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Raising up emerging church planters through new regional centers pg.8

Choosing the right social media platform for your church pg.20

How to turn everyday talks into Gospel conversations pg.22

En EspaĂąol: CĂłmo convertir conversaciones diarias en conversaciones del Evangelio pg.24


TEXAS BAPTISTS EVENT CALENDAR Sun

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Hispanic Pastors and Wives Retreat, Fort Worth Pastor Financial Retreat, Dallas

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Church Safety Workshop, El Paso

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Executive Board Meeting, Dallas BOUNCE Collegiate Mission, Houston

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BOUNCE Summer Mission 2, Houston Camp Fusion, Aquilla Super Summer Session 3, Belton Super Summer Session 4, Dallas

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BOUNCE Summer Mission 3, Houston Super Summer Session 5, Brownwood

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SAVE THE DATE FOR FAMILY GATHERING, ARLINGTON, TEXAS JULY 29-31


TEX AS BAPTISTS LIFE / VOLUME 6 • ISSUE 2

CONTENTS F E AT U R E S

8 RAISING UP EMERGING CHURCH PLANTERS THROUGH NEW REGIONAL CENTERS As culture is changing, Texas Baptists Church Starting has developed a new way of pushing back the lostness of Texas.

12 THE POWER OF VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL Hear stories from church leaders on memorable moments from VBS.

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13 SOLDIER TURNED HBU STUDENT AIMS TO HELP FELLOW VETERANS

CHOOSING THE RIGHT SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORM FOR YOUR CHURCH

US Army Veteran Jonathan Bohannon is pursuing education at Houston Baptist University to provide hope to fellow veterans walking through struggles.

From Facebook to Snapchat, the potential reach for your church is immeasurable. Discover which social media platform best fits your needs and reaches your target audience.

I N E V E RY I S S U E

EVENT CALENDAR

LETTER FROM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

IMPACT NEWS

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Events to inform and inspire your church in 2018.

A letter from Executive Director David Hardage highlighting Texas Baptists evangelism.

Highlights from Texas Baptists ministries, churches and partners.

Get a closer look at the history and ministries of Texas Baptists and how you and your church can be a part.

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WHO WE ARE AND WHAT WE DO

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CONTENTS SPOTLIGHT

T H E G R E AT E S T P O S S I B L E

evangelism

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THE GREATEST POSSIBLE EVANGELISM The past, present and future of Texas Baptists evangelism.

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THE CENTRALITY OF GOSPEL-SHARING

A BIBLICAL CALL TO EVANGELISM

From protracted meetings to apologetics, the history of Texas Baptists involves innovative evangelism strategies.

Leighton Flowers shares biblical commands all believers should follow to share the hope of Christ with the world.

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22 HOW TO TURN EVERYDAY TALKS INTO GOSPEL CONVERSATIONS Learn about one specific evangelism strategy Pastor Victor Rodriguez uses in his church to turn everyday encounters into Gospel conversations.

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YOUR GUIDE TO REACHING YOUR COMMUNITY

SHARING YOUR FAITH IN DIFFERENT SETTINGS

Tips offered by Mike Satterfield to empower your church when evangelizing in your circles of influence.

Consider these key evangelism factors as you live out the call to share the Gospel with all people in different contexts.

P U B L I C AT I O N T E A M Joshua Seth Minatrea, Director of Communications Kalie Lowrie, News Director Jeremy Honea, Art Director Kirsten McKimmey, News Writer Jordan Parker, Multimedia Specialist Kristen Clardy, Graphic Designer Brittany Thomas, Communications Assistant

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You are receiving a free copy of Texas Baptists Life because of your generous support of the Cooperative Program. To subscribe or update your subscription preferences, call 214.828.5232 or email subscriptions@texasbaptists.org.


Hello, Texas Baptists!

¡Hola, Bautistas de Texas!

During my six years as Executive Director I have learned much. At the top of the list, I’ve learned that evangelism is still the heartbeat of our Texas Baptists family.

Durante mis seis años como Director Ejecutivo he aprendido mucho. Primero en mi lista, he aprendido que el evangelismo todavía es el palpitar de la familia de los Bautista de Texas.

I’ve been in many churches across our great state. Some are large, and some are not. Some have one worship style or preference, and some have another. Some speak the same language I do, and some speak another. The uniqueness of Texas Baptists churches is significant. However, there is one common thread that runs throughout all of these congregations — they all love seeing men, women, boys and girls come to faith in Jesus Christ.

He estado en muchas iglesias por todo este gran estado. Algunas son grandes, y otras no. Algunas tienen un estilo o preferencia para la adoración, y otras tienen otro. Algunas hablan el mismo idioma que yo, y otras hablan otro. La particularidad de las iglesias de los Bautistas de Texas es significativa. Sin embargo, todas estas congregaciones comparten un denominador común—todas aman ver a hombres, mujeres, niños, y niñas profesar fe en Jesucristo.

This issue of our Texas Baptists Life magazine focuses on Evangelism. I’m grateful for the leadership that Delvin Atchison brings as Director of our Great Commission Team. If you have not had Delvin preach in your church or association, I strongly recommend you do. He has assembled a wonderful team of leaders who can assist you and your church in the entire work of disciple-making.

Este ejemplar de esta revista enfoca en el evangelismo. Estoy agradecido por el liderazgo que Delvin Atchison aporta como Director de nuestro Equipo de Gran Comisión. Si no ha tenido a Delvin predicando en su iglesia o asociación, le recomiendo que lo haga. Él ha organizado un maravilloso equipo de líderes que pueden asistirle—a usted y su iglesia—en todo el trabajo de hacer discípulos.

As our Texas population continues to grow and diversify, the challenges are great. Yet each challenge is an opportunity to make a positive Kingdom difference.

El continuo crecimiento y diversificación de la población en Texas presenta grandes desafíos. No obstante, cada desafío es una oportunidad para hacer una diferencia positiva para el Reino.

Please pray, work and, as always, we’ll be careful to give God the glory for all He will do. Thank you for your support. Texas Baptists, you are a blessing!

Por favor, ore, trabaje y, como siempre, glorifique a Dios por todo lo que Él hará. Gracias por su respaldo. ¡Bautistas de Texas, ustedes son una bendición!

BLESSINGS AND BENDICIONES,

D AV I D H A R D A G E E XECU TIVE DIRECTOR DIRECTOR E JECU TIVO

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IMPACT NEWS MEET THE TEAM Several individuals have accepted new ministry positions in the last few months. Take a moment to read about how these team members can connect with you and your church to provide resources, training and more.

LEIGHTON FLOWERS

TOM HOWE

BOB BILLUPS

E VA N G E L I S M L E A D

D I R E C TO R O F U R B A N M I S S I O N S

B A P T I S T WAY P R E S S P U B L I S H E R

Leighton Flowers will lead the Evangelism Team in equipping and training church leaders in innovative ways to share and defend the Gospel.

Tom Howe will utilize his years of pastoral ministry to focus on connecting churches with their communities through missional training, consulting, coaching and commissioning.

Bob Billups will use his relational and entrepreneurial skills to facilitate partnerships with Texas Baptists churches and oversee curriculum development through BaptistWay Press to meet the needs of Texas Baptists churches.

DANIEL D eLEON

STEVE MASSE Y

A R E A 3 R E P R E S E N TAT I V E - R I O G R A N D E VA L L E Y

VICE PRESIDENT OF TEXAS B A P T I S T M I S S I O N S F O U N DAT I O N

Daniel DeLeon will connect pastors and leaders to resources and opportunities that will help them advance the Kingdom of God from Del Rio to Brownsville.

Steve Massey will use his experience in both the for-profit and nonprofit industries to provide giving opportunities for individuals who seek to make an impact for God’s Kingdom in Texas and beyond.

TEXAS BAP TISTS RECEIVES NAMB EVANGELISM AWARD This past November, Texas Baptists was recognized by the North American Mission Board with an award for the “Highest Number of Baptisms” for the 2016 calendar year. Texas Baptists churches had a recorded 28,765 baptisms, making this the second year in a row for Texas Baptists to receive this national award. “At the heart of each baptism is a call to the Great Commission and the work of the Lord, and this award is a reflection of the commitment of Texas Baptists churches to evangelism,” said Delvin Atchison, director of the Great Commission Team.

Read more news about Texas Baptists missions, ministries and partners at texasbaptists.org/news 6

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


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RAISING UP EMERGING CHURCH PLANTERS THROUGH NEW REGIONAL CENTERS B Y: K I R S T E N M C K I M M E Y, N E W S W R I T E R

T

he goal of Texas Baptists Church Starting is to push back the lostness of Texas, according to Paul Atkinson, director of Church Starting.

In an effort to better equip, mentor and train the next generation of church planters, Texas Baptists has started a new initiative named Church Planting Centers, or CPCs. The CPC provides a 42-week intensive training program for potential church planting leaders. Hosted by a local church or association, CPCs are comprised of a residency coordinator and five residents. Through the program, these future church planters are prepared to start missional

congregations through assessing, equipping, coaching, mentoring and resourcing. The goal is for the residents to be able to plant churches with preparedness, intentionality and competence.

TRAINING AND PR AC TICU M ADDRESS ESSENTIAL S T R AT E G I E S F O R PLANTING “The best way to plant churches is together, through relationships,” said Atkinson. “And the best way to build those relationships is through the CPCs which are taking people who normally don’t run together and bringing them together.”

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The five residents, all from different Texas Baptists churches, spend three hours a week in the classroom and seven hours a week in practicum. Lessons, taught by various instructors and experts, include the subjects of strategy development, evangelism and discipleship, church administration, leader development, worship experience, preaching, pastoral care and church launch. For the practicum, residents work closely with an existing church planter – someone who is planting a church similar to one that the residents themselves desire to plant. These church planters serve as mentors for the residents, giving them valuable firsthand experience in church planting. “With the four other residents and the church planter you’re with each week, you’ll come together to problem solve so that when you launch your church, you’re more prepared. You know what the questions and challenges are,” said Atkinson.

REGIONAL CENTERS CONNECT PLANTERS W I T H PA R T N E R S The first CPC started at Tallowood Baptist Church in Houston. The five residents graduated in January of 2017 and have all gone on to plant churches. “When I started the Houston CPC residency in January 2016, I believed God was calling me to church planting, but I was unsure of the next steps to take or how the process would work,” said Ryan Thompson, lead pastor of Cornerstone Church in Nederland. “The Lord was gracious to use the CPC at a pivotal time in my readiness and preparation to start a new church. I gained a practical understanding of the nuts and bolts of church planting, and I was better equipped to develop and lead a church plant core team. Much of the tools and training I received from the CPC was used by the Lord to bring to fruition the vision for Cornerstone Church when we successfully launched in April 2017.”

Currently, there are CPCs in Haltom City; San Antonio; El Paso, in partnership with El Paso Baptist Association; and Belton, in partnership with Bell Baptist Association. Plans are under way to launch another CPC in Tarrant County, in partnership with Tarrant Baptist Association. “The Church Planting Center is preparing the church planters to be as effective as they can possibly be when the time comes for them to get started,” said Tom Howe, resident director of the Haltom City campus. He continued, “We have a fantastic group of planters, and their church plants are all going to be unique and completely different. One resident is going to plant churches in Africa, one is reaching inner city Fort Worth, one is starting an African American church, one is from Brazil and is reaching a Portuguese church and another is from Brazil and is starting a Spanish-speaking church.” The Haltom City CPC residents will complete their training in May and the pastors will officially become church planters. “By the time you’re finished, you’re fully prepared,” said Atkinson. “We can plant you the next week. You have everything that you need and you’re not missing components. You have a sponsor, you’ve figured out where your church will be planted, and it’s in this time you’ve not only learned how to lead but have formed your core group.” He continued, “The fact that the participants invested the 42 weeks meant that they started out twice as strong, and they’ve stayed twice as strong – and that’s the hope for all of our churches.” FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CHURCH PLANTING CENTERS, CONTACT PAUL ATKINSON AT PAUL.ATKINSON@TEXASBAPTISTS.ORG OR 214.828-5217.

DANILO VIEIRA, (PICTURED ON PAGE 8) IS FLUENT IN PORTUGUESE, ENGLISH AND SPANISH. HE MOVED TO THE UNITED STATES FROM BRAZIL IN 2015 TO PURSUE A DEGREE AT SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. SOON AFTER, HE WAS INVITED TO JOIN HALTOM CITY’S CHURCH PLANTING CENTER, WHERE HE HAS USED THE LEARNED SKILLS TO MINISTER TO THE PEOPLE OF THE PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA HALTOM CITY CHURCH PLANT.

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SOLDIER TURNED HBU STUDENT AIMS TO HELP FELLOW VETERANS B Y: E L I Z A B E T H YO R K M E D I A W R I T E R A N D D I G I TA L E D I T O R AT H O U S T O N B A P T I S T U N I V E R S I T Y

US Army veteran Jonathan Bohannon doesn’t hesitate when asked if he believes that healing from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is possible. “Yes, definitely – 100 percent,” he says. Bohannon is a student in Houston Baptist University’s online program, earning a Master of Arts in Psychology. He knows firsthand the kind of challenges that military members and veterans face. Bohannon joined the Army in 2006 and trained to be a combat medic. He was stationed overseas and completed tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. For his service, he received a Combat Medical Badge. Bohannon attended veterans support groups and, with God’s prompting, quit drinking. He switched his major to psychology, deciding to focus on helping people heal from the inside out. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston. When he learned about HBU’s master’s program with a Christian emphasis, Bohannon was thrilled. His experience is one he has in common with many others: “When you go over there, something wakes up,” he said. “There’s that old saying, ‘There is no such thing as an atheist in a foxhole.’ Then, when you come back, you ask yourself, ‘Why me? Why did I get to come home when some of my buddies didn’t?’ There is a void spiritually. It doesn’t matter how many medications they throw at you, or how many psychological sessions you have.”

A faith-foundational approach, including a relationship with Jesus Christ, is what servicemen and women really need, Bohannon said. That’s why he likes HBU’s program. “The secular counseling system can sometimes feel chaotic and confusing,” he said. “HBU has their ear to the ground, and they are being trailblazers. There’s so much potential for veteran care in the Christian context. That’s why I chose HBU Online to navigate those waters.” There are a number of factors to consider when working with military professionals. One of the first things servicepeople must come to terms with upon returning to civilian life is adjusting to a different environment, Bohannon said. “When you’re in the military, you have a mission, you look out for each other, and everyone knows you’re a soldier,” he said. “You come back, you have to find your way and you don’t have anyone looking out for you.”

“I advise getting them involved in church or volunteer service,” Bohannon said. “It’s what they want — to serve — that’s why they joined the military. They don’t want to be coddled. They want to be challenged and they want to meet people who aren’t just in bars. They want to see what’s on the other side of the tunnel.” There are many challenges to overcome in military and veteran care, particularly the suicide rate and unhealthy coping mechanisms like substance abuse. Yet Bohannon is optimistic. “We need to get to some of these people before it’s too late,” he said. “We need a holistic approach. There’s a lot of work to be done, and that’s why I want to be part of their care. They need to know that life gets better.” LEARN MORE ABOUT HBU ONLINE BY VISITING HBU.EDU/COEBS.

However, trials have a silver lining. Bohannon refers to the work of Dr. George Bonanno, professor at Columbia University, who asserts that trauma can widen one’s capacity to handle hardship. Difficulties can develop resilience and emotional flexibility. Similarly, Bohannon wants to see good coming after veterans’ challenging and painful experiences. He asserts that veterans want to be understood, but they also want to have a mission.

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THE POWER OF VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL WE ASKED YOU TO SHARE STORIES OF YOUR MOST MEMORABLE MOMENTS FROM VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL THROUGH THE YEARS. HERE ARE SOME OF OUR FAVORITE RESPONSES:

VBS is a powerful ministry to our young people. Seeds are planted for a solid foundation in Christ. In this, there is power to change the culture of our families, cities, and state.

Abby Manes, Children’s Minister at FBC Muleshoe

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I believe that a holistic approach to ministering to children and their families is needed, and VBS provides an open door for those in our community who may not come to church any other time.

Jennifer Howington, Minister of Preschool/ Children at Field Street Baptist Church in Cleburne

We are building a foundation on Jesus with our preschoolers and we are planting seeds for God to water and nurture for the next generation, all through preschoolers and VBS.

Pam Click, Preschool Minister at Pioneer Drive Baptist Church in Abilene

Seeing children give their hearts and lives to Jesus is what makes it all worthwhile.

Barbara Hessong, Minister to Children at Second Baptist Church in Corpus Christi


Vacation Bible School makes an impression that is hard to measure. But one way we know we make a difference in the lives of kids is when they still remember things years later. I served as associate pastor for First Baptist Church of Levelland. During the group time each day with the preschool kids at VBS, we told Bible stories – and where appropriate, we acted out those stories. On one of those days, we told the story of Jesus’ birth. Our pastor decided he would tell the story and select children to play the roles of Joseph and Mary but he needed a strong, able donkey. Being the associate pastor, I suppose I was the obvious choice, and being the good, submissive staff person, I reluctantly agreed. I walked around the room on all fours while the story was told of how Jesus was born in a stable and laid to rest in a feed trough. I didn’t really know exactly how big of an impression that simple story had until the next school year when I arrived to pick up my first grade child and I had two or three kindergarteners run up to me yelling, “It’s the donkey, it’s the donkey!” I was known as the donkey at that school for the next 3 years! Never underestimate the power of the Gospel to make an impression. VBS makes an eternal difference in the lives of kids and we get to have a small part in the process. What a blessing!!

Dr. Brian Hill, Senior Pastor, FBC Corpus Christi

I was raised in church. I don't remember when I heard about God for the first time, but I'm assuming it was while I was in the nursery. Growing up in church, I had learned about the Bible, Jesus, and God’s love for people. I also knew that I, like all other people, was a sinner and because of my sin, I was separated from God. While at VBS at the age of seven, I accepted Christ as my savior. It wasn’t my first time at VBS, but it was this year in particular that everything I had been taught came together and made sense. All of the pieces I learned while at church seemed to fall into place, and I began to understand the bigger picture. I didn't fully grasp the implications that faith would have on my life, but I did know that I needed God as my savior. Once I got into the youth group, I began to see that God was calling me into children’s ministry. Overall, I have participated in 18 weeks of VBS, six of them as a child attending, eleven of them as a leader volunteering, and even one of them as a leader for a VBS in Jibou, Romania. Currently, I am finishing my master’s degree at East Texas Baptist University, and then I will be beginning my life as a full-time children’s minister. I am excited to continue the tradition of VBS in my ministry, as I know how valuable an experience it is for everyone involved.

Caitlin Alverson, Student at East Texas Baptist University and future Children’s Minister

Several years ago, one of the high school students in our town lost her life in a terrible automobile accident. Neither the student nor her family attended church. We were surprised when her mother called us to see if we would be willing to have her memorial service at our church. Our pastor immediately agreed and began ministering to the grieving parents and family. Upon asking in conversation why the mother had called our church, she told our pastor that her daughter had come to our VBS many times when she was a child and always loved being here – VBS was the only connection that this family had to a church. I am so thankful that their precious daughter had been well-loved while she was here. We were able to walk through this terrible tragedy with this family. This is a reminder that we never know the impact of our ministries and programs.

Bronwyn Stanley, Minister to Children at First Baptist Church in College Station

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL, CONTACT DIANE LANE, CHILDHOOD DISCIPLESHIP SPECIALIST, AT DIANE.LANE@TEXASBAPTISTS.ORG OR 214.828.5287.

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SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS EVANGELISM: FULFILLING THE CALL TO GO AND TELL

Texas Baptists Evangelism: Fulfilling the call to go and tell

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SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS EVANGELISM

T H E G R E AT E S T P O S S I B L E

evangelism

Back in 1848, at the first Baptist state convention in Texas, a handful of words were used to describe the primary purpose of the group gathered. Later on, in 1886, those same words were incorporated into the Baptist General Convention of Texas constitution at its formation. Today, Texas Baptists continue their cooperative efforts to live out the Great Commandment and the Great Commission with a commitment to those same words:

“The object of this Convention shall be to awaken and stimulate among the churches the greatest possible activity in evangelism, missions, Christian education and benevolent work and enterprises; to cultivate a closer cooperation among the churches and promote harmony of feeling and concert of action in advancing all the interests of the Redeemer’s Kingdom.” (Article II - Object, Constitution of the Baptist General Convention of Texas)

THE CENTRALITY OF GOSPEL SHARING BY : J O S H UA S E T H M I N AT R E A , D I R E C T O R O F C O M M U N I C AT I O N S AL AN LEFE VER, DIRECTOR OF HISTORICAL COLLECTION

Texas Baptists always have been, and always will be, evangelistic to our core. Through a variety of influential leaders, ambitious strategies and innovative tactics, Texas Baptist evangelistic efforts have resulted in countless salvations, and with the most recent appointment of evangelism lead (see pg. 18), there is no end in sight.

Print resources have been instrumental in helping eager Christians to share the story of Jesus. Some of the earliest tracts used by Texas Baptists to share the Gospel were produced by the American Tract Society, which printed evangelistic tracts from 1824-2013.

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G R O W T H O F E VA N G E L I S T I C G AT H E R I N G S When the Second Great Awakening occurred in the early 1800s, worshippers from Baptist churches began to gather and participate in camp meetings. Over time, these meetings transitioned into churches, and became known as “protracted meetings” that took place between the time the harvest was gathered and the next season’s planting began. These meetings could last months, and took considerable planning as churches prepared their congregations and canvassed their communities. By the 1870s, protracted meetings had become common in the south, and they continued into the 20th century. Around the time of the Depression, two-week revivals took the place of protracted meetings, and since that time, the span of evangelistic revivals has continued to shrink due to a number of church and social factors.

D E V E L O P M E N T O F S TAT E E VA N G E L I S M D E PA R T M E N T In 1924, with receipts falling short amidst the Great Depression, the Convention was forced to cut personnel, but set aside money to appoint two “general evangelists.” A year later, the first Department of Evangelism was established under the leadership of W.Y. Pond of First Baptist Church of Hillsboro. Pond sent out evangelists who traveled the state holding revivals, leading evangelistic rallies, and conducting evangelism workshops in churches and associations. In 1945, Baptists in Texas renewed their commitment to evangelism as the primary task of the Convention, and revamped its approach to coordinating evangelistic efforts. A State Committee on Evangelism appointed Charles Everett Matthews, longtime pastor of Travis Avenue Baptist Church in Ft. Worth, as director of the department, and announced plans for evangelistic rallies, simultaneous revivals and a renewed emphasis upon a statewide evangelism conference. The department encouraged all methods of evangelismindividual church revivals, personal and conversational soul winning, youth revivals and an emphasis mainly on the association-wide simultaneous crusade. In 1947, an astounding 107 of the 114 associations in Texas, including about 3,000 churches, committed themselves to simultaneous revivals. Other state and national conventions quickly followed suit, establishing their own evangelism departments.

E VA N G E L I S M C O N F E R E N C E A N D OTHER EMPHASES Under the leadership of C. Wade Freeman from 1954 to 1974, the Convention’s evangelism staff evolved from general evangelists to specialists who led in local church revivals, language and ethnic revivals, city crusade evangelism,

The first full-time Baptist evangelist in Texas was ordained in 1880. W.E. Penn was known as the “John the Baptist” of modern crusaders like Billy Graham, laying the groundwork for others to find full-time employment as evangelists and follow the trail that he blazed.

personal witnessing, and taught evangelism methods in churches. Freeman brought more organization to the department, planned training and clinics, created literature to help pastors and greatly expanded the Evangelism Conference. This annual conference, held in either Ft. Worth or Dallas each January, grew to exceed national Baptist conventions in attendance, and is credited with helping to set the spiritual tone for Texas Baptists for the remainder of each year. In the 1980s, Evangelism Director Carlos McLeod coordinated the soul-winning campaign “Share Jesus Now” as a part of the Mission Texas emphasis. The goal was to have 89,000 trained witnesses from 3,000 churches sharing the gospel with a million Texans over a two-month span. To accomplish this task, people were trained in the “Roman Road” plan of witnessing.

I N N O VAT I V E E VA N G E L I S M From wagon rides to protracted meetings and passing out tracts, to regional evangelism trainings and modern-day tools such as 4xFour, Pray for Every Home, and [un]Apologetic conferences, Texas Baptists’ evangelistic efforts have remained innovative. While strategies are adjusted and tactics are reimagined with the changing times, the unchanging truth is that the lost in Texas and beyond need to hear of the transformative love of Jesus Christ. It is through the cooperation of Texas Baptists churches just like yours that, more than 130 years later, we continue to be about the Great Commandment and the Great Commission, showing God’s love and sharing the Good News of His son Jesus with all who will hear. APRIL 2018

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WELCOME

LEIGHTON FLOWERS AS TEXAS BAPTISTS’ N E W E VA N G E L I S M L E A D

No stranger to Texas Baptists, Leighton Flowers has been on staff with the Convention since 2003, overseeing key evangelistic ministry initiatives including Super Summer, Youth Evangelism Conference, Hot Hearts, See You At the Pole, [un]Apologetic conferences and more. A self-proclaimed “church brat,” Leighton spent his formative years watching his father, Chuck Flowers, serve in ministry. He felt personally called to ministry as a junior in high school. He is passionate about the local church and equipping individuals to effectively share their faith through compassion and love for others. Armed with two decades of ministry experience across Texas Baptists life, Leighton looks forward with great anticipation to future evangelistic work around the state and beyond. Leighton’s vision for the evangelism work of Texas Baptists is “to challenge, equip and train Texas Baptists, by the power of the Holy Spirit, to passionately fulfill God’s call to reach all people with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.” Join us in welcoming Leighton to this new role! TO LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW YOUR CHURCH CAN BE TRAINED AND EQUIPPED IN EVANGELISM STRATEGIES, VISIT TEXASBAPTISTS.ORG/EVANGELISM.


A BIBLICAL CALL TO EVANGELISM B Y : L E I G H T O N F L O W E R S , E VA N G E L I S M L E A D

Evangelism is an ancient biblical term that simply means to share the Good News. What greater gift can any human being give to another than the message that God has made a way for us to be reconciled with Him? All Christians are called to participate in sharing this wonderful news with others. Here are three key Biblical reasons we have and will continue to focus on evangelism: 1. EVANGELISM IS ABOUT MAKING KNOWN GOD’S GOODNESS Psalm 105:1: Give praise to the Lord, proclaim His name; make known among the nations what He has done. The word “Gospel” literally means “Good News.” The news about God is good because God’s character is good. If He was not a good God, then there would be no Gospel. The news brought to us through the scripture is that our God is a loving Creator who would rather show mercy than justice toward undeserving sinners. God has provided for all people, at all times and in all places, not because He has to, but because He is good, and that truth is the very heart of what we call the Gospel. Mankind is not left to be slaves to what sin and death bring – judgment and wrath. Every single morally accountable person has, at some point, the opportunity to be reconciled to God. Romans 10:12-13: For there is no distinction between the Jew and the Greek, for the same Lord is Lord of all, who richly blesses all who call on Him. For everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved. The Gospel is the truth that whoever calls upon the name of the Lord (by seeking Him in faith) will be saved (Ps. 145:18; Joel 2:32; Ps. 18:3; Zech. 13:9; Acts 2:21).

2. EVANGELISM REVEALS THE ONLY WAY TO SALVATION Isaiah 45:22: Turn to Me and be saved, all you ends of the earth; for I am God, and there is no other. God and God alone has provided the way of salvation. It is not narrow minded or intolerant to tell people this truth. In fact, it is horribly cruel to withhold this truth from others if indeed God’s way is the only way to be saved. If you were trapped in a burning building would you call a firefighter intolerant or narrow minded if he told you the only way to escape? No. You would be grateful for his help in finding safety. Jesus told his followers, “Go into all the world and preach the Gospel to all creation. Whoever believes and is baptized will be saved, but whoever does not believe will be condemned” (Mark 16:16). He also said, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me” (John 14:6). Notice that Jesus does not hesitate to clearly speak the simple truth so all would know the only way to salvation. We must really consider what is at stake when it comes to evangelism and prioritize our lives accordingly. If indeed the only way to salvation is through Christ then we must spread the news to all people! 3. EVANGELISM IS OUR GOD-GIVEN RESPONSIBILITY Acts 20:24: However, I consider my life worth nothing to me; my only aim is to finish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me—the task of testifying to the good news of God’s grace.

Clearly Paul understood the urgency of evangelism and made it the priority of his life. He knew the task the Lord had given him: Matthew 28:19–20: Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey... These are Jesus’ marching orders and no one who calls themselves a Christ follower is exempt from this greatest of all commissions. Jesus also said, “The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few. Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field” (Matt. 9:37-38). There is no more disappointing sight for a farmer than ripe fruit rotting on the vine simply because there are not enough harvesters to gather the harvest. Likewise, there is nothing more tragic in a world of lost sinners than a shortage of willing evangelists to deliver the good news. The Lord has given all of us the responsibility to share the Good News of Christ with others. The harvest is ready for more harvesters, so will you join in the greatest and most rewarding work anyone could ever do? The work of an evangelist!

GOD AND GOD ALONE HAS PROVIDED THE WAY OF SALVATION. IT IS NOT NARROW MINDED OR INTOLERANT TO TELL PEOPLE THIS TRUTH.

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CHOOSING THE RIGHT SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORM FOR YOUR CHURCH B Y: B R A N D I J O N E S , S O C I A L M E D I A S P E C I A L I S T

Today, churches have access to the largest and most diverse mission field, with people from nearly every continent, age group and cultural background. In Matthew 10, Jesus sent out his disciples to share the Good News, and we have the same mission today – just with more advanced tools. Have concerns? We get it. Social media can be daunting and your concerns are valid. What if Martin Luther hadn’t recognized the printing press as a tool to be used for God? What if he let his fear of new technology dissuade him from printing a translated version of the Bible? When Justin Wise, author of "The Social Church," asked a pastor why their church used social media, he replied, “We want as many people as possible to have access to our church’s resources so the Gospel can go forth and lives be changed.” Is your church ready to impact lives around the world in 2018?

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Now it’s time to get started. Consider the following when selecting the best social media tool for your church: 1. Who is our target audience? 2. What platform is our target audience using? 3. What are the capabilities of our social media team? Your church does not have to be on every platform. Instead, find the one that’s right for you, and try to master one platform before moving on to the next.


HERE ARE A FEW OPTIONS TO CONSIDER: For many churches, Facebook pages have replaced traditional websites. Using a religious organization page template, churches can build relationships with their target audiences and showcase what makes their worship experience unique by showcasing images, videos, resources and more. The options are limitless.

FACEBOOK:

CONTENT IDEA: Break Sunday’s sermon into 3 actionable points your followers can participate in throughout the week. Encourage followers to share their moments in the comments.

Twitter allows churches to engage in real-time conversations with their followers using a limited amount of text (280 characters). It’s important to remember that Twitter is a fast-paced platform, and the lifespan of a single tweet is about 15 minutes. You’ll want to post valuable content consistently and engage in conversations with your audience daily.

TWITTER:

CONTENT IDEA: Share 5 quotes from Sunday’s sermon each day throughout the week. Use free smartphone apps like Canva to create great images with quote/ text overlays.

Instagram is a photo sharing platform to showcase images, one-minute videos and 15-second disappearing video clips. In 2017, Instagram reported that 59% of their audience was between the ages of 18 and 29 years old, according to Smart Insights. If this is your target audience — try Instagram.

INSTAGRAM:

CONTENT IDEA: Ask 3 members of your church leadership team to record a short video (<1min) detailing what they’ve learned from Sunday’s sermon. Publish throughout the week.

Snapchat is a great way to connect with students and young adults with photos and videos throughout the week or at special events. Published content disappears after 24 hours, so the platform encourages your followers to focus on the message. Similar to Instagram, 71% of Snapchat’s audience is under the age of 34, according to a report from Omnicore Agency.

SNAPCHAT:

YOUTUBE:

CONTENT IDEA: Give your followers a sneak peek at Sunday’s sermon. Have your pastor or youth minister post a sermon prep photo or record a short promo video for Sunday’s message.

Did you know that YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world? For some, YouTube is just another video sharing platform, but for 1 billion users in 88 countries, YouTube is the first choice when searching items like: how-to videos, commentaries on a variety of topics, sermon recaps, study resources, Christian music videos and much more. If you have videos to share with your congregation or guests, YouTube is the perfect home for your content. As a bonus, it’s free! CONTENT IDEA: Post Sunday’s sermon in its entirety or ask your pastor to record a short video on how to apply Sunday’s sermon to hot topics in the news.

FOLLOW @TEXASBAPTISTS ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AND USE #TXBLIFE TO JOIN IN THE ONGOING CONVERSATION.

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HOW TO TURN EVERYDAY TALKS INTO GOSPEL CONVERSATIONS B Y: K A L I E LOW R I E , N E W S D I R E C T O R

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As pastor’s kid, Victor Rodriguez remembers spending Sunday afternoons at the park with his dad and a handful of friends looking for opportunities to share the Gospel. “I caught the ‘evangelism bug’ at a young age,” Rodriguez, pastor of Life Church in San Antonio, recalled.

While street evangelism is one method of starting Gospel-centered conversations, Rodriguez has utilized many different strategies throughout his ministry. To Rodriguez, evangelism is important because it is what the Lord has called believers to do. “We live in a time today that our culture is resisting Christ and what the Lord has in store, but it is important for us to understand this is our mandate–this is our calling from God,” he said. As a pastor, Rodriguez feels called to not only train leaders in his church on how to share the Gospel, but also to model that behavior. “Someone once told me, you can’t take your people where you’ve never been before,” Rodriguez said. Therefore, as he learns new evangelism strategies, he takes time to practice and implement them in his own life, before encouraging his congregation to do the same. One new strategy that Rodriguez has found to be very useful is the “3 Circles: Life Conversations” method, developed by Jimmy Scroggins, pastor of First Baptist Church in West Palm Beach, Florida. When Rodriguez trains others on this method, he passes out napkins on tables, leaving conference attendees

curious. He then talks them through the three circles method of evangelism in a five-minute conversation, while drawing the illustration on a napkin. “It’s teachable, learnable and simple,” Rodriguez said. The first circle contains the words “God’s design,” and the leader discusses both God’s perfect plan for the world and the entrance of sin which set people apart from God. In the second circle, the leader writes the word “brokenness,” explaining how the consequences of sin leads people to realize a need for something greater. This leads to the third circle of the “Gospel.” The leader explains how a person can repent of their sins and believe in Jesus Christ as Savior. Finally, when a person receives Christ in his or her life, he or she is restored in relationship with God and can begin to walk with Him. This personal life change provides an opportunity for the leader to share their personal testimony. Rodriguez has committed to teaching his church the 3 Circles method over the next two years by integrating it into sermons, hosting training sessions and making intentional time to practice the method in his daily life.

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The 3 Circles strategy has been helpful in Rodriguez’s own personal conversations and in the lives of others he has trained. “This is one strategy, but there are many out there,” he said. “The important thing is to learn a method that works for you and then apply it often. People can use many different methods – they are all just tools to turn everyday conversations into Gospel conversations.”

Rodriguez is an Evangelism Regional Associate for Texas Baptists, serving in the San Antonio and South Texas region. He provides training and consultations for church leaders on intentional and relevant evangelism approaches. VISIT TEXASBAPTISTS.ORG/EVANGELISM TO FIND THE EVANGELISM REGIONAL ASSOCIATE FOR YOUR AREA AND RECEIVE HELPFUL RESOURCES AND ACCESS TO TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES NEAR YOU.

CÓMO CONVERTIR CONVERSACIONES DIARIAS EN CONVERSACIONES DEL EVANGELIO P O R : K A L I E LOW R I E , D I R E C T O R A D E N O T I C I A S

Como hijo de pastor, Víctor Rodríguez recuerda pasar los domingos en la tarde en el parque con su papá y un grupo de amigos buscando oportunidades para compartir el Evangelio. “Se me pegó el “virus del Evangelio” temprano cuando era pequeño,” recuerda Rodríguez, pastor de Life Church en San Antonio. A pesar de que el evangelismo en la calle es un método para iniciar conversaciones centradas en el Evangelio, Rodríguez ha utilizado muchas estrategias diferentes durante su ministerio. Para Rodríguez, el evangelismo es importante porque es a lo que el Señor ha llamado a los creyentes. “Vivimos en un tiempo hoy cuando nuestra cultura resiste a Cristo y lo que el Señor tiene deparado, pero es importante que entendamos que ése es nuestro mandato—éste es nuestro llamado de Dios,” dijo. Como pastor, Rodríguez se siente llamado no solamente a entrenar a los líderes de su iglesia a cómo compartir el Evangelio, sino también a modelar esa conducta. “Una vez alguien me dijo que no puedes llevar a las personas a donde tú nunca has ido”, dijo Rodríguez. Por lo tanto, según él aprende nuevas estrategias de evangelismo, se toma el tiempo para practicarlas e implementarlas en su propia vida, antes de exhortar a su congregación a hacer lo mismo. Una nueva estrategia que Rodríguez ha encontrado muy útil es el método de los “3 Círculos: Conversaciones acerca de la vida,” desarrollado por Jimmy Scroggins, pastor de First Baptist Church en West Palm Beach, Florida. Cuando Rodríguez entrena a otros en este método, él distribuye servilletas sobre las mesas, despertando la curiosidad en sus participantes. Entonces les explica el método de evangelismo de los tres círculos en una conversación de cinco minutos, mientras dibuja en una servilleta. “Es fácil de enseñar, fácil de aprender, y simple,” dijo Rodríguez.

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El primer círculo contiene las palabras “Diseño de Dios,” y el líder conversa acerca del plan perfecto de Dios para el mundo y la entrada del pecado el cual separa a las personas de Dios. En el segundo círculo, el líder escribe la palabra “quebrantamiento,” explicando cómo las consecuencias del pecado llevan a las personas a darse cuenta de que necesitan algo más grande. Esto conduce al tercer círculo del “Evangelio.” El líder explica cómo una persona puede arrepentirse de sus pecados y creer en Jesucristo como Salvador. Por último, cuando una persona recibe a Cristo en su vida, es restaurada en su relación con Dios y puede comenzar a caminar con Él. Este cambio personal de vida provee una oportunidad para que el líder comparta su testimonio personal. Rodríguez se ha comprometido a enseñar en su iglesia el método de los 3 Círculos durante los próximos dos años integrándolo en sus sermones, auspiciando sesiones de entrenamiento, y sacando tiempo para practicar el método en su vida diaria. La estrategia de los 3 Círculos ha sido útil en las conversaciones personales de Rodríguez y en las vidas de otros a quienes ha entrenado. “Ésta es una estrategia, pero hay muchas otras,” él dijo. “Lo importante es aprender un método que trabaje para uno y entonces aplicarlo con frecuencia. Las personas pueden usar muchos métodos diferentes—son herramientas para volver conversaciones en conversaciones del Evangelio.” Rodríguez es un Asociado Regional de Evangelismo para los Bautistas de Texas, sirviendo en las regiones de San Antonio y el Sur de Texas. Él provee entrenamiento y consulta para líderes de iglesias en enfoques intencionales y relevantes de evangelismo. VISITE TEXASBAPTISTS.ORG/EVANGELISM PARA ENCONTRAR EL ASOCIADO DE EVANGELISMO REGIONAL PARA SU ÁREA Y RECIBIR RECURSOS ÚTILES Y ACCESO A OPORTUNIDADES DE ENTRENAMIENTO CERCA DE USTED.


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YOUR GUIDE TO REACHING YOUR COMMUNITY B Y: J O H N H A L L , C O N T R I B U T I N G W R I T E R

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When Mike Satterfield was a teenager, he had to mow his family’s lawn as well as the lawn of his neighbors. So no matter how hot it was, he was out there pushing a lawn mower every week. Up and down the yards he trudged, sweat dripping down his brow, while his father watched from the porch. As Satterfield looked across his work after he believed it to be finished, he noticed spots that he missed and uneven lines. Just once, Satterfield thought, I wish my father would show me how to do this properly rather than leaving me out here to learn on my own. I’d probably be a lot better at it. That thought has stuck with the new Texas Baptists African American Evangelism Specialist as he’s served churches, led revivals, guided retreats and shared the Gospel in a variety of settings. Wherever he teaches or preaches, he attempts to equip Christians to share the Gospel as they move about their circles of influence – their neighborhoods, families and workplaces. He offers these tips for church leaders seeking to empower their congregations to be more evangelistic:

SHOW PEOPLE HOW TO SHARE THE GOSPEL , D O N ’ T S I M P LY T E L L THEM TO DO IT As children learn from observing their parents, younger Christians learn by being with more mature believers. They gain confidence by seeing others exercise their faith and share the Gospel. They learn how to do it in a variety of ways. Mature Christians can prod their younger brothers and sisters in the faith to be bolder in sharing the Gospel. They can hold younger believers accountable. And they can provide a guide to living out one’s faith. “There’s a difference between a travel agent and a tour guide,” Satterfield said. “A travel agent says, ‘You ought to go to Paris. I’ll book your flight.’ But a tour guide will say, ‘You ought to go to Paris. I’ve been there. Come with me, I’ll show you around the city.’”

KEEP THE EMPHASIS ON E VA N G E L I S M B E F O R E T H E C O N G R E G AT I O N Pastors craft sermon series to connect with their congregations, sharing biblical truths on issues they may be facing. Worship services, including music and multimedia selection, are molded artfully to reinforce the message. Then after a few weeks, the sermon series changes to address another topic. The worship service is tailored to those messages. And the congregation is left to believe that whatever the current series is must be the most important topic to the church at that moment. Pastors must be mindful of this and continuously speak to the importance of sharing the Gospel. Videos must reinforce it. Preaching must encourage it. Songs must empower it. Otherwise, the emphasis on evangelism will be lost. “If the pastor doesn’t undergird and endorse it and see evangelism become contagious through discipleship, it will become the seed that’s fallen on thorny ground,” Satterfield said.

KEEP THE NEED BEFORE THE PEOPLE

“We think of going overseas to go to the places that are hostile to the Gospel, but even in our own world here there are places that are against a kingdom mindset,” he said. Satterfield is reminded of a church he visited that met across the street from a mall. Each Sunday, members would worship at the church. And each Sunday, people would work at the mall. The two never seemed to intersect. The opportunity to share the Gospel with a group of people was literally across the street. But congregations have to see the mission field before them.

KEEP IT SIMPLE Every believer is called to share his or her faith, Satterfield noted. Even the youngest Christian has a testimony to share. Satterfield encourages each leader to keep it simple: let mature Christians disciple younger ones and be role models, talk about the importance of evangelism and keep the need before the congregation. Then let them do it. And watch as God changes lives. “It’s knowing what we know – Jesus is Lord – and showing what we know so those who don’t know can do it together with us,” he said. Through support from the Texas Baptists Cooperative Program, Mike Satterfield and other evangelism strategists are available to help your congregation reach its community. HE LEADS REVIVALS, EQUIPPING CONFERENCES AND TEACHING SESSIONS. CONTACT HIM AT MIKE.SATTERFIELD@TEXASBAPTISTS.ORG.

Satterfield’s next point of encouragement to church leaders goes hand-in-hand with the last: keep the need for evangelism in front of the congregation. Non-Christians live all around every member of every church, even if they don’t realize it.

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SHARING YOUR FAITH IN DIFFERENT SETTINGS B Y: K A L I E L O W R I E , N E W S D I R E C T O R A N D K I R S T E N M C K I M M E Y, N E W S W R I T E R

When Jesus commanded his followers in Matthew 28 to go and make disciples, it was a call to share the Gospel with all people. No matter the context in which you find yourself, through prayer, submission to the Holy Spirit’s promptings and obedience to the word of God, opportunities to share the Gospel can abound. Here are some different contexts and key factors to consider when sharing your faith.

IN TH E WO RKPL ACE Steve Colwell, corporate chaplain for Tyson Foods, meets with newly-hired truck drivers each week and encourages them not to “park their faith at the door.” When integrating their beliefs into the workplace, Colwell says, individuals should live an authentic faith that is contagious. “It would be very hard to share a faith that is not evident in your life, at work, at home, or in the community,” he said. He also noted the importance of being sensitive to the boundaries people put in their professional life. “It really comes down to asking the question of yourself, ‘Has this person given me the invitation into sharing a truth that is life-changing

and personal?’ If we violate someone’s boundary, then they will be offended and not feel respected.”

ON THE COLLEGE CAMPUS Evangelizing on a college campus comes with many challenges as students may appear disengaged, uninterested or ‘too busy.’ But as Robert Rueda, director of the BSM at University to Texas at Rio Grande Valley, said, “It is important to remember that students are looking for meaning in their lives, and there will always be students who are open to God.” With that in mind, Rueda noted that it is vital to be confident, direct and committed in overcoming these barriers. “Get to know students and show you care,” he said. “When they see that you care, they will listen and let you minister to them.”

IN THE COMMUNITY

and graciously sharing the Good News of Jesus. When we do that, then we can authentically share Christ. Along with that, churches must also be able to relate within their communities. “A church which has little relationship in its immediate surroundings also has little opportunity to be evangelistic within its community,” Howe continued. “Seek out how to make community connections to build the framework to share Christ.”

O N T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L MISSION FIELD When sharing your faith in different countries and cultures, it is helpful to be mindful of barriers and bridges to the Gospel within the specific context in which you are working. Josue Valerio, director of the Missions Team, shared that the two most important components are to be direct and clear. “If you are up front in the beginning of your conversation why you are there and what you want to share, that will transcend cultures and people will respect what you have to say,” Valerio said.

“Effective community evangelism is born out of relationships within that community,” said Tom Howe, director of Urban Missions. That’s the heart of ministry and evangelism within your community and beyond – to build sincere, FOR MORE INFORMATION ON EVANGELISM STRATEGIES, VISIT caring relationships while lovingly TEXASBAPTISTS.ORG/EVANGELISM.

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Dr. Andrea Ramirez (BBA ’04, MBA ’06) Director, White House Initiative’s Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships U.S. Department of Education

LEAD WITH DISTINCTION One of the greatest cravings in our world today is a hunger for Christian leadership. Dallas Baptist University provides a Christ-centered academic environment that richly integrates faith and learning. DBU’s commitment to servant leadership develops you for the leadership roles you have today—and the roles you will have in the future. An interdisciplinary approach allows graduates like Dr. Ramirez to pursue a unique combination of theory and practical experience that equips them to use the gifts and abilities endowed to them by God with a deep sense of purpose and mission. Dr. Andrea Ramirez uses her gifts and education as the Director of the White House Initiative’s Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships at the U.S. Department of Education. With 73 undergraduate majors, 31 master’s degrees, and two doctoral degrees, each program is rigorously designed to enrich your learning experience and equip you to be a servant leader for the glory of God.

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WHO WE ARE WHAT WE DO For more than 130 years, the Baptist General Convention of Texas (Texas Baptists) has helped churches fulfill the Great Commission and the Great Commandment. Today, we are more than 5,300 churches working together in harmonious cooperation to share the Gospel and love others.

GREAT COMMISSION TEAM

MISSIONS TEAM

Evangelism Discipleship Music & Worship

Multi-housing & House Congregations Church Starting Urban Missions River Ministry & Mexico Missions MAP BOUNCE

CHRISTIAN LIFE COMMISSION

COLLEGIATE MINISTRY TEAM

Ethics & Justice Public Policy Community Care Hunger Offering

Baptist Student Ministries Church College Ministry Go Now Missions

CONNECTIONS TEAM

CULTURAL ENGAGEMENT TEAM

Counseling Services Area Representatives Minister Connection Interim Services Bivocational Pastors Western Heritage Center for Ministerial Excellence Camps

African American Ministries Hispanic Ministries Hispanic Education Initiative Intercultural Ministries Project: Start Associations

The ministry of the Convention is organized into teams that inform and inspire churches through events, resources, consultations and more. Through gifts to the Texas Baptists Cooperative Program, you and your church enable missions and ministry across the state and around the world. Because you give, love is shown, the Gospel is shared and lives are transformed. Learn more about affiliation at texasbaptists.org/affiliate, and learn more about the Texas Baptists Cooperative Program at texasbaptists.org/cp.

In addition, we proudly partner with education, advocacy and human care institutions around Texas.

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Profile for Texas Baptists

Texas Baptists Life, Volume 6 - Issue 2  

Texas Baptists Evangelism: Fulfilling the Call to Go and Tell

Texas Baptists Life, Volume 6 - Issue 2  

Texas Baptists Evangelism: Fulfilling the Call to Go and Tell

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