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Texas Intercollegiate Press Association

Type-Hi 2013

Winners from the 2013 TIPA Convention On-Site Contests in Fort Worth, Texas. Inside are the best from writers, photographers, and designers from Texas’ 2-year and 4-year, public and private college and university student media.

DIRECTOR’S TROPHY -- Members of the Sam Houston State University student media participating in the 2013 TIPA Convention in Fort Worth, took home the first Director’s Trophy for On-Site Contest Excellence. The trophy is presented to the school accumulating the most points in the convention’s 30 on-site contests. From left to right: Debbi Hatton, Sophie Nelson, Lizzeth De La Garza, Trent Scott, Bryce Leasure, Jacquelin Villafranco, Kessler McLaughlin, Meghan Herring, Connor Hyde, Stephen Green, Misti Jones, Robin Johnson, Kassidy Turnpaugh, Monty Sloan, LeeAn Muns. (photo submitted by SHSU)


2013 On-Site Contest Winners (Fort Worth Convention) News Photo Newspaper Design PR Crisis Management TV Advertising Radio Advertising Print Advertising Video News Radio Announcing Print News Writing 2-Person Photo Essay TV Announcing TV News Writing Editorial Writing Editorial Cartoon Copy Editing Magazine Design Feature Photo Headline Feature Writing Critical Review Spanish TV Announcing Spanish Radio Announcing Yearbook Design PR Release Writing Radio News Writing Spanish News Writing Sports Action Photo Print Sports Writing TV Sports Writing Radio Sportrs Writing

Andrew Wilson Mark Smith Anwesha Bhattacharjee Jacob Spadie Jacqui Villafranco Hannah Wilson Joey McReynolds Lane Lewis Caitlin Clark Kathy Tran & Scott Patrick Mitchell Malcolm Hornsby Brooke Long Bobby Karalla Rebecca Aguilar Brittney Richerson Cathryn Ploehn Matt Hellman Evan Recatune Hollie O’Connor Nadia Hill Lily Lamas Danny Lopez Derek Byrne Julie Coppedge Cooper Welch Viridiana Zuniga Matt Hellman Cameron Irvine Bryce Leasure Trent Scott

Type-Hi TYPE-HI is the on-line publication presenting First Place winners from the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association On-Site Contests conducted at the organization’s annual spring convention. Students representing student media (newspapers, magazine, yearbook, radio, television, online) from the state’s two-year and four-year, public and private colleges and universities compete against each other in scenario contests under deadline. Some contests feature

(Del Mar College) (Abilene Christian University) (University of Texas at Dallas) (Tyler Junior College) (Sam Houston State University) (Texas State University) (TCU) (Texas State University) (Texas State University) (Brookhaven College) (Texas A&M University-Commerce) (Midwestern State University) (University of Texas at Dallas) (University of Texas at Dallas) (Texas A&M Univ.-Corpus Christi) (University of Texas at Dallas) (Baylor University) (TCU) (Texas State University) (University of North Texas) TCU) (Austin Community College) (Baylor University) (Abilene Christian University) (Texas A&M University-Commerce) (University of Texas - Brownsville) (Baylor University) (Texas State University) (Sam Houston State University) (Sam Houston State University)

Texas Intercollegiate Press Association Spring 2013

actual events or activities, sending the students into the field to test their skills. Contests are supervised, monitored and judged by student media faculty advisers. Contest winners are then recognized at the association’s annual Awards Breakfast on the last day of the convention. Material is reprinted as the entries were submitted to judges, there is no editing. Cutlines for photos are as the students submitted them with their

photos.

TYPE-HI is organized at the TIPA Central Office, located on the campus of Texas A&M University-Commerce. Contact information: Fred Stewart, executive director, Box 4104, Commerce, TX 75429. Ph: 903-886-5231, Fax: 903-468-3128, Email: Fred.Stewart@tamuc.edu. Texas Intercollegiate Press Association was established in 1909.

Public Relations Release Writing by Julie Coppedge (Abilene Christian University)

(Company logo) Contact: Jane Doe Play-Well Communication Director 111-123-4567 jane.doe@play-well.com PLAY-WELL’S ZOOMERS BRAND RECALLS BATTERY-OPERATED TOY CARS AND OFFERS FREE REPAIRS TO MALFUNCTIONING PRODUCTS DALLAS, April 4, 2013 – Play-Well’s popular Zoomers brand announced today a voluntary recall of toy car models sold after November 2009. The announcement included instruction for consumers to attain free vehicle repairs for malfunctioning products. Play-Well and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) acknowledge complaints from consumers regarding malfunctioning Zoomers products, including reports of electrical components in the vehicles overheating both while in use and while parked. A dozen children have suffered minor burns to hands, legs and feet. 100 product-related fires have also been reported in houses and garages. “The company will make every effort to help consumers identify if their model needs repaired,” said Michael Hayes, vice president of consumer relations. Vehicles sold before November 2009 are not included in the Zoomers recall. Consumers can check vehicle tags for model names, call Play-Well directly or visit the Zoomers website to identify repair needs. Safety as top priority “We suggest parents disable the cars immediately and not let their kids use the vehicles until any repairs have been made,” said Hayes. Play-Well suggests consumers who discover Zoomers products sold after November 2009 adhere to the following precautions to protect children:

* Prevent children from using vehicles temporarily * Immediately remove batteries from vehicles * Schedule an appointment for repairs at a local service center, free of charge

Play-Well encourages consumers to call 800-ZOOMERS or visit www.zoomers.com with questions regarding the recall or to locate a nearby service center. About Play-Well Company Founded in 1940, the Play-Well Company ranks among the leading manufactures of quality toys and games for young children. Play-Well offers a variety of product lines ranging from crib and musical toys for newborns to preschool games and educational toys for children ages 5 and older. Visit Play-Well on the web at www.play-well.com for more information about Play-Well products. ###


Editorial Writing

Editorial Cartoon

by Bobby Karalla (University of Texas at Dallas)

by Rebecca Aguilar (University of Texas at Dallas)

A high school student’s future is at stake because all she wants is to be heard. Courtni Webb, a 17-yearold student at a San Francisco charter school for high schoolaged troubled youth, was suspended from Life Learning Academy for writing a poem about the Connecticut killings. The work, which wasn’t even a school assignment, contained nothing more violent than what we hear in rap songs, her words no darker than anything we can find on a rock album. Webb’s 12-line introspective piece, featuring lines such as “The silence the world will never get. I understand the killings in Connecticut. I know why he pulled the trigger,” has earned her local infamy and a school suspension. But instead of taking the time to examine why Webb feels the way she does and recognizing that young men and women struggling through the justice system might need outlets like poetry through which they can express themselves, we’ve laid the blame on the easy target.

If a young girl says something you don’t like, make her go away. Webb seems like a smart young woman, and has since made it clear that she was in no way supporting Sandy Hook shooter Adam Lanza’s actions. “The meaning of the poem is talking about society and how I understand why things like that incident happened,” she said in an interview with ABC News. “So it’s not like I’m agreeing with it, but that’s how the school made it seem.” It’s no surprise that adults would punish any kid, especially one coping with substance abuse or gang involvement, as many at Life Learning Academy do. High school students have never had the freedom to openly speak their mind. An unnamed school official used words like “deeply concerning” and “threatening” to describe Webb’s language. Here’s a line from Webb’s poem. Look for anything concerning: “They wanna hold me back. I run, but they still attack.

My innocence, I won’t get back.” Who feels threatened? If anything, it’s Webb herself, who is clearly using poetry as a means to express her inner frustration with how we all view her and those like her. Obviously Webb’s teachers don’t understand her, either. Rather than talking about why “misery loves company,” as she wrote, the school threw her aside in a time of need. Now it’s up to the San Francisco Unified School District to determine if Webb’s poem was a genuine threat to students or a form of art. A group of teachers and administrators holds in its hands the fate of a troubled young girl, relishing the art of expression and working to graduate high school. She’s no more a threat to you or me than she is to herself. She just wants to be heard. The Life Learning Academy threw Webb and her message away. Now it’s time to see if the school district will do the same, or if those administrators can open their ears and give freedom of speech a chance.

On-Site Contest Winner Headline Evan Recatune (TCU)

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On-Site Contest Winner Copy Editing

Brittney Richerson (Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi) 5


Feature Writing

by Hollie O’Connor (Texas State University) He sat in the window of the western wear store at the foot of a large elevated chair, his polishstained hands skillfully scrubbing a pair of leather shoes. Roosevelt K. Miles Jr., or “Theo,” as he’s known around the store, was intent on his work as a shoe shiner at Leddy’s Ranch. “I can do everything from shining the shoe to changing the color of the shoe,” Theo said. “It’s becoming a lost art.” Theo supports himself shining shoes for a host of regular customers who know he can do the job right, but it hasn’t always been this way. About nine years ago, he was homeless and addicted to drugs and alcohol, vices he used to distract him from the posttraumatic stress he experienced after a stint in the military. To make matters worse, he had to have his left foot partially amputated as a result of an accident while deployed, which made getting a job especially difficult. He needed to find a trade he could do that would allow him to sit down and still make a living-- that’s where shoe shining came in. He had shined shoes as a boy growing up in California to help make money for his family, which was on welfare, and frequently had to polish boots while in the

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military. He had grown to like the work, and with a little bit of luck and help from a friend, set up shop in Leddy’s Ranch.

“My reply was ‘Well, that’s what you were going to do. I don’t think you’re going to do that now,’” Theo said.

“I don’t even think of it as a job anymore,” Theo said. “It’s more of a hobby.”

Three months later, he ran into the man again, but this time he was dressed nicely and at a restaurant with his family, who he insisted Theo meet.

His hobby has led him to meet some interesting people. Theo shined the shoes of George W. Bush and Shaquille O’Neal, among other celebrities. “From here to here were Shaquille O’Neal’s shoes,” he said, pointing from his fingertips to the bend in his elbow. But despite his encounters with past presidents and basketball superstars, Theo has not forgotten where he came from. He said his most memorable encounter was not with a celebrity at all, but rather a young homeless man he ran into on his way home from work, a man who reminded him entirely too much of himself. The man asked Theo for $1 to buy a cup of coffee, and Theo obliged. When the man said “thank you,” Theo said to instead “thank God, because he’s the one that put it on my heart.”

Feature Photo by Matt Hellman (Baylor University)

“He was letting me know I was the one who helped turn his life around,” Theo said. Theo continues to help the homeless when he can. From his window at Leddy’s Ranch, he can see a trash can that homeless people often rifle through for a discarded cup of coffee. He started keeping a stockpile of Gatorade and water to run out and give them so they won’t have to result to something so degrading. “To help someone else is a true blessing,” Theo said. “You know, I’ve had problems, and I still have problems, but seeing people who are in worse shape than me makes me realize how truly blessed I am.”

FEATURE PHOTO -- After having the last three fingers of his hand smashed by a punch press on June 18, 1964, Fort Worth hairstylist Joe Guerrero received his barber’s license in 1966 and continues to cut hair for many prominent names such as Robert Bass of the Bass Brothers, former chief of police Ralph Mendonza, coowner of the Williamson-Dickie Manufacturing Co. Don Williamson and former Texas Ranger co-owern Bob Simpson.

The man then attempted to give the dollar back, admitting that he had intended to use the money to get high.

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2-Person Photo Essay by Kathy Tran and Scott Patrick Mitchell (Brookhaven College)


Radio Advertising

by Jacqui Villafranco (Sam Houston State University)

RADIO ADVERTISING #086 VERSION 1: SPECS: WOMAN, SOUNDS MOTHERLY WITH A SMOOTH VOICE. WOMAN VO: ROAD TRIPS ARE THE WORST. KIDS SCREAMING,(SFX: CHILD SCREAMING) HUSBANDS SINGING,(SFX:BAD CLIP OF A MALE SINGING) BATHROOM BREAKS AND GAS STOPS. (SFX: KID SAYING ARE WE THERE YET?) THAT’S WHY I LOVE OUR PRIUS C. THERE IS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE. SAFETY FEATURES SUCH AS 3 POINT SEATBELTS WITH FORCE LIMITERS AND CHILD SAFTEY LOCKS, NEW TECHNOLOGY LIKE HD RADIO, REMOTE KEYLESS ENTRY, WIRLESS BLUETOOTH FOR CALLS ON THE GO, AND HEATED FRONT SEATS FOR THOSE CHILLY DAYS.IT’S ALSO SLEEK AND CLASSY WITH THE LEATHERETTE INTERIOR SEATS WITH PLENTY OF ROOM.THE PRIUS C ALSO GETS 51 MPG OUT ON THE OPEN ROAD. THANKS TO THE PRIUS C I

LUNCHEON SPEAKER -- Bob Ray Sanders, associate editor and senior columnist at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram was the Hall of Fame Induction Luncheon speaker. Sanders is a graduate of the University of North Texas and has been a journalist for 40 years, working in newspaper, television and radio. (photo by Jason Nam, Texas A&M University-Commerce)

CAN ENJOY OUR FAMILY ROAD TRIPS A LITTLE BIT EASIER. SFX: CUE FAMILY SINGING ALONG TO A ROAD TRIP HAPPY SONG

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Television Advertising by Jacob Spadie (Tyler Junior College)

2013 Director’s Trophy Winner (Sam Houston State University)

On-Site Contest Winner Video News Joey McReynolds (TCU) 12

Place 1st 1st 1st 2nd 2nd 2nd 2nd 3rd 3rd HM HM HM HM

Contest

TV Sports Writing Trent Scott Radio Advertising TV News Writing TV Advertising PR Release Writing Video News Radio Announcing Editorial Cartoon Print News Writing Spanish Radio Announcing TV Announcing Feature Photo

Name

Bryce Leasure Radio Sports Writing Jacqui Villafranco Bryce Leasure Pete Petitti Misti Jones Kessler McLaughlin Meagan Herring Kassidy Turnpaugh Jay Jordan Jacqui Villafranco Stephen Green Connor Hyde


Critical Review by Nadia Hill (University of North Texas)

Newspaper Design by Mark Smith (Abilene Christian University)

Experienced and bitter, guarded and independent, Billie steps off a train from New Orleans, arriving in 1930s Harlem. She’s perched on a bench, sullen and withdrawn, but is startled when an old flame crosses her path not 15 minutes into stepping on new ground. He doesn’t recognize her, but her scheming, broken heart reignited the flame he left her with more than 40 years before. “Trav’lin” tells the story of three black couples who took part in the historical Black Exodus from the south, as they try to navigate love and politics in trying times. As the old flame George Walker puts it, “We all know love - it’s a mess.” The Jubilee Theatre performed its first preview of the play, written by acclaimed playwrights Gary Holmes and Allan Shapiro, with music composed by J.C. Johnson. Holmes’ and Shapiro’s characters were not contrived, only “refined,” as they put it, as they were all based on historical figures or stories Johnson told Holmes when they were younger. One of the final songs, “Pretty Little People,” was performed publicly the first time as it was originally a gift from composer Johnson to his wife. The delightful things about this play were that the characters were completely relatable and the show did not feel as forced as some musicals do. The

lyrics and melodies seemed written into the script, and as artistic director Tre Garrett said, “They happened to just burst into song when the emotion got to that point.” There were no dramatic scene or costume changes that would otherwise alienate or distance an audience, and the play felt more like a friendly movie or gossip at a dinner party. Set in a black box, the space was perfect for this musical, as audiences got up close and personal to these realistic situations and relatable characters. The costumes were telling of the times, and the props were simple and well orchestrated into scenes. The intimate environment required the actors to be expressive and authentic with their emotions, two aspects they all captured flawlessly. These felt like friends that most audience members could relate to, from the scorned to the hopeless to the naive. On a technical note, Billie, played by May Allen, George Walker, played by Marvin Matthews and Roz, played by T.K Bell, were the most vocally impressive. Allen stole the show with her sass, wisdom and wit, delivering one-liners with attitude and grace. Nelson, the nerdy and eager one of the bunch, played by Michael Sylvester, put the moves on with his impeccable dancing. Oris Phillips, Jr., who played

two-timing Archie, nailed the sleazy character while his voice was average. Naive Ella, played by Thelma Mitchell, didn’t have a strong voice, but her expressive face and girlish behavior charmed the audience. The story was primarily told through the women - Billie, who pretends to be Ethel from Mississippi, Roz and Ella. Each has their own take on how women behave in love and how their personal stories affect their current situations. All three are inherently intelligent, but over the course of the play, come into their own and reflect the deeper meaning of the show’s title, “Trav’lin.” Eventually, audiences will realize this poignant, hilarious, emotional and accurate play has nothing to do with Harlem or the Black Exodus, but more about the ways people travel and grow from one relationship to the next and throughout a relationship and in love. It’s not always healthy, and it’s not always mature, but these historical places and movements are an analogy for “trav’lin,” a word often repeated in every scene. It doesn’t matter race or gender, it doesn’t matter the decade, love is love, and as George Walker sings in an emotional, tear-jerking scene, it’s better to love and to have lost, than never love at all, no matter how messy it gets.

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PR Crisis Management by Anwesha Bhattacharjee (University of Texas at Dallas)

Situation Analysis: A Texas Wesleyan men’s basketball player assaults a game official after a game and is suspended for 10 games by the university, Red River Athletic Conference and NAIA. 1. The following steps should be taken to deal with the immediate impact: a. Notify the attendees of the game and the students and faculty that they are safe, urge them to remain calm and assure them that the university will take appropriate action. b. A PR spokesperson, possibly the Director of the Athletic Department, should offer help and medical assistance to the game official who was assaulted. c. Notify Texas Wesleyan’s Office of Communications of the incident to draft a statement regretting the student’s actions and clearly stating the university’s response of suspending the student for 10 games. i. The Office of Com-

munications should work with the head coach, the Director of Athletic Programs and the Dean of Students while formulating the statement. ii. The statement should clearly state the university’s actions and support toward the Conference management and game officials immediately after the incident. iii. It should state that the safety of the assaulted as the university’s priority, as well as the wellbeing of the team. iv. The statement should be released to all stakeholders, including the student community and the team sponsors if any as well as the university’s Board of Directors. v. The statement should be posted online, and to the Athletic Program’s social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, as well as on the university’s athletic program website. d. Notify all team members to avoid responding to any media requests and to

direct all media to the Office of Communications. e. Work with the head coach to formulate a response, if he were to be contacted by the media. f. Notify the player’s guardian of the incident and ramifications.

The following steps should be taken to deal with the legal impact: a. Identify the various parties that might file a legal complaint against the university and the player, including the Conference management and the official. b. Consult with the university’s resident attorney, or the law firm on retainer, regarding the possible course of action if a lawsuit were to be filed by each of the identified parties above, and the university’s responsibility in the situation. c. Contact the university’s insurance company to discuss liability clauses and the amount of compensation that the university might have to pay the official or the Conference management in the possibility of a

lawsuit. d. Draw up a list of witnesses present — team members, the coach. 2. The Director of the university’s Athletic Department, the Dean of Students and the Executive Director of the university’s Office of Communications should be the spokespersons for the university. The head coach could also be a spokesperson, but only in a limited capacity. a. The Director of the Athletic program or department, as an official who oversees the well-being of athletic programs and players, is a good choice as spokesperson because his presence will lend a voice to the players on the team. He will be able to communicate better with the coaches and players on the team, find out what really happened, and communicate in an official capacity with the player’s parents and act as a liaison between the administrators and the team. b. The Dean of Students is an obvious choice for a spokesperson, since the player is a student, and decisions regarding sports scholarships, whether or not any further disciplinary actions will be taken against him, are all under the Dean’s jurisdiction. c. Both the Dean of Students and the Director, Athletic Programs, will

be able to advise the student on any future course of action, the legal impact of his actions and his involvement with the media. d. The Executive Director of the university’s Office of Communications should be a second spokesperson, since he or she will be able to respond to the crisis in an administrative capacity, communicating with the athletic program director and the Dean of Students, as well as the legal counsel for the university. e. The head coach of the team should work with the Office of Communications to formulate adequate responses to media questions pertaining to the impact on the team’s morale and performance in following games as a result of the incident.

3. The student athlete should be advised not to respond to media requests and should be explained what his legal and disciplinary options are if a. The injured party decides to file a lawsuit, b. The player responds to the media directly The university spokespersons, such as Dean of Students and the Director of Athletic Programs should definitely talk to the player

to get his side of the story.

If the player decides to make himself available on social media, however, and wishes to share his side of the story, the following steps can be taken by the university: a. If the student admits his fault and apologizes for the assault, he should be asked to remove the social media feed and draft an official statement. The university can arrange for a press Conference where he can openly admit his fault and apologize. b. If the student, however, continues to justify his actions, that could lead to possible repercussions from the student community at the university, and from the public, the university should ask him to stay off social media until the issue is resolved in a disciplinary manner, and if he refuses to cooperate, request the social media website to de-activate his account temporarily, citing possible unrest among the student community in the university.

4. The head basketball coach, while in a position to help liaise with the student, will not be the best orator at a press Conference. His involvement in the entire process can be phased in,


so that his responses are structured to quell any controversy and at the same time present his concern for the team. a. Initially, on game night, the head coach should be asked to direct all communication to the designated spokespersons. The Office of Communications should work with him while formulating their statement. b. The head coach should be involved in talking to the spokespersons and the player, possibly his guardian as well, and help calm the player to prevent any further controversy. c. The head coach should pass on any directions he receives from the university to the other players on the team. d. In the later stages of the crisis, the head coach should work with the Office of Communications to formulate his responses to the media on how this incident is likely to impact the team in terms of performance, morale and standings in the Red River Athletic Conference. e. The university should arrange a press Conference for the head coach to speak to the media. His comments should be brief and about the team, and how not having one player on the team could change the dynamics of the team. He should not comment on the disciplinary actions against

the player, nor should be comment on the incident itself.

Additional disciplinary action should not be publicized as it does not affect the student community in any way. The university’s statements and updates should be about the team, but should state that any disciplinary action against the student-athlete is pending. According to FERPA restrictions, any reduction or cancellation of financial aid or scholarships is confidential and the disciplinary hearing process should be completely confidential, unless the student is suspended, in which case, the university can release a brief statement that states that his suspension is related to his involvement in the incident, and for how long he has been suspended.

5. The procedure to coordinate crisis action plans in the days immediately following the game night are as follows:

a. The morning after the game, a representative from the Office of Communications should arrange a meeting with the player, the Dean of Students, the Director of the Athletic Program and the head coach of the men’s

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

basketball team to i. Understand the player’s reason for the assault. ii. To outline the current status of the situation including the legal and disciplinary impacts of the incident on the student and the university. iii. To outline the student-athlete’s responsibilities and directions on communicating with the media. The Office of Communications should update their statement on all online forums and notify all the stakeholders, including team sponsors and board members, of the legal and financial consequences. The team’s marketing specialist should stay in regular contact with the team’s sponsors, if any, and smooth out issues regarding financial support to the team. A press Conference should be arranged and media outlets should be called by the university. The designated spokespersons should be available for comment at the press Conference. The Dean of Students should follow-up with the student athlete to discuss further disciplinary actions. The Athletics Program and head coach should decide whether or not the student athlete should be

barred from team practices until the disciplinary actions are resolved or until the 10game suspension is over. g. The university’s legal counsel and auditor’s office should be notified of any possible legal or financial actions taken by the Conference management or the game official, including fines imposed or lawsuits filed. h. Finally, all social media should be updated regularly, and students should be asked to maintain order and remain calm after the incident. i. Any student or groups of students trying to disturb the peace in the university should be asked to stop in the better interest of the university community.

TIPA was established in 1909 by students representing nine Texas colleges/universities meeting on the campus of Baylor University in Waco.

HALL OF FAME inductee Kathleen McElroy accepted her selection to the TIPA Hall of Fame and addressed the audience during the induction luncheon. McElroy is a graduate of Texas A&M University-College Station and former staff member of the campus newspaper The Battalion. She worked professionally for more than 20 as an editor at The New York Times. She also worked at The National and Newsday in New York, The Austin American-Stateman, Huntsville Item and Bryan-College Station Eagle in Texasa. She is a Harrington Doctoral Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin in the School of Journalism. (photo by Jason Nam, Texas A&M University-Commerce)

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Television News Writing

STUDENTS WHO ARRIVE ON SCENE ARE BEING DIRECTED AWAY FROM THE CAMPUS, AND WE DO HAVE EVACUATION AREAS INSIDE THE BUILDINGS.”

by Brooke Long (Midwestern State University)

SOT: SCHOEPPEY CG 2-LINE: LANCE D. SCHOEPPEY BATTALLION CHEIF, FWFD SOT:SCHOEPPEY SOT: WILSON CG 2-LINE: KEITH WILSON POLICE OFFICER AN EXPLOSION SHOOK THE NORTHWEST CAMPUS OF TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE AT 7:30 A.M. WHEN TWO TRAIN CARS CARRYING 52,000 GALLONS OF LIQUID PETROLEUM DERAILED AS THE RESULT OF A CAR CRASH.THE DRIVER OF THE CAR WAS PRONOUNCED DEAD ON THE SCENE.

SOT: CLARK CG 2-LINE: TRACY CLARK UNITED PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

STUDENTS FROM BOTH CAMPUSES WILL RESUME CLASSES TOMORROW MORNING AT THEIR SCHEDULED TIMES. THE NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD WILL INVESTIGATE THE DETAILS OF THE CRASH, AND UNION PACIFIC IS QUESTIONING THE TRAIN'S ENGINEER. TRACY CLARK OF UNITED PROFESSIONAL SERVICES SAYS THAT THE SPILL WILL NOT HAVE A LASTING ENVIROMENTAL EFFECT. “ONE OF THE PROPERTIES ABOUT LIQUIFIED PETROLEUM, ESPECIALLY IN FIRE CONDITIONS IS THAT FIRE CONSUMES ALL OF THE PRODUCT. IT WILL YEILD NO ADVERSE EFFECTS”

“WE HAVE ONE FATALITY IN THE VEHICLE THAT IS UNIDENTIFIED AT THIS TIME. IT APPEARS FROM A DISTANCE TO BE A MIDDLE AGED FEMALE. NO ONE ELSE WAS INJURED.” THREE TEAMS OF FIRE FIGHTERS SHOWED UP ON THE SCENE MINUTES AFTER THE EXPLOSION TO BATTLE AND CONTAIN THE BLAZE. OFFICIALS SAY THAT DOUSING THE FLAMES WAS NOT THEIR ONLY CONCERN. “THERE IS ALSO ANOTHER L.P.G. CAR NEXT TO THE ONE THAT IS BURNING, AND WE ARE COOLING IT TO AVOID A BLEVE. A BLEVE IS A BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION.”

NEEDED REST -- Students grab a quick rest whenever they can during the convention. Students are busy during the 3-day event with contests, workshops and other activities. (photo by Jason Nam, Texas A&M University-Commerce)

SCHOEPPEY (SHEPPY) SAYS THAT IT TOOK THE FIRE TEAMS LESS THEN FIVE MINUTES TO EXTINGUISH THE FIRE. OFFICIALS SAY THEY TOOK PRECAUTIONS TO ENSURE THE SAFETY OF THE STUDENTS AT TARRANT COUNTY COLLEGE NORTHWEST CAMPUS AND AT NEIGHBORING CHISOLM TRAIL HIGH SCHOOL. “THE CAMPUS AND THE HIGH SCHOOL HAVE BEEN PUT ON LOCKDOWN. ANY OTHER

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Print News Writing by Caitlin Clark (Texas State University)

An unidentified female victim died Thursday when her vehicle struck the side of a train near Tarrant County College and derailed two cars, leaving one ablaze after the gas it was transporting ignited.

James Craft, assistant coordinator for the college’s Fire Services Training Center, said the window in his office shattered at approximately 7:35 a.m. when the vehicle collided with the train. The accident derailed two tank cars of the Union Pacific Train, which were transporting liquid petroleum gas. One tank car caught fire due to leaking gas, and the other was cooled by firefighters to avoid an explosion. Craft said he was the first and only witness at the scene, and saw a “huge fireball and thick black smoke rising into the air.”

Lance Schoeppey, Fort Worth Fire Department battalion chief, said firefighters responded to the scene within four minutes. It

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took an additional four minutes to bring the fire under control, he said.

Keith Wilson, Tarrant County College police officer, said the cause of the crash has not been determined.

Frank Becerra, manager of hazardous materials for Union Pacific Railroad, said cameras on board the train will be have to be reviewed to determine if the driver was at fault for the collision. “As far as I could see the crossing arms were down and the train was stopped, so we can figure that possibly the driver may have had some kind of other issue,” Becerra said. The driver’s side of the victim’s dark blue 1986 Buick LaSabre was wedged under the side of one of the tank cars. Wilson said police will judge how fast the driver was traveling by assessing skid marks on the road once the tank cars and vehicle are moved.

News Photo

by Andrew Wilson (Del Mar College)

Schoeppey said the victim is believed to be a thin, white female in her 40s. No other fatalities or injuries resulted from the incident. The victim’s body has not been extracted from the vehicle, which “will take some work,” Schoeppey said.

Wilson said the victim’s name will not be identified until next of kin are notified.

Craft said he notified the campus police department of the accident and emergency procedures were enacted. Students, faculty and staff on campus during the event were evacuated to glass-free areas in the case of an explosion. Wilson said people arriving to the campus and nearby Chisholm Trail High School were directed away from the scene. Craft said students were released from the schools once the fire was under control, and classes will resume tomorrow.

NEWS PHOTO - Tarrant County Firefighters work to put out a fire of the LP6 tanker that derailed on the campus of Tarrant County College. The accident was caused by a car that crashed into the tanker earlier this morning. One fatality was reported.

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Radio News Writing by Cooper Welch (Texas A&M University-Commerce)

:45 Lead: A derailing of a Union Pacific train leads to one death early Thursday morning in Northwest Tarrant County. Body: At approximately 7:35 Thursday morning an explosion rocked the Fire Services Training Center of Tarrant County College as a car crashed into an oncoming train, rupturing two petroleum tankers and igniting one.

The driver of the car, whose identity has not yet been released, died on impact, but no other injuries have yet been reported. Students on campus were placed in lockdown, and anyone arriving on the scene was directed away from the area.

The Fort Worth Fire Department responded to the scene at 7:40 a.m., and extinguished the burning petroleum within 3 to 4 minutes. An investigation by the Tarrant County College Police Department is underway, according to TCC Police Officer Keith Wilson. [CLIP] :11 “It is not known why the driver crashed into the train, as this is an ongoing investigation.”

No long-term environmental affects are expected, and clean up should take 3 to 4 days. TCC and Chisolm High School will resume their normal schedules on Friday. For TIPA News, I’m Contestant 382.

On-Site Contest Winners TV Announcing

Spanish News Writing by Viridiana Zuniga (University of Texas at Brownsville)

Forth Worth, Texas – Un muerto es el saldo que dejó hoy un accidente ferroviario en el que un automóvil se estrelló contra un tren, causando un incendio que detuvo las actividades escolares de la zona. Se presume que la víctima fatal de la colisión es una mujer blanca de mediana edad, quien fuera la conductora del vehículo, pero sus generales no han sido identificados. Su cuerpo aún permanece dentro del automóvil. Al accidente, que se registró en la interjección de la calle 5a. e Industrial a las 7:30 de la mañana, llegó el cuerpo de bomberos de la ciudad quienes tardaron cuatro horas en apagar el fuego. El oficial del Departamento de Policía de la Universidad del Condado de Tarrant, Kieth Wilson, dijo en una conferencia de prensa que tanto la causa del accidente, así como los datos del conductor del tren son desconocidos. “No sabemos si las barras de aviso de las vías fallaron, ni tampoco la velocidad a la que iba el automóvil, pero revisaremos las cámaras de seguridad para saber qué causo el impacto”, dijo Frank Barrera, gerente de materiales peligrosos de Ferrovías Unión del Pacífico. Los agentes de Servicios Profesionales Unidos se hicieron cargo de la situación acordonando la zona. Los estudiantes, profesores y trabajadores de la Universidad del Condando de Tarrant y de la preparatoria Chisholm Trail se mantuvieron dentro de los edificios hasta que el fuego fue extinguido. “ No es nada común ver un accidente de esta clase en esta interjección”, dijo Michael Herndon, oficial de policía de Forth Worth. El tren pertenece a la Compañía de Petróleo Móvil y tiene una capacidad de carga de hasta 33,000 galones. Los portavoces de la empresa no han hecho comentarios sobre el incidente. Se estima que el costo de los daños va de $40,000 a $50,000, de acuerdo a Barrera. Se esperan más detalles de lo sucedido en las próximas horas.

On-Site Contest Winners Spanish TV Announcing

Malcolm Hornsby (Texas A&M University-Commerce)

Lily Lamas (TCU)

Radio Announcing

Spanish Radio Announcing

Lane Lewis

Danny Lopez (Austin Community College)


Magazine Design by Cathryn Ploehn (University of Texas at Dallas)


Radio Sports Writing by Trent Scott (Sam Houston State University)

(:08) Ashley Seibel and Kali Jester both sent homeruns soaring over the leftfield fence for Texas Wes leyan in its 6-0 softball victory over Southwest Assemblies of God University on Friday night. (:14) TWU pitcher Cheyenne Brown got more than enough help from her offense as she dominated, throwing a complete game, three hit shutout.

Print Advertising by Hannah Wilson (Texas State University)

(:22, SB) (:32) (:38)

“I just felt like really on tonight. I hit my spots with pretty good movement. And so, I mean, I was just pretty confident in myself. I felt pretty good out there.” SAGU pitcher Shannen Nance took the loss, allowing six earned runs in 7 innings of work. Nance’s performance was in line with her season-long struggles, as her ERA is now a troubling 17.44.

Texas Wesleyan improved to 15-17 with the win, while the loss dropped SAGU to 11-14.

(:44) These two teams will meet again in the final game of this series on Monday night, where Texas Wesleyan will be looking to finish the three game sweep. ##### TRT: 0:44

CONVENTION DISCUSSIONS and meeting students from around the state were part of the activities for convention attendees. Students competed in contests and attended workshops during the 3-day convention. (photo by Jason Nam, Texas A&M University-Commerce)


TV Sports Writing

Cue Sports Studio (8 seconds)

by Bryce Leasure (Sam Houston State University)

Run Sports Stinger Cue Sports Studio (8 second)

VO Take package Clips of game and Seibel three-run homer (8 seconds)

SOT Ashley Seibel Wesleyan 2B (7 seconds) VO Shots of the two scoring plays: the tworun homer and the RBI single (8 seconds)

SOT Shannon Gower Wesleyan Head Coach (6 seconds) VO (Video shots of Lions struggling at the plate and different Rams players hitting off Nance) (9 seconds)

BASKETBALL ISN’T THE ONLY SPORT CATCHING ATTENTION OUT IN FORT WORTH THIS WEEKEND. THE TEXAS WESLEYAN RAMS SQUARED OFF AGAINST THE SOUTHWESTERN ASSEMBLIES OF GOD LIONS ON FRIDAY. FRIDAY EVENING PLAYED HOST TO A DOUBLE-HEADER BETWEEN THE RAMS AND LIONS. THE RAMS TOOK GAME ONE 7-5 AND DIDN’T LOOK BACK. IN THE THIRD INNING OF GAME TWO ASHLEY SEIBEL BELTED A THREE-RUN HOMER FOR THE FIRST RUNS OF THE GAME.

AFTER TONIGHT THE RAMS MOVE TO8-6 IN CONFERENCE PLAY WHILE THE LIONS FALL TO 5-11. THESE TWO TEAMS WILL MEET AGAIN ON MONDAY AS WESLEYAN TRIES TO COMPLETE THE SERIES SWEEP AND SAGU FIGHTS FOR A PLAYOFF SPOT. #####

END ` TRT: 60 seconds

Sports Action Photo by Matt Hellman (Baylor University)

“Yes it was my first college homerun. It was awesome. I was running around the bases not really knowing about it. I mean if yall would’ve seen my facial expressions, I was being an idiot.” WESLEYAN SEALED THE DEAL WITH THREE MORE RUNS IN THE SIXTH OFF A TWO-RUN HOMER AND RBI SINGLE. AS THE RAMS ARE FIGHTING FOR A PLAYOFF SPOT THESE TWO WINS COULDN’T HAVE COME AT A BETTER TIME. “It is very important. Because every series we win puts us up and we’re trying to get up top too so we can get seeded in the tournament and get a bye.”

THE LIONS JUST COULDN’T GET ANYTHING GOING OFFENSIVELY ONLY RECORDING THREE HITS ON THE EVENING. SHANNEN NANCE STRUGGLED ON THE MOUND FOR THE LIONS ALLOWING SIX RUNS ON TEN HITS.

SPORTS ACTION PHOTO -- Sophomore catcher Heather Wyatt of Southwestern Assemblies of God University passes first base safely seconds before Texas Wesleyan’s junior first baseman ashley Seibel catched the ball. The SAGU Lions were upset by the TWC Rams 6-0 at Sycamore Park in Fort Worth.


Yearbook Design by Derek Byrne (Baylor University)


Print Sports Writing by Cameron Irvine (Texas State University)

Two home runs propelled Texas Wesleyan softball to an 8-6 Red River Athletic Conference record and a 6-0 victory over Southwestern Assemblies of God University Friday night at Sycamore Park. The shutout was the fourth in the last two years against SAGU (11-14, 5-11), who began softball last season. The Lady Lions (15-17, 8-6) were run-ruled in all three meetings with Wesleyan in 2012. Utility junior Kali Jester and junior second baseman Ashley Seibel, notched the two homers for Wesleyan. Seibel’s home run was the first of her collegiate career. “I knew I hit it solid but I didn’t know it went over,” Seibel said. “I was rounding, hit second, hit third and (asked) if I could keep the ball. I was really excited.” With no score entering the bottom of the third, Wesleyan got the bats going on four straight hits, capped off by Seibel’s shot to center field. Overall, the Lady Rams got 10 total hits out of seven batters and eight total batters reached base in the game. “My assistant and I are offensive coaches,” said Coach Shannon Gower. “Whenever we actually do perform offensively, we hold that very highly and that’s how I feel we win our ball games - by getting on base.” Wesleyan Senior pitcher Cheyenne Brown picked up her sixth win of the season. Up 3-0 in the bottom of the sixth, Brown was hit by a foul ball during an at bat, but recovered with a single in the inning. Jester’s home run came on the next at bat. “I feel pretty motivated by myself, getting hit didn’t hurt anything,” Brown said. “I think that our team had such a good energy and we got up on them.” Brown struck out four batters, allowing three hits. Junior pitcher Alexis Beltran went 2-3 in game two and went yard for her sixth home run of the season in game one. The Lady Rams took the first game of the doubleheader 7-5. Freshman third baseman Kelsey Coburn, sophomore first baseman Kasey Poovey and senior catcher Heather Wyatt all recorded hits for the Lady Lions in the loss. With the win, Texas Wesleyan moves into the fourth slot in the RRAC with 10 games remaining. The Lady Rams will face SAGU for the third game of the series Monday at 5:00 p.m. “Every series we win puts us up and we are trying to get (a top two spot) so we can get seeded in the tournament and get a bye,” Gower said. “Every win is very important. It helps with our confidence and gets the momentum going for the next game.”

Texas Intercollegiate Press Association c/o Texas A&M University - Commerce Box 4104 Commerce, TX 75429 Ph: 903-886-5231 Fax: 903-468-3128 Email: Fred.Stewart@tamuc.edu Web: www.TexasIPA.org

CONVENTION SESSION -- More than 30 workshop sessions were offered to students at the 2013 convention including one by Beth Francesco-Currie of the University of Texas at Arlington. The session presented tips and ideas concerning internships. (photo by Jason Nam, Texas A&M University-Commerce)

HALL OF FAME inductee Kathleen McElroy took time to visit with students Elva Ramirez, Bertha Bernal and Laura Hernandez of University of Texas-Pan American following the induction luncheon. (photo by Jason Nam, Texas A&M University-Commerce)


Type-Hi 2013