 » P  roject Profile: Dymocks building, Sydney – repairing and conserving a heritage listed façade suffering from corrosion 40 » Project Profile: George Street’s bridge for future generations 42 » University Profile: University of Adelaide 44 » Coatings Group Member Profile 45 » ACA Branch News 46 » R  esearch paper: Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: Global Phenomena, Local Mechanisms 52 » R  esearch paper: Behaviour of Stainless Steel 316L in a Marine Mixed Culture containing Sulphate Reducing and Iron Reducing Bacteria 58 » Suppliers and Consultants

Front Cover Photo Under Raps protect hydraulic rams at Sino Iron Project, Cape Preston (100 kilometres south west of Karratha in Western Australia's Pilbara region) utilising oil free anti-corrosive Intercept Technology - copper chemically bonded to UV stabilised shrink film. Photo supplied by Under Raps Pty Ltd.

The ACA is a founder member of the World Corrosion Organization

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

3


&

Corrosion Engineers

Metallurgy & Materials Consulting SPECIALISING IN: • Examination of corrosion failures • Identification of fracture causes • Investigation of manufacturing problems • Insurance & litigation investigations • Simulated corrosion testing • Materials selection • Materials testing • Material characterisation W: www.incospec.com.au P: 1300 721 029 E: peter.kentish@incospec.com.au

PROTECTING YOUR ASSETS

M

A

T

E

R

I

A

L

S

ISSN 1326-1932 Published by the Australasian Corrosion Association Inc. ABN: 66 214 557 257 Publications Director Mohammad Ali – GHD, MAli@ghd.com.au Editor Brian Cherry – Monash University, Brian.Cherry@monash.edu Associate Editors Research: Bruce Hinton – Monash University, bruce.hinton@monash.edu Professional Practice: Willie Mandeno – Opus International Consultants, Willie.Mandeno@opus.co.nz News: Ian Booth – Australasian Corrosion Association, ibooth@corrosion.com.au Reviewers Andy Atrens – University of Queensland Nick Birbilis – Monash University Lex Edmond – Monash University Harvey Flitt – Queensland University of Technology Maria Forsyth – Monash University Rob Francis – Aurecon Australia Warren Green – Vinsi Partners Doug John – Curtin University of Technology Graeme Kelly – Corrotec Services Nick Laycock – STOS Grant McAdam – Defence Science and Technology Organisation David Nicholas – Nicholas Corrosion John Robinson – Mount Townsend Solutions Paul Schweinsburg – Queensland University of Technology Raman Singh – Monash University Graham Sussex – Sussex Material Solutions Tony Trueman – Defence Science and Technology Organisation Geoffrey Will – Queensland University of Technology David Young – University of New South Wales Advertising Sales Wesley Fawaz - wesley.fawaz@corrosion.com.au Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Subscription Print Version: ISSN 1326-1932 Subscription rates to non members: Within Australia: A$72.60, incl GST, single copies A$16.50, incl GST Outside Australia: A$77, excl GST posted airmail, single copies A$22 incl GST On-Line Version: ISSN 1446-6848 Subscription rates to non members: A$22 incl GST The views expressed in Corrosion & Materials are those of the individual authors and are not necessarily those of the ACA. Publication of advertisements does not imply endorsement by the ACA. Copyright of all published materials is retained by the ACA but it may be quoted with due reference. Australasian Corrosion Association Inc PO Box 112, Kerrimuir Vic 3129, Australia Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Email: aca@corrosion.com.au Internet: www.corrosion.com.au President: Ian MacLeod Chief Executive Officer: Ian Booth Operations Chairman: John Grapiglia Finance Director: Paul Vince Senior Vice President: Peter Dove Junior Vice President: Allan Sterling Immediate Past President: Roman Dankiw Technical Director: Graham Sussex Education Director: Geoffrey Will Membership Director: Fred Salome Communications Director: Bryan Pike Publications Director: Mohammad Ali Newcastle Representative: TBA New Zealand Representative: John Duncan Branches & Divisions Auckland Division: Sean Ryder 64 9 261 1400 61 2 4954 2329 Newcastle: Bill Livingstone 61 2 9736 3911 New South Wales: Fred Salome 61 7 3821 0202 Queensland: Cathy Sterling 61 8 8267 4744 South Australia: Alex Shepherd 61 3 6335 4786 Tasmania: Bryan Pike 64 27 671 2278 Taranaki Division: Ron Berry 64 4 473 3124 Wellington Division: Alistair MacKenzie 61 0 433 251 728 Western Australia: Ben Coleman 61 3 9885 5305 Victoria: John Tanti Technical Groups Concrete Structures & Buildings: Frédéric Blin 61 3 9653 8406 61 3 9890 3096 Cathodic Protection: Bruce Ackland 61 3 9905 4919 Research: Nick Birbilis 61 2 9385 4322 Research: David Young 61 8 9456 0344 Mining Industry: Peter Farinha 61 400 522 944 Coatings: David Hopkins 61 402 684 165 Refining & Processing Industry: Fikry Barouky 61 419 816 783 Water & Water Teatment: David Mavros 61 3 9495 6566 Welding, Joining & Corrosion: Graham Sussex Young Corrosion Professionals: Erwin Gamboa 61 8 8303 5473 www.corrosion.com.au

4 » President’s Message 5 » ACA 2011 Training Calendar 6 » Chief Executive Officer's Message 7 » 2011 ACA Events Calendar 8 » Letter to the Editor 10 » News 15 » ACA Standards Update 20 » Corrosion & Prevention 2010 Review  pdates to the ACA technologist and technician 36 » U certification program 38 » P  roject Profile: Dymocks building, Sydney – repairing and conserving a heritage listed façade suffering from corrosion 40 » Project Profile: George Street’s bridge for future generations 42 » University Profile: University of Adelaide 44 » Coatings Group Member Profile 45 » ACA Branch News 46 » R  esearch paper: Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: Global Phenomena, Local Mechanisms 52 » R  esearch paper: Behaviour of Stainless Steel 316L in a Marine Mixed Culture containing Sulphate Reducing and Iron Reducing Bacteria 58 » Suppliers and Consultants

Front Cover Photo Under Raps protect hydraulic rams at Sino Iron Project, Cape Preston (100 kilometres south west of Karratha in Western Australia's Pilbara region) utilising oil free anti-corrosive Intercept Technology - copper chemically bonded to UV stabilised shrink film. Photo supplied by Under Raps Pty Ltd.

The ACA is a founder member of the World Corrosion Organization

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

3


ACA 2011 Training Calendar Greetings, members There has been a wonderful response to the communications of our CEO Ian Booth from individual and corporate members of the ACA regarding the floods across Australia and the impact they have had on our colleagues. As I write the flood waters across Victoria are still encroaching upon communities as the one in two hundred year events take place. Members across the country have all been affected by the huge floods and it will be a great struggle for all our political leaders to come up with the right balance of support that will enable our ravaged communities to rebuild their lives and businesses. Graphic images of the torrents of water sweeping through homes and taking with them the cherished memories, the hopes and dreams of thousands of people are brought to us by the print and all forms of electronic media. However, for those concerned with the vital infrastructure of the community, all our members in the electricity, water, gas and transport industries will have their own operational challenges as power supplies are flooded and the cathodic protection circuits drop out. The wholesale changes will last a very long time but out of this adversity

better corrosion mitigation and management plans will emerge. In a recent executive hook up we renewed the commitment of the ACA to be there to provide any enquiries with the unbiased technical expertise that will be needed to help find the answers to many of the problems of collapsing buildings, roads and homes. In the not too distant past, many corrosion scientists did not really believe in the role of microorganisms in the decay of metals but anybody listening to the plenary paper by Brenda Little from the Naval Research Laboratory at the Adelaide Conference could not fail to be totally won over by her presentation. She expertly and deftly steered us through the blind alleys and confusing maze of alternative explanations and proved how one can be readily deceived by the presence of bacteria that are not actively involved in the corrosion process. In order to help members share this understanding there is going to be a symposium on Microbially Induced Corrosion in August. Members should consult the overall training calendar to organise the times when you can make yourself available for professional development opportunities that are being developed for and presented for you by the ACA in 2011.

include visits to two classic scenes of heroic episodes from the time of the Civil War. The stabilised remains of the submarine H L Hunley are on public view in Charleston at the weekends when the conservators take a break from treating this 1864 hand propelled vessel. The Hunley was the first submarine to successfully blow up an enemy vessel, the USS Housatonic. The submarine is shaped like a long cigar and is made of riveted wrought iron plates fashioned in a boiler workshop in Mobile, Tennessee. Remains recovered from the wreck of the USS Monitor (1862) are found at The Mariners Museum in Newport News in Virginia. The massive turret made of nine bolted one inch plate; the famous Eriksson engine and condenser are all testaments to superb ingenuity in the face of tough conditions of war time nations. The corrosion phenomena found on these historic iron vessels has direct relevance to the operational performance of structures located offshore. We can all learn from the past and use the information to plan for a better future. Ian MacLeod President

Members travelling to the NACE Conference in Houston in Texas during March might just want to check out their travel options to

Concrete Repairs and Reconstruction

• hydro-demolition • shotcreting • formwork • crack injection • coatings and linings • carbon fibre wraps

Contact Us: Geoff Adlem Mob: 419 464 082 Office: 02 9519 8944 E-mail: info@silverraven.com.au

4

Corrosion & Materials

• Cathodic protection • confined spaces • industrial rope access

All registration fees are payable in Australian Dollars. All registrations are subject to ACA’s published terms, conditions and policies Corrosion Technology Certificate Non member AU Member AU $2115 Member NZ* $1925 Non member NZ* Brisbane May Auckland, NZ July

$2480 $2255 23-27 04-08

Introduction to Protective Coatings Member AU $550 Non member AU Newcastle February Tasmania May Brisbane August

$680 25 02 29

Protective Coatings Quality Control Non member AU Member AU $1415 Sydney March Perth May Melbourne June Brisbane July

$1725 22-24 17-19 21-23 27-29

Coatings Selection & Specification Non member AU Member AU $1415 Melbourne July

$1725 11-13

Coating Inspection Refresher Non member AU Member AU $550 Member NZ* $500 Non member NZ* Sydney February Melbourne June Perth June Brisbane July August Auckland – NZ

$680 $620 07 24 27 04 01

Introduction to Cathodic Protection Non member AU Member AU $550 Member NZ* $500 Non member NZ* Brisbane May Adelaide May Melbourne July September Auckland – NZ

$680 $620 09 11 14 01

Cathodic Protection Monitoring Non member AU Member AU $1415 Brisbane June Perth June Melbourne August

$1725 14-16 21-23 23-25

Cathodic Protection Advanced Non member AU Member AU $2115 Adelaide June/July Brisbane July Perth August Melbourne September

$2480 27-01 19-21 01-05 12-16

Corrosion & CP of Concrete Structures Non member AU Member AU $1010 Brisbane April Perth October

$1265 27-28 25-26

ACA/ACRA Corrosion & Protection of Reinforced Concrete Non member AU $1265 Member AU $1010 Sydney March 01-02 Brisbane June 06-07 Tasmania September 01-02 Melbourne December 05-06 www.corrosion.com.au

*All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free NACE – Coating Inspection Program CIP Level 1 Non member AU $4070 Member AU $3560 Member SE Non member Asia & NZ* $3235 SE Asia & NZ* $3715 Melbourne February 21-26 Kuala Lumpur February 21-26 Gladstone March 07-12 Singapore March 07-12 Bangkok April 04-09 Sydney April 04-09 Perth May 02-07 Kuala Lumpur May 23-28 Brisbane June 06-11 Auckland NZ* June 20-25 Adelaide July 18-23 Karratha August 02-07 Singapore August 08-13 Bangkok August 15-20 Melbourne September 05-10 September 12-17 Kuala Lumpur Darwin September 19-24 Miri October 17-22 Perth November 07-12 Kuala Lumpur Nov/Dec 28-03 *All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free NACE – Coating Inspection Program CIP Level 2 Member AU $3560 Non member AU $4070 Member SE Non member Asia & NZ* $3235 SE Asia & NZ* $3715 March 14-19 Singapore Sydney April 11-16 Perth May 09-14 Kuala Lumpur May/June 30-04 Brisbane June 13-18 Adelaide July 25-30 Singapore August 15-20 Bangkok August 22-27 Melbourne September 12-17 Perth November 14-19 Kuala Lumpur December 05-10 *All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free NACE – Peer Review Member AU $1399 Non member AU Member SE Non member SE Asia & NZ* Asia & NZ* $1272 November Perth Kuala Lumpur December

$1494 17-19 11-13

*All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free NACE – CP Tester Level 1 Member $3235 Non member Kuala Lumpur November

$3715 07-12

$1643

To check the currency of this information please view the latest information at www.corrosion.com.au

5


ACA 2011 Training Calendar Greetings, members There has been a wonderful response to the communications of our CEO Ian Booth from individual and corporate members of the ACA regarding the floods across Australia and the impact they have had on our colleagues. As I write the flood waters across Victoria are still encroaching upon communities as the one in two hundred year events take place. Members across the country have all been affected by the huge floods and it will be a great struggle for all our political leaders to come up with the right balance of support that will enable our ravaged communities to rebuild their lives and businesses. Graphic images of the torrents of water sweeping through homes and taking with them the cherished memories, the hopes and dreams of thousands of people are brought to us by the print and all forms of electronic media. However, for those concerned with the vital infrastructure of the community, all our members in the electricity, water, gas and transport industries will have their own operational challenges as power supplies are flooded and the cathodic protection circuits drop out. The wholesale changes will last a very long time but out of this adversity

better corrosion mitigation and management plans will emerge. In a recent executive hook up we renewed the commitment of the ACA to be there to provide any enquiries with the unbiased technical expertise that will be needed to help find the answers to many of the problems of collapsing buildings, roads and homes. In the not too distant past, many corrosion scientists did not really believe in the role of microorganisms in the decay of metals but anybody listening to the plenary paper by Brenda Little from the Naval Research Laboratory at the Adelaide Conference could not fail to be totally won over by her presentation. She expertly and deftly steered us through the blind alleys and confusing maze of alternative explanations and proved how one can be readily deceived by the presence of bacteria that are not actively involved in the corrosion process. In order to help members share this understanding there is going to be a symposium on Microbially Induced Corrosion in August. Members should consult the overall training calendar to organise the times when you can make yourself available for professional development opportunities that are being developed for and presented for you by the ACA in 2011.

include visits to two classic scenes of heroic episodes from the time of the Civil War. The stabilised remains of the submarine H L Hunley are on public view in Charleston at the weekends when the conservators take a break from treating this 1864 hand propelled vessel. The Hunley was the first submarine to successfully blow up an enemy vessel, the USS Housatonic. The submarine is shaped like a long cigar and is made of riveted wrought iron plates fashioned in a boiler workshop in Mobile, Tennessee. Remains recovered from the wreck of the USS Monitor (1862) are found at The Mariners Museum in Newport News in Virginia. The massive turret made of nine bolted one inch plate; the famous Eriksson engine and condenser are all testaments to superb ingenuity in the face of tough conditions of war time nations. The corrosion phenomena found on these historic iron vessels has direct relevance to the operational performance of structures located offshore. We can all learn from the past and use the information to plan for a better future. Ian MacLeod President

Members travelling to the NACE Conference in Houston in Texas during March might just want to check out their travel options to

Concrete Repairs and Reconstruction

• hydro-demolition • shotcreting • formwork • crack injection • coatings and linings • carbon fibre wraps

Contact Us: Geoff Adlem Mob: 419 464 082 Office: 02 9519 8944 E-mail: info@silverraven.com.au

4

Corrosion & Materials

• Cathodic protection • confined spaces • industrial rope access

All registration fees are payable in Australian Dollars. All registrations are subject to ACA’s published terms, conditions and policies Corrosion Technology Certificate Non member AU Member AU $2115 Member NZ* $1925 Non member NZ* Brisbane May Auckland, NZ July

$2480 $2255 23-27 04-08

Introduction to Protective Coatings Member AU $550 Non member AU Newcastle February Tasmania May Brisbane August

$680 25 02 29

Protective Coatings Quality Control Non member AU Member AU $1415 Sydney March Perth May Melbourne June Brisbane July

$1725 22-24 17-19 21-23 27-29

Coatings Selection & Specification Non member AU Member AU $1415 Melbourne July

$1725 11-13

Coating Inspection Refresher Non member AU Member AU $550 Member NZ* $500 Non member NZ* Sydney February Melbourne June Perth June Brisbane July August Auckland – NZ

$680 $620 07 24 27 04 01

Introduction to Cathodic Protection Non member AU Member AU $550 Member NZ* $500 Non member NZ* Brisbane May Adelaide May Melbourne July September Auckland – NZ

$680 $620 09 11 14 01

Cathodic Protection Monitoring Non member AU Member AU $1415 Brisbane June Perth June Melbourne August

$1725 14-16 21-23 23-25

Cathodic Protection Advanced Non member AU Member AU $2115 Adelaide June/July Brisbane July Perth August Melbourne September

$2480 27-01 19-21 01-05 12-16

Corrosion & CP of Concrete Structures Non member AU Member AU $1010 Brisbane April Perth October

$1265 27-28 25-26

ACA/ACRA Corrosion & Protection of Reinforced Concrete Non member AU $1265 Member AU $1010 Sydney March 01-02 Brisbane June 06-07 Tasmania September 01-02 Melbourne December 05-06 www.corrosion.com.au

*All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free NACE – Coating Inspection Program CIP Level 1 Non member AU $4070 Member AU $3560 Member SE Non member Asia & NZ* $3235 SE Asia & NZ* $3715 Melbourne February 21-26 Kuala Lumpur February 21-26 Gladstone March 07-12 Singapore March 07-12 Bangkok April 04-09 Sydney April 04-09 Perth May 02-07 Kuala Lumpur May 23-28 Brisbane June 06-11 Auckland NZ* June 20-25 Adelaide July 18-23 Karratha August 02-07 Singapore August 08-13 Bangkok August 15-20 Melbourne September 05-10 September 12-17 Kuala Lumpur Darwin September 19-24 Miri October 17-22 Perth November 07-12 Kuala Lumpur Nov/Dec 28-03 *All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free NACE – Coating Inspection Program CIP Level 2 Member AU $3560 Non member AU $4070 Member SE Non member Asia & NZ* $3235 SE Asia & NZ* $3715 March 14-19 Singapore Sydney April 11-16 Perth May 09-14 Kuala Lumpur May/June 30-04 Brisbane June 13-18 Adelaide July 25-30 Singapore August 15-20 Bangkok August 22-27 Melbourne September 12-17 Perth November 14-19 Kuala Lumpur December 05-10 *All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free NACE – Peer Review Member AU $1399 Non member AU Member SE Non member SE Asia & NZ* Asia & NZ* $1272 November Perth Kuala Lumpur December

$1494 17-19 11-13

*All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free NACE – CP Tester Level 1 Member $3235 Non member Kuala Lumpur November

$3715 07-12

$1643

To check the currency of this information please view the latest information at www.corrosion.com.au

5


As we start 2011 it is already time to pause to consider our members and the wider community that have been dramatically affected by the spate of horrendous natural disasters which have beset many parts of Australia during January. The impacts on families, business, the economy and the landscape are unprecedented. ACA will do its best to be of assistance wherever it can. And now to ACA business. The joint ACA and ICC conference and congress scheduled for November in Perth will be the headline activity for the year. This event will require an enormous contribution by members, staff and international partners. The organising committee, with staff support are well advanced with their planning and all the right indicators promise that this year’s conference will be an outstanding success. The review of ACA’s cathodic protection education program has commenced. Stage 2 will be well underway by the time this edition of Corrosion & Materials goes to press. ACA Training Manager Barry Hodder is managing this project with the support of the senior lecturers who present the programs on behalf of ACA. In addition to the internal review being conducted, recommendations

for change will be validated through industry consultation. The full education and training program for the year is in place. Whilst there will no doubt be modifications to the schedule during the year, with 60 plus events planned we certainly have our hands full managing the significant contribution the association makes to education in the industries in which members are engaged. May and June will see the ACA’s highly successful technical roadshow conducted throughout Australasia. We will again be extending the number of regional locations at which the roadshow will be presented. The technical groups continue to develop and a number of events are being finalised for the year. A MIC symposium will be held in August at which international and Australasian experts will present papers. The symposium will also feature open forums aimed at maximising the transfer of technology through consideration of practical application of the theory and research under discussion. The Australian Electrolysis Committee (Cathodic Protection technical group) will meet in Launceston in June. The Mining Industry technical group will

conduct seminars in Kalgoorlie in July and Mackay in August. Plans are developing for a seminar in April on welding and joining in the water industry with a focus on stainless steel. A number of other technical events are under consideration by the technical groups and details will be distributed shortly. Our relationships with partnering organisations and others with which the ACA is involved will continue to be reviewed during 2011. Changes are likely for the PCCP and APAS schemes. Our involvement with the standards development processes will continue to increase. Training programs will be enhanced. The ACA’s board will meet in February in Melbourne and no doubt there will be even more positive activity generated. ACA will continue to develop its presence and increase its relevance in the industries in which our members are represented.

2011 ACA Events Calendar 2011 promises to be an active year for the ACA with the listed events below confirmed and with further events currently being finalised. ACA members will receive further information on each event as appropriate throughout the

year, but for now you may wish to include these details in your diary now. A finalised 2011 events calendar will be published by the ACA once available which will also include local Branch activities.

EVENT TYPE

EVENT TITLE

DATE

LOCATION

1 day seminar

Welding and Joining in Water Industry Applications

12th April

Melbourne, Victoria

(with a focus on stainless steel)

Road Show of 1 day seminars

Corrosion Mitigation & Monitoring

May–June

Various Australasian locations (12 in total)

1 day meeting

Cathodic Protection Technical Group Mid-year Meeting: Australian Electrolysis Committee Meeting

24th June

Launceston, Tasmania

1 day seminar

Mining; Best Practice In Corrosion Management – Or Is It?

8th July

Kalgoorlie, Western Australia

2 day symposium

Symposium on Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

10th–11th August

Melbourne, Victoria

1 day seminar

Mining; Best Practice In Corrosion Management – Or Is It?

30th August

Mackay, Queensland

4 day congress

18th International Corrosion Congress

20th–24th November

Perth, Western Australia

Ian Booth Chief Executive Officer ibooth@corrosion.com.au

Sponsorship Opportunities Sponsorship opportunities exist for each event listed above. For further information or to express your interest, please contact Wesley Fawaz at the ACA Centre on +61 3 9890 4833 or wesley.fawaz@corrosion.com.au

6

Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

7


As we start 2011 it is already time to pause to consider our members and the wider community that have been dramatically affected by the spate of horrendous natural disasters which have beset many parts of Australia during January. The impacts on families, business, the economy and the landscape are unprecedented. ACA will do its best to be of assistance wherever it can. And now to ACA business. The joint ACA and ICC conference and congress scheduled for November in Perth will be the headline activity for the year. This event will require an enormous contribution by members, staff and international partners. The organising committee, with staff support are well advanced with their planning and all the right indicators promise that this year’s conference will be an outstanding success. The review of ACA’s cathodic protection education program has commenced. Stage 2 will be well underway by the time this edition of Corrosion & Materials goes to press. ACA Training Manager Barry Hodder is managing this project with the support of the senior lecturers who present the programs on behalf of ACA. In addition to the internal review being conducted, recommendations

for change will be validated through industry consultation. The full education and training program for the year is in place. Whilst there will no doubt be modifications to the schedule during the year, with 60 plus events planned we certainly have our hands full managing the significant contribution the association makes to education in the industries in which members are engaged. May and June will see the ACA’s highly successful technical roadshow conducted throughout Australasia. We will again be extending the number of regional locations at which the roadshow will be presented. The technical groups continue to develop and a number of events are being finalised for the year. A MIC symposium will be held in August at which international and Australasian experts will present papers. The symposium will also feature open forums aimed at maximising the transfer of technology through consideration of practical application of the theory and research under discussion. The Australian Electrolysis Committee (Cathodic Protection technical group) will meet in Launceston in June. The Mining Industry technical group will

conduct seminars in Kalgoorlie in July and Mackay in August. Plans are developing for a seminar in April on welding and joining in the water industry with a focus on stainless steel. A number of other technical events are under consideration by the technical groups and details will be distributed shortly. Our relationships with partnering organisations and others with which the ACA is involved will continue to be reviewed during 2011. Changes are likely for the PCCP and APAS schemes. Our involvement with the standards development processes will continue to increase. Training programs will be enhanced. The ACA’s board will meet in February in Melbourne and no doubt there will be even more positive activity generated. ACA will continue to develop its presence and increase its relevance in the industries in which our members are represented.

2011 ACA Events Calendar 2011 promises to be an active year for the ACA with the listed events below confirmed and with further events currently being finalised. ACA members will receive further information on each event as appropriate throughout the

year, but for now you may wish to include these details in your diary now. A finalised 2011 events calendar will be published by the ACA once available which will also include local Branch activities.

EVENT TYPE

EVENT TITLE

DATE

LOCATION

1 day seminar

Welding and Joining in Water Industry Applications

12th April

Melbourne, Victoria

(with a focus on stainless steel)

Road Show of 1 day seminars

Corrosion Mitigation & Monitoring

May–June

Various Australasian locations (12 in total)

1 day meeting

Cathodic Protection Technical Group Mid-year Meeting: Australian Electrolysis Committee Meeting

24th June

Launceston, Tasmania

1 day seminar

Mining; Best Practice In Corrosion Management – Or Is It?

8th July

Kalgoorlie, Western Australia

2 day symposium

Symposium on Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion

10th–11th August

Melbourne, Victoria

1 day seminar

Mining; Best Practice In Corrosion Management – Or Is It?

30th August

Mackay, Queensland

4 day congress

18th International Corrosion Congress

20th–24th November

Perth, Western Australia

Ian Booth Chief Executive Officer ibooth@corrosion.com.au

Sponsorship Opportunities Sponsorship opportunities exist for each event listed above. For further information or to express your interest, please contact Wesley Fawaz at the ACA Centre on +61 3 9890 4833 or wesley.fawaz@corrosion.com.au

6

Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

7


Letter to the Editor Comments to Caustic Soda Service Chart for Carbon Steel

750

280

Corrosion & Materials

Acknowlegement The author acknowledges the contribution from Christian van der Westhuizen.

~ ~

420

120

nickel alloy trim for valves in areas ‘B’ and ‘C’

220

400

110

360

100 200

160 140

70 60

120

50

100

40 area ‘A’

30

80

carbon steel no stress relief necessary

60

20

stress relieve welded steam-traced lines 10

40

0 20

application of nickel alloys to be considered in this area

~

300

20

30

40

Concentration NaOH, % by weight

50

 .W. Shmidt, P.J. Gegner, [4] H G. Heinemann, C.F. Pogacar, E.H. Wyche, “Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alkaline Solutions”, Corrosion, NACE, V.7, September 1951, pp. 295-302 [5] “ Caustic Stress Corrosion Cracking (Caustic Embrittlement)”, Recommended Practice 571, 4.5.3, First Edition, December 2003, API, p.4-138

175

150

280

nickel alloy trim for valves in areas ‘B’ and ‘C’

260

125

240 220

area ‘B’

200 180

100

carbon steel stress relieve welds and bends necessary

75

160 140

50

120

area ‘A’

100

carbon steel no stress relief necessary

80

25

60 40

0

[6] E  .S. Beardwood, “Operational Control and Maintenance Integrity of Typical and Atypical Coil Tube Steam Generating Systems”, CORROSION/99, Paper 338, NACE  .N. Kemmer, Ed., The NALCO [7] F Water Handbook, 2nd Edition., McGraw-Hill Inc., 1988, ISBN No. 0-07-045872-3 [8] S  TEAM, its generation and use, 40th Ed., Babcock and Wilcox, Editors S.C. Stultz and J.B.Kitto, McDermott Co., 1992, ISBN No. 09634570-0-4 [9] M  etals Handbook, 9th Edition, V. 11, “Failure Analysis and Prevention”, ASM, 1995

0

20

10

[2] “ Avoiding Caustic Stress Corrosion Cracking of Carbon Steel Refinery Equipment and Piping”, NACE Standard RP04032003, Item No. 21102

320

80 carbon steel stress relieve welds and bends

area ‘C’

340

90

area ‘B’

180

200

380

Temperature, °C

application of nickel alloys to be considered in this area

area ‘C’

240

225

~

260

399

~

References [1] Corrosion Data Survey, NACE, 1974. NACE Corrosion Engineer’s Reference Book, Ed. R.S. Tresedes, 1980

[3] A  . A. Berk, W.F. Waldeck, “Caustic Danger Zone”, Chemical Engineering, V.57, June 1950, pp. 235-237

°C

440

Figure 1: Caustic Soda Service Chart2

8

 The exact upper temperature limit for the curves (related to 50 ppm and to 5%, Figure 2) that runs parallel to the temperature axis should not be specified unless research work has been performed to verify such a limit and probable slope. From a practical point of view, it should be below the creep temperature limit for carbon steel (800°F or 427°C), [7-9].

°F

~

 Earlier [3,4] and in the NACE RP0403 [2] write-up mention is made of the fact that carbon steel could be used in Area C if the concentration of the caustic soda is below 5 wt%. However, clearly the Chart (Figure 1) does not reflect this. Furthermore from the literature it is clear that if carbon steel is used in this region of Area C it must be in the stress relived condition, as is required in Area B. It is therefore proposed that the upper curve that separates Area B & Area C, be modified to end at 5 wt% and to continue upwards to 300°F (149°C) [3,4], parallel to the temperature axis (Figure 2), rather than the way it is at present (Figure 1). Furthermore, the Chart

 At present the Chart curves (Figure 1) are drawn to include 0% caustic concentration. Zero concentration of NaOH implies a neutral medium with pH 7, where actually a plain carbon steel with/

Temperature, °F

It has become very clear over the years, after numerous discussions with industry, that the well known chart for carbon steel in caustic service (Figure 1, [1,2] ), causes some confusion during material selection and application at lower caustic concentrations (< 5 wt%). Furthermore, it appears that most plant personnel don’t find the time to always read the details in the write-up and that they simply refer to the chart, as if it is a stand-alone document. Moreover, plant personnel don’t often consult corrosion experts for interpretation and as such the ease of interpretation of the chart and clarity of this chart becomes crucial. As a result the chart is mostly interpreted at face-value. It is proposed therefore that this chart requires some further clarification / modifications, particularly:

 There are times when a concentration mechanism is at work and when a bulk solution below 5 wt% can lead to SCC; this is also pointed out in NACE RP0403 [2]. However, API Recommended Practice 571 [5] gives a more detailed coverage where it is stated

that only caustic solutions < 50 ppm are safe, when this concentration mechanism is expected. It is therefore recommended (Figure 2) to also include this in the existing Chart.

Temperature, °C

SABIC Technology Center-Jubail, P.O. Box 11425, Al-Jubail 31961, Saudi Arabia. E-mail: bairamovak@sabic.com

should have a 5% entry included on the NaOH concentration axis for clarity purposes as shown in Figure 2.

Temperature, °F

Avtandil Khalil Bairamov

without PWHT can be used at much higher temperatures. Particularly, in the boiler feed water (with pH range 9.5 to 9.8) where there is a high temperature inhibitor present; carbon steel with/without PWHT normally operates at temperatures up to 446°F (230°C) above 30 years. Generally, allowable temperature for carbon steel is 750°F (399°C) [6]. For this reason it is also recommended to modify (as in Figure 2) the existing Chart as explained above.

50 PPM

5

10

20

30

40

50

NaOH Concentration, Weight %

Figure 2: Materials - Applicability Modified Chart - Caustic Soda Service

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

9


Letter to the Editor Comments to Caustic Soda Service Chart for Carbon Steel

750

280

Corrosion & Materials

Acknowlegement The author acknowledges the contribution from Christian van der Westhuizen.

~ ~

420

120

nickel alloy trim for valves in areas ‘B’ and ‘C’

220

400

110

360

100 200

160 140

70 60

120

50

100

40 area ‘A’

30

80

carbon steel no stress relief necessary

60

20

stress relieve welded steam-traced lines 10

40

0 20

application of nickel alloys to be considered in this area

~

300

20

30

40

Concentration NaOH, % by weight

50

 .W. Shmidt, P.J. Gegner, [4] H G. Heinemann, C.F. Pogacar, E.H. Wyche, “Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alkaline Solutions”, Corrosion, NACE, V.7, September 1951, pp. 295-302 [5] “ Caustic Stress Corrosion Cracking (Caustic Embrittlement)”, Recommended Practice 571, 4.5.3, First Edition, December 2003, API, p.4-138

175

150

280

nickel alloy trim for valves in areas ‘B’ and ‘C’

260

125

240 220

area ‘B’

200 180

100

carbon steel stress relieve welds and bends necessary

75

160 140

50

120

area ‘A’

100

carbon steel no stress relief necessary

80

25

60 40

0

[6] E  .S. Beardwood, “Operational Control and Maintenance Integrity of Typical and Atypical Coil Tube Steam Generating Systems”, CORROSION/99, Paper 338, NACE  .N. Kemmer, Ed., The NALCO [7] F Water Handbook, 2nd Edition., McGraw-Hill Inc., 1988, ISBN No. 0-07-045872-3 [8] S  TEAM, its generation and use, 40th Ed., Babcock and Wilcox, Editors S.C. Stultz and J.B.Kitto, McDermott Co., 1992, ISBN No. 09634570-0-4 [9] M  etals Handbook, 9th Edition, V. 11, “Failure Analysis and Prevention”, ASM, 1995

0

20

10

[2] “ Avoiding Caustic Stress Corrosion Cracking of Carbon Steel Refinery Equipment and Piping”, NACE Standard RP04032003, Item No. 21102

320

80 carbon steel stress relieve welds and bends

area ‘C’

340

90

area ‘B’

180

200

380

Temperature, °C

application of nickel alloys to be considered in this area

area ‘C’

240

225

~

260

399

~

References [1] Corrosion Data Survey, NACE, 1974. NACE Corrosion Engineer’s Reference Book, Ed. R.S. Tresedes, 1980

[3] A  . A. Berk, W.F. Waldeck, “Caustic Danger Zone”, Chemical Engineering, V.57, June 1950, pp. 235-237

°C

440

Figure 1: Caustic Soda Service Chart2

8

 The exact upper temperature limit for the curves (related to 50 ppm and to 5%, Figure 2) that runs parallel to the temperature axis should not be specified unless research work has been performed to verify such a limit and probable slope. From a practical point of view, it should be below the creep temperature limit for carbon steel (800°F or 427°C), [7-9].

°F

~

 Earlier [3,4] and in the NACE RP0403 [2] write-up mention is made of the fact that carbon steel could be used in Area C if the concentration of the caustic soda is below 5 wt%. However, clearly the Chart (Figure 1) does not reflect this. Furthermore from the literature it is clear that if carbon steel is used in this region of Area C it must be in the stress relived condition, as is required in Area B. It is therefore proposed that the upper curve that separates Area B & Area C, be modified to end at 5 wt% and to continue upwards to 300°F (149°C) [3,4], parallel to the temperature axis (Figure 2), rather than the way it is at present (Figure 1). Furthermore, the Chart

 At present the Chart curves (Figure 1) are drawn to include 0% caustic concentration. Zero concentration of NaOH implies a neutral medium with pH 7, where actually a plain carbon steel with/

Temperature, °F

It has become very clear over the years, after numerous discussions with industry, that the well known chart for carbon steel in caustic service (Figure 1, [1,2] ), causes some confusion during material selection and application at lower caustic concentrations (< 5 wt%). Furthermore, it appears that most plant personnel don’t find the time to always read the details in the write-up and that they simply refer to the chart, as if it is a stand-alone document. Moreover, plant personnel don’t often consult corrosion experts for interpretation and as such the ease of interpretation of the chart and clarity of this chart becomes crucial. As a result the chart is mostly interpreted at face-value. It is proposed therefore that this chart requires some further clarification / modifications, particularly:

 There are times when a concentration mechanism is at work and when a bulk solution below 5 wt% can lead to SCC; this is also pointed out in NACE RP0403 [2]. However, API Recommended Practice 571 [5] gives a more detailed coverage where it is stated

that only caustic solutions < 50 ppm are safe, when this concentration mechanism is expected. It is therefore recommended (Figure 2) to also include this in the existing Chart.

Temperature, °C

SABIC Technology Center-Jubail, P.O. Box 11425, Al-Jubail 31961, Saudi Arabia. E-mail: bairamovak@sabic.com

should have a 5% entry included on the NaOH concentration axis for clarity purposes as shown in Figure 2.

Temperature, °F

Avtandil Khalil Bairamov

without PWHT can be used at much higher temperatures. Particularly, in the boiler feed water (with pH range 9.5 to 9.8) where there is a high temperature inhibitor present; carbon steel with/without PWHT normally operates at temperatures up to 446°F (230°C) above 30 years. Generally, allowable temperature for carbon steel is 750°F (399°C) [6]. For this reason it is also recommended to modify (as in Figure 2) the existing Chart as explained above.

50 PPM

5

10

20

30

40

50

NaOH Concentration, Weight %

Figure 2: Materials - Applicability Modified Chart - Caustic Soda Service

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

9


Final Report on Review of New South Wales corrosion protection regulation released The NSW Government has released the report of the review of corrosion protection regulation and endorsed its recommendations. ACA along with a number of other significant industry stakeholders made a submission to the review team. According to the NSW Government the nine (9) recommendations will improve the currency of information on the register through new requirements for an annual return submitted by owners and by allowing offences to be more efficiently enforced using penalty notices instead of just prosecution. This will enhance the register’s role as a risk management tool for the benefit of business and the community. The review recommendations will be implemented by Industry and Investment NSW during 2011. Summary and recommendations: Corrosion Protection Systems (CPSs) are used to protect underground metal structures from corrosion. They operate by sending a low voltage direct current through ground or water to a structure. While this protects the CPS owner’s asset, it may corrode nearby underground metallic structures owned by others. To protect underground metallic structures in NSW, which are valued at over $18 billion, many of which deliver utility services, a regulatory framework for corrosion protection systems is in place. This requires owners to test their CPS, obtain the consent of affected asset owners and then provide their details to a public register administered by the Department of Industry and Investment (I&I NSW) before the CPS can be operated.

10 Corrosion & Materials

The current approach to CPS regulation has been in place in NSW since 2003. Stakeholders have since raised concerns about the accuracy of the register because of delays in retesting, and problems with the compliance and enforcement framework. Questions have also been raised about whether the existing approach is the most efficient way to address the risks posed by CPSs. In July 2010, the Better Regulation Office and Industry and Investment NSW released an Issues Paper seeking feedback on the current regulatory scheme. The paper identified a number of options for a future regulatory and administrative framework. Consultation with stakeholders has informed the review recommendations contained in this report. The review finds that a public CPS register is an effective way of addressing risks to metallic structures by providing information to third parties about the location of CPSs so that they are aware of the location of any CPS near their own infrastructure and are able to work with the system owners to minimise any risks from nearby CPSs. The register needs to be mandated by the NSW Government to ensure that all system owners are required to provide the information about their systems to a central public register. The review also found that a NSW Government administered register is probably the most efficient means of running the register. In order to ensure the information in the register is kept up to date, CPS owners will be required to provide an annual return to I&I NSW updating the status of all their systems. This is consistent with the

NSW Government’s performance management approach to regulation of the electricity and gas network businesses. The review also recommends that as CPS owners will be providing an annual return on the status of their systems, some of the regulatory burden associated with the existing scheme can be reduced by no longer requiring CPSs to be re-registered. Improvements can also be made by removing any ambiguity with regard to the responsibilities of CPS owners to prevent damage to other metallic structures and their obligations to comply with regulatory requirements. Additional industry-based funding should increase resources provided by I&I NSW to enforce the legislation. Giving I&I NSW the power to issue penalty notices for offences relating to the register should also improve the efficiency of enforcement.

2008 that no liability accrues to the NSW Government as a result of administering the CPS register. Recommendation 3 The regulatory regime should be operated on a cost recovery basis. An appropriate regime which covers I&I NSW’s costs in managing the regulatory regime will be developed with Treasury. Recommendation 4 In order to facilitate compliance with the Regulation, each system owner shall submit an annual return to I&I NSW about the CPSs currently operated by the owner as at 30 June to confirm matters recorded on the register. In line with the performance regulation approach adopted for electricity and gas in NSW, this annual return shall be submitted by the CEO of the system owner. The report must also include a corrective action and timeline for addressing any noncompliance identified in the return.

Recommendation 1 A public register detailing all operating corrosion protection systems should be maintained. Systems that are currently exempt from registration (under clause 4 of the Electricity Supply (Corrosion Protection) Regulation 2008) will continue to be so. This register will record details such as the system number, system owner, contact person, location, and approved operating conditions (including retesting period). Only one owner shall be registered for each system.

Recommendation 5 CPSs should only be required to be registered once. Retesting periods will vary according to risk levels and be specified as a condition of registration when the CPS is presented for registration, as is currently the case. It is an offence to operate a CPS that has not been registered or has not been retested in accordance with the legislation. Recommendation 6 It should be clarified that CPS owners are responsible for CPSs maintenance and testing, and compliance with all registration and notification requirements under the Regulation, including submitting an accurate annual return. Failure to do so is a breach of the legislation and can lead to I&I NSW cancelling registration and/or imposing penalties. Recommendation 7 I&I NSW should inform CPS owners and testers about their obligations under the Regulation and ensure

that there is effective communication between I&I NSW and the industry, including advance notification of CPSs due for retesting. Recommendation 8 I&I NSW should be given the power to issue penalty notices for offences under the Regulation. Recommendation 9 I&I NSW shall conduct periodic reviews of the register to identify any non-compliance. Any noncompliance identified shall be brought to the attention of the CEO of the CPS owner. The owner will be requested to submit an explanation within 30 days as to why enforcement action should not be taken and also a corrective action report. Copies of the report are available from the Better Regulation Office website: http://www.betterregulation. nsw.gov.au/targeted_reviews/review_ of_nsw_corrosion_protection_ regulation

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Recommendation 2 The register should be maintained by Industry & Investment NSW. It should be clarified in the Electricity Supply Act 1995 and Electricity Supply (Corrosion Protection) Regulation

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

11


Final Report on Review of New South Wales corrosion protection regulation released The NSW Government has released the report of the review of corrosion protection regulation and endorsed its recommendations. ACA along with a number of other significant industry stakeholders made a submission to the review team. According to the NSW Government the nine (9) recommendations will improve the currency of information on the register through new requirements for an annual return submitted by owners and by allowing offences to be more efficiently enforced using penalty notices instead of just prosecution. This will enhance the register’s role as a risk management tool for the benefit of business and the community. The review recommendations will be implemented by Industry and Investment NSW during 2011. Summary and recommendations: Corrosion Protection Systems (CPSs) are used to protect underground metal structures from corrosion. They operate by sending a low voltage direct current through ground or water to a structure. While this protects the CPS owner’s asset, it may corrode nearby underground metallic structures owned by others. To protect underground metallic structures in NSW, which are valued at over $18 billion, many of which deliver utility services, a regulatory framework for corrosion protection systems is in place. This requires owners to test their CPS, obtain the consent of affected asset owners and then provide their details to a public register administered by the Department of Industry and Investment (I&I NSW) before the CPS can be operated.

10 Corrosion & Materials

The current approach to CPS regulation has been in place in NSW since 2003. Stakeholders have since raised concerns about the accuracy of the register because of delays in retesting, and problems with the compliance and enforcement framework. Questions have also been raised about whether the existing approach is the most efficient way to address the risks posed by CPSs. In July 2010, the Better Regulation Office and Industry and Investment NSW released an Issues Paper seeking feedback on the current regulatory scheme. The paper identified a number of options for a future regulatory and administrative framework. Consultation with stakeholders has informed the review recommendations contained in this report. The review finds that a public CPS register is an effective way of addressing risks to metallic structures by providing information to third parties about the location of CPSs so that they are aware of the location of any CPS near their own infrastructure and are able to work with the system owners to minimise any risks from nearby CPSs. The register needs to be mandated by the NSW Government to ensure that all system owners are required to provide the information about their systems to a central public register. The review also found that a NSW Government administered register is probably the most efficient means of running the register. In order to ensure the information in the register is kept up to date, CPS owners will be required to provide an annual return to I&I NSW updating the status of all their systems. This is consistent with the

NSW Government’s performance management approach to regulation of the electricity and gas network businesses. The review also recommends that as CPS owners will be providing an annual return on the status of their systems, some of the regulatory burden associated with the existing scheme can be reduced by no longer requiring CPSs to be re-registered. Improvements can also be made by removing any ambiguity with regard to the responsibilities of CPS owners to prevent damage to other metallic structures and their obligations to comply with regulatory requirements. Additional industry-based funding should increase resources provided by I&I NSW to enforce the legislation. Giving I&I NSW the power to issue penalty notices for offences relating to the register should also improve the efficiency of enforcement.

2008 that no liability accrues to the NSW Government as a result of administering the CPS register. Recommendation 3 The regulatory regime should be operated on a cost recovery basis. An appropriate regime which covers I&I NSW’s costs in managing the regulatory regime will be developed with Treasury. Recommendation 4 In order to facilitate compliance with the Regulation, each system owner shall submit an annual return to I&I NSW about the CPSs currently operated by the owner as at 30 June to confirm matters recorded on the register. In line with the performance regulation approach adopted for electricity and gas in NSW, this annual return shall be submitted by the CEO of the system owner. The report must also include a corrective action and timeline for addressing any noncompliance identified in the return.

Recommendation 1 A public register detailing all operating corrosion protection systems should be maintained. Systems that are currently exempt from registration (under clause 4 of the Electricity Supply (Corrosion Protection) Regulation 2008) will continue to be so. This register will record details such as the system number, system owner, contact person, location, and approved operating conditions (including retesting period). Only one owner shall be registered for each system.

Recommendation 5 CPSs should only be required to be registered once. Retesting periods will vary according to risk levels and be specified as a condition of registration when the CPS is presented for registration, as is currently the case. It is an offence to operate a CPS that has not been registered or has not been retested in accordance with the legislation. Recommendation 6 It should be clarified that CPS owners are responsible for CPSs maintenance and testing, and compliance with all registration and notification requirements under the Regulation, including submitting an accurate annual return. Failure to do so is a breach of the legislation and can lead to I&I NSW cancelling registration and/or imposing penalties. Recommendation 7 I&I NSW should inform CPS owners and testers about their obligations under the Regulation and ensure

that there is effective communication between I&I NSW and the industry, including advance notification of CPSs due for retesting. Recommendation 8 I&I NSW should be given the power to issue penalty notices for offences under the Regulation. Recommendation 9 I&I NSW shall conduct periodic reviews of the register to identify any non-compliance. Any noncompliance identified shall be brought to the attention of the CEO of the CPS owner. The owner will be requested to submit an explanation within 30 days as to why enforcement action should not be taken and also a corrective action report. Copies of the report are available from the Better Regulation Office website: http://www.betterregulation. nsw.gov.au/targeted_reviews/review_ of_nsw_corrosion_protection_ regulation

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Recommendation 2 The register should be maintained by Industry & Investment NSW. It should be clarified in the Electricity Supply Act 1995 and Electricity Supply (Corrosion Protection) Regulation

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

11


NEWS

Future of PCCP scheme needs to be clarified Towards the end of 2010, ACA received advice from the management of the Painting Contractors Certification Program (PCCP) that there was a strong possibility that there would be changes in the “ownership” of the scheme. Currently, the scheme is administered by CSIRO along with a number of other certification programs including APAS. In order to ensure that ACA members are not disadvantaged by

any changes, ACA has entered into discussions with senior management at CSIRO to ensure that the scheme remains relevant and increases the benefits the scheme provides, particularly to certified contractors. ACA is examining whether it should auspice an industry managed company to administer PCCP or a similar scheme at some future time. The association’s position will be determined by the final announced intentions of CSIRO as

far as divestment goes and whether there is benefit for ACA members and industry support for ACA to take the lead in establishing a new entity to run PCCP or a similar body. As more information comes to hand, members, particularly contractor members who are participants in the scheme will be contacted. Further information is available from Ian Booth at ACA on 03 9890 4833 or by email to ibooth@corrosion.com.au

Incospec & Associates Australia Pty Ltd acquisition of CTI Consultants As announced at the closing ceremony of the 2010 ACA Annual Conference held in Adelaide in November, ACA Platinum corporate members Incospec & Associates Australia have reached an ‘in principle’ acquisition agreement with CTI Consultants. Directors of CTI Consultants Fred Salome and Carol Bodle, along with their valued team

will remain active within the business for the foreseeable future ensuring continuity to clients and projects during CTI’s transition into the Incospec group of companies.

employment opportunities for experienced personnel for both management and technical roles in the New South Wales region”.

Incospec General Manager Steve Marks said “this agreement broadens the range of technical expertise and geographical resources already offered to the clients of both organisations, and will generate

Incospec & Associates Australia Pty Ltd partners with Mach 3 Engineering, Malaysia Incospec & Associates Australia have also reached an associate services partnership with Mach 3 Engineering, Malaysia.

Central Systems acquires Asset Systems ACA corporate members Central Systems have completed the acquisition of Asset Systems and have expanded their Remedial Services Division to incorporate a new Specialty Coatings and Linings capability. The acquisition complements Central Systems existing service offering in the industrial and resources sectors providing remedial coatings and corrosion prevention services.

Central Systems Director of Services, Ivan Ruefli said “this sets Central Systems apart from our competitors with the ability to offer a complete range of protective coating and lining solutions to our clients”.

The expanded range of specialised preparation and application equipment

“We are making excellent progress toward implementing our strategy

12 Corrosion & Materials

of ‘whole of life’ civil and remedial contracting services, from the construction of new structures, asset protection and maintenance, to remediation, and ultimately their demolition and replacement.” “Specialist coatings are a growing area for Central Systems, with new products and technologies becoming available we have secured the required knowledge and depth of experience to provide innovative and reliable solutions to our clients”, Mr Ruefli said.

Transfield Services secures $68 million in new work Transfield Services has secured two new defence industry contracts, a six year A$35 million contract with ASC on behalf of the Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) Alliance and a three year A$33 million contract with the Department of Defence to provide Comprehensive Maintenance Services (CMS) in Central Northern New South Wales. Transfield Services will perform blast and paint work for the ASC – Australia’s largest specialised defence shipbuilding organisation – as part of the construction of three AWDs. Work will commence early in 2011 and be carried out at

the ASC facility in Adelaide, South Australia. In addition, through the Comprehensive Maintenance Services contract with the Department of Defence, Transfield Services will provide all building and equipment maintenance, call centre services and manage a portfolio of capital works projects primarily to RAAF Williamtown in Newcastle and the Singleton Military Area. The work will also encompass services to bases spread from the Hawkesbury River north of Sydney through to the Queensland border.

Transfield Services’ Managing Director and CEO, Peter Goode, said “this new work reinforces our already well established position in the defence sector and reflects our ability to provide specialised skills to key industries.” Transfield Services has also provided Garrison Support Services to the Department of Defence for more than a decade in Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia and provides corrosion protection services to the Australian Navy’s six Collins Class Submarines.

Battling with Excessive Humidity?

Incospec Director Peter Hart (left) with Mach 3 Technical Manager Michelle Lau (right) following the signing of the agreement.

Incospec will utilise Mach 3’s decades of corrosion engineering experience in disciplines such as cathodic protection design, surveying and auditing, material selection, failure analysis, NDT, project management, expert witness and training. This agreement strengthens Incospec’s international operations in the Asia-Pacific region.

includes; mobile self contained polyurea/polyurethane spray application rigs, UHP preparation and coating removal equipment and vacuum recovery systems.

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Melbourne

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NEWS

Future of PCCP scheme needs to be clarified Towards the end of 2010, ACA received advice from the management of the Painting Contractors Certification Program (PCCP) that there was a strong possibility that there would be changes in the “ownership” of the scheme. Currently, the scheme is administered by CSIRO along with a number of other certification programs including APAS. In order to ensure that ACA members are not disadvantaged by

any changes, ACA has entered into discussions with senior management at CSIRO to ensure that the scheme remains relevant and increases the benefits the scheme provides, particularly to certified contractors. ACA is examining whether it should auspice an industry managed company to administer PCCP or a similar scheme at some future time. The association’s position will be determined by the final announced intentions of CSIRO as

far as divestment goes and whether there is benefit for ACA members and industry support for ACA to take the lead in establishing a new entity to run PCCP or a similar body. As more information comes to hand, members, particularly contractor members who are participants in the scheme will be contacted. Further information is available from Ian Booth at ACA on 03 9890 4833 or by email to ibooth@corrosion.com.au

Incospec & Associates Australia Pty Ltd acquisition of CTI Consultants As announced at the closing ceremony of the 2010 ACA Annual Conference held in Adelaide in November, ACA Platinum corporate members Incospec & Associates Australia have reached an ‘in principle’ acquisition agreement with CTI Consultants. Directors of CTI Consultants Fred Salome and Carol Bodle, along with their valued team

will remain active within the business for the foreseeable future ensuring continuity to clients and projects during CTI’s transition into the Incospec group of companies.

employment opportunities for experienced personnel for both management and technical roles in the New South Wales region”.

Incospec General Manager Steve Marks said “this agreement broadens the range of technical expertise and geographical resources already offered to the clients of both organisations, and will generate

Incospec & Associates Australia Pty Ltd partners with Mach 3 Engineering, Malaysia Incospec & Associates Australia have also reached an associate services partnership with Mach 3 Engineering, Malaysia.

Central Systems acquires Asset Systems ACA corporate members Central Systems have completed the acquisition of Asset Systems and have expanded their Remedial Services Division to incorporate a new Specialty Coatings and Linings capability. The acquisition complements Central Systems existing service offering in the industrial and resources sectors providing remedial coatings and corrosion prevention services.

Central Systems Director of Services, Ivan Ruefli said “this sets Central Systems apart from our competitors with the ability to offer a complete range of protective coating and lining solutions to our clients”.

The expanded range of specialised preparation and application equipment

“We are making excellent progress toward implementing our strategy

12 Corrosion & Materials

of ‘whole of life’ civil and remedial contracting services, from the construction of new structures, asset protection and maintenance, to remediation, and ultimately their demolition and replacement.” “Specialist coatings are a growing area for Central Systems, with new products and technologies becoming available we have secured the required knowledge and depth of experience to provide innovative and reliable solutions to our clients”, Mr Ruefli said.

Transfield Services secures $68 million in new work Transfield Services has secured two new defence industry contracts, a six year A$35 million contract with ASC on behalf of the Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) Alliance and a three year A$33 million contract with the Department of Defence to provide Comprehensive Maintenance Services (CMS) in Central Northern New South Wales. Transfield Services will perform blast and paint work for the ASC – Australia’s largest specialised defence shipbuilding organisation – as part of the construction of three AWDs. Work will commence early in 2011 and be carried out at

the ASC facility in Adelaide, South Australia. In addition, through the Comprehensive Maintenance Services contract with the Department of Defence, Transfield Services will provide all building and equipment maintenance, call centre services and manage a portfolio of capital works projects primarily to RAAF Williamtown in Newcastle and the Singleton Military Area. The work will also encompass services to bases spread from the Hawkesbury River north of Sydney through to the Queensland border.

Transfield Services’ Managing Director and CEO, Peter Goode, said “this new work reinforces our already well established position in the defence sector and reflects our ability to provide specialised skills to key industries.” Transfield Services has also provided Garrison Support Services to the Department of Defence for more than a decade in Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia and provides corrosion protection services to the Australian Navy’s six Collins Class Submarines.

Battling with Excessive Humidity?

Incospec Director Peter Hart (left) with Mach 3 Technical Manager Michelle Lau (right) following the signing of the agreement.

Incospec will utilise Mach 3’s decades of corrosion engineering experience in disciplines such as cathodic protection design, surveying and auditing, material selection, failure analysis, NDT, project management, expert witness and training. This agreement strengthens Incospec’s international operations in the Asia-Pacific region.

includes; mobile self contained polyurea/polyurethane spray application rigs, UHP preparation and coating removal equipment and vacuum recovery systems.

We have the solution. Dehumidification Technologies offers rental & sales of desiccant and refrigerant dehumidifiers. We have a wide range of dehumidification, cooling and heating equipment available to create any environment for our customer. Our innovative techniques, a wealth of knowledge and experience, and dependable service help customers achieve a successful project – on time and under budget.

1800-RentDH

(736 834)

www.rentdh.com www.corrosion.com.au

Melbourne

ddawson@rentdh.com

Sydney

Adelaide

Perth

Brisbane

24 hours a day / 7 days a week on-call service


NEWS

ACA welcomes new members Corporate Members

Titanium Anode Corporation Pty Ltd Titanium Anode Corporation Pty Ltd (TICOR) has been licensed by Titanium Electrode Products Inc of the USA to produce in Queensland its worldwide recognised and specified range of MMO and Pt/ Ti anodes for use in Cathodic Protection. TICOR brings to Australia anodes with MMO coatings for use in the onshore, offshore, marine, industrial and civil industries which have been independently tested to NACE TM108-2008 at Manchester University, England.

Horiso Pty Ltd With landmark design perspectives featured in leading commercial, hospitality, institutional, and residential sectors worldwide, Australian owned manufacturer of solar control systems and specialty blinds since 1995, horiso® creates internal and external integrated solar control solutions. A growing awareness of sustainability principles has made horiso an international pioneer for high performance buildings where the comfort and well-being of occupants is paramount, setting the benchmark for innovative design, engineering and technology with distinctive projects throughout North America, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

Individual Members Bradley Adams Rodney Clarke of Woodside Energy Limited

David Cuthbertson of Savcor Finn Arwind Kumar Dubey of SAIPEM Steven Johnson of Incospec & Associates Kevin MacDonald of BHP Billiton Sean McTavish of Best-Weld Engineering & Inspection Beverley McTavish of Best-Weld Engineering & Inspection Calvin Ogilvie of ITW Polymers & Fluids

New steel, surface with light rust & thin coatings

GMA SpeedBlastTM

t-POHUFSNDPSSPTJPO QSPUFDUJPO

t"UNPTQIFSJDBOEJNNFSTJPO BQQMJDBUJPOT

t%JSFDUUPNFUBMBQQMJDBUJPO

t'VMM"4DPMPVSPGGFS

t3BQJEDVSJOHQSPQFSUJFT

t"QQSPWFEUP"1"4

GMA PremiumBlast

Maintenance grade for tough jobs

For more information, contact us at 08 9287 3250 or email sales@garnetsales.com

Ae d

AU

AN

14 Corrosion & Materials

US de LIn ow T& RA

mAa

www.garnetsales.com

corrosion or corrosivity or corrosive; but not anodizing or anodize(d) paint or coating; but not anodizing or anodize(d) galvanize or galvanized or galvanizing cathode or cathodic anode or anodic

There were 146 citations against a search for “concrete and corrosion” with no directly related AS or AS/ NZS standards”. A total of 34 listings of new Standards, Drafts and Amendments, were found issued from to 19 November 2010 to 17 January 2011. There were no Standards, Drafts or Amendments issued for AS, AS/ NZS for the same period. A copy of the full report can be downloaded from the ACA’s website www.corrosion.com.au

Key word search on ‘corrosion’ or ‘corrosivity’ or ‘corrosive’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’- 6 citations in all – no AS/NZS citations; ISO 4404-2:2010

Petroleum and related products - Determination of the corrosion resistance of fire-resistant hydraulic fluids Part 2: Non-aqueous fluids

BS EN 4538-003:2010

Aerospace series. Bearings, spherical plain, in corrosion resisting steel with self-lubricating liner elevated load under low oscillations. Narrow series. Dimensions and loads. Inch series with low friction coefficient

BS EN 4539-003:2010

Aerospace series. Bearings, spherical plain, in corrosion resisting steel with self-lubricating liner elevated load under low oscillations. Wide series. Dimensions and loads. Inch series with low friction coefficient

DIN EN ISO 11130 (2010-12)

Corrosion of metals and alloys - Alternate immersion test in salt solution (ISO 11130:2010)

DIN EN ISO 13680 (2010-12)

Petroleum and natural gas industries - Corrosion-resistant alloy seamless tubes for use as casing, tubing and coupling stock - Technical delivery conditions (ISO 13680:2010); English version EN ISO 13680:2010

DIN EN ISO 15156-3 (2010-12)

Petroleum and natural gas industries - Materials for use in H<(Index)2>S-containing environments in oil and gas production - Part 3: Cracking-resistant CRAs (corrosion-resistant alloys) and other alloys (ISO 15156-3:2009)

Key word search on 'paint’ and or ‘coating’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’ or corrosion– 26 Publications found; 6 Drafts; no publications from AS/NZS; ISO 1519:2011

Paints and varnishes - Bend test (cylindrical mandrel)

ISO/DIS 12013-1

Paints and varnishes - Determination of curing characteristics using a free-damped oscillation method - Part 1: Start temperature of reaction

ISO/DIS 12013-2

Paints and varnishes - Determination of curing characteristics using a free-damped oscillation method - Part 2: Glass-transition temperature

ISO/DIS 13129

Paints and varnishes - Electrochemical measurement of the protection provided to steel by paint coatings Current interrupter (CI) technique, relaxation voltammetry (RV) or DC transient (DCT) measurements

I.S. EN ISO 14446:2010

Binders for Paints and Varnishes - Determination of the Viscosity of Industrial Cellulose Nitrate Solutions and Classification of Such Solutions

I.S. EN ISO 15234:2010

Paints and Varnishes - Testing of Formaldehyde-emitting Coatings and Melamine Foams - Determination of the Steadystate Concentration of Formaldehyde in a Small Test Chamber

I.S. EN ISO 276:2010

Binders for Paints and Varnishes - Linseed Stand oil - Requirements and Methods of Test

I.S. EN ISO 277:2010

Binders for Paints and Varnishes - raw Tung oil - Requirements and Methods of Test

I.S. EN ISO 4619:2010

Driers for Paints and Varnishes

TM

REALINI ATD MS

durability

Key word search on ‘durability’.- 3 BS EN citations found relating to furniture durability

General purpose abrasive

GMA Garnet Group Level 18, Exchange Plaza, The Esplanade, Perth, WA 6000

corrosion and concrete, or concrete and coatings

Richard Thorley of Thorley Protective Coatings

High solids, surface tolerant maintenance epoxy

GMA NewSteel

electrochemical or electrolysis or electroplated

NEW STANDARDS, AMENDMENTS OR DRAFTS FOR AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI AND STANDARDS OR AMENDMENTS FOR ISO & IEC PUBLISHED between 20/11/10 &17/01/11:

DTM985

TM

A search of SAI Global for new standards, amendments or drafts published between 19th November 2010 to 17th January 2011 as AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN,

ETSI, JSA, NSAI, and standards and amendments for ISO & IEC, was conducted using the key words and key word groups:

Mark O'Sullivan

Paul Cummack of Athfield Architects Ltd

Quality range of blasting grades for your blast cleaning requirements.

ACA Standards Officer Arthur Austin has prepared a schedule of the latest standards developments. This year the report will comprise two parts; a search of SAIGLOBAL Publications at https://infostore. saiglobal.com/store as previously for new standards, amendments and drafts, and a search for all current publications and standards relating to one of the ACA Technical Groups. The first of these groups will be Concrete Structures and Buildings Technical Group.

For more information on Wattyl Epinamel high performance epoxies contact Wattyl Customer Service on 132 101 or visit us at www.wattyl.com.au Wattyl® and Epinamel® are registered trademarks of Wattyl Australia Pty Limited A.B.N. 40 000 035 914

I.S. EN ISO 8623:2010

Tall-oil Fatty Acids for Paints and Varnishes - Specifications and Test Methods

10/30197383 DC BS ISO 12013-1

Paints and varnishes. Determination of curing characteristics using a free-damped oscillation method. Part 1. Start temperature of reaction

10/30197386 DC BS ISO 12013-2

Paints and varnishes. Determination of curing characteristics using a free-damped oscillation method. Part 2. Glass-transition temperature

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

15


NEWS

ACA welcomes new members Corporate Members

Titanium Anode Corporation Pty Ltd Titanium Anode Corporation Pty Ltd (TICOR) has been licensed by Titanium Electrode Products Inc of the USA to produce in Queensland its worldwide recognised and specified range of MMO and Pt/ Ti anodes for use in Cathodic Protection. TICOR brings to Australia anodes with MMO coatings for use in the onshore, offshore, marine, industrial and civil industries which have been independently tested to NACE TM108-2008 at Manchester University, England.

Horiso Pty Ltd With landmark design perspectives featured in leading commercial, hospitality, institutional, and residential sectors worldwide, Australian owned manufacturer of solar control systems and specialty blinds since 1995, horiso® creates internal and external integrated solar control solutions. A growing awareness of sustainability principles has made horiso an international pioneer for high performance buildings where the comfort and well-being of occupants is paramount, setting the benchmark for innovative design, engineering and technology with distinctive projects throughout North America, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

Individual Members Bradley Adams Rodney Clarke of Woodside Energy Limited

David Cuthbertson of Savcor Finn Arwind Kumar Dubey of SAIPEM Steven Johnson of Incospec & Associates Kevin MacDonald of BHP Billiton Sean McTavish of Best-Weld Engineering & Inspection Beverley McTavish of Best-Weld Engineering & Inspection Calvin Ogilvie of ITW Polymers & Fluids

New steel, surface with light rust & thin coatings

GMA SpeedBlastTM

t-POHUFSNDPSSPTJPO QSPUFDUJPO

t"UNPTQIFSJDBOEJNNFSTJPO BQQMJDBUJPOT

t%JSFDUUPNFUBMBQQMJDBUJPO

t'VMM"4DPMPVSPGGFS

t3BQJEDVSJOHQSPQFSUJFT

t"QQSPWFEUP"1"4

GMA PremiumBlast

Maintenance grade for tough jobs

For more information, contact us at 08 9287 3250 or email sales@garnetsales.com

Ae d

AU

AN

14 Corrosion & Materials

US de LIn ow T& RA

mAa

www.garnetsales.com

corrosion or corrosivity or corrosive; but not anodizing or anodize(d) paint or coating; but not anodizing or anodize(d) galvanize or galvanized or galvanizing cathode or cathodic anode or anodic

There were 146 citations against a search for “concrete and corrosion” with no directly related AS or AS/ NZS standards”. A total of 34 listings of new Standards, Drafts and Amendments, were found issued from to 19 November 2010 to 17 January 2011. There were no Standards, Drafts or Amendments issued for AS, AS/ NZS for the same period. A copy of the full report can be downloaded from the ACA’s website www.corrosion.com.au

Key word search on ‘corrosion’ or ‘corrosivity’ or ‘corrosive’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’- 6 citations in all – no AS/NZS citations; ISO 4404-2:2010

Petroleum and related products - Determination of the corrosion resistance of fire-resistant hydraulic fluids Part 2: Non-aqueous fluids

BS EN 4538-003:2010

Aerospace series. Bearings, spherical plain, in corrosion resisting steel with self-lubricating liner elevated load under low oscillations. Narrow series. Dimensions and loads. Inch series with low friction coefficient

BS EN 4539-003:2010

Aerospace series. Bearings, spherical plain, in corrosion resisting steel with self-lubricating liner elevated load under low oscillations. Wide series. Dimensions and loads. Inch series with low friction coefficient

DIN EN ISO 11130 (2010-12)

Corrosion of metals and alloys - Alternate immersion test in salt solution (ISO 11130:2010)

DIN EN ISO 13680 (2010-12)

Petroleum and natural gas industries - Corrosion-resistant alloy seamless tubes for use as casing, tubing and coupling stock - Technical delivery conditions (ISO 13680:2010); English version EN ISO 13680:2010

DIN EN ISO 15156-3 (2010-12)

Petroleum and natural gas industries - Materials for use in H<(Index)2>S-containing environments in oil and gas production - Part 3: Cracking-resistant CRAs (corrosion-resistant alloys) and other alloys (ISO 15156-3:2009)

Key word search on 'paint’ and or ‘coating’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’ or corrosion– 26 Publications found; 6 Drafts; no publications from AS/NZS; ISO 1519:2011

Paints and varnishes - Bend test (cylindrical mandrel)

ISO/DIS 12013-1

Paints and varnishes - Determination of curing characteristics using a free-damped oscillation method - Part 1: Start temperature of reaction

ISO/DIS 12013-2

Paints and varnishes - Determination of curing characteristics using a free-damped oscillation method - Part 2: Glass-transition temperature

ISO/DIS 13129

Paints and varnishes - Electrochemical measurement of the protection provided to steel by paint coatings Current interrupter (CI) technique, relaxation voltammetry (RV) or DC transient (DCT) measurements

I.S. EN ISO 14446:2010

Binders for Paints and Varnishes - Determination of the Viscosity of Industrial Cellulose Nitrate Solutions and Classification of Such Solutions

I.S. EN ISO 15234:2010

Paints and Varnishes - Testing of Formaldehyde-emitting Coatings and Melamine Foams - Determination of the Steadystate Concentration of Formaldehyde in a Small Test Chamber

I.S. EN ISO 276:2010

Binders for Paints and Varnishes - Linseed Stand oil - Requirements and Methods of Test

I.S. EN ISO 277:2010

Binders for Paints and Varnishes - raw Tung oil - Requirements and Methods of Test

I.S. EN ISO 4619:2010

Driers for Paints and Varnishes

TM

REALINI ATD MS

durability

Key word search on ‘durability’.- 3 BS EN citations found relating to furniture durability

General purpose abrasive

GMA Garnet Group Level 18, Exchange Plaza, The Esplanade, Perth, WA 6000

corrosion and concrete, or concrete and coatings

Richard Thorley of Thorley Protective Coatings

High solids, surface tolerant maintenance epoxy

GMA NewSteel

electrochemical or electrolysis or electroplated

NEW STANDARDS, AMENDMENTS OR DRAFTS FOR AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI AND STANDARDS OR AMENDMENTS FOR ISO & IEC PUBLISHED between 20/11/10 &17/01/11:

DTM985

TM

A search of SAI Global for new standards, amendments or drafts published between 19th November 2010 to 17th January 2011 as AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN,

ETSI, JSA, NSAI, and standards and amendments for ISO & IEC, was conducted using the key words and key word groups:

Mark O'Sullivan

Paul Cummack of Athfield Architects Ltd

Quality range of blasting grades for your blast cleaning requirements.

ACA Standards Officer Arthur Austin has prepared a schedule of the latest standards developments. This year the report will comprise two parts; a search of SAIGLOBAL Publications at https://infostore. saiglobal.com/store as previously for new standards, amendments and drafts, and a search for all current publications and standards relating to one of the ACA Technical Groups. The first of these groups will be Concrete Structures and Buildings Technical Group.

For more information on Wattyl Epinamel high performance epoxies contact Wattyl Customer Service on 132 101 or visit us at www.wattyl.com.au Wattyl® and Epinamel® are registered trademarks of Wattyl Australia Pty Limited A.B.N. 40 000 035 914

I.S. EN ISO 8623:2010

Tall-oil Fatty Acids for Paints and Varnishes - Specifications and Test Methods

10/30197383 DC BS ISO 12013-1

Paints and varnishes. Determination of curing characteristics using a free-damped oscillation method. Part 1. Start temperature of reaction

10/30197386 DC BS ISO 12013-2

Paints and varnishes. Determination of curing characteristics using a free-damped oscillation method. Part 2. Glass-transition temperature

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

15


Standards Update

10/30200337 DC BS EN ISO 13129

Paints and varnishes. Electrochemical measurement of the protection provided to steel by paint coatings. Current interrupter (CI) technique, relaxation voltammetry (RV) or DC transient (DCT) measurements

BS EN ISO 10890:2010

Paints and varnishes. Modelling of biocide release rate from antifouling paints by mass-balance calculation

BS EN ISO 15234:2010

Paints and varnishes. Testing of formaldehyde-emitting coatings and melamine foams. Determination of the steady-state concentration of formaldehyde in a small test chamber

BS EN 2434-001:2010

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Two component cold curing polyurethane finish. Basic requirements

BS EN 2434-002:2010

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Two component cold curing polyurethane finish. High chemical resistance

BS EN 2434-003:2010

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Two component cold curing polyurethane finish. Flexible and high fluid resistance for interior

BS EN 2434-004:2010

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Two component cold curing polyurethane finish. High flexibility

DIN EN 2434-001 (2010-12)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Two component cold curing polyurethane finish - Part 001: Basic requirements; German and English version EN 2434-001:2010

DIN EN 2434-002 (2010-12)

STANDARDS LISTING BY SUBJECT, RELATING TO CONCRETE AND CORROSION. Construction materials and building; Structures of buildings BS EN 990:2002 DIN EN 990 (2003-01) NF EN 990:2003 NS EN 990 Ed. 2 (2002) ONORM EN 990:2003 SS EN 990 Ed. 2 (2002) UNE EN 990:2003

Test Methods For Verification Of Corrosion Protection Of Reinforcement In Autoclaved Aerated Concrete And Lightweight Aggregate Concrete With Open Structure

PN 82/B-01801:1982

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Basic Design Principles

PN 86/B-01802:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Terms And Definitions

PN 86/B-01810:1986

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Two component cold curing polyurethane finish - Part 002: High chemical resistance; German and English version EN 2434-002:2010

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Protective Properties Of Concrete Referring To Reinforcing Steel Electrochemical Tests

PN 86/B-01811:1986

DIN EN 2434-003 (2010-12)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Two component cold curing polyurethane finish - Part 003: Flexible and high fluid resistance for interior; German and English version EN 2434-003:2010

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Material And Structural Protection - Specifications

PN 88/B-01807:1988

DIN EN 2434-004 (2010-12)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Two component cold curing polyurethane finish - Part 004: High flexibility; German and English version EN 2434-004:2010

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Principles Of Diagnostics For Structures

GOST 28574:1990

ISO 12690:2010

Metallic and other inorganic coatings - Thermal spray coordination - Tasks and responsibilities

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Methods Of The Protection Covers Adhesion Testing

ISO 14921:2010

Thermal spraying - Procedures for the application of thermally sprayed coatings for engineering components

GOST 28575:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Test Of Protection Covers From Steam Penetration

ISO 3613:2010

Metallic and other inorganic coatings - Chromate conversion coatings on zinc, cadmium, aluminium-zinc alloys and zinc-aluminium alloys - Test methods

PN 88/B-01808:1988

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - The Principles Of The Determination Of Scars In The Coatings Protecting Steel And Reinforced Concrete Structures

ISO 9717:2010

Metallic and other inorganic coatings - Phosphate conversion coating of metals

PN 91/B-01813:1991

IEC 60664-3 Amd.1 Ed. 2.0 Cor.1 (Bilingual 2010)

Corrigendum 1 to amendment 1 - Insulation coordination for equipment within low-voltage systems - Part 3: Use of coating, potting or moulding for protection against pollution

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Superficial Protective Measures - Principles And Choice

PN 92/B-01814:1992

I.S. EN ISO 28762:2010

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Enamel Coatings Applied to Steel for Writing Surfaces - Specification

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Test Method For Adherence Protective Coatings

I.S. EN ISO 8130-1:2010

Coating Powders - Part 1: Determination of Particle Size Distribution by Sieving

PN 92/B-01815:1992

I.S. EN ISO 8130-10:2010

Coating Powders - Part 10: Determination of Deposition Efficiency

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Test Methods For Water Vapour Permeability Of Protective Coatings

I.S. EN ISO 8130-11:2010

Coating Powders - Part 11: Inclined-plane Flow Test

ASTM G109-07

Standard Test Method for Determining Effects of Chemical Admixtures on Corrosion of Embedded Steel Reinforcement in Concrete Exposed to Chloride Environments

I.S. EN ISO 8130-12:2010

Coating Powders - Part 12: Determination of Compatibility

I.S. EN ISO 8130-13:2010

Coating Powders - Part 13: Particle Size Analysis by Laser Diffraction

Products And Systems For The Protection And Repair Of Concrete Structures - Definitions, Requirements, Quality Control And Evaluation Of Conformity - Part 7: Reinforcement Corrosion Protection

I.S. EN ISO 8130-2:2010

Coating Powders - Part 2: Determination of Density by gas Comparison Pyknometer (referee Method)

I.S. EN ISO 8130-3:2010

Coating Powders - Part 3: Determination of Density by Liquid Displacement Pyknometer

I.S. EN ISO 8130-4:2010

Coating Powders - Part 4: Calculation of Lower Explosion Limit

BS EN 1504-7:2006 DIN EN 1504-7 (2006-11) I.S. EN 1504-7:2007 NBN EN 1504-7:2007 NEN EN 1504-7:2006 NF EN 1504-7:2006 NS EN 1504-7 Ed. 1 (2006) PN EN 1504-7:2007 SS EN 1504-7 Ed. 1 (2006) UNE EN 1504-7:2007 UNI EN 1504-7:2007

Key word search on ‘cathode’ or 'cathodic' - 2 corrosion related Standard Publications found,

UNE 112010:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Chloride Determinations For In Service Concrete

10/30234726 DC BS EN 12496

Galvanic anodes for cathodic protection in seawater and saline mud

UNE 112011:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Determination Of The Carbonatation Depth For In Service Concrete

10/30234732 DC BS EN ISO 13174

Cathodic protection of harbour installations

Products And Systems For The Protection And Repair Of Concrete Structures - Test Methods - Corrosion Protection Test

Determination Of The Bond Behaviour Between Reinforcing Steel And Autoclaved Aerated Concrete By The Beam Test - Part 2: Long Term Test

Key word search on 'galvanize' or ‘galvanized’ or 'galvanizing’ –1 Standard Publications found; 10/30234726 DC BS EN 12496

Galvanic anodes for cathodic protection in seawater and saline mud

ISO/FDIS 2106.2

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Determination of mass per unit area (surface density) of anodic oxidation coatings - Gravimetric method

BS EN 15183:2006 DIN EN 15183 (2006-11) I.S. EN 15183:2007 NEN EN 15183:2006 PN EN 15183:2007 NF EN 15183:2007 UNE EN 15183:2007 (R2010) UNI EN 15183:2007

ISO/FDIS 8994.2

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Rating system for the evaluation of pitting corrosion - Grid method

NF EN 12269-2:2010

BS EN ISO 2143:2010

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys. Estimation of loss of absorptive power of anodic oxidation coatings after sealing. Dye-spot test with prior acid treatment CD-ROM

Construction materials and building; Construction materials

BS EN ISO 6719:2010

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys. Measurement of reflectance characteristics of aluminium surfaces using integrating-sphere instruments

PN 82/B-01801:1982

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Basic Design Principles

BS EN ISO 7668:2010

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys. Measurement of specular reflectance and specular gloss of anodic oxidation coatings at angles of 20 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees or 85 degrees

PN 86/B-01802:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Terms And Definitions

PN 86/B-01810:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Protective Properties Of Concrete Referring To Reinforcing Steel Electrochemical Tests

Key word search on 'anode' or ‘anodes’ or ‘anodic’ – 1 Standard Publications found; 10/30234726 DC BS EN 12496

Galvanic anodes for cathodic protection in seawater and saline mud

Key word search on 'anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’ –5 Standard Publications found relating to aluminium and its anodizing; none from AS/NZS;

Key word search on 'corrosion' and 'concrete' or ‘concrete’ and ‘coatings’ - 0 Standard Publications found.

16 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

17


Standards Update

10/30200337 DC BS EN ISO 13129

Paints and varnishes. Electrochemical measurement of the protection provided to steel by paint coatings. Current interrupter (CI) technique, relaxation voltammetry (RV) or DC transient (DCT) measurements

BS EN ISO 10890:2010

Paints and varnishes. Modelling of biocide release rate from antifouling paints by mass-balance calculation

BS EN ISO 15234:2010

Paints and varnishes. Testing of formaldehyde-emitting coatings and melamine foams. Determination of the steady-state concentration of formaldehyde in a small test chamber

BS EN 2434-001:2010

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Two component cold curing polyurethane finish. Basic requirements

BS EN 2434-002:2010

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Two component cold curing polyurethane finish. High chemical resistance

BS EN 2434-003:2010

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Two component cold curing polyurethane finish. Flexible and high fluid resistance for interior

BS EN 2434-004:2010

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Two component cold curing polyurethane finish. High flexibility

DIN EN 2434-001 (2010-12)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Two component cold curing polyurethane finish - Part 001: Basic requirements; German and English version EN 2434-001:2010

DIN EN 2434-002 (2010-12)

STANDARDS LISTING BY SUBJECT, RELATING TO CONCRETE AND CORROSION. Construction materials and building; Structures of buildings BS EN 990:2002 DIN EN 990 (2003-01) NF EN 990:2003 NS EN 990 Ed. 2 (2002) ONORM EN 990:2003 SS EN 990 Ed. 2 (2002) UNE EN 990:2003

Test Methods For Verification Of Corrosion Protection Of Reinforcement In Autoclaved Aerated Concrete And Lightweight Aggregate Concrete With Open Structure

PN 82/B-01801:1982

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Basic Design Principles

PN 86/B-01802:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Terms And Definitions

PN 86/B-01810:1986

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Two component cold curing polyurethane finish - Part 002: High chemical resistance; German and English version EN 2434-002:2010

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Protective Properties Of Concrete Referring To Reinforcing Steel Electrochemical Tests

PN 86/B-01811:1986

DIN EN 2434-003 (2010-12)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Two component cold curing polyurethane finish - Part 003: Flexible and high fluid resistance for interior; German and English version EN 2434-003:2010

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Material And Structural Protection - Specifications

PN 88/B-01807:1988

DIN EN 2434-004 (2010-12)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Two component cold curing polyurethane finish - Part 004: High flexibility; German and English version EN 2434-004:2010

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Principles Of Diagnostics For Structures

GOST 28574:1990

ISO 12690:2010

Metallic and other inorganic coatings - Thermal spray coordination - Tasks and responsibilities

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Methods Of The Protection Covers Adhesion Testing

ISO 14921:2010

Thermal spraying - Procedures for the application of thermally sprayed coatings for engineering components

GOST 28575:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Test Of Protection Covers From Steam Penetration

ISO 3613:2010

Metallic and other inorganic coatings - Chromate conversion coatings on zinc, cadmium, aluminium-zinc alloys and zinc-aluminium alloys - Test methods

PN 88/B-01808:1988

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - The Principles Of The Determination Of Scars In The Coatings Protecting Steel And Reinforced Concrete Structures

ISO 9717:2010

Metallic and other inorganic coatings - Phosphate conversion coating of metals

PN 91/B-01813:1991

IEC 60664-3 Amd.1 Ed. 2.0 Cor.1 (Bilingual 2010)

Corrigendum 1 to amendment 1 - Insulation coordination for equipment within low-voltage systems - Part 3: Use of coating, potting or moulding for protection against pollution

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Superficial Protective Measures - Principles And Choice

PN 92/B-01814:1992

I.S. EN ISO 28762:2010

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Enamel Coatings Applied to Steel for Writing Surfaces - Specification

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Test Method For Adherence Protective Coatings

I.S. EN ISO 8130-1:2010

Coating Powders - Part 1: Determination of Particle Size Distribution by Sieving

PN 92/B-01815:1992

I.S. EN ISO 8130-10:2010

Coating Powders - Part 10: Determination of Deposition Efficiency

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Test Methods For Water Vapour Permeability Of Protective Coatings

I.S. EN ISO 8130-11:2010

Coating Powders - Part 11: Inclined-plane Flow Test

ASTM G109-07

Standard Test Method for Determining Effects of Chemical Admixtures on Corrosion of Embedded Steel Reinforcement in Concrete Exposed to Chloride Environments

I.S. EN ISO 8130-12:2010

Coating Powders - Part 12: Determination of Compatibility

I.S. EN ISO 8130-13:2010

Coating Powders - Part 13: Particle Size Analysis by Laser Diffraction

Products And Systems For The Protection And Repair Of Concrete Structures - Definitions, Requirements, Quality Control And Evaluation Of Conformity - Part 7: Reinforcement Corrosion Protection

I.S. EN ISO 8130-2:2010

Coating Powders - Part 2: Determination of Density by gas Comparison Pyknometer (referee Method)

I.S. EN ISO 8130-3:2010

Coating Powders - Part 3: Determination of Density by Liquid Displacement Pyknometer

I.S. EN ISO 8130-4:2010

Coating Powders - Part 4: Calculation of Lower Explosion Limit

BS EN 1504-7:2006 DIN EN 1504-7 (2006-11) I.S. EN 1504-7:2007 NBN EN 1504-7:2007 NEN EN 1504-7:2006 NF EN 1504-7:2006 NS EN 1504-7 Ed. 1 (2006) PN EN 1504-7:2007 SS EN 1504-7 Ed. 1 (2006) UNE EN 1504-7:2007 UNI EN 1504-7:2007

Key word search on ‘cathode’ or 'cathodic' - 2 corrosion related Standard Publications found,

UNE 112010:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Chloride Determinations For In Service Concrete

10/30234726 DC BS EN 12496

Galvanic anodes for cathodic protection in seawater and saline mud

UNE 112011:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Determination Of The Carbonatation Depth For In Service Concrete

10/30234732 DC BS EN ISO 13174

Cathodic protection of harbour installations

Products And Systems For The Protection And Repair Of Concrete Structures - Test Methods - Corrosion Protection Test

Determination Of The Bond Behaviour Between Reinforcing Steel And Autoclaved Aerated Concrete By The Beam Test - Part 2: Long Term Test

Key word search on 'galvanize' or ‘galvanized’ or 'galvanizing’ –1 Standard Publications found; 10/30234726 DC BS EN 12496

Galvanic anodes for cathodic protection in seawater and saline mud

ISO/FDIS 2106.2

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Determination of mass per unit area (surface density) of anodic oxidation coatings - Gravimetric method

BS EN 15183:2006 DIN EN 15183 (2006-11) I.S. EN 15183:2007 NEN EN 15183:2006 PN EN 15183:2007 NF EN 15183:2007 UNE EN 15183:2007 (R2010) UNI EN 15183:2007

ISO/FDIS 8994.2

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Rating system for the evaluation of pitting corrosion - Grid method

NF EN 12269-2:2010

BS EN ISO 2143:2010

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys. Estimation of loss of absorptive power of anodic oxidation coatings after sealing. Dye-spot test with prior acid treatment CD-ROM

Construction materials and building; Construction materials

BS EN ISO 6719:2010

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys. Measurement of reflectance characteristics of aluminium surfaces using integrating-sphere instruments

PN 82/B-01801:1982

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Basic Design Principles

BS EN ISO 7668:2010

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys. Measurement of specular reflectance and specular gloss of anodic oxidation coatings at angles of 20 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees or 85 degrees

PN 86/B-01802:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Terms And Definitions

PN 86/B-01810:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Protective Properties Of Concrete Referring To Reinforcing Steel Electrochemical Tests

Key word search on 'anode' or ‘anodes’ or ‘anodic’ – 1 Standard Publications found; 10/30234726 DC BS EN 12496

Galvanic anodes for cathodic protection in seawater and saline mud

Key word search on 'anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’ –5 Standard Publications found relating to aluminium and its anodizing; none from AS/NZS;

Key word search on 'corrosion' and 'concrete' or ‘concrete’ and ‘coatings’ - 0 Standard Publications found.

16 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

17


Standards Update

PN 86/B-01811:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Material And Structural Protection - Specifications

PN 88/B-01807:1988

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Principles Of Diagnostics For Structures

BS EN 990:2002 DIN EN 990 (2003-01) NF EN 990:2003 NS EN 990 Ed. 2 (2002) ONORM EN 990:2003 SS EN 990 Ed. 2 (2002) UNE EN 990:2003

Test Methods For Verification Of Corrosion Protection Of Reinforcement In Autoclaved Aerated Concrete And Lightweight Aggregate Concrete With Open Structure

GOST 28574:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Methods Of The Protection Covers Adhesion Testing

GOST 28575:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Test Of Protection Covers From Steam Penetration

PN 88/B-01808:1988

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - The Principles Of The Determination Of Scars In The Coatings Protecting Steel And Reinforced Concrete Structures

PN 91/B-01813:1991

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Superficial Protective Measures - Principles And Choice

PN 92/B-01814:1992

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Test Method For Adherence Protective Coatings

PN 92/B-01815:1992

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Test Methods For Water Vapour Permeability Of Protective Coatings

ASTM G109-07

Standard Test Method for Determining Effects of Chemical Admixtures on Corrosion of Embedded Steel Reinforcement in Concrete Exposed to Chloride Environments

BS EN 1504-7:2006 DIN EN 1504-7 (2006-11) I.S. EN 1504-7:2007 NBN EN 1504-7:2007 NEN EN 1504-7:2006 NF EN 1504-7:2006 PN EN 1504-7:2007 NS EN 1504-7 Ed. 1 (2006) SS EN 1504-7 Ed. 1 (2006) UNE EN 1504-7:2007 UNI EN 1504-7:2007

Products and Systems for the Protection and Repair of Concrete Structures - Definitions, Requirements, Quality Control and Evaluation of Conformity - Part 7: Reinforcement Corrosion Protection

BS EN 15183:2006 DIN EN 15183 (2006-11) I.S. EN 15183:2007 NEN EN 15183:2006 NF EN 15183:2007 PN EN 15183:2007 UNE EN 15183:2007 (R2010) UNI EN 15183:2007

Products and Systems for the Protection and Repair of Concrete Structures - Test Methods - Corrosion Protection Test

UNE 112010:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Chloride Determinations For In Service Concrete

UNE 112011:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Determination Of The Carbonatation Depth For In Service Concrete

NF EN 12269-2:2010

Determination Of The Bond Behaviour Between Reinforcing Steel And Autoclaved Aerated Concrete By The Beam Test - Part 2: Long Term Test

BS EN 14879-5:2007 DIN EN 14879-5 (2007-10) I.S. EN 14879-5:2007 NBN EN 14879-5:2007 NEN EN 14879-5:2007 NS EN 14879-5 Ed. 1 (2007) ONORM EN 14879-5:2008 SS EN 14879-5 Ed. 1 (2007) UNE EN 14879-5:2008 UNI EN 14879-5:2008

Organic Coating Systems and Linings for Protection of Industrial Apparatus and Plants Against Corrosion Caused by Aggressive Media - Part 5: Linings on Concrete Components

Metallurgy; Corrosion of metals ASTM STP1065-90

Corrosion Rates Of Steel In Concrete

ASTM STP1276-96

Techniques To Assess The Corrosion Activity Of Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

JIS A 6205:2003

Corrosion inhibitor for reinforcing steel in concrete

UNI 10322:1994

Corrosion Of Reinforcement In Concrete Structures - Method For The Determination Of The Degree Protection Of Concrete Against The Corrosion Of Reinforcement

NFA 05 611:1992

Electrochemical Corrosion Protection - Cathodic Protection Of Concrete Reinforcement - Buried Or Immersed Works

ASTM G109-07

Standard Test Method for Determining Effects of Chemical Admixtures on Corrosion of Embedded Steel Reinforcement in Concrete Exposed to Chloride Environments

UNI 9944:1992

Corrosion And Protection Of Reinforcing Steel In Concrete - Determination Of The Carbonation Depth And Of The Chlorides Penetration Profile In Concrete

UNE 112010:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Chloride Determinations For In Service Concrete

UNE 112011:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Determination Of The Carbonatation Depth For In Service Concrete

UNE 112083:2010

Measurement Of Free Corrosion Potential On Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

Metallurgy; Iron and steel products ASTM C1582/C1582M-04

Standard Specification for Admixtures to Inhibit Chloride-Induced Corrosion of Reinforcing Steel in Concrete

ASTM G180-07

Standard Test Method for Initial Screening of Corrosion Inhibiting Admixtures for Steel in Concrete

UNE 112010:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Chloride Determinations For In Service Concrete

UNE 112011:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Determination Of The Carbonatation Depth For In Service Concrete

Generalities. Terminology. Standardization. Documentation; Vocabularies

Manufacturing engineering; Surface treatment and coating

AS/NZS 3500 (Set):2003

Plumbing and drainage Set

AS/NZS 3500.0:2003

Plumbing and drainage - Glossary of terms

PN 86/B-01802:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Terms And Definitions

UNE EN 14879-3:2008

Organic Coating Systems And Linings For Protection Of Industrial Apparatus And Plants Against Corrosion Caused By Aggressive Media - Part 3: Coatings On Concrete Components

UNE EN 14879-5:2008

Organic Coating Systems And Linings For Protection Of Industrial Apparatus And Plants Against Corrosion Caused By Aggressive Media - Part 5: Linings On Concrete Components

DIN EN 1504-7 (2006-11)

Products and systems for the protection and repair of concrete structures - Definitions, requirements, quality control and evaluation of conformity - Part 7: Reinforcement corrosion protection

Testing; Environmental testing GOST 28574:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Methods Of The Protection Covers Adhesion Testing Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Test Of Protection Covers From Steam Penetration

PN EN 14879-5:2009

Organic Coating Systems And Linings For Protection Of Industrial Apparatus And Plants Against Corrosion Caused By Aggressive Media - Part 5: Linings On Concrete Components

GOST 28575:1990

GOST 28574:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Methods Of The Protection Covers Adhesion Testing

Civil engineering; Bridge construction

BS EN 14879-3:2006 DIN EN 14879-3 (2007-02) I.S. EN 14879-3:2006 PN EN 14879-3:2008 NBN EN 14879-3:2007 NEN EN 14879-3:2006 NF EN 14879-3:2007 NS EN 14879-3 Ed. 1 (2006) SS EN 14879-3 Ed. 1 (2006) UNE EN 14879-3:2008 UNI EN 14879-3:2007

Organic Coating Systems And Linings For Protection Of Industrial Apparatus And Plants Against Corrosion Caused By Aggressive Media - Part 3: Coatings On Concrete Components

18 Corrosion & Materials

AASHTO TF 32:1992

www.corrosion.com.au

Task Force 32 Report - Manual For Corrosion Protection Of Concrete Components In Bridges

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

19


Standards Update

PN 86/B-01811:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Material And Structural Protection - Specifications

PN 88/B-01807:1988

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Principles Of Diagnostics For Structures

BS EN 990:2002 DIN EN 990 (2003-01) NF EN 990:2003 NS EN 990 Ed. 2 (2002) ONORM EN 990:2003 SS EN 990 Ed. 2 (2002) UNE EN 990:2003

Test Methods For Verification Of Corrosion Protection Of Reinforcement In Autoclaved Aerated Concrete And Lightweight Aggregate Concrete With Open Structure

GOST 28574:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Methods Of The Protection Covers Adhesion Testing

GOST 28575:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Test Of Protection Covers From Steam Penetration

PN 88/B-01808:1988

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - The Principles Of The Determination Of Scars In The Coatings Protecting Steel And Reinforced Concrete Structures

PN 91/B-01813:1991

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Superficial Protective Measures - Principles And Choice

PN 92/B-01814:1992

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Test Method For Adherence Protective Coatings

PN 92/B-01815:1992

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Test Methods For Water Vapour Permeability Of Protective Coatings

ASTM G109-07

Standard Test Method for Determining Effects of Chemical Admixtures on Corrosion of Embedded Steel Reinforcement in Concrete Exposed to Chloride Environments

BS EN 1504-7:2006 DIN EN 1504-7 (2006-11) I.S. EN 1504-7:2007 NBN EN 1504-7:2007 NEN EN 1504-7:2006 NF EN 1504-7:2006 PN EN 1504-7:2007 NS EN 1504-7 Ed. 1 (2006) SS EN 1504-7 Ed. 1 (2006) UNE EN 1504-7:2007 UNI EN 1504-7:2007

Products and Systems for the Protection and Repair of Concrete Structures - Definitions, Requirements, Quality Control and Evaluation of Conformity - Part 7: Reinforcement Corrosion Protection

BS EN 15183:2006 DIN EN 15183 (2006-11) I.S. EN 15183:2007 NEN EN 15183:2006 NF EN 15183:2007 PN EN 15183:2007 UNE EN 15183:2007 (R2010) UNI EN 15183:2007

Products and Systems for the Protection and Repair of Concrete Structures - Test Methods - Corrosion Protection Test

UNE 112010:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Chloride Determinations For In Service Concrete

UNE 112011:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Determination Of The Carbonatation Depth For In Service Concrete

NF EN 12269-2:2010

Determination Of The Bond Behaviour Between Reinforcing Steel And Autoclaved Aerated Concrete By The Beam Test - Part 2: Long Term Test

BS EN 14879-5:2007 DIN EN 14879-5 (2007-10) I.S. EN 14879-5:2007 NBN EN 14879-5:2007 NEN EN 14879-5:2007 NS EN 14879-5 Ed. 1 (2007) ONORM EN 14879-5:2008 SS EN 14879-5 Ed. 1 (2007) UNE EN 14879-5:2008 UNI EN 14879-5:2008

Organic Coating Systems and Linings for Protection of Industrial Apparatus and Plants Against Corrosion Caused by Aggressive Media - Part 5: Linings on Concrete Components

Metallurgy; Corrosion of metals ASTM STP1065-90

Corrosion Rates Of Steel In Concrete

ASTM STP1276-96

Techniques To Assess The Corrosion Activity Of Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

JIS A 6205:2003

Corrosion inhibitor for reinforcing steel in concrete

UNI 10322:1994

Corrosion Of Reinforcement In Concrete Structures - Method For The Determination Of The Degree Protection Of Concrete Against The Corrosion Of Reinforcement

NFA 05 611:1992

Electrochemical Corrosion Protection - Cathodic Protection Of Concrete Reinforcement - Buried Or Immersed Works

ASTM G109-07

Standard Test Method for Determining Effects of Chemical Admixtures on Corrosion of Embedded Steel Reinforcement in Concrete Exposed to Chloride Environments

UNI 9944:1992

Corrosion And Protection Of Reinforcing Steel In Concrete - Determination Of The Carbonation Depth And Of The Chlorides Penetration Profile In Concrete

UNE 112010:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Chloride Determinations For In Service Concrete

UNE 112011:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Determination Of The Carbonatation Depth For In Service Concrete

UNE 112083:2010

Measurement Of Free Corrosion Potential On Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

Metallurgy; Iron and steel products ASTM C1582/C1582M-04

Standard Specification for Admixtures to Inhibit Chloride-Induced Corrosion of Reinforcing Steel in Concrete

ASTM G180-07

Standard Test Method for Initial Screening of Corrosion Inhibiting Admixtures for Steel in Concrete

UNE 112010:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Chloride Determinations For In Service Concrete

UNE 112011:1994

Assembly Corrosion - Determination Of The Carbonatation Depth For In Service Concrete

Generalities. Terminology. Standardization. Documentation; Vocabularies

Manufacturing engineering; Surface treatment and coating

AS/NZS 3500 (Set):2003

Plumbing and drainage Set

AS/NZS 3500.0:2003

Plumbing and drainage - Glossary of terms

PN 86/B-01802:1986

Protection Against Corrosion In Building - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Structures - Terms And Definitions

UNE EN 14879-3:2008

Organic Coating Systems And Linings For Protection Of Industrial Apparatus And Plants Against Corrosion Caused By Aggressive Media - Part 3: Coatings On Concrete Components

UNE EN 14879-5:2008

Organic Coating Systems And Linings For Protection Of Industrial Apparatus And Plants Against Corrosion Caused By Aggressive Media - Part 5: Linings On Concrete Components

DIN EN 1504-7 (2006-11)

Products and systems for the protection and repair of concrete structures - Definitions, requirements, quality control and evaluation of conformity - Part 7: Reinforcement corrosion protection

Testing; Environmental testing GOST 28574:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Methods Of The Protection Covers Adhesion Testing Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Test Of Protection Covers From Steam Penetration

PN EN 14879-5:2009

Organic Coating Systems And Linings For Protection Of Industrial Apparatus And Plants Against Corrosion Caused By Aggressive Media - Part 5: Linings On Concrete Components

GOST 28575:1990

GOST 28574:1990

Corrosion Protection In Construction - Concrete And Reinforced Concrete Constructions - Methods Of The Protection Covers Adhesion Testing

Civil engineering; Bridge construction

BS EN 14879-3:2006 DIN EN 14879-3 (2007-02) I.S. EN 14879-3:2006 PN EN 14879-3:2008 NBN EN 14879-3:2007 NEN EN 14879-3:2006 NF EN 14879-3:2007 NS EN 14879-3 Ed. 1 (2006) SS EN 14879-3 Ed. 1 (2006) UNE EN 14879-3:2008 UNI EN 14879-3:2007

Organic Coating Systems And Linings For Protection Of Industrial Apparatus And Plants Against Corrosion Caused By Aggressive Media - Part 3: Coatings On Concrete Components

18 Corrosion & Materials

AASHTO TF 32:1992

www.corrosion.com.au

Task Force 32 Report - Manual For Corrosion Protection Of Concrete Components In Bridges

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

19


REVIEW Corrosion & Prevention 2010 Review The picturesque banks of the Torrens River and surrounding parklands were the backdrop for the 2010 Corrosion & Prevention Conference held at the Adelaide Convention Centre from the 14th-17th November 2010. Themed ‘Always Protecting, Always Learning: Celebrating the 50th Annual ACA Conference & 50 Years of the SA Branch 1960-2010’, the conference provided a vibrant forum for the corrosion industry to gather and discuss the key issues currently facing the industry. The 400 plus delegates also attended the conference to network, come face to face with the industry products and service providers on display, professional development and to access an international array of speakers. Known as one of Australia’s top food and wine regions, it was only fitting that the first introduction to the 2010 Conference was held at the National Wine Centre of Australia. Sponsored by Incospec & Associates Australia, the Welcome Function was held on a fine Adelaide evening with delegates enjoying what Adelaide has to offer in food and wine whilst catching up with new and old friends to the sounds of an acoustic guitar duo. Official conference formalities began early Monday morning with an opening address from Roman Dankiw, the 2010 President. Roman then introduced Paul James, the General Manager of Hempel who were the conference Golden Jubilee sponsors. The tradition of the Ed Potter Clock to officially start the conference was connected by Reg Casling, a South Australian life member of the ACA. The Monday morning plenary session began with George Thompson, Deputy Head of the School of Materials and Director of Research at The University of Manchester

20 Corrosion & Materials

to give his presentation on ‘Environmentally Friendly Anodizing of Aluminium Alloys’. Soeren Nyborg Rasmussem of Hempel currently based in China followed to present on ‘Advancements in High Performance Zinc Epoxy Coatings’. Morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea each day were served in the exhibition hall which provided delegates the opportunity to network around the 60 stands showcasing products and services from a range of providers in the industry from paint suppliers, paint applicators, cathodic protection equipment, height safety services, dehumidification equipment, construction supplies, NDT equipment and more. Monday afternoon plenary session began with two more plenary lectures beginning with Valerie Linton of The Energy Pipeline Cooperative Research Centre who gave her keynote presentation on ‘Corrosion Related Research within the Energy Pipelines Cooperative Research Centre’. Valerie was followed by Neil Campbell of ExxonMobil Production Company who presented ‘A Global Approach to Coating Integrity’. After sessions broke on Monday afternoon the Official Exhibition Opening was held in the Exhibition Halls with drinks and finger food.

During the function Ian Booth, the CEO of the ACA took the opportunity to thank Peerless Industrial Systems for a recent donation to the ACA Foundation which now takes their level of financial support to the foundation to Silver. The certificate was received by John Tanti who was also celebrating his 70th birthday. Another certificate was also awarded to Ted Riding of Jotun to acknowledge Jotun’s ongoing support to the ACA’s training activities. The Young Corrosion Professionals also held an informal function sponsored by the Galvanizers Association of Australia with speeches from YCP acting chairman Erwin Gamboa and Kingsley Brown from ASC who talked about his career so far and his experiences with the ACA and the corrosion industry. Dennis Richards started the Tuesday programme with the annual P.F. Thompson Lecture on ‘The Good, The Bad, The Ugly of the Heavy Duty Coating Industry’. This was followed by Brenda Little of the Naval Research Laboratory in the USA who presented on ‘Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Global Phenomena Local Mechanisms’. On Tuesday evening the annual Gala Dinner sponsored by Denso Australia was hosted at the Adelaide Convention Centre, with

  Golden Jubilee Sponsor:  Hempel

Roman Dankiw acting as MC for the evening. The ACA annual awards were presented during the function following entrée, with a special presentation of an SA Branch Honour Role to mark 50 years of the SA Branch to Bill Denholm, the first SA Branch President. Following the awards and the main course, delegates were entertained by Australia’s only Unusualist, Raymond Crowe. The first of the Wednesday morning plenary presenters was from Rolf Gubner of Curtin University of Technology who presented on ‘Steps to Developing an Effective Integrated Corrosion Management Program to Minimise Costs & Extend Life’. The final keynote presenter for the conference was Mads Juhl of Hempel in Denmark who presented on ‘Fibre Reinforced Coatings for Corrosion Protection’. Peter Farinha, the convenor of the 18th International Corrosion Congress in Perth, 20-24 November 2011 was then invited to introduce and encourage all 2010 delegates to go west in 2011 to attend the congress hosted by the ACA. The Farewell Function sponsored by CTI Consultants on Wednesday afternoon was held out on the Regatta’s Lawns of the Convention Centre on a beautiful sunny Adelaide afternoon. The winners of the annual photo competition was announced with the best judged photo awarded to Amer Jarragh for his ‘General Corrosion’ photo and the people’s choice award went to Ross Darrigan for his photo ‘Kids never get the dream’. The South Australian Branch was thanked for their efforts in organising the conference and the 2010 President Roman Dankiw handed over the President’s gavel to incoming 2011 ACA President Ian MacLeod. The Corrosion & Prevention 2010 committee and the ACA take this opportunity to acknowledge the following:

www.corrosion.com.au

  Supporting Sponsors:   Century Yuasa   Inconmat Australia   NMT Electrodes  Thomas Contracting   Welcome Function Sponsor:  Incospec & Associates Australia   Gala Dinner Sponsor:  Denso Australia

Roman Dankiw, 2010 ACA President

  Farewell Function Sponsor:  CTI Consultants   Coffee Sponsor:  Zintec Corrosion Solutions   YCP Sponsor:  Galvanizers Association of Australia

  Morning Tea, Lunch & Afternoon Tea Sponsors:   AMAC Corrosion   Anti Corrosion Technology   Rezitech Services  Savcor

Paul Vince , C&P2010 Technical Convenor

  All the Exhibitors   Keynote Speakers:   George Thompson   Soeren Nyborg Rasmussem   Valerie Linton   Neil Campbell   Dennis Richards   Brenda Little   Rolf Gubner  Mads Juhl

David Towns, SA Branch President

 Authors and presenters of all papers  Reviewers The ACA extends its gratitude to everyone involved in Corrosion & Prevention 2010 in making the conference a success and we look forward to welcoming you to Perth for the 18th International Corrosion Congress.

Paul James, General Manager of Hempel

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

21


REVIEW Corrosion & Prevention 2010 Review The picturesque banks of the Torrens River and surrounding parklands were the backdrop for the 2010 Corrosion & Prevention Conference held at the Adelaide Convention Centre from the 14th-17th November 2010. Themed ‘Always Protecting, Always Learning: Celebrating the 50th Annual ACA Conference & 50 Years of the SA Branch 1960-2010’, the conference provided a vibrant forum for the corrosion industry to gather and discuss the key issues currently facing the industry. The 400 plus delegates also attended the conference to network, come face to face with the industry products and service providers on display, professional development and to access an international array of speakers. Known as one of Australia’s top food and wine regions, it was only fitting that the first introduction to the 2010 Conference was held at the National Wine Centre of Australia. Sponsored by Incospec & Associates Australia, the Welcome Function was held on a fine Adelaide evening with delegates enjoying what Adelaide has to offer in food and wine whilst catching up with new and old friends to the sounds of an acoustic guitar duo. Official conference formalities began early Monday morning with an opening address from Roman Dankiw, the 2010 President. Roman then introduced Paul James, the General Manager of Hempel who were the conference Golden Jubilee sponsors. The tradition of the Ed Potter Clock to officially start the conference was connected by Reg Casling, a South Australian life member of the ACA. The Monday morning plenary session began with George Thompson, Deputy Head of the School of Materials and Director of Research at The University of Manchester

20 Corrosion & Materials

to give his presentation on ‘Environmentally Friendly Anodizing of Aluminium Alloys’. Soeren Nyborg Rasmussem of Hempel currently based in China followed to present on ‘Advancements in High Performance Zinc Epoxy Coatings’. Morning tea, lunch and afternoon tea each day were served in the exhibition hall which provided delegates the opportunity to network around the 60 stands showcasing products and services from a range of providers in the industry from paint suppliers, paint applicators, cathodic protection equipment, height safety services, dehumidification equipment, construction supplies, NDT equipment and more. Monday afternoon plenary session began with two more plenary lectures beginning with Valerie Linton of The Energy Pipeline Cooperative Research Centre who gave her keynote presentation on ‘Corrosion Related Research within the Energy Pipelines Cooperative Research Centre’. Valerie was followed by Neil Campbell of ExxonMobil Production Company who presented ‘A Global Approach to Coating Integrity’. After sessions broke on Monday afternoon the Official Exhibition Opening was held in the Exhibition Halls with drinks and finger food.

During the function Ian Booth, the CEO of the ACA took the opportunity to thank Peerless Industrial Systems for a recent donation to the ACA Foundation which now takes their level of financial support to the foundation to Silver. The certificate was received by John Tanti who was also celebrating his 70th birthday. Another certificate was also awarded to Ted Riding of Jotun to acknowledge Jotun’s ongoing support to the ACA’s training activities. The Young Corrosion Professionals also held an informal function sponsored by the Galvanizers Association of Australia with speeches from YCP acting chairman Erwin Gamboa and Kingsley Brown from ASC who talked about his career so far and his experiences with the ACA and the corrosion industry. Dennis Richards started the Tuesday programme with the annual P.F. Thompson Lecture on ‘The Good, The Bad, The Ugly of the Heavy Duty Coating Industry’. This was followed by Brenda Little of the Naval Research Laboratory in the USA who presented on ‘Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Global Phenomena Local Mechanisms’. On Tuesday evening the annual Gala Dinner sponsored by Denso Australia was hosted at the Adelaide Convention Centre, with

  Golden Jubilee Sponsor:  Hempel

Roman Dankiw acting as MC for the evening. The ACA annual awards were presented during the function following entrée, with a special presentation of an SA Branch Honour Role to mark 50 years of the SA Branch to Bill Denholm, the first SA Branch President. Following the awards and the main course, delegates were entertained by Australia’s only Unusualist, Raymond Crowe. The first of the Wednesday morning plenary presenters was from Rolf Gubner of Curtin University of Technology who presented on ‘Steps to Developing an Effective Integrated Corrosion Management Program to Minimise Costs & Extend Life’. The final keynote presenter for the conference was Mads Juhl of Hempel in Denmark who presented on ‘Fibre Reinforced Coatings for Corrosion Protection’. Peter Farinha, the convenor of the 18th International Corrosion Congress in Perth, 20-24 November 2011 was then invited to introduce and encourage all 2010 delegates to go west in 2011 to attend the congress hosted by the ACA. The Farewell Function sponsored by CTI Consultants on Wednesday afternoon was held out on the Regatta’s Lawns of the Convention Centre on a beautiful sunny Adelaide afternoon. The winners of the annual photo competition was announced with the best judged photo awarded to Amer Jarragh for his ‘General Corrosion’ photo and the people’s choice award went to Ross Darrigan for his photo ‘Kids never get the dream’. The South Australian Branch was thanked for their efforts in organising the conference and the 2010 President Roman Dankiw handed over the President’s gavel to incoming 2011 ACA President Ian MacLeod. The Corrosion & Prevention 2010 committee and the ACA take this opportunity to acknowledge the following:

www.corrosion.com.au

  Supporting Sponsors:   Century Yuasa   Inconmat Australia   NMT Electrodes  Thomas Contracting   Welcome Function Sponsor:  Incospec & Associates Australia   Gala Dinner Sponsor:  Denso Australia

Roman Dankiw, 2010 ACA President

  Farewell Function Sponsor:  CTI Consultants   Coffee Sponsor:  Zintec Corrosion Solutions   YCP Sponsor:  Galvanizers Association of Australia

  Morning Tea, Lunch & Afternoon Tea Sponsors:   AMAC Corrosion   Anti Corrosion Technology   Rezitech Services  Savcor

Paul Vince , C&P2010 Technical Convenor

  All the Exhibitors   Keynote Speakers:   George Thompson   Soeren Nyborg Rasmussem   Valerie Linton   Neil Campbell   Dennis Richards   Brenda Little   Rolf Gubner  Mads Juhl

David Towns, SA Branch President

 Authors and presenters of all papers  Reviewers The ACA extends its gratitude to everyone involved in Corrosion & Prevention 2010 in making the conference a success and we look forward to welcoming you to Perth for the 18th International Corrosion Congress.

Paul James, General Manager of Hempel

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

21


TECHNICAL REVIEW Technical Review As always, the technical programme of the Adelaide Conference delivered a diverse cross section of technical content from all streams of the corrosion industry and from all corners of the globe. The theme was ‘Always Protecting, Always Learning’ and the technical programme fitted well with this theme. There was a good combination of keynote speakers, case studies, industry papers and research papers. Over 50% of survey respondents indicated that the technical content, professional development and the keynote speakers were pivotal in attracting them to the conference. The keynote speakers provided an excellent entree to the technical sessions through each day. George Thompson from the University of Manchester gave a thorough overview of his research activities in the area of surface treatment of aluminium and understanding its oxide film formation. A significant aspect of the work has been developing techniques for the characterisation and evaluation of the oxide film. This understanding has lead to a reduction of the environmental impact of anodising aluminium. Soeren Nyborg Rasmussen from Hempel reported recent developments in zinc epoxy coatings. Inspired by observations in the battery industry, experimentation with zinc alloys containing a small percentage of bismuth showed that coatings manufactured with this alloy exhibited higher performance; in particular, lower rust creep. Valerie Linton presented the current research activities of the Energy Pipelines Collaborative Research Centre (CRC). Collaborative work is ongoing with University of Wollongong, University of Adelaide and Monash University in support of

22 Corrosion & Materials

welding activities, stress corrosion cracking and alternative materials in the Oil & Gas industry. Neil Campbell from ExxonMobil provided perspectives on asset management for a large company with many sites, contrasting a centralised management structure with a devolved management structure. Of particular interest were the methods of communication used by engineers with operators and tradespeople. The language used and the volume of work instructions can significantly impact on the effectiveness of the message being communicated. Dennis Richards presented the 2010 PF Thompson lecture. He gave an educated review of the long term performance of various coatings based on his experience with the Department of Transport over the last 40 years. Dennis gave an entertaining look at the Good, Bad and Ugly of Heavy Duty Coatings whilst also examining some myths associated with surface preparation and coating performance. Some of Dennis’s observations are sure to cause some controversy despite the case study evidence that was presented. Brenda Little from the US Naval Research Laboratories gave an overview of the mechanisms associated with microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). She highlighted the interaction of some of the mechanisms and the possibility that MIC is influenced by a complex combination of biological, chemical, physical and environmental factors. This was highlighted by a case from Duluth Superior Harbor. For many this was the highlight of the conference. Rolf Gubner from Curtin University of Technology spoke about the highly relevant issue of corrosion management and the development of

integrated systems which can provide improved reliability and asset life. Such systems can result in significant cost savings over the life of assets. Mads Juhl from Hempel presented highlights of developments with the use of fibres in liquid coatings. While research is ongoing, improvements in crack resistance, impact resistance, tensile strength and flexibility have been achieved. The coatings and cathodic protection streams were strongly supported; as was the MIC session indicating a growing interest in this phenomenon within Australasia. The Defence stream was strongly supported by the Australian, New Zealand and United States military. The forum provides an opportunity to discuss common issues and has improved the formal and informal networks between the various organisations involved. The desalination industry is expanding in Australia and Frederic Blin and Sarah Furman gave an excellent review of durability issues for Australian desalination plants. Significant guidance was provided for concrete parameters and materials selection of stainless steels and polymers. Mathieu Robert from Sherbrooke University presented two papers on the use and performance of glass fibre reinforced bars for concrete reinforcement. This generated significant interest and identified areas where Australasia could learn from the Canadian experience. There was discussion of the impact of weld heat tint on the corrosion of stainless steels through the Welding Forum and through a paper presented by Mike Dinon. This is an area that has required repeated attention due to ongoing occurrence in industry. Through these discussions and through previous papers by Les

Boulton there is now a wealth of knowledge in this area that can assist fabricators and asset owners. One of the highlights of the Water Forum and the Defence Forum was the presentation of the ‘Corrosion Challenges’ project report. This report highlights the impact of corrosion on these two sectors and promises to be a pivotal document in raising political and social awareness of corrosion issues. Erk Gamboa from the University of Adelaide presented recent work on understanding stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth using x-ray microtomography. It was found that crack growth in a pipeline can proceed initially normal to the surface but change direction within 500 microns of the surface. The cracks can then interact with neighbouring cracks creating a complex crack pattern. Ongoing investigations are looking at the impact of these interactions on the crack growth rate.

George Thompson

Dennis Richards

Soeren Nyborg Rasmussen

Brenda Little

Valerie Linton

Rolf Gubner

Neil Campbell

Mads Juhl

The feedback on the technical programme has been positive. Over 70% of survey respondents rated the technical content as Excellent or Very Good. Over 70% of survey respondents rated the keynote speakers as Excellent or Very Good. Thanks to all the authors and reviewers for making the technical programme one of the best yet for an ACA Conference. Particular thanks to Erk Gamboa and Kingsley Brown for assisting with the paper selection, reviewing and programming and to the SA Branch Committee for their overwhelming support for the Conference as a whole. Finally, thanks to Wesley Fawaz in the ACA Office who worked like a trooper to miraculously get the papers finalised by the deadline dates and for showing measured mercy to the occasional sluggish author. Paul Vince Technical Chair, C&P 2010

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

23


TECHNICAL REVIEW Technical Review As always, the technical programme of the Adelaide Conference delivered a diverse cross section of technical content from all streams of the corrosion industry and from all corners of the globe. The theme was ‘Always Protecting, Always Learning’ and the technical programme fitted well with this theme. There was a good combination of keynote speakers, case studies, industry papers and research papers. Over 50% of survey respondents indicated that the technical content, professional development and the keynote speakers were pivotal in attracting them to the conference. The keynote speakers provided an excellent entree to the technical sessions through each day. George Thompson from the University of Manchester gave a thorough overview of his research activities in the area of surface treatment of aluminium and understanding its oxide film formation. A significant aspect of the work has been developing techniques for the characterisation and evaluation of the oxide film. This understanding has lead to a reduction of the environmental impact of anodising aluminium. Soeren Nyborg Rasmussen from Hempel reported recent developments in zinc epoxy coatings. Inspired by observations in the battery industry, experimentation with zinc alloys containing a small percentage of bismuth showed that coatings manufactured with this alloy exhibited higher performance; in particular, lower rust creep. Valerie Linton presented the current research activities of the Energy Pipelines Collaborative Research Centre (CRC). Collaborative work is ongoing with University of Wollongong, University of Adelaide and Monash University in support of

22 Corrosion & Materials

welding activities, stress corrosion cracking and alternative materials in the Oil & Gas industry. Neil Campbell from ExxonMobil provided perspectives on asset management for a large company with many sites, contrasting a centralised management structure with a devolved management structure. Of particular interest were the methods of communication used by engineers with operators and tradespeople. The language used and the volume of work instructions can significantly impact on the effectiveness of the message being communicated. Dennis Richards presented the 2010 PF Thompson lecture. He gave an educated review of the long term performance of various coatings based on his experience with the Department of Transport over the last 40 years. Dennis gave an entertaining look at the Good, Bad and Ugly of Heavy Duty Coatings whilst also examining some myths associated with surface preparation and coating performance. Some of Dennis’s observations are sure to cause some controversy despite the case study evidence that was presented. Brenda Little from the US Naval Research Laboratories gave an overview of the mechanisms associated with microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). She highlighted the interaction of some of the mechanisms and the possibility that MIC is influenced by a complex combination of biological, chemical, physical and environmental factors. This was highlighted by a case from Duluth Superior Harbor. For many this was the highlight of the conference. Rolf Gubner from Curtin University of Technology spoke about the highly relevant issue of corrosion management and the development of

integrated systems which can provide improved reliability and asset life. Such systems can result in significant cost savings over the life of assets. Mads Juhl from Hempel presented highlights of developments with the use of fibres in liquid coatings. While research is ongoing, improvements in crack resistance, impact resistance, tensile strength and flexibility have been achieved. The coatings and cathodic protection streams were strongly supported; as was the MIC session indicating a growing interest in this phenomenon within Australasia. The Defence stream was strongly supported by the Australian, New Zealand and United States military. The forum provides an opportunity to discuss common issues and has improved the formal and informal networks between the various organisations involved. The desalination industry is expanding in Australia and Frederic Blin and Sarah Furman gave an excellent review of durability issues for Australian desalination plants. Significant guidance was provided for concrete parameters and materials selection of stainless steels and polymers. Mathieu Robert from Sherbrooke University presented two papers on the use and performance of glass fibre reinforced bars for concrete reinforcement. This generated significant interest and identified areas where Australasia could learn from the Canadian experience. There was discussion of the impact of weld heat tint on the corrosion of stainless steels through the Welding Forum and through a paper presented by Mike Dinon. This is an area that has required repeated attention due to ongoing occurrence in industry. Through these discussions and through previous papers by Les

Boulton there is now a wealth of knowledge in this area that can assist fabricators and asset owners. One of the highlights of the Water Forum and the Defence Forum was the presentation of the ‘Corrosion Challenges’ project report. This report highlights the impact of corrosion on these two sectors and promises to be a pivotal document in raising political and social awareness of corrosion issues. Erk Gamboa from the University of Adelaide presented recent work on understanding stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth using x-ray microtomography. It was found that crack growth in a pipeline can proceed initially normal to the surface but change direction within 500 microns of the surface. The cracks can then interact with neighbouring cracks creating a complex crack pattern. Ongoing investigations are looking at the impact of these interactions on the crack growth rate.

George Thompson

Dennis Richards

Soeren Nyborg Rasmussen

Brenda Little

Valerie Linton

Rolf Gubner

Neil Campbell

Mads Juhl

The feedback on the technical programme has been positive. Over 70% of survey respondents rated the technical content as Excellent or Very Good. Over 70% of survey respondents rated the keynote speakers as Excellent or Very Good. Thanks to all the authors and reviewers for making the technical programme one of the best yet for an ACA Conference. Particular thanks to Erk Gamboa and Kingsley Brown for assisting with the paper selection, reviewing and programming and to the SA Branch Committee for their overwhelming support for the Conference as a whole. Finally, thanks to Wesley Fawaz in the ACA Office who worked like a trooper to miraculously get the papers finalised by the deadline dates and for showing measured mercy to the occasional sluggish author. Paul Vince Technical Chair, C&P 2010

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

23


ALWAYS PROTECTING, ALWAYS LEARNING: Celebrating the 50th Annual ACA Conference & 50 Years of the SA Branch 1960–2010

CORROSION&PREVENTION2010

25


ALWAYS PROTECTING, ALWAYS LEARNING: Celebrating the 50th Annual ACA Conference & 50 Years of the SA Branch 1960–2010

CORROSION&PREVENTION2010

25


ALWAYS PROTECTING, ALWAYS LEARNING: Celebrating the 50th Annual ACA Conference & 50 Years of the SA Branch 1960–2010

CORROSION&PREVENTION2010

27


ALWAYS PROTECTING, ALWAYS LEARNING: Celebrating the 50th Annual ACA Conference & 50 Years of the SA Branch 1960–2010

CORROSION&PREVENTION2010

27


EXHIBITORS

The 2010 Best Booth Award was taken out by Phillro Industries. Exhibiting for the 5th consecutive year, Phillro Industries booth featured their two core product brands, Elcometer and Graco. Supported by representatives of the manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the stand featured the latest in the quality range of Elcometer instruments including the E130 Surface Salt test kit and the latest Graco XP Fixed Ratio Proportioner for spraying 2 pack coatings in Industrial applications. Both products attracted a great deal of interest.

28 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

29


EXHIBITORS

The 2010 Best Booth Award was taken out by Phillro Industries. Exhibiting for the 5th consecutive year, Phillro Industries booth featured their two core product brands, Elcometer and Graco. Supported by representatives of the manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the stand featured the latest in the quality range of Elcometer instruments including the E130 Surface Salt test kit and the latest Graco XP Fixed Ratio Proportioner for spraying 2 pack coatings in Industrial applications. Both products attracted a great deal of interest.

28 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

29


AWARDS David Whitby Best Review Paper Award

The David Whitby Best Review Paper Award is awarded annually to the best review paper either published in Corrosion & Materials or in the Annual ACA Conference Proceedings.

ACA AWARDS AC Kennett Award

The AC Kennett Award is awarded each year to the best paper presented under the auspices of the Association that deals with non-metallic corrosion. Mr Robert Jeffrey for his paper presented at Corrosion & Prevention 2009 in Coffs Harbour ‘Set in Stone - or is it?  A Case Study of Rock Corrosion’. SUMMARY: Stone is generally thought to be a relatively long term building material, take Stonehenge and the Pyramids for example. However when significant changes in stone building materials are noticed less than two months after exposure to the elements, serious questions have to be asked. The case presented herein involves sandstone tiles that were installed on a property close to an open saltwater bay. Six weeks after being cemented to a concrete slab, hairline cracks occurred at the grout-tile interfaces that eventually resulted in edges of the tile lifting by up to two millimetres. An investigation was carried out where new and used tiles were subjected to cyclic exposure of inundation and drying. Moisture uptake, horizontal and vertical displacement and the thermal expansion coefficient were determined. Analysis of new and used tiles, mortar and a fine slime extracted from new tiles was carried out. It was found that the tiles moved both horizontally following a series of wet/dry cycles. However the significant observation was the amount of calcite identified in the fines

washed out of the new tiles. Calcite is one of a number of “mineral glues” that holds the sand in sandstone together. It was deduced that the dissolution of the sandstone glue caused loss of strength of the stone. This dissolution coupled with natural diurnal moisture and temperature cycling and strong adhesion of the lower face caused the tiles to contract on the top face, crack at one edge and eventually to bow.

Robert Jeffrey (right) receives the AC Kennett Award from Roman Dankiw (left)

The Marshall Fordham Best Research Award is awarded annually to the best research paper either published in Corrosion & Materials or in the Annual ACA Conference Proceedings.

SUMMARY: Burning coal provides Australia with cheap power, but involves handling CO2 and water vapour at high temperature. CO2-containing gases are known to be corrosive, but information is lacking on the reactivity of CO2-H2O mixtures. The aim of this study is to investigate the corrosion behaviour of Fe-Cr alloys in these atmospheres. Pure iron and Fe-Cr alloys containing 2.25, 9 and 20 % Cr were reacted in Ar-20%CO2, Ar-20%CO2-5%H2O and Ar-20%CO2-20%H2O for 48 h at 800°C. The effects of chromium and water vapour levels were investigated using kinetic data and metallographic observations. The presence of H2O in the test gas has been found to have a significant influence on the corrosion behaviour of Fe and low Cr alloys, whereas that of Fe-20Cr alloys was hardly affected. It is shown that the presence of H2O causes an acceleration of the surface process by which a wustite scale grows, but does not significantly alter the diffusion process in wustite. Corrosion rates were found to

30 Corrosion & Materials

SUMMARY: There are plenty of Australasian Standards that address the needs of steel, but those for concrete are few and far between. Many specifiers try to adapt the standards for coating steel or floor coverings with varying degrees of success. The nature of concrete makes the successful application of protective coatings challenging. Concrete surfaces vary and may be inconsistent from one pour to the next. The variability in the components which concrete is made of compound this. The concrete surface is porous and can have different finishes and textures. The nature of the surface of a horizontal slab where, the surface can be worked to remove voids is markedly different to vertical walls, which rely on the formwork and compaction methods to reduce voids and bugholes. Some concrete may develop cracks of different types and significance to structural durability. Such cracks can test of the ability of some coatings to cope with covering them as well as movement of the substrate. This paper examines at concrete as a

substrate and review the available Australasian Standards and their application to the development of a coating specification; identifies overseas standards which can be adopted to assist in successful coating application; and considers where there are other factors that also need to be addressed to increase the chance of a successful coating project for concrete structures.

Peter Dove (right) receives the David Whitby Best Review Paper Award from Roman Dankiw (left)

ACA Student Research Award

Marshall Fordham Best Research Award Mr Thomas Gheno for his paper presented at Corrosion & Prevention 2009 in Coffs Harbour ‘High Temperature Corrosion of Fe-Cr Alloys in CO2 – H2O Gas Atmospheres’.

Mr Peter Dove for his paper presented at Corrosion & Prevention 2009 in Coffs Harbour ‘Review of Australasian and Overseas Standards for Concrete Protective Coatings’.

be drastically different for pure iron, low Cr alloys (2.25 and 9 % Cr) and Fe-20Cr. These differences are related to the formation and growth of a Cr-containing inner layer in the case of the low Cr alloys, and of chromia in the case of the 20Cr grade. It is proposed that surface selective adsorption of H2O accounts for modifications to the scale morphology observed in the case of the low Cr alloys.

Thomas Gheno (right) and David Young (centre) receive the Marshall Fordham Best Research Award from Roman Dankiw (left)

The ACA Student Research Award is presented to full time post graduate students for fundamental or applied research in any branch of corrosion for the purpose of a higher degree in Science, Engineering or a related discipline. The award is judged upon significance of the work to the community, originality and soundness of the research as well as several other criteria. Mr Wayne Neil for his paper presented at Corrosion & Prevention 2010 in Adelaide ‘Corrosion of Mg Alloy ZE41 and its Mitigation Using Ionic Liquids’. SUMMARY: Magnesium alloy ZE41 (Mg-Zn-RE-Zr), which is used extensively in the aerospace industry, possesses excellent mechanical properties albeit poor corrosion resistance. This work investigates the mechanism of corrosion, and the interaction between the grain boundary intermetallic phases, the zirconium (Zr)‑rich regions within the grains and the bulk Mg rich matrix in both the as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The results of optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show the importance of the microstructure in the initiation and propagation of corrosion in an aqueous environment. The Zr-rich regions play a distinct role in the early stages of corrosion with this alloy. The second part of this work investigates the interaction of two different ionic liquids (ILs) with the surface of the ZE41 alloy. ILs based on trihexyltetradecylphosphonium (P6,6,6,14) coupled with either diphenylphosphate (DPP) or bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) amide (Tf2N) have been shown to react with Mg alloy surfaces, leading to the formation of a surface film that can improve the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The interaction of the ILs with the ZE41 surface has been investigated by optical microscopy www.corrosion.com.au

and SEM. Surface characterization has been performed using Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The surface characterization and microscopy revealed the preferential interaction with the grain boundaries and grain boundary phases. Thus the morphology and microstructure of the Mg surface seems critical in determining the nature of the interaction with the IL. The corrosion protection of the IL films formed on the ZE41 surface was investigated by SEM and potentiodynamic polarisation.

Wayne Neil (centre) receives the ACA Student Research Award from Roman Dankiw (left) and Ian MacLeod (right) Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

31


AWARDS David Whitby Best Review Paper Award

The David Whitby Best Review Paper Award is awarded annually to the best review paper either published in Corrosion & Materials or in the Annual ACA Conference Proceedings.

ACA AWARDS AC Kennett Award

The AC Kennett Award is awarded each year to the best paper presented under the auspices of the Association that deals with non-metallic corrosion. Mr Robert Jeffrey for his paper presented at Corrosion & Prevention 2009 in Coffs Harbour ‘Set in Stone - or is it?  A Case Study of Rock Corrosion’. SUMMARY: Stone is generally thought to be a relatively long term building material, take Stonehenge and the Pyramids for example. However when significant changes in stone building materials are noticed less than two months after exposure to the elements, serious questions have to be asked. The case presented herein involves sandstone tiles that were installed on a property close to an open saltwater bay. Six weeks after being cemented to a concrete slab, hairline cracks occurred at the grout-tile interfaces that eventually resulted in edges of the tile lifting by up to two millimetres. An investigation was carried out where new and used tiles were subjected to cyclic exposure of inundation and drying. Moisture uptake, horizontal and vertical displacement and the thermal expansion coefficient were determined. Analysis of new and used tiles, mortar and a fine slime extracted from new tiles was carried out. It was found that the tiles moved both horizontally following a series of wet/dry cycles. However the significant observation was the amount of calcite identified in the fines

washed out of the new tiles. Calcite is one of a number of “mineral glues” that holds the sand in sandstone together. It was deduced that the dissolution of the sandstone glue caused loss of strength of the stone. This dissolution coupled with natural diurnal moisture and temperature cycling and strong adhesion of the lower face caused the tiles to contract on the top face, crack at one edge and eventually to bow.

Robert Jeffrey (right) receives the AC Kennett Award from Roman Dankiw (left)

The Marshall Fordham Best Research Award is awarded annually to the best research paper either published in Corrosion & Materials or in the Annual ACA Conference Proceedings.

SUMMARY: Burning coal provides Australia with cheap power, but involves handling CO2 and water vapour at high temperature. CO2-containing gases are known to be corrosive, but information is lacking on the reactivity of CO2-H2O mixtures. The aim of this study is to investigate the corrosion behaviour of Fe-Cr alloys in these atmospheres. Pure iron and Fe-Cr alloys containing 2.25, 9 and 20 % Cr were reacted in Ar-20%CO2, Ar-20%CO2-5%H2O and Ar-20%CO2-20%H2O for 48 h at 800°C. The effects of chromium and water vapour levels were investigated using kinetic data and metallographic observations. The presence of H2O in the test gas has been found to have a significant influence on the corrosion behaviour of Fe and low Cr alloys, whereas that of Fe-20Cr alloys was hardly affected. It is shown that the presence of H2O causes an acceleration of the surface process by which a wustite scale grows, but does not significantly alter the diffusion process in wustite. Corrosion rates were found to

30 Corrosion & Materials

SUMMARY: There are plenty of Australasian Standards that address the needs of steel, but those for concrete are few and far between. Many specifiers try to adapt the standards for coating steel or floor coverings with varying degrees of success. The nature of concrete makes the successful application of protective coatings challenging. Concrete surfaces vary and may be inconsistent from one pour to the next. The variability in the components which concrete is made of compound this. The concrete surface is porous and can have different finishes and textures. The nature of the surface of a horizontal slab where, the surface can be worked to remove voids is markedly different to vertical walls, which rely on the formwork and compaction methods to reduce voids and bugholes. Some concrete may develop cracks of different types and significance to structural durability. Such cracks can test of the ability of some coatings to cope with covering them as well as movement of the substrate. This paper examines at concrete as a

substrate and review the available Australasian Standards and their application to the development of a coating specification; identifies overseas standards which can be adopted to assist in successful coating application; and considers where there are other factors that also need to be addressed to increase the chance of a successful coating project for concrete structures.

Peter Dove (right) receives the David Whitby Best Review Paper Award from Roman Dankiw (left)

ACA Student Research Award

Marshall Fordham Best Research Award Mr Thomas Gheno for his paper presented at Corrosion & Prevention 2009 in Coffs Harbour ‘High Temperature Corrosion of Fe-Cr Alloys in CO2 – H2O Gas Atmospheres’.

Mr Peter Dove for his paper presented at Corrosion & Prevention 2009 in Coffs Harbour ‘Review of Australasian and Overseas Standards for Concrete Protective Coatings’.

be drastically different for pure iron, low Cr alloys (2.25 and 9 % Cr) and Fe-20Cr. These differences are related to the formation and growth of a Cr-containing inner layer in the case of the low Cr alloys, and of chromia in the case of the 20Cr grade. It is proposed that surface selective adsorption of H2O accounts for modifications to the scale morphology observed in the case of the low Cr alloys.

Thomas Gheno (right) and David Young (centre) receive the Marshall Fordham Best Research Award from Roman Dankiw (left)

The ACA Student Research Award is presented to full time post graduate students for fundamental or applied research in any branch of corrosion for the purpose of a higher degree in Science, Engineering or a related discipline. The award is judged upon significance of the work to the community, originality and soundness of the research as well as several other criteria. Mr Wayne Neil for his paper presented at Corrosion & Prevention 2010 in Adelaide ‘Corrosion of Mg Alloy ZE41 and its Mitigation Using Ionic Liquids’. SUMMARY: Magnesium alloy ZE41 (Mg-Zn-RE-Zr), which is used extensively in the aerospace industry, possesses excellent mechanical properties albeit poor corrosion resistance. This work investigates the mechanism of corrosion, and the interaction between the grain boundary intermetallic phases, the zirconium (Zr)‑rich regions within the grains and the bulk Mg rich matrix in both the as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The results of optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show the importance of the microstructure in the initiation and propagation of corrosion in an aqueous environment. The Zr-rich regions play a distinct role in the early stages of corrosion with this alloy. The second part of this work investigates the interaction of two different ionic liquids (ILs) with the surface of the ZE41 alloy. ILs based on trihexyltetradecylphosphonium (P6,6,6,14) coupled with either diphenylphosphate (DPP) or bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) amide (Tf2N) have been shown to react with Mg alloy surfaces, leading to the formation of a surface film that can improve the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The interaction of the ILs with the ZE41 surface has been investigated by optical microscopy www.corrosion.com.au

and SEM. Surface characterization has been performed using Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The surface characterization and microscopy revealed the preferential interaction with the grain boundaries and grain boundary phases. Thus the morphology and microstructure of the Mg surface seems critical in determining the nature of the interaction with the IL. The corrosion protection of the IL films formed on the ZE41 surface was investigated by SEM and potentiodynamic polarisation.

Wayne Neil (centre) receives the ACA Student Research Award from Roman Dankiw (left) and Ian MacLeod (right) Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

31


AWARDS Life Membership

Corrosion Medal

Life Membership is awarded for outstanding service over an extended period either to a Branch or the Council and is awarded only as agreed by Council. Fred Salome Fred holds a B.Sc. with Honours in Organic Chemistry from Sydney University and has over 35 years experience in the corrosion mitigation industry. Fred has published over 40 papers in the corrosion mitigation field, mostly in the coatings and concrete reinforcement areas. Fred is a principal of his own consulting business called CTI Consultants, is an accredited ACA/NACE lecturer of the NACE Coatings Inspection Program and ACA Coating Courses and sits on various Standards Committee’s including CH-003 Paints and Related Materials, MT-014 Corrosion of Metals, CH/3/10 Site Testing of Protective Coatings, CH/3/11 Lead Paint Management and MT/14/2 Corrosion Protection of Steelwork. Fred has been a member of the ACA since 1990 and is a former ACA President. Fred has been an active member of the NSW branch for over 15 years, particularly in recruiting new members and is the current ACA Membership Director.

Fred Salome (right) receives life membership from Roman Dankiw (left)

John Tanti John began his career with a Fitting and Turning Trades Apprenticeship in Turbines and Boilers at the Melbourne City Council. Shortly thereafter he spent several years at the Hydraulic Engineering Company before entering the pipeline industry in 1971. It was in 1974 that John joined Denso, where he worked for two decades in a variety of roles. John was with Denso during a period of extensive growth, which saw him relocate to the USA for several years to have responsibility for the North American market (incl. Mexico). Upon returning to Australia, John was responsible for Victoria and Tasmania sales, until 1994. Following this, John established J & G Marketing (Vic) P/L - which served principally as a contractor to Solomon Corrosion Control Services (SCCS).

32 Corrosion & Materials

More recently, John has also been affiliated with Peerless Industrial Systems Pty Ltd, to assist with marketing and sales throughout Victoria. John joined the ACA in the mid 1970s and was elected to the Victoria Branch Committee in 1976. He has held the position of Victorian Branch Treasurer, and Victorian Branch President. Since the 1990s, John has been Victorian Branch Secretary.

John Tanti (right) receives life membership from Roman Dankiw (left)

Mark Weston With over 40 years experience in the corrosion mitigation industry, Mark has an electronics engineering background and has published numerous papers in the corrosion mitigation field, mostly in the coatings and coating failure areas. Mark is currently a principal of his own consulting business called Incospec & Associates Australia. He is an accredited ACA/NACE lecturer of the NACE Coatings Inspection Program as well as ACA Coating Courses. An accredited ACA Corrosion Technologist and NACE Cathodic Protection Technician, Mark sits on various Standards and advisory committees and also represents the ACA on the Painting Contractor’s Certification Program. Mark is a former ACA President and ACA board member and has been an ACA member since 1979 in which he has also provided many years of support to the SA Branch.

The Corrosion Medal is the Association’s most prestigious award. It is bestowed for outstanding scientific or technological work in the field of corrosion in Australasia. Meritorious contributions in Australasia to the mitigation of corrosion shall also be a basis for the award. Greg Moore Greg has over 30 years experience in the corrosion mitigation industry, particularly in materials. He completed his degree training in Metallurgy and is a certified ACA Corrosion Technologist and Material Professional. A renowned and respected expert in his field, Greg has acquired an international reputation in the fields of materials testing, plastic pipe performance and degradation of plastics in water exposure. Greg is currently a specialist consultant to the water industry.

Greg has been an ACA member since 1972 and is a past ACA President and Treasurer. Greg has also held the roles of President and Treasurer for the South Australia Branch.

Greg has developed research programs and test facilities on material degradation and performance in the water industry, here in Australia and overseas. He has been involved in preparation of durability plans for a number of Australia’s desalination plants, preparation of durability plans for a range of water and wastewater plants and condition assessments of GRP pipelines in Hong Kong. He has developed and introduced innovative methods for infrastructure condition assessments and developed and implemented a range of test programs for plastic and GRP pipes.

Greg Moore (right) receives the corrosion medal from Roman Dankiw (left)

South Australia Branch Honorary Membership

Honorary Membership is appointed by a Branch in recognition of service to that Branch. Dennis Richards Dennis has over 40 years experience in the corrosion mitigation industry with extensive experience in research and development associated with coatings and corrosion. Dennis has presented technical papers at numerous state, national and international conferences, including the ACA and Blast Cleaning and Coating Association.  Dennis is an accredited ACA Corrosion Technologist and PCCP accredited trainer. He sits on various Australian Standards Committees in areas of coatings and atmospheric corrosion and is a former member of NATA technical advisory group in areas concerning coatings. Dennis has been an ACA member since 1974 and has held positions as Branch President, Branch Secretary and has been involved in promoting numerous technical forums in coatings for the South Australia Branch.

Mark Weston (right) receives life membership from Roman Dankiw (left)

Greg has published over 20 peer reviewed papers including winning the ACA Best Review Paper award twice in 1992 and 2007.

Dennis Richards (centre) receives the South Australia Branch Honorary Membership from Roman Dankiw (left) and Bill Denholm (right)

Recently a principal of his own consulting business called DMRichards Consulting Services, Dennis continues to actively support the South Australia Branch.

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

33


AWARDS Life Membership

Corrosion Medal

Life Membership is awarded for outstanding service over an extended period either to a Branch or the Council and is awarded only as agreed by Council. Fred Salome Fred holds a B.Sc. with Honours in Organic Chemistry from Sydney University and has over 35 years experience in the corrosion mitigation industry. Fred has published over 40 papers in the corrosion mitigation field, mostly in the coatings and concrete reinforcement areas. Fred is a principal of his own consulting business called CTI Consultants, is an accredited ACA/NACE lecturer of the NACE Coatings Inspection Program and ACA Coating Courses and sits on various Standards Committee’s including CH-003 Paints and Related Materials, MT-014 Corrosion of Metals, CH/3/10 Site Testing of Protective Coatings, CH/3/11 Lead Paint Management and MT/14/2 Corrosion Protection of Steelwork. Fred has been a member of the ACA since 1990 and is a former ACA President. Fred has been an active member of the NSW branch for over 15 years, particularly in recruiting new members and is the current ACA Membership Director.

Fred Salome (right) receives life membership from Roman Dankiw (left)

John Tanti John began his career with a Fitting and Turning Trades Apprenticeship in Turbines and Boilers at the Melbourne City Council. Shortly thereafter he spent several years at the Hydraulic Engineering Company before entering the pipeline industry in 1971. It was in 1974 that John joined Denso, where he worked for two decades in a variety of roles. John was with Denso during a period of extensive growth, which saw him relocate to the USA for several years to have responsibility for the North American market (incl. Mexico). Upon returning to Australia, John was responsible for Victoria and Tasmania sales, until 1994. Following this, John established J & G Marketing (Vic) P/L - which served principally as a contractor to Solomon Corrosion Control Services (SCCS).

32 Corrosion & Materials

More recently, John has also been affiliated with Peerless Industrial Systems Pty Ltd, to assist with marketing and sales throughout Victoria. John joined the ACA in the mid 1970s and was elected to the Victoria Branch Committee in 1976. He has held the position of Victorian Branch Treasurer, and Victorian Branch President. Since the 1990s, John has been Victorian Branch Secretary.

John Tanti (right) receives life membership from Roman Dankiw (left)

Mark Weston With over 40 years experience in the corrosion mitigation industry, Mark has an electronics engineering background and has published numerous papers in the corrosion mitigation field, mostly in the coatings and coating failure areas. Mark is currently a principal of his own consulting business called Incospec & Associates Australia. He is an accredited ACA/NACE lecturer of the NACE Coatings Inspection Program as well as ACA Coating Courses. An accredited ACA Corrosion Technologist and NACE Cathodic Protection Technician, Mark sits on various Standards and advisory committees and also represents the ACA on the Painting Contractor’s Certification Program. Mark is a former ACA President and ACA board member and has been an ACA member since 1979 in which he has also provided many years of support to the SA Branch.

The Corrosion Medal is the Association’s most prestigious award. It is bestowed for outstanding scientific or technological work in the field of corrosion in Australasia. Meritorious contributions in Australasia to the mitigation of corrosion shall also be a basis for the award. Greg Moore Greg has over 30 years experience in the corrosion mitigation industry, particularly in materials. He completed his degree training in Metallurgy and is a certified ACA Corrosion Technologist and Material Professional. A renowned and respected expert in his field, Greg has acquired an international reputation in the fields of materials testing, plastic pipe performance and degradation of plastics in water exposure. Greg is currently a specialist consultant to the water industry.

Greg has been an ACA member since 1972 and is a past ACA President and Treasurer. Greg has also held the roles of President and Treasurer for the South Australia Branch.

Greg has developed research programs and test facilities on material degradation and performance in the water industry, here in Australia and overseas. He has been involved in preparation of durability plans for a number of Australia’s desalination plants, preparation of durability plans for a range of water and wastewater plants and condition assessments of GRP pipelines in Hong Kong. He has developed and introduced innovative methods for infrastructure condition assessments and developed and implemented a range of test programs for plastic and GRP pipes.

Greg Moore (right) receives the corrosion medal from Roman Dankiw (left)

South Australia Branch Honorary Membership

Honorary Membership is appointed by a Branch in recognition of service to that Branch. Dennis Richards Dennis has over 40 years experience in the corrosion mitigation industry with extensive experience in research and development associated with coatings and corrosion. Dennis has presented technical papers at numerous state, national and international conferences, including the ACA and Blast Cleaning and Coating Association.  Dennis is an accredited ACA Corrosion Technologist and PCCP accredited trainer. He sits on various Australian Standards Committees in areas of coatings and atmospheric corrosion and is a former member of NATA technical advisory group in areas concerning coatings. Dennis has been an ACA member since 1974 and has held positions as Branch President, Branch Secretary and has been involved in promoting numerous technical forums in coatings for the South Australia Branch.

Mark Weston (right) receives life membership from Roman Dankiw (left)

Greg has published over 20 peer reviewed papers including winning the ACA Best Review Paper award twice in 1992 and 2007.

Dennis Richards (centre) receives the South Australia Branch Honorary Membership from Roman Dankiw (left) and Bill Denholm (right)

Recently a principal of his own consulting business called DMRichards Consulting Services, Dennis continues to actively support the South Australia Branch.

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

33


Corrosion Photography Competition Winners Best Judged Photo  Photographer: Amer Jarragh  Image Title: General Corrosion

Image Description: A macroshot of a stud bolt on a redundant pipeline shows wonderful example of corrosion on an unprotected surface. Material SA 193/194 exposure of unprotected surface to more than one phase of an atmosphere accelerated the corrosion process.

Perth 2011

People’s Choice Award  Photographer: Ross Darrigan  Image Title: Kids Never Get The Dream

List of accepted abstracts and registration details available soon. Major Sponsor

Image Description: Grand concept for inland water playground. Sign reflects sad outcome of this once great idea.

34 Corrosion & Materials

Perth Convention Exhibition Centre, Perth, Western Australia, Australia 20–24 November 2011 • www.18iccperth2011.com

Corrosion Control, Contributing to a Sustainable Future for All


Corrosion Photography Competition Winners Best Judged Photo  Photographer: Amer Jarragh  Image Title: General Corrosion

Image Description: A macroshot of a stud bolt on a redundant pipeline shows wonderful example of corrosion on an unprotected surface. Material SA 193/194 exposure of unprotected surface to more than one phase of an atmosphere accelerated the corrosion process.

Perth 2011

People’s Choice Award  Photographer: Ross Darrigan  Image Title: Kids Never Get The Dream

List of accepted abstracts and registration details available soon. Major Sponsor

Image Description: Grand concept for inland water playground. Sign reflects sad outcome of this once great idea.

34 Corrosion & Materials

Perth Convention Exhibition Centre, Perth, Western Australia, Australia 20–24 November 2011 • www.18iccperth2011.com

Corrosion Control, Contributing to a Sustainable Future for All


297 x 210 6PP

DL ROLL FOLD

BACK COVER Application pr ocedure

 Recognition from industry peers that you have met stringent minimum standards and have satisfied a number of requisite criteria.  Provide a competitive advantage over others when applying/ tendering for work.

 A signed ACA Affirmation, which details the values and standards expected of accredited technicians by the ACA.

Requirements for certification as an ACA Corrosion Technologist: Applicants for the grade of Technologist will need to satisfy all requirements of an ACA Corrosion Technician and the following additional requirements:  An additional 6 years work experience in corrosion (at least 10 in total) with 5 years in responsible charge. (Please see below for definitions of work experience and work in responsible charge.)

36 Corrosion & Materials

Association Inc

100mm

 An extra 4 points (or 10 points in total) achieved through courses and other work listed in the table.

Work experience and work in responsible charge Work experience in corrosion or corrosion related field is defined as practical experience in corrosion mechanisms, causes, control and monitoring. It covers the investigation, design or implementation of corrosion control. The work must be technical in nature (not sales for example) and in the corrosion field. Metallurgy, welding inspection, Non Destructive Testing (NDT) etc, are not acceptable, except when directly related to corrosion.

Updates to the ACA technologist and technician certification program Work in responsible charge in corrosion or a corrosion related field is, work experience as defined above, which includes a level of responsibility requiring technical judgement. The applicant must be in technical control and have technical responsibility. Work such as design, specification, and failure analysis etc are considered responsible work in charge, as opposed to routine testing or application of corrosion control measures, ie painting or installing anodes.

Affect on ACA Membership ACA accreditation as a Corrosion Technician/ Technologist will have no affect on a member’s privileges including their right to vote, hold any office or participate in any associated activity. Points may be obtained through the following courses: Course Name

Points

Master’s or PhD in Corrosion Science

10

ACA Corrosion Technology Certificate or ACA Home Study course with optional exam

5

Degree, diploma or advanced certificate in chemistry, metallurgy or engineering

5

ACA CP Advanced

5

ACA or HERA Coating Inspection Certificate

5

NACE CIP Level 1

5

NACE CIP Level 2

5

ACA Coatings Selection and Specification

3

ACA CP Monitoring

3

ACA Corrosion and CP of Concrete Structures

2

ACA/ACRA Corrosion and Protection of Reinforced Concrete with optional exam

2

Literature Survey

1

Or each year successful completion of the above

1

Each year of corrosion related work*

1

Other corrosion related courses will be assessed by the Review Panel and allocated points *Over and above that required in the work experience clause www.corrosion.com.au

Application procedure A completed application form with accompanying payment and documentation should be sent to the ACA Certification Scheme, PO Box 112, Kerrimuir VIC 3129 or faxed to +61 3 9890 7866. Your application will be initially assessed and you will be contacted if any further information is required. If your application is complete the ACA will contact your referees and then forward your application to the Certification Review Board (which meets periodically - approx every 3 months) for assessment. You may be contacted by the ACA or one of the Certification Review Board members if further information is needed to properly assess your application. Once reviewed, you’ll receive notification by letter as to the Certification Review Board’s decision. For further information on the Certification Rules, Application Form or the Complaints Process, please visit our website at www.corrosion.com or call the ACA on +61 3 9890 4833.

CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

Why apply for certification?

sian Corrosion

Working toward Professional Development in Corrosion

The Australasian Corrosion  Satisfy criteria in Australian Association (ACA) provides a Standards such as AS2832.5 Work experie nc in responsib pathway to formal recognition ofle chearanged work that specifically call for qualified Work experienc education, knowledge and worke in corrosion or corrosion ACA Corrosion Technicians/ related field is defined as pra ctical experienc in corrosion me e experience for those working Technologists. chanisms, cau ses, control and monitoring. It covers the inv est igation, design imp lem entation of cor in corrosion related industries or ros ion control. The wo must be techni rk cal in nature (not sales for  Formal recognition of your andprogram. in the corrosion through its certificationins example) field. Metallur gy, welding pection, Non Destructive Tes ting (NDT) etc not apply training and education activity ACA members are ableareto acceptable, exc , ept when direct to corrosion. ly related the industry. in for recognition as either ACA Workan in responsible charge corrosion relate rosion or a Corrosion Technician or ACA d field is, woinrkcor experience as above, which defined includes a lev el of responsib requiring techni ility  Ensures you stay up to date with the Corrosion Technologist depending cal judgement . The applicant must be in tec hnical contro l and have tec responthe sibility. Work hnicallatest in corrosion industry news, on their ability to satisfy such as design and failure ana , specification lysis etc are con , sidered respon events and information through wo rk in charge, as eligibility criteria. sible opposed to rou application of tine testing or corrosion con trol measures or installing ano your , ie pai nting ongoing ACA membership. des. Changes have been implemented Affect on ACA Membership ACA acc reditation as recently to improve the operation Requirements to become an a Corrosion Tec Technologist hnician/ will have no aff privileges inc ensureect on a member’ of the certification program, luding their rig s ht to vote, hol ACA Corrosion Technician: office or partici d any that the registers of certifiedpate in any associated activity.  Ongoing ACA membership technicians and technologists 98mm as an individual member or are up to date and ACA certified 99mm an ACA corporate member’s technologists and technicians will representative. soon be issued with an identification card which attests to the currency of  Satisfactory completion of a their certification. The cards will be recognised basic corrosion course issued on an annual basis. such as the Corrosion Technology Certificate offered by the ACA. A new brochure outlining the operation of the program has also  At least 4 years work experience been published. in corrosion or a corrosion related position. The brochure together with the latest information on the program are  Completion of courses in corrosion available for download from ACA’s or corrosion subjects worth a web site at www.corrosion.com.au minimum of 6 points (see table below for points allocation).

The Australa

CER T I F I C A T I O N PROGRAM

A completed application for m with accom payment and panying documentatio n should be sen ACA Certificat t to the ion Scheme, PO Box 112, Ke VIC 3129 or fax rrimuir ed to +61 3 989 0 7866. Your application will be initiall y assessed and you will be con tacted if any fur ther informatio required. The n is ACA will contac t your referees then forward and your application to the Certificat Review Board ion (which meets periodically every 3 month approx s) for assessme nt. You may be contacted by the ACA or one of the Certificat Review Board ion members if fur ther informatio needed to pro n is perly assess your application reviewed, you . Once will receive not ification by let the Certificat ter as to ion Review Bo ard’s decision. For further info rmation on the Certification Application For Rules, m or the Comp laints Proces please visit our s, website at ww w.corrosion.com or call the AC A on +61 3 989 0 4833.

Working towar d Prof es si on al D ev elopment in Co rrosion

Updates to the ACA technologist and technician certification program

FRONT COVER

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

37


297 x 210 6PP

DL ROLL FOLD

BACK COVER Application pr ocedure

 Recognition from industry peers that you have met stringent minimum standards and have satisfied a number of requisite criteria.  Provide a competitive advantage over others when applying/ tendering for work.

 A signed ACA Affirmation, which details the values and standards expected of accredited technicians by the ACA.

Requirements for certification as an ACA Corrosion Technologist: Applicants for the grade of Technologist will need to satisfy all requirements of an ACA Corrosion Technician and the following additional requirements:  An additional 6 years work experience in corrosion (at least 10 in total) with 5 years in responsible charge. (Please see below for definitions of work experience and work in responsible charge.)

36 Corrosion & Materials

Association Inc

100mm

 An extra 4 points (or 10 points in total) achieved through courses and other work listed in the table.

Work experience and work in responsible charge Work experience in corrosion or corrosion related field is defined as practical experience in corrosion mechanisms, causes, control and monitoring. It covers the investigation, design or implementation of corrosion control. The work must be technical in nature (not sales for example) and in the corrosion field. Metallurgy, welding inspection, Non Destructive Testing (NDT) etc, are not acceptable, except when directly related to corrosion.

Updates to the ACA technologist and technician certification program Work in responsible charge in corrosion or a corrosion related field is, work experience as defined above, which includes a level of responsibility requiring technical judgement. The applicant must be in technical control and have technical responsibility. Work such as design, specification, and failure analysis etc are considered responsible work in charge, as opposed to routine testing or application of corrosion control measures, ie painting or installing anodes.

Affect on ACA Membership ACA accreditation as a Corrosion Technician/ Technologist will have no affect on a member’s privileges including their right to vote, hold any office or participate in any associated activity. Points may be obtained through the following courses: Course Name

Points

Master’s or PhD in Corrosion Science

10

ACA Corrosion Technology Certificate or ACA Home Study course with optional exam

5

Degree, diploma or advanced certificate in chemistry, metallurgy or engineering

5

ACA CP Advanced

5

ACA or HERA Coating Inspection Certificate

5

NACE CIP Level 1

5

NACE CIP Level 2

5

ACA Coatings Selection and Specification

3

ACA CP Monitoring

3

ACA Corrosion and CP of Concrete Structures

2

ACA/ACRA Corrosion and Protection of Reinforced Concrete with optional exam

2

Literature Survey

1

Or each year successful completion of the above

1

Each year of corrosion related work*

1

Other corrosion related courses will be assessed by the Review Panel and allocated points *Over and above that required in the work experience clause www.corrosion.com.au

Application procedure A completed application form with accompanying payment and documentation should be sent to the ACA Certification Scheme, PO Box 112, Kerrimuir VIC 3129 or faxed to +61 3 9890 7866. Your application will be initially assessed and you will be contacted if any further information is required. If your application is complete the ACA will contact your referees and then forward your application to the Certification Review Board (which meets periodically - approx every 3 months) for assessment. You may be contacted by the ACA or one of the Certification Review Board members if further information is needed to properly assess your application. Once reviewed, you’ll receive notification by letter as to the Certification Review Board’s decision. For further information on the Certification Rules, Application Form or the Complaints Process, please visit our website at www.corrosion.com or call the ACA on +61 3 9890 4833.

CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

Why apply for certification?

sian Corrosion

Working toward Professional Development in Corrosion

The Australasian Corrosion  Satisfy criteria in Australian Association (ACA) provides a Standards such as AS2832.5 Work experie nc in responsib pathway to formal recognition ofle chearanged work that specifically call for qualified Work experienc education, knowledge and worke in corrosion or corrosion ACA Corrosion Technicians/ related field is defined as pra ctical experienc in corrosion me e experience for those working Technologists. chanisms, cau ses, control and monitoring. It covers the inv est igation, design imp lem entation of cor in corrosion related industries or ros ion control. The wo must be techni rk cal in nature (not sales for  Formal recognition of your andprogram. in the corrosion through its certificationins example) field. Metallur gy, welding pection, Non Destructive Tes ting (NDT) etc not apply training and education activity ACA members are ableareto acceptable, exc , ept when direct to corrosion. ly related the industry. in for recognition as either ACA Workan in responsible charge corrosion relate rosion or a Corrosion Technician or ACA d field is, woinrkcor experience as above, which defined includes a lev el of responsib requiring techni ility  Ensures you stay up to date with the Corrosion Technologist depending cal judgement . The applicant must be in tec hnical contro l and have tec responthe sibility. Work hnicallatest in corrosion industry news, on their ability to satisfy such as design and failure ana , specification lysis etc are con , sidered respon events and information through wo rk in charge, as eligibility criteria. sible opposed to rou application of tine testing or corrosion con trol measures or installing ano your , ie pai nting ongoing ACA membership. des. Changes have been implemented Affect on ACA Membership ACA acc reditation as recently to improve the operation Requirements to become an a Corrosion Tec Technologist hnician/ will have no aff privileges inc ensureect on a member’ of the certification program, luding their rig s ht to vote, hol ACA Corrosion Technician: office or partici d any that the registers of certifiedpate in any associated activity.  Ongoing ACA membership technicians and technologists 98mm as an individual member or are up to date and ACA certified 99mm an ACA corporate member’s technologists and technicians will representative. soon be issued with an identification card which attests to the currency of  Satisfactory completion of a their certification. The cards will be recognised basic corrosion course issued on an annual basis. such as the Corrosion Technology Certificate offered by the ACA. A new brochure outlining the operation of the program has also  At least 4 years work experience been published. in corrosion or a corrosion related position. The brochure together with the latest information on the program are  Completion of courses in corrosion available for download from ACA’s or corrosion subjects worth a web site at www.corrosion.com.au minimum of 6 points (see table below for points allocation).

The Australa

CER T I F I C A T I O N PROGRAM

A completed application for m with accom payment and panying documentatio n should be sen ACA Certificat t to the ion Scheme, PO Box 112, Ke VIC 3129 or fax rrimuir ed to +61 3 989 0 7866. Your application will be initiall y assessed and you will be con tacted if any fur ther informatio required. The n is ACA will contac t your referees then forward and your application to the Certificat Review Board ion (which meets periodically every 3 month approx s) for assessme nt. You may be contacted by the ACA or one of the Certificat Review Board ion members if fur ther informatio needed to pro n is perly assess your application reviewed, you . Once will receive not ification by let the Certificat ter as to ion Review Bo ard’s decision. For further info rmation on the Certification Application For Rules, m or the Comp laints Proces please visit our s, website at ww w.corrosion.com or call the AC A on +61 3 989 0 4833.

Working towar d Prof es si on al D ev elopment in Co rrosion

Updates to the ACA technologist and technician certification program

FRONT COVER

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

37


Dymocks building, Sydney – repairing and conserving a heritage listed façade suffering from corrosion 1. Introduction Conservation works to the façade of the heritage listed Dymocks Building located in George Street, Sydney were completed in the period between 2008 and 2010.

for each block would be similar. As such, whilst the observed defects were relatively obvious, the potential for hidden corrosion could not be adequately assessed without proper access.

The George Street facade is a terracotta faience façade, which consists of terracotta blocks moulded and formed to replicate carved stone. This technique was employed circa the 1920’s as a more economical method of achieving the look of a carved stone building. In the case of Dymocks, the terracotta had an applied glaze which was designed to replicate the appearance of grey granite.

The façade also consists of steel framed windows. The windows had fairly extensive surface corrosion, however corrosion was only severe at locations where there was bimetallic corrosion due to intimate contact with the moulded copper cladding. This generally occurred at the bottom corners of the windows, where water runoff and pooling contributed to the corrosion rate.

Terracotta faience blocks are hollow, formed by pressing clay into the moulds and firing in a kiln. The Dymocks Building before works

The terracotta blocks are fixed back to the steel structure with a range of angles, cleats, hooks, bolts and bars. Details of these fixings were not available, however literature produced by the National Terra Cotta Society in the United States, as well as published texts, papers and guides from both Europe and the USA provided an indication of the construction. 2. Observed deterioration Deterioration was noted dating back to the 1990’s. The terracotta cladding had cracked at various locations and threatened to detach from the façade. It was determined that the cracking was predominantly due to the corrosion of embedded structural steel elements and presented a developing risk to public safety.

The Dymocks Building on completion

38 Corrosion & Materials

Due to the large repetition present in the casting of the blocks, it was expected that the fixing methods

3. The approach The project team devised a two phased approach to the repair and conservation of the façade. The first phase was to undertake a “Deconstruction and Investigation” phase to properly determine the construction of the façade and to assess the potential extent of hidden corrosion. This was to ensure that not only the visible signs of deterioration were addressed, but also to gain some assurance that similar typical details would not give rise to problems shortly after repair and conservation works were completed.

The second phase would see the results of the first phase implemented in the “Facade Reconstruction and Conservation”. 4. Repair and protection methods and materials Replacement terracotta was sourced from Boston Valley Terra Cotta (BVTC) in upstate New York, near Buffalo. The two phased approach allowed one of each type of terracotta block to be sent to BVTC to allow them to replicate the pieces. New terracotta blocks were generally reinstalled using stainless steel fixings, although galvanised fixings were used where connection to the existing mild steel in the building was required. Any exposed mild steel was primed with a zinc rich primer prior to encapsulation with grout or mortar. Three of the large dentil pieces located beneath the level 10 cornice had cracked and removal of the damaged sections revealed corroding reinforcement. There was no effective NDT method to determine whether any of the remaining 70 or so large dentils were experiencing the same problem. An electromagnetic covermeter test was undertaken and it was determined that the location of steel within may mean that all large dentils may be at risk.

to the affected section of the steel hangers in the dentils, along with issues with electrical continuity and finally wiring meant that CP wasn’t a viable option. It was therefore decided to stabilise all of the large dentils by installing stainless steel helical ties to ‘stitch’ the large dentils together along potential fault or crack lines to limit the possibility of catastrophic failure due to corrosion of the steel fixings within. The steel windows were completely removed from the building and refurbished off site. The aim was to achieve a coating that would preserve the structure of the windows and limit the future maintenance to repainting of the windows, rather than the structural repairs to sections of the windows that were required this time. The system chosen was a hybrid of that detailed in Table 5.1 of AS2312-2002, being a duplex coating system; TSZ100 plus an epoxy and a semi-gloss polyurethane topcoat. The durability of this system with regular maintenance is expected to achieve a 25+ year life to first major maintenance in the Category C environment.

Cathodic Protection (CP) was considered early in the development of the repair strategy, however owing to the difficulty in achieving protection

The protective coating system was chosen to balance the functional use (abrasion resistance) of the windows and negate the need for stripe coats of epoxy primers, which would have added significant costs to the project. The zinc will also provide some galvanic protection to the

Windows ready for abrasive blast cleaning

Windows after abrasive blast cleaning

steel frames to minimise any future structural rectification of the frames. 5. Conclusion Corrosion and time related deterioration of certain elements of the façade of the Dymocks Building were remediated or stabilised using a range of different concrete repair techniques, stonemasonry techniques and protective coatings technologies. The techniques used were intended to extend the useful life of the façade and minimise future maintenance costs. The experiences from this project illustrate that the application of corrosion mitigation techniques can be used to protect and conserve significant heritage listed building facades. CLIENT Dymocks Book Arcade Pty Ltd CONSULTANTS Hyder Consulting – Diagnostic & Remedial / Façade Engineering Spectrum Partners – Project Manager Truman Zaniol Associates – Heritage Architect CONTRACTOR Traditional Stonemasonry PREPARED BY Peter Johnsson, Principal Engineer – Facades / Diagnostic & Remedial Hyder Consulting Pty Ltd

To reduce the costs of scaffolding during the first phase, it was decided to scaffold only half of the building and concentrate on investigating the areas that were of most concern by carefully dismantling a number of sections of terracotta to confirm the cause of deterioration. By extrapolation, the quantity of works required on the second half of the building could be estimated.

www.corrosion.com.au

Application of sprayed zinc coating

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

39


Dymocks building, Sydney – repairing and conserving a heritage listed façade suffering from corrosion 1. Introduction Conservation works to the façade of the heritage listed Dymocks Building located in George Street, Sydney were completed in the period between 2008 and 2010.

for each block would be similar. As such, whilst the observed defects were relatively obvious, the potential for hidden corrosion could not be adequately assessed without proper access.

The George Street facade is a terracotta faience façade, which consists of terracotta blocks moulded and formed to replicate carved stone. This technique was employed circa the 1920’s as a more economical method of achieving the look of a carved stone building. In the case of Dymocks, the terracotta had an applied glaze which was designed to replicate the appearance of grey granite.

The façade also consists of steel framed windows. The windows had fairly extensive surface corrosion, however corrosion was only severe at locations where there was bimetallic corrosion due to intimate contact with the moulded copper cladding. This generally occurred at the bottom corners of the windows, where water runoff and pooling contributed to the corrosion rate.

Terracotta faience blocks are hollow, formed by pressing clay into the moulds and firing in a kiln. The Dymocks Building before works

The terracotta blocks are fixed back to the steel structure with a range of angles, cleats, hooks, bolts and bars. Details of these fixings were not available, however literature produced by the National Terra Cotta Society in the United States, as well as published texts, papers and guides from both Europe and the USA provided an indication of the construction. 2. Observed deterioration Deterioration was noted dating back to the 1990’s. The terracotta cladding had cracked at various locations and threatened to detach from the façade. It was determined that the cracking was predominantly due to the corrosion of embedded structural steel elements and presented a developing risk to public safety.

The Dymocks Building on completion

38 Corrosion & Materials

Due to the large repetition present in the casting of the blocks, it was expected that the fixing methods

3. The approach The project team devised a two phased approach to the repair and conservation of the façade. The first phase was to undertake a “Deconstruction and Investigation” phase to properly determine the construction of the façade and to assess the potential extent of hidden corrosion. This was to ensure that not only the visible signs of deterioration were addressed, but also to gain some assurance that similar typical details would not give rise to problems shortly after repair and conservation works were completed.

The second phase would see the results of the first phase implemented in the “Facade Reconstruction and Conservation”. 4. Repair and protection methods and materials Replacement terracotta was sourced from Boston Valley Terra Cotta (BVTC) in upstate New York, near Buffalo. The two phased approach allowed one of each type of terracotta block to be sent to BVTC to allow them to replicate the pieces. New terracotta blocks were generally reinstalled using stainless steel fixings, although galvanised fixings were used where connection to the existing mild steel in the building was required. Any exposed mild steel was primed with a zinc rich primer prior to encapsulation with grout or mortar. Three of the large dentil pieces located beneath the level 10 cornice had cracked and removal of the damaged sections revealed corroding reinforcement. There was no effective NDT method to determine whether any of the remaining 70 or so large dentils were experiencing the same problem. An electromagnetic covermeter test was undertaken and it was determined that the location of steel within may mean that all large dentils may be at risk.

to the affected section of the steel hangers in the dentils, along with issues with electrical continuity and finally wiring meant that CP wasn’t a viable option. It was therefore decided to stabilise all of the large dentils by installing stainless steel helical ties to ‘stitch’ the large dentils together along potential fault or crack lines to limit the possibility of catastrophic failure due to corrosion of the steel fixings within. The steel windows were completely removed from the building and refurbished off site. The aim was to achieve a coating that would preserve the structure of the windows and limit the future maintenance to repainting of the windows, rather than the structural repairs to sections of the windows that were required this time. The system chosen was a hybrid of that detailed in Table 5.1 of AS2312-2002, being a duplex coating system; TSZ100 plus an epoxy and a semi-gloss polyurethane topcoat. The durability of this system with regular maintenance is expected to achieve a 25+ year life to first major maintenance in the Category C environment.

Cathodic Protection (CP) was considered early in the development of the repair strategy, however owing to the difficulty in achieving protection

The protective coating system was chosen to balance the functional use (abrasion resistance) of the windows and negate the need for stripe coats of epoxy primers, which would have added significant costs to the project. The zinc will also provide some galvanic protection to the

Windows ready for abrasive blast cleaning

Windows after abrasive blast cleaning

steel frames to minimise any future structural rectification of the frames. 5. Conclusion Corrosion and time related deterioration of certain elements of the façade of the Dymocks Building were remediated or stabilised using a range of different concrete repair techniques, stonemasonry techniques and protective coatings technologies. The techniques used were intended to extend the useful life of the façade and minimise future maintenance costs. The experiences from this project illustrate that the application of corrosion mitigation techniques can be used to protect and conserve significant heritage listed building facades. CLIENT Dymocks Book Arcade Pty Ltd CONSULTANTS Hyder Consulting – Diagnostic & Remedial / Façade Engineering Spectrum Partners – Project Manager Truman Zaniol Associates – Heritage Architect CONTRACTOR Traditional Stonemasonry PREPARED BY Peter Johnsson, Principal Engineer – Facades / Diagnostic & Remedial Hyder Consulting Pty Ltd

To reduce the costs of scaffolding during the first phase, it was decided to scaffold only half of the building and concentrate on investigating the areas that were of most concern by carefully dismantling a number of sections of terracotta to confirm the cause of deterioration. By extrapolation, the quantity of works required on the second half of the building could be estimated.

www.corrosion.com.au

Application of sprayed zinc coating

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

39


George Street’s bridge for future generations As the population of metropolitan Melbourne marches toward 5 million people by 2020 a number of outer suburban areas are experiencing increased traffic flow, and government is struggling to provide the infrastructure needed to keep Victoria moving. One of the areas experiencing rapid growth is the suburb of Dandenong in Melbourne’s outer south-east. A mix of residential and light industrial areas provides housing and employment and acts as a hub for the burgeoning population in the new growth corridor. As part of a major redevelopment, Revitalising Central Dandenong, all three levels of government are investing in local infrastructure – separating road and rail interfaces, linking major freeways to bypass the Dandenong CBD and regenerating rail lines to better serve both the passenger and freight services that pass through the area. A major undertaking of the project has included the construction of the $29 million George Street

bridge over the railway lines near Dandenong train station for VicRoads. At 240 metres long and more than six metres tall, the 4000m2 concrete bridge was constructed by contractor Cut and Fill in the tight space between two major roads, the busy rail line, a bus depot and the Dandenong town centre. Once constructed, the challenge was on to meet the exacting government requirements to complete the protective surface work on the bridge to withstand all weather extremes, the grime from heavy vehicle usage and the carbon emissions from trains passing underneath it every day not to mention the damaging carbonation that occurs when concrete is exposed to water. The anti-graffiti and anticarbonation coatings to standard proscribed surface thickness as required by government engineering and infrastructure projects provided a further challenge. Two additional complications were the construction of the bridge in a grid pattern making the traditional roller/brush application techniques ineffective; and its location in a

busy precinct making overspray a major concern. A specialist coating company was required to complete the bridge, so Cut and Fill engaged Commercial Industrial Painting Services (CIPS). CIPS was chosen because it has Protective Coating Certification Program (PCCP) accreditation level 3 and 4, is a corporate member of the Australasian Corrosion Association, and also has fully qualified staff with both ‘rail track awareness’ and ‘elevated work platforms’ qualifications. Upon appointment, CIPS consulted suppliers to find the coating that would provide the best quality for the best price, and conform to VicRoads requirements. The coatings were required to: comply with proscribed thickness requirements be impermeable to chlorides, water, carbon dioxide and acid rain

allow the transmission of water vapour be UV resistant and non-yellowing have VicRoads grey coating pigments that are colourfast and not subject to fading or discolouration have guaranteed outdoor exposure of at least ten years be capable of withstanding cleaning with detergent and hot water of between 40 and 50 degrees celsius withstand at least eight cycles of graffiti removal be smooth, uniform and without imperfection on application

40 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Based on the consultation, the coatings chosen were the Dulux Durebild STE with 60 per cent solids to meet the necessary level of thickness and durability, and a Weathermax top coat to include the corrosion and graffiti protection. The products provided best value for money and had been used by CIPS successfully on the Wodonga bypass project. When application commenced, three staff were used to complete the job over a three month period. Considering the complications of the project, two painters would apply the coating using a spraying technique while a third person, the spotter, would monitor changing weather and wind patterns to avoid overspray which may cause damage

to nearby property. At times when wind direction changed or increased work would have to stop, and on rainy days work was halted altogether. The stop and start nature of the job was also hampered by the fact that once mixed in the pot, the coating lasts two hours before it begins to break down – so choosing the right days and times to work was a critical component to finishing the job to the highest aesthetic and practical levels and staying on-budget. The bridge was completed in August 2010 and will not need further work for a minimum of 15 years. It is free from runs and colour variations or gloss variations and from all angles it has a consistent surface shine.

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

41


George Street’s bridge for future generations As the population of metropolitan Melbourne marches toward 5 million people by 2020 a number of outer suburban areas are experiencing increased traffic flow, and government is struggling to provide the infrastructure needed to keep Victoria moving. One of the areas experiencing rapid growth is the suburb of Dandenong in Melbourne’s outer south-east. A mix of residential and light industrial areas provides housing and employment and acts as a hub for the burgeoning population in the new growth corridor. As part of a major redevelopment, Revitalising Central Dandenong, all three levels of government are investing in local infrastructure – separating road and rail interfaces, linking major freeways to bypass the Dandenong CBD and regenerating rail lines to better serve both the passenger and freight services that pass through the area. A major undertaking of the project has included the construction of the $29 million George Street

bridge over the railway lines near Dandenong train station for VicRoads. At 240 metres long and more than six metres tall, the 4000m2 concrete bridge was constructed by contractor Cut and Fill in the tight space between two major roads, the busy rail line, a bus depot and the Dandenong town centre. Once constructed, the challenge was on to meet the exacting government requirements to complete the protective surface work on the bridge to withstand all weather extremes, the grime from heavy vehicle usage and the carbon emissions from trains passing underneath it every day not to mention the damaging carbonation that occurs when concrete is exposed to water. The anti-graffiti and anticarbonation coatings to standard proscribed surface thickness as required by government engineering and infrastructure projects provided a further challenge. Two additional complications were the construction of the bridge in a grid pattern making the traditional roller/brush application techniques ineffective; and its location in a

busy precinct making overspray a major concern. A specialist coating company was required to complete the bridge, so Cut and Fill engaged Commercial Industrial Painting Services (CIPS). CIPS was chosen because it has Protective Coating Certification Program (PCCP) accreditation level 3 and 4, is a corporate member of the Australasian Corrosion Association, and also has fully qualified staff with both ‘rail track awareness’ and ‘elevated work platforms’ qualifications. Upon appointment, CIPS consulted suppliers to find the coating that would provide the best quality for the best price, and conform to VicRoads requirements. The coatings were required to: comply with proscribed thickness requirements be impermeable to chlorides, water, carbon dioxide and acid rain

allow the transmission of water vapour be UV resistant and non-yellowing have VicRoads grey coating pigments that are colourfast and not subject to fading or discolouration have guaranteed outdoor exposure of at least ten years be capable of withstanding cleaning with detergent and hot water of between 40 and 50 degrees celsius withstand at least eight cycles of graffiti removal be smooth, uniform and without imperfection on application

40 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Based on the consultation, the coatings chosen were the Dulux Durebild STE with 60 per cent solids to meet the necessary level of thickness and durability, and a Weathermax top coat to include the corrosion and graffiti protection. The products provided best value for money and had been used by CIPS successfully on the Wodonga bypass project. When application commenced, three staff were used to complete the job over a three month period. Considering the complications of the project, two painters would apply the coating using a spraying technique while a third person, the spotter, would monitor changing weather and wind patterns to avoid overspray which may cause damage

to nearby property. At times when wind direction changed or increased work would have to stop, and on rainy days work was halted altogether. The stop and start nature of the job was also hampered by the fact that once mixed in the pot, the coating lasts two hours before it begins to break down – so choosing the right days and times to work was a critical component to finishing the job to the highest aesthetic and practical levels and staying on-budget. The bridge was completed in August 2010 and will not need further work for a minimum of 15 years. It is free from runs and colour variations or gloss variations and from all angles it has a consistent surface shine.

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

41


University Profile University of Adelaide Profile School of Mechanical Engineering Introduction After a long history of engineering education at the University of Adelaide (UoA), dating back to 1878, the School of Mechanical Engineering was established separately in 1946. Steady growth in research and teaching activities since that time has led to an increase in the size of the School to 24 academic staff, more than 50 postgraduate students and more than 400 undergraduate students. The Mechanical Engineering program provides students with a broad education designed to give them the skills necessary to become professional mechanical engineers and includes corrosion as a course in the program. Corrosion Lecturer

Dr. Erwin Gamboa arrived at the UoA in late 2003 as a Research Fellow after having just completed his PhD in Corrosion from The University of Queensland. As a Research Fellow under Professor Valerie Linton, he developed the University’s corrosion research activities, especially in the area of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC).

within the School of Mechanical Engineering as part of the Materials Group, where he currently teaches a course in Corrosion to undergraduate and postgraduate students. In the area of research, Dr. Gamboa has been involved since 2006 in research for the Australian Pipeline Industry Association (APIA) Research and Standards Committee (RSC) in a range of areas, including gas pipeline girth welding consumables, pipe coatings, pipe metallurgy and pipe integrity, with a focus on high pH SCC of gas pipelines. Research One successful APIA research project carried out in collaboration with ANSTO involved investigating how SCC cracks in gas pipelines extended by fatigue due to operational cyclic pressures to research if the SCC could be rendered permanently dormant. Full scale tests showed that cracks formed initially by SCC could further propagate by fatigue, but that this growth was usually minute due to normal operational cyclic stresses within that pipeline’s expected remaining lifetime. The results of the research work led to one company saving $8m in the first year after the research findings were applied.

Another successful research project carried out for the APIA RSC involved studying the effect of boron in cellulosic welding consumables on the weld metal properties and susceptibility to weld metal hydrogen assisted cold cracking. Thanks to this work, recommendations have been made to the current AWS weld consumable Standard to change the way in which consumable alloy additions are reported.

42 Corrosion & Materials

As the colour image shows, this recent work has highlighted the fact that SCC cracks can have complex geometries and interactions underneath the free surface. One of the initial goals of the research work is to determine the extent of SCC crack interaction below the free surface of the material.

Industry Collaboration One of the main strengths of corrosion research at UoA is the multidisciplinary approach to tackling research questions (due to the make-up of the experts in the School), as well as the wide range of analytical tools available (including those of Adelaide Microscopy which cover tomographs, scanning electron microscopes and other state of the art equipment). The University has also been involved with other research projects with industry in different fields, primarily focusing on estimating relative corrosion resistant materials’ performance in a range of environments, whether through contract work or as part of final year Mechanical Engineering student projects.

Energy Pipeline Cooperative Research Centre Participation UoA is a participant in the Energy Pipeline Cooperative Research Centre, established in January 2010. The APIA Research and Standards Committee represented the industry members involved in the Energy Pipelines CRC.

The final year mechanical engineering projects are shown at the end of every year to the public at the Mech Expo which is the largest exhibition of its kind in the country. A large majority of the projects have been done in collaboration with industry. The link http://www.mecheng.adelaide.edu.au/ projectexhibition/ has many examples of projects and media coverage that the Mech Expo has attracted.

As part of the Energy Pipelines CRC activities, UoA’s corrosion related research will be concerned with investigating the role of the environment and cyclic operating stress regime on stress corrosion cracking in existing pipelines. The goal of this research is to cost effectively extend the life of Australian pipeline infrastructure by mitigation of corrosion and environmentally assisted degradation.

Contact Details For more information on research opportunities with UoA, collaboration for final year Mechanical Engineering projects or past research work, please contact Dr. Gamboa on erwin.gamboa@adelaide.edu.au. By Erwin “Erk” Gamboa The University of Adelaide

In the same year, Dr. Gamboa became a member of the ACA, a member of the South Australian Branch Committee in 2006 and in late 2010 became the acting Chairman for the Young Corrosion Professionals Committee. During 2007, Dr. Gamboa was appointed to the position of Lecturer

Recent research in this area at UoA has found that X-ray tomography can be used to study SCC crack morphology and SCC crack interaction, even in the case of multiple, non-collinear, inclined, interacting cracks in X65 grade pipeline steels.

Figure 1: Opened Stress Corrosion Crack in a steel pipe wall. The dark thumbnail shape is the original SCC crack. The lighter brown/orange banded region is the area where the crack grew by fatigue only.

Figure 2: A tomograph image of an X65 pipeline steel sample that has been affected by SCC. The pipe free surface is at the top of the image, and the pipe main axis is into the page. The four coloured lines show different interacting sections of the same SCC crack as it grew into the pipe wall (~3 mm deep cracks). www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

43


University Profile University of Adelaide Profile School of Mechanical Engineering Introduction After a long history of engineering education at the University of Adelaide (UoA), dating back to 1878, the School of Mechanical Engineering was established separately in 1946. Steady growth in research and teaching activities since that time has led to an increase in the size of the School to 24 academic staff, more than 50 postgraduate students and more than 400 undergraduate students. The Mechanical Engineering program provides students with a broad education designed to give them the skills necessary to become professional mechanical engineers and includes corrosion as a course in the program. Corrosion Lecturer

Dr. Erwin Gamboa arrived at the UoA in late 2003 as a Research Fellow after having just completed his PhD in Corrosion from The University of Queensland. As a Research Fellow under Professor Valerie Linton, he developed the University’s corrosion research activities, especially in the area of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC).

within the School of Mechanical Engineering as part of the Materials Group, where he currently teaches a course in Corrosion to undergraduate and postgraduate students. In the area of research, Dr. Gamboa has been involved since 2006 in research for the Australian Pipeline Industry Association (APIA) Research and Standards Committee (RSC) in a range of areas, including gas pipeline girth welding consumables, pipe coatings, pipe metallurgy and pipe integrity, with a focus on high pH SCC of gas pipelines. Research One successful APIA research project carried out in collaboration with ANSTO involved investigating how SCC cracks in gas pipelines extended by fatigue due to operational cyclic pressures to research if the SCC could be rendered permanently dormant. Full scale tests showed that cracks formed initially by SCC could further propagate by fatigue, but that this growth was usually minute due to normal operational cyclic stresses within that pipeline’s expected remaining lifetime. The results of the research work led to one company saving $8m in the first year after the research findings were applied.

Another successful research project carried out for the APIA RSC involved studying the effect of boron in cellulosic welding consumables on the weld metal properties and susceptibility to weld metal hydrogen assisted cold cracking. Thanks to this work, recommendations have been made to the current AWS weld consumable Standard to change the way in which consumable alloy additions are reported.

42 Corrosion & Materials

As the colour image shows, this recent work has highlighted the fact that SCC cracks can have complex geometries and interactions underneath the free surface. One of the initial goals of the research work is to determine the extent of SCC crack interaction below the free surface of the material.

Industry Collaboration One of the main strengths of corrosion research at UoA is the multidisciplinary approach to tackling research questions (due to the make-up of the experts in the School), as well as the wide range of analytical tools available (including those of Adelaide Microscopy which cover tomographs, scanning electron microscopes and other state of the art equipment). The University has also been involved with other research projects with industry in different fields, primarily focusing on estimating relative corrosion resistant materials’ performance in a range of environments, whether through contract work or as part of final year Mechanical Engineering student projects.

Energy Pipeline Cooperative Research Centre Participation UoA is a participant in the Energy Pipeline Cooperative Research Centre, established in January 2010. The APIA Research and Standards Committee represented the industry members involved in the Energy Pipelines CRC.

The final year mechanical engineering projects are shown at the end of every year to the public at the Mech Expo which is the largest exhibition of its kind in the country. A large majority of the projects have been done in collaboration with industry. The link http://www.mecheng.adelaide.edu.au/ projectexhibition/ has many examples of projects and media coverage that the Mech Expo has attracted.

As part of the Energy Pipelines CRC activities, UoA’s corrosion related research will be concerned with investigating the role of the environment and cyclic operating stress regime on stress corrosion cracking in existing pipelines. The goal of this research is to cost effectively extend the life of Australian pipeline infrastructure by mitigation of corrosion and environmentally assisted degradation.

Contact Details For more information on research opportunities with UoA, collaboration for final year Mechanical Engineering projects or past research work, please contact Dr. Gamboa on erwin.gamboa@adelaide.edu.au. By Erwin “Erk” Gamboa The University of Adelaide

In the same year, Dr. Gamboa became a member of the ACA, a member of the South Australian Branch Committee in 2006 and in late 2010 became the acting Chairman for the Young Corrosion Professionals Committee. During 2007, Dr. Gamboa was appointed to the position of Lecturer

Recent research in this area at UoA has found that X-ray tomography can be used to study SCC crack morphology and SCC crack interaction, even in the case of multiple, non-collinear, inclined, interacting cracks in X65 grade pipeline steels.

Figure 1: Opened Stress Corrosion Crack in a steel pipe wall. The dark thumbnail shape is the original SCC crack. The lighter brown/orange banded region is the area where the crack grew by fatigue only.

Figure 2: A tomograph image of an X65 pipeline steel sample that has been affected by SCC. The pipe free surface is at the top of the image, and the pipe main axis is into the page. The four coloured lines show different interacting sections of the same SCC crack as it grew into the pipe wall (~3 mm deep cracks). www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

43


Action Alliance In what year was your company established? Action Alliance was established in Airport West Victoria in 1992. How many employees did you employ when you first started the business? There were 3 employees at beginning of business.

ACA Wellington Division December Meeting Do you have an internal training scheme or do you outsource training for your employees? Action Alliance has a very strong ongoing in-house training focus that is always kept up to date. Action Alliance is also an ISO 9001 and PCCP Accredited company.

How many do you currently employ?

Contact Details:

Currently Action Alliance employees 40 staff members.

Ph: 03 9931 0740 Fax: 03 9931 0750

Do you operate from a number of locations in your home state or in other states of Australia? We are a Victorian based company who are pursuing expansion into other states. What is your core business? (e.g. blasting and painting, rubber lining, waterjetting, laminating, insulation, flooring etc.) Our core business is abrasive blasting and protective coatings. What markets do you cover with your products or services? eg: oil & gas, marine, chemical process, general fabrication, tank lining, offshore etc. We cover the following markets: marine, mining, general and architectural fabrications. Is the business yard based, site based or both? We are a factory based company. What is your monthly capacity or tonnage that you can blast and prime? Our monthly capacity is 1500 tonne. Do you offer any specialty services outside your core business? (eg. primary yard based but will do site touch up etc.) Speciality services outside our business, we do selective site works.

Email: info@actionalliance.com.au Address: 50 Cyanamid Street, Laverton North, Victoria, 3026 Website: www.actionalliance.com.au

Lucky Jack (with apologies to Jack Fry and Kingsley Amis) To hear Jack Fry tell it, his progression from a junior in a small British paint company to one of New Zealand’s most respected marine archaeologists was the result of a series of serendipitous happenstances rather than of deliberate career planning. Jack is currently a freelance conservator and Membership Secretary of the Maritime Archaeological Association of New Zealand. Jack was the guest speaker at the December meeting of the Wellington Division of ACANZ, which was also attended by a heartening number of SCANZ Wellington section members. When Jack first entered the paint industry in England he knew nothing of the chemistry or physics of paint but learned sufficient to succeed in his application to join a resin company where he was instrumental in introducing thixotropic paints as well as electrostatic and spotted paints. After further experience in another coatings company, where he rose to be in charge of the decorative section Jack once again took wing and joined the R&D section of a civil engineering company, where his attention turned to timber technology, and means of dealing with problems of timber in use.

Jack’s work was intersecting with that of Building Research Establishment (BRE) on some jobs, and on one he discovered that a senior BRE staff member was shortly to leave for NZ to become Director of the recently-established Building Research Association of New Zealand. He mentioned in passing that if a ‘materials’ man was needed, he was interested in going too. To his surprise, shortly afterwards he received a letter from Dr Gray offering him a job. So in late 1973 Jack found himself studying (among other things) the weathering of sealants, the behaviour of pre-laid particle board flooring and the performance of latex-based paints on galvanized steel roofs in New Zealand. While at what is now BRANZ, Jack visited the meeting house at Ohinemutu and decided that his future lay in the preservation of Maori artefacts. This feeling, and a change in BRANZ direction which was placing more emphasis on the science and less on the practical assistance and problem-solving issues, happily coincided with a vacancy to become the country’s first professional ‘Conservator’ at the (then) National Museum where he worked on conserving and restoring a number of meeting houses, and established a team of materials conservators. During this time Jack developed an interest in the Maori waka. When the chance came to do significant conservation on one, it was on a large

craft sunk in Lake Waikaremoana. “And so” said Jack “I learned to dive.” There were also two trips to Antarctica to study the huts (and their contents) left by Scott and other early explorers, and a trip to the Auckland Islands to study the huts and caches left there for shipwrecked mariners. Then after ‘retirement’ – which is a totally inappropriate term for Jack’s path of interests! – from the National Museum came the discovery in 1997 of the remains of Plimmer’s Ark - a shipwreck from the days of Wellington’s first settlement beneath Wellington’s old Bank of New Zealand. This is being conserved by Jack and his team similarly to the Vasa in Stockholm. There also came the rebirth of the Hikitia , a historical floating crane which is still in working order and which now houses Maritime Archaeological Association of New Zealand’s laboratory, and where Jack can be found most Saturday afternoons preserving marine relics found by divers. In thanking Jack for his talk, John Duncan (who acknowledged the mentoring he had received from Jack at BRANZ in the late 1970s) drew the audience’s attention again to the mastery of materials performance studies which Jack has carried out himself, or led, for almost 40 years in New Zealand, and the audience joined in acclaiming Jack‘s work and his absolutely riveting presentation.

What is the most satisfying project that you have completed in the past two years and why?

ACA In-house and Custom-Built Training Courses

The most satisfying project completed in the past two years would have to be the Rectangle Stadium in Melbourne due to its complexity. It was a great challenge.

In an effort to accommodate companies and company staff who cannot attend one of our public courses, the ACA is available to come to your job site or facility. The ACA can also tailor any course to your organisation’s own specific needs to better suit your learning requirements. Pricing for in-house courses are based on the course, number of participants (minimum of 8), lecturer’s travel and accommodation costs. If you'd like to discuss having an in-house or custom-built course please contact Barry Hodder, ACA Training Manager at the ACA Centre on +61 3 9890 4833 or email bhodder@corrosion.com.au

What positive advice can you pass on to the Coatings Group from that satisfying project or job? Positive advise we would pass onto the coatings group would be always keep positive and take a can do approach.

44 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

45


Action Alliance In what year was your company established? Action Alliance was established in Airport West Victoria in 1992. How many employees did you employ when you first started the business? There were 3 employees at beginning of business.

ACA Wellington Division December Meeting Do you have an internal training scheme or do you outsource training for your employees? Action Alliance has a very strong ongoing in-house training focus that is always kept up to date. Action Alliance is also an ISO 9001 and PCCP Accredited company.

How many do you currently employ?

Contact Details:

Currently Action Alliance employees 40 staff members.

Ph: 03 9931 0740 Fax: 03 9931 0750

Do you operate from a number of locations in your home state or in other states of Australia? We are a Victorian based company who are pursuing expansion into other states. What is your core business? (e.g. blasting and painting, rubber lining, waterjetting, laminating, insulation, flooring etc.) Our core business is abrasive blasting and protective coatings. What markets do you cover with your products or services? eg: oil & gas, marine, chemical process, general fabrication, tank lining, offshore etc. We cover the following markets: marine, mining, general and architectural fabrications. Is the business yard based, site based or both? We are a factory based company. What is your monthly capacity or tonnage that you can blast and prime? Our monthly capacity is 1500 tonne. Do you offer any specialty services outside your core business? (eg. primary yard based but will do site touch up etc.) Speciality services outside our business, we do selective site works.

Email: info@actionalliance.com.au Address: 50 Cyanamid Street, Laverton North, Victoria, 3026 Website: www.actionalliance.com.au

Lucky Jack (with apologies to Jack Fry and Kingsley Amis) To hear Jack Fry tell it, his progression from a junior in a small British paint company to one of New Zealand’s most respected marine archaeologists was the result of a series of serendipitous happenstances rather than of deliberate career planning. Jack is currently a freelance conservator and Membership Secretary of the Maritime Archaeological Association of New Zealand. Jack was the guest speaker at the December meeting of the Wellington Division of ACANZ, which was also attended by a heartening number of SCANZ Wellington section members. When Jack first entered the paint industry in England he knew nothing of the chemistry or physics of paint but learned sufficient to succeed in his application to join a resin company where he was instrumental in introducing thixotropic paints as well as electrostatic and spotted paints. After further experience in another coatings company, where he rose to be in charge of the decorative section Jack once again took wing and joined the R&D section of a civil engineering company, where his attention turned to timber technology, and means of dealing with problems of timber in use.

Jack’s work was intersecting with that of Building Research Establishment (BRE) on some jobs, and on one he discovered that a senior BRE staff member was shortly to leave for NZ to become Director of the recently-established Building Research Association of New Zealand. He mentioned in passing that if a ‘materials’ man was needed, he was interested in going too. To his surprise, shortly afterwards he received a letter from Dr Gray offering him a job. So in late 1973 Jack found himself studying (among other things) the weathering of sealants, the behaviour of pre-laid particle board flooring and the performance of latex-based paints on galvanized steel roofs in New Zealand. While at what is now BRANZ, Jack visited the meeting house at Ohinemutu and decided that his future lay in the preservation of Maori artefacts. This feeling, and a change in BRANZ direction which was placing more emphasis on the science and less on the practical assistance and problem-solving issues, happily coincided with a vacancy to become the country’s first professional ‘Conservator’ at the (then) National Museum where he worked on conserving and restoring a number of meeting houses, and established a team of materials conservators. During this time Jack developed an interest in the Maori waka. When the chance came to do significant conservation on one, it was on a large

craft sunk in Lake Waikaremoana. “And so” said Jack “I learned to dive.” There were also two trips to Antarctica to study the huts (and their contents) left by Scott and other early explorers, and a trip to the Auckland Islands to study the huts and caches left there for shipwrecked mariners. Then after ‘retirement’ – which is a totally inappropriate term for Jack’s path of interests! – from the National Museum came the discovery in 1997 of the remains of Plimmer’s Ark - a shipwreck from the days of Wellington’s first settlement beneath Wellington’s old Bank of New Zealand. This is being conserved by Jack and his team similarly to the Vasa in Stockholm. There also came the rebirth of the Hikitia , a historical floating crane which is still in working order and which now houses Maritime Archaeological Association of New Zealand’s laboratory, and where Jack can be found most Saturday afternoons preserving marine relics found by divers. In thanking Jack for his talk, John Duncan (who acknowledged the mentoring he had received from Jack at BRANZ in the late 1970s) drew the audience’s attention again to the mastery of materials performance studies which Jack has carried out himself, or led, for almost 40 years in New Zealand, and the audience joined in acclaiming Jack‘s work and his absolutely riveting presentation.

What is the most satisfying project that you have completed in the past two years and why?

ACA In-house and Custom-Built Training Courses

The most satisfying project completed in the past two years would have to be the Rectangle Stadium in Melbourne due to its complexity. It was a great challenge.

In an effort to accommodate companies and company staff who cannot attend one of our public courses, the ACA is available to come to your job site or facility. The ACA can also tailor any course to your organisation’s own specific needs to better suit your learning requirements. Pricing for in-house courses are based on the course, number of participants (minimum of 8), lecturer’s travel and accommodation costs. If you'd like to discuss having an in-house or custom-built course please contact Barry Hodder, ACA Training Manager at the ACA Centre on +61 3 9890 4833 or email bhodder@corrosion.com.au

What positive advice can you pass on to the Coatings Group from that satisfying project or job? Positive advise we would pass onto the coatings group would be always keep positive and take a can do approach.

44 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

45


David Pocock

SICK OF RUST EATING YOUR ASSETS? THEN USE RUST CONQUEROR .........................TO BEAT RUST!

MANAGER

22 Irvine Street Bayswater WA 6053 T: 08 9721 2265 F: 08 9271 2235 M: 0409 112 010 E: david@tfgpumpline.com.au www.pumpline.com.au

M: 0413 806 232 michal@atlasaccess.com.au www.atlasaccess.com.au P: 61-2-9700 0812 F: 61-2-9700 0813 9/41 – 43 GREEN ST BOTANY NSW 2019 IRATA

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LEEA

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AINDT

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WITH A 20+ YEAR HISTORY, THIS PROVEN, COST EFFECTIVE, ORGANIC BASED, SIMPLE & SAFE TO USE PRODUCT, REALLY WORKS! Available Australia wide! www.xtrollglobal.com.au Email: sales@xtrollglobal.com.au Phone 07 3865 1077 Xtroll offers a wide range of excellent products that work.

-

ACA

-

David Dawson National Sales/Operations Manager

Welding Supervision Welding Inspection NDT Specialist Coating Inspection Inservice Inspection

DeHumidification Technologies PTY LTD 113 Bonds Road Riverwood NSW 2210 Australia

SuPPLying inSPection & teSting equiPment

Queensland (Head Office)

Phone: +61 7 5476 9788 Fax: +61 7 5476 8268

Melbourne

Phone: +61 3 9755 3770 Email: sales@cathodicdiecasting.com.au

Specialist Infrastructure and durability consultants

ABN: 93 821 370 828

www.cathodicdiecasting.com.au

Ph: 1300 763 319 | www.bcrc.com.au

Cathodic Diecating - small advert 3-2-10.indd 1

APPLIED MAGNESIUM PTY LIMITED

N I C H O L A S C O R R O S I O N P T Y LT D

Manufacturers and suppliers of Extruded Galvanic Magnesium Anodes (formerly )

Dr David Nicholas

• Round section from 17 mm to 89 mm diameter • Rectangular ribbon section in 305 metre coils • All anodes have continuous length core wire • High potential (Galvomag) and low potential (Galvorod)

Ph.D, B.Sc (Hons), FIE Aust, CP Eng

• Ultrasonic Thickness Gauges • Holiday Detectors • Coating Thickness Gauges • Pit Gauges • Borescopes & Magnifiers • Surface Replication products

Geelong Office: 193 Station Street, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Postal Address: P.O. Box 1080, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Tel: +61 3 5275 3339 Fax: +61 3 5275 0585 Mob: 0412 520 699 Email: dmay@drmay.com.au

Manufacturing anodes since 1984

CICIND

Russell Fraser Sales Pty Ltd

SYDNEY t: 02 9545 4433 F: 02 9545 4218 rfs@rfsales.com.au www.rfsales.com.au

David May

Mobile: 0450 008 259 Fax: (02) 8525 8850 ddawson@rentdh.com www.rentdh.com

Cathodic Diecasting

Industrial Chimney Services Windshield / Flue / Lining Crown Dams / Bridges / Jetties Silos / Towers / Buildings Concrete Surveys Remedial Repairs Protective Coating Industrial Rope Access & Suspended Platforms Confined Space Entry & Standby Rescue Height Safety System NATA

D R MAY Inspections

Principal Consultant Tel: 02 4952 6593 Int: (+612) Mob: 0421 745 059 8 Bambara Close, Lambton, NSW 2299, Australia Email: david@nicholascorrosion.com.au

Mail PO Box 520 Winston Hills NSW 2153 Telephone 02 9838 8544 Facsimile 02 9838 7690 Email prose@appliedmag.com

Materials and Corrosion Consultancy to the Water Industry

3/3/10 10:51:21 AM

CATHODIC PROTECTION Agent for:

LIDA® – Mixed Metal Oxide Anodes • Strip, Rod, Tubular, Ribbon, Disk and Wire

• Sacrificial Anodes • Silicon Iron Anodes • Transformer Rectifiers • Reference Electrodes

D E NORA

–Zinc, Aluminium and Magnesium • Calcined Petroleum Backfill • Surge Protection, Insulation –Copper, Zinc and Silver

Prevent corrosion on your:-

PIPELINES, TANKS, BRIDGES, WHARVES, OFFSHORE PLATFORMS

Tel: +61 (03) 94672520 or 0413 201562

Email: robertcox@pipecorr.com.au • www.pipecorr.com.au Committed to Professional Service, Competitive Pricing and Customer Satisfaction

PREMIUM PROTECTION

Providing proven, tested & superior spray applied elastomeric protective coating solutions against Impact, Abrasion, Corrosion, Chemical Attack & Containment issues. Rhino Linings Australasia Pty Ltd

501-505 Olsen Avenue, Molendinar Qld 4214

Ph: +61 7 5585 7000 Fax: +61 7 5539 6399

info@rhinolinings.com.au

Front

www.rhinolinings.com.au

RESPONSIVE SERVICE EXPERTISE INDEPENDENCE

A.B.N. 82 101 032 788 1300 723 924

www.industrialpainter.com.au

• Anti Graffiti • Sign Writing • Line Marking • Pressure Cleaning • PCCP/NACE Accredited • • Protective Coatings • All Related Services • Building Maintenance •

MR JUSTIN RIGBY

Business Development Manager

Specialist Manufacturer of DIMET Aluminium & Zinc Anodes (Cathodic Protection.) ICCP design and commissioning are also available by NACE certified CP Engineers.

Corrosion and Coating Failure Investigations Coating Specification and Review Fitness for Purpose and Remnant Life Assessment Expert Witness and Litigation Support Corrosion, Materials & Mechanical Engineers Applied Scientists, Metallurgists, Coating Inspectors NDT Technicians

MASTERCOTE PTFE Coated, and other special fasteners. ZINGA Film Galvanizing System.

Factory 5, 227 Wells Rd Chelsea Heights 3196 jrigby@industrialpainter.com.au • www.industrialpainter.com.au 1300 723 924 • Fax 9773 3522 • 0417 338 773

58 Corrosion & Materials

Australia Wide

www.corrosion.com.au

Phone: +61 7 3718 0300

Gareth van Loggerenberg TITANUM ELECTRODE PRODUCTS

t: +61 (0) 8 9256 4499 f: +61 (0) 8 9256 4599 m: +61 (0) 408 931 072 e: gareth@telpro.com.au w: www.telpro.com.au Unit 2, 26 Baile Road Canning Vale Western Australia 6155

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

59


David Pocock

SICK OF RUST EATING YOUR ASSETS? THEN USE RUST CONQUEROR .........................TO BEAT RUST!

MANAGER

22 Irvine Street Bayswater WA 6053 T: 08 9721 2265 F: 08 9271 2235 M: 0409 112 010 E: david@tfgpumpline.com.au www.pumpline.com.au

M: 0413 806 232 michal@atlasaccess.com.au www.atlasaccess.com.au P: 61-2-9700 0812 F: 61-2-9700 0813 9/41 – 43 GREEN ST BOTANY NSW 2019 IRATA

-

LEEA

-

AINDT

-

WITH A 20+ YEAR HISTORY, THIS PROVEN, COST EFFECTIVE, ORGANIC BASED, SIMPLE & SAFE TO USE PRODUCT, REALLY WORKS! Available Australia wide! www.xtrollglobal.com.au Email: sales@xtrollglobal.com.au Phone 07 3865 1077 Xtroll offers a wide range of excellent products that work.

-

ACA

-

David Dawson National Sales/Operations Manager

Welding Supervision Welding Inspection NDT Specialist Coating Inspection Inservice Inspection

DeHumidification Technologies PTY LTD 113 Bonds Road Riverwood NSW 2210 Australia

SuPPLying inSPection & teSting equiPment

Queensland (Head Office)

Phone: +61 7 5476 9788 Fax: +61 7 5476 8268

Melbourne

Phone: +61 3 9755 3770 Email: sales@cathodicdiecasting.com.au

Specialist Infrastructure and durability consultants

ABN: 93 821 370 828

www.cathodicdiecasting.com.au

Ph: 1300 763 319 | www.bcrc.com.au

Cathodic Diecating - small advert 3-2-10.indd 1

APPLIED MAGNESIUM PTY LIMITED

N I C H O L A S C O R R O S I O N P T Y LT D

Manufacturers and suppliers of Extruded Galvanic Magnesium Anodes (formerly )

Dr David Nicholas

• Round section from 17 mm to 89 mm diameter • Rectangular ribbon section in 305 metre coils • All anodes have continuous length core wire • High potential (Galvomag) and low potential (Galvorod)

Ph.D, B.Sc (Hons), FIE Aust, CP Eng

• Ultrasonic Thickness Gauges • Holiday Detectors • Coating Thickness Gauges • Pit Gauges • Borescopes & Magnifiers • Surface Replication products

Geelong Office: 193 Station Street, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Postal Address: P.O. Box 1080, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Tel: +61 3 5275 3339 Fax: +61 3 5275 0585 Mob: 0412 520 699 Email: dmay@drmay.com.au

Manufacturing anodes since 1984

CICIND

Russell Fraser Sales Pty Ltd

SYDNEY t: 02 9545 4433 F: 02 9545 4218 rfs@rfsales.com.au www.rfsales.com.au

David May

Mobile: 0450 008 259 Fax: (02) 8525 8850 ddawson@rentdh.com www.rentdh.com

Cathodic Diecasting

Industrial Chimney Services Windshield / Flue / Lining Crown Dams / Bridges / Jetties Silos / Towers / Buildings Concrete Surveys Remedial Repairs Protective Coating Industrial Rope Access & Suspended Platforms Confined Space Entry & Standby Rescue Height Safety System NATA

D R MAY Inspections

Principal Consultant Tel: 02 4952 6593 Int: (+612) Mob: 0421 745 059 8 Bambara Close, Lambton, NSW 2299, Australia Email: david@nicholascorrosion.com.au

Mail PO Box 520 Winston Hills NSW 2153 Telephone 02 9838 8544 Facsimile 02 9838 7690 Email prose@appliedmag.com

Materials and Corrosion Consultancy to the Water Industry

3/3/10 10:51:21 AM

CATHODIC PROTECTION Agent for:

LIDA® – Mixed Metal Oxide Anodes • Strip, Rod, Tubular, Ribbon, Disk and Wire

• Sacrificial Anodes • Silicon Iron Anodes • Transformer Rectifiers • Reference Electrodes

D E NORA

–Zinc, Aluminium and Magnesium • Calcined Petroleum Backfill • Surge Protection, Insulation –Copper, Zinc and Silver

Prevent corrosion on your:-

PIPELINES, TANKS, BRIDGES, WHARVES, OFFSHORE PLATFORMS

Tel: +61 (03) 94672520 or 0413 201562

Email: robertcox@pipecorr.com.au • www.pipecorr.com.au Committed to Professional Service, Competitive Pricing and Customer Satisfaction

PREMIUM PROTECTION

Providing proven, tested & superior spray applied elastomeric protective coating solutions against Impact, Abrasion, Corrosion, Chemical Attack & Containment issues. Rhino Linings Australasia Pty Ltd

501-505 Olsen Avenue, Molendinar Qld 4214

Ph: +61 7 5585 7000 Fax: +61 7 5539 6399

info@rhinolinings.com.au

Front

www.rhinolinings.com.au

RESPONSIVE SERVICE EXPERTISE INDEPENDENCE

A.B.N. 82 101 032 788 1300 723 924

www.industrialpainter.com.au

• Anti Graffiti • Sign Writing • Line Marking • Pressure Cleaning • PCCP/NACE Accredited • • Protective Coatings • All Related Services • Building Maintenance •

MR JUSTIN RIGBY

Business Development Manager

Specialist Manufacturer of DIMET Aluminium & Zinc Anodes (Cathodic Protection.) ICCP design and commissioning are also available by NACE certified CP Engineers.

Corrosion and Coating Failure Investigations Coating Specification and Review Fitness for Purpose and Remnant Life Assessment Expert Witness and Litigation Support Corrosion, Materials & Mechanical Engineers Applied Scientists, Metallurgists, Coating Inspectors NDT Technicians

MASTERCOTE PTFE Coated, and other special fasteners. ZINGA Film Galvanizing System.

Factory 5, 227 Wells Rd Chelsea Heights 3196 jrigby@industrialpainter.com.au • www.industrialpainter.com.au 1300 723 924 • Fax 9773 3522 • 0417 338 773

58 Corrosion & Materials

Australia Wide

www.corrosion.com.au

Phone: +61 7 3718 0300

Gareth van Loggerenberg TITANUM ELECTRODE PRODUCTS

t: +61 (0) 8 9256 4499 f: +61 (0) 8 9256 4599 m: +61 (0) 408 931 072 e: gareth@telpro.com.au w: www.telpro.com.au Unit 2, 26 Baile Road Canning Vale Western Australia 6155

Vol 36 No 1 February 2011

59


Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve changed our name to ORONTIDE Industrial Services. For years, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve offered our clients in the Oil & Gas, Naval Defence, Marine and Commercial Industries the highest level of service for UHP Water Jetting, Abrasive Blasting and Surface Protection. As part of ORONTIDE we can now offer you an even wider range of preservation and integrity maintenance services, including engineering, machining, fabrication and fitting services.

Delivering Integrity orontide.com.au


Corrosion & Materials Feb 2011