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SPOTLIGHT: ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES FOR CHRIST PG. 13

Volume 5 ∙ Issue 4

Making missions possible through Mary Hill Davis Offering scholarships pg.8

Project Start helps Kenyan church expand capacity for refugee ministry pg.18

Training DBU business students to serve in the marketplaces of the world pg.26


TEXAS BAPTISTS EVENT CALENDAR Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

30

31

1 August

2

3

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5

Growing in Grace Summer Workshop, Dallas

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7

8

9

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Great Commission Summit, Dallas Childhood Ministry Certification, Dallas

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26 ONE: Unity not Uniformity, Grand Prairie

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National Boomer and Senior Adult Ministry Conference, Dallas Intentional Interim Ministry Fall Update, Fort Worth

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Director of Missions Team Meeting

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Special Friends Retreat, Floydada Hispanic Men’s Retreat, Glen Rose

Leader’s Edge Summit, San Antonio

15

Childhood Ministry Certification

MinistrySafe Regional Church Safety Workshop, Sugar Land

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18

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Chaplain Training Event, San Antonio

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16 Seasoned Saints and Family Conference, Mansfield

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Hispanic Men’s Retreat, Woodlake

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1 October

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3

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TEX AS BAPTISTS LIFE / VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 4 / JULY 2017

F E AT U R E S

IN E VE RY ISSU E

Making missions possible through Mary Hill Davis Offering scholarships

Event Calendar Letter from Executive Director

BSM graduate thanks Texas Baptists

Impact: Texas Baptists news

Being an industrious pastor

Who we are and what we do

Training DBU business students to serve in the marketplaces of the world A report from the Texas capitol SPOTLIGHT

Connecting, collaborating and contextualizing cultures across Texas Compelled to make disciples through Hispanic Ministries Project Start helps Kenyan church expand capacity for refugee ministry

SP OT

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. 15 SP OT R PG LIG HT : EN GA PO WE SUMMERTIME GOOD NEWS: GROWING AND SHARING THE GOSPEL PG. 15 SPOTLIGHT: IN G GIN G STAY DIV ER

Vol. 5

2 Issue

SE CU LTU

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FO R

CH RIS

T PG . 13

Vol. 5 Issue 3

Healthy bodies, healthy churches

Volum

e. 5 ∙

pg.8

l g loca acin ty Embr re: Coun in cultu thrives ch Chur Texas st Ea pg.22

ts uden w st Go No ng the rist hi r Ch reac er fo bord pg.8

: Six true g and tin Tried to plan s step ch ur a ch

pg. 18

Making the mystery of the Gospel known at Super Summer pg.22

Issue

4

Makin poss g missions ib Hill Da le throug h scho vis Of ferin Mar y larsh g ips pg.8

5 steps to make the most of your camp experience as a leader

Proje ct St ar t he Keny an expa s church lps nd refuge capacit y fo e min istry r

pg. 18

Train in stud g DBU bu en the m ts to servsiness the woarketplac e in es of rld

pg.26

pg. 18

Intercultural churches connect people groups to the Gospel Filling hearts through lunch program Hacer discípulos a través de Ministerios Hispanos

WE ARE SENDING ENOUGH TO SHARE!

P U B L I C AT I O N T E A M

Joshua Seth Minatrea, Director of Communications Kalie Lowrie, News Director Jeremy Honea, Art Director Kirsten McKimmey, News Writer Jordan Parker, Multimedia Specialist Brittany Thomas, Communications Assistant

You are receiving a free copy of Texas Baptists Life because of your generous support of the Cooperative Program. To subscribe, call 214.828.5232 or email subscriptions@texasbaptists.org.

J U LY 2 0 1 7

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Hello, Texas Baptists! Like many of you, I am a native Texan (and a lifelong Baptist). However, the Texas into which I was born is not the Texas I live in today. The state continues to change, and we as Texas Baptists must keep pace.

¡Hola, Bautistas de Texas! Al igual que muchos de ustedes, yo nací en Texas (y he sido bautista durante toda mi vida). Sin embargo, el Texas donde nací no es el Texas donde hoy vivo. El estado continúa cambiando y nosotros, como Bautistas de Texas, necesitamos mantenernos al día.

The Convention’s intention is to show love to and share Christ with the more than 28 million people of Texas, regardless of their language or context. We do so because of our focus on the Great Commandment and the Great Commission, and we do so through our Cultural Engagement Team led by Lorenzo Peña.

La intención de la Convención es demostrar amor y compartir a Cristo con más de los 28 millones de personas en Texas, sin importar su lenguaje o contexto. Lo hacemos a causa de nuestro enfoque en el Gran Mandamiento y la Gran Comisión, y lo hacemos a través de nuestro Equipo de Interacción Cultural dirigido por Lorenzo Peña.

As an expression of their unique calling, this talented team connects, creates, contextualizes and collaborates to reach our increasingly diverse state for Christ. Through Hispanic, African American and Intercultural Ministries, CET serves more than 2,300 congregations ministering in over 69 languages across the state. Amen! One of our key efforts in reaching the unchurched in Texas, including the growing number of diverse people groups, is through Church Starting. We are constantly on the lookout for new population centers, such as subdivisions and developments, as well as new people groups hungry for the Gospel. You and your church can help in this effort by communicating with us when, in your community, you see something new unfolding. Additionally, we are taking a close look at our Church Starting model to make sure we are providing every means necessary to start new churches in new areas, or with new groups. You can also help by praying for these efforts. There are no signs that the population growth and expanding diversity of Texas is slowing. Therefore, our work will continue with a sense of urgency and expectancy. As always, we are grateful for your support. Together we can take the Good News to our neighbors and the strangers among us.

Como una expresión de un llamado particular, este equipo talentoso conecta, crea, contextualiza, y colabora para alcanzar para Cristo a este estado cada vez más diverso. A través de Ministerios Hispanos, Afroamericanos e Interculturales, el Equipo de Interacción Cultural sirve a más de 2,300 congregaciones ministrando en más de 69 lenguajes por todo el estado. ¡Amén! Uno de nuestros esfuerzos clave al alcanzar a los que no tienen iglesia en Texas, incluyendo al creciente número de grupos étnicos diversos, es a través de iniciar iglesias. Estamos constantemente atentos identificando centros de poblaciones nuevas como subdivisiones y desarrollos, así como nuevos grupos étnicos con hambre por el Evangelio. Ustedes y sus iglesias pueden ayudar en este esfuerzo al comunicarse con nosotros cuando, en su comunidad, ven algo nuevo en desarrollo. Además, estamos considerando de cerca nuestro modelo para iniciar iglesias para asegurarnos de proveer todos los medios necesarios para iniciar iglesias nuevas en áreas nuevas, o con grupos nuevos. Ustedes también pueden ayudar orando por estos esfuerzos. No hay indicio de que el crecimiento en la población y la expansión en diversidad en Texas estén mitigando. Por tanto, nuestro trabajo continúa con un sentido de urgencia y expectativa. Como siempre, agradecemos su respaldo. Juntos, podemos llevar las Buenas Nuevas a nuestros vecinos y extranjeros entre nosotros.

BLESSINGS AND BENDICIONES,

D AV I D H A R D A G E E XECU TIVE DIRECTOR DIRECTOR E JECU TIVO

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TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


IMPACT: TEXAS BAPTISTS NEWS

LEADERS ATTEND BRAZILIAN BAPTIST CONVENTION, MEET MAP PARTNERS Four Texas Baptists leaders recently traveled to Belem, Brazil, to attend the Brazilian Baptist Convention to formalize the partnership between the two conventions for the Missionary Adoption Program (MAP). Texas Baptists Executive Director David Hardage was accompanied by Danny Reeves, Texas Baptists president, Josue Valerio, director of missions, and Jair Campos, director of MAP for Texas Baptists. Currently, 16 churches have adopted missionaries to indigenous people groups along the Amazon with 32 missionaries available for adoption. ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

GOLF CLASSIC CREATES CONNECTIONS, BRINGS AWARENESS The Fourth Annual Texas Baptists Golf Classic took place on April 24 at the Golf Club of Houston with 235 participants from across Texas. “The fellowship is really great to experience, and I have been amazed at how many players come every year from all over the state,” said David Adams, Texas Baptists director of church administration and special projects.

UNAPOLOGETIC CONFERENCES TRAIN MORE THAN 1,500 ON REMOVING OBSTACLES TO EVANGELISM

TWO HUNDRED SEVENTYEIGHT STUDENTS TO SERVE ON SUMMER GO NOW MISSIONS PROJECTS

More than 1,500 attendees gathered at unApologetic conferences in Corpus Christi, Austin and Dallas this spring. Corpus Christi Keynote speaker Lane Craig, introduced as the world's premier apologist, talked about the importance of being able to persuade people with the truth of Jesus Christ. "Apologetics is defending the truth of what we believe in the Scriptures," Craig said.

Two hundred seventy-eight collegiate students are serving on summer missions projects with Go Now missions. "It is amazing to see what God is doing with Texas college students,” said Go Now Director Brenda Sanders. “They continue to answer the call to take the Gospel to the peoples of the world. This year, we are scattering them as close as Arlington and as far as Zambia.”

6

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


EMERGING YOUNG LEADERS GRADUATE FROM LEADERSHIP TEXAS BAPTISTS The second cohort of Leadership Texas Baptists was honored during the Executive Board meeting on May 22. A diverse group of 14 emerging young leaders, ranging from pastors and church planters to institution staff members, participated in the nine-month program where they were introduced to leaders of Texas Baptists institutions, convention staff and ministry leaders around the state. ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

FBC ALLEN STUDENTS TAKE FIRST PLACE IN STATE BIBLE DRILL AND SPEAKERS’ TOURNAMENT Eighty-four students competed in the Texas Baptists State Bible Drill and Speakers’ Tournament on April 30 at Dallas Baptist University. Youth Bible Drill: 1st - Gracie Daugherty, FBC Allen, 2nd - Cailin Powell, Memorial Baptist Church, Temple; High School Bible Drill: 1st - Katie Davidson, FBC Allen, 2nd - Madison Lee, FBC College Station; Speakers' Tournament: 1st - Anna Kemp, FBC Allen, 2nd Brendan Waller, FBC Dallas.

SINGING MEN OF TEXAS PLANT SEEDS IN UKRAINE THROUGH APRIL MISSION TRIP More than 13,000 people heard the Gospel through the Singing Men of Texas mission trip to Ukraine in April. Over a 10-day span, the musicians performed nine concerts to Ukrainians who were hungry for and receptive to the Good News of Jesus Christ.

CHURCHES PARTNER TO PROVIDE WATER TOWER FOR STRUGGLING LIBERIAN COMMUNITY Tom Howe, pastor of Fort Worth’s Birdville Baptist Church, learned of the need for water at the Lott Carey Mission (LCM) in Brewerville, Liberia, through the donations his church made to the Texas Baptist Hunger Offering. The church was moved by the need and partnered with Haltom Road Baptist Church to raise funds to build a water tower in Liberia. The two churches presented a check for $29,245.33 to the Hunger Offering at the May executive board meeting to go toward the purchase of the tower. To read more Texas Baptists news stories, visit texasbaptists.org/news.

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Making missions possible through mary hill davis Offering scholarships BY ANALIZ G . SCHREMMER , CONTRIBUTING WRITER Any student who has benefited from a scholarship knows what an

most hardworking students that I’d ever seen. Their hearts were for

enormous difference it can make. When that scholarship funds a

Christ, and regardless of any encounter, they served wholeheartedly. I

mission trip, the outcome can be eternal.

am very proud of all of our students, particularly those three.”

Luis Juarez was once the recipient of a Mary Hill Davis Offering

“The students’ lives were enriched by this experience,” Juarez said.

scholarship. Today, he is currently Director of Missions and Ministries

“Their missions experience helped them realize that this is why they

at Baptist University of the Américas (BUA) and is able to see the

are here — to serve God and others.”

impact that the scholarship continues to have in the lives of students.

The Mary Hill Davis Offering scholarship is awarded to 12-13 BUA

“This scholarship makes mission work possible for a lot of students,”

students who dedicate their summer to working an internship. The

Juarez said. “Without it, they wouldn’t be able to experience missions

scholarship covers the cost of their mission experience and provides

and receive funding for their education.”

funds for their education.

Juarez completed his undergraduate work in BUA in 2011 and is

“I would encourage every person who has the opportunity to

currently a doctoral student at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor.

contribute to the Mary Hill Davis Offering to do so, because it shapes

“My junior year, I was involved in mission work in the summer and received the scholarship,” he said. “It gave me the opportunity to

these students’ futures and could be a gateway to a potential calling in their lives,” Juarez said. “I know that is what it did for me.”

gain experience working in a church and it made it possible for me to

This year, the Mary Hill Davis Offering is highlighting four

continue my studies. Working as a missionary opened my eyes to the

funding categories:

need that there is and affirmed the plans that I had for my future. When

Serve Ministries -

we give students this opportunity, we open doors to the possibility that they can do this type of work in the future, as well.” As the BUA mission director, Juarez sometimes gets to join students in their mission experience. He recently participated on a spring break trip to Arkansas and said he was moved by the impact it had on the students. “We had a student from Nigeria named Oluwatofumi Oeulate,” he said. “She said that she felt at home, even though she was surrounded by people who spoke English differently than she was accustomed to hearing it.

Caring for the whole person is a demonstration of the gospel and often opens the door for more effective sharing of the gospel.

Advance Missions Equipping -

These ministries equip both clergy and laity to have a missional mindset and tools to lead their congregations to be more effective in

It impacted her life because, regardless of the type of people she was

reaching their communities as they share the gospel and serve others.

ministering to, the opportunity to serve God goes beyond culture.”

Love the Least of These -

He added that another student, Amin Calvo, said, “God’s work never comes back empty. When we get out of our comfort zone to live out God’s purpose in our lives, we never come back empty.” Juarez also shared about three students from Colombia who went on the trip. “They had never seen snow,” Juarez said. “It was unlike anything they had ever experienced. They were so cold. But they were among the

These ministries seek to serve those who can be forgotten or overlooked.

Tell Ministries -

These ministries enable Texas Baptists to be witnesses.

T O M A K E A D O N AT I O N T O T H E M A R Y H I L L D AV I S O F F E R I N G , 8

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

V I S I T W M U T X .O R G .


s! t s i t p a B s a x e T , m o re t h a n m y u st i n, I t h i n k o f Thank you A t a s a x Te f o s think of n d u re d. I a l w a y t T h e U n iv e rs it y

have e m y e x p e ri e n c e a s h a p e m e, a n d t h e st re s s I ed ll u p e v When I think of I’ rs p e o p l e t h e re t o e e ht h t g i n ed s llu a s e a h t h s, od h m a n, I A s a y o u n g f re s m aj o r, m y c l a s s e i st ry a n d h o w G n . i m M a I nt e t a d h u t St ll a st h w Hi m Ba p t i e p u rs u e G od w it o w I w o u l d fo llo m h my time at the s p l a e w h s i d h n t a t e a m h t c o u ra g e t t y w e ll a n d st d a y s, a n d c h a ll e n g e m e, e n llo w i n g Je s u s p re a d m y B ib le m o fo re s a h, w rc u I h c t a e h h t t n i n o w, G od (n a iv e ly ) t h o u g ht rs . L it t le di d I k I h a d be e n ra is ed e h ll, ot a r h e it ft w A s u e. s lif Je y to m e if I s h a re t h e st o ry of fo r t h e re st of m m o re of H i m s e lf to d n p a u ro re g o h m ut g o n y li a h my l a n n ed o n re ve w e nt o n t ri p s w it m e o n. e a n d H e fu lly p m r fo re o H e w a s i nv iti n g m at h h c t u m re u o s nt e ed dv nt a a w g re at U T st u d e nt s e s’ a n d j o i n t hi s t s o m a n y ot h e r e e m o t w o u l d j u st sa y ‘ Y y it n u rt o w a nt m e opp . T h e y di d n’ t j u st SM, I h a d th e m B i r H u o ed f o w llo rs o fo o d I a nt ed the i n th e wa y s th at c c e p t ed . T h e y w a w B y w a lk i n g i nt o s ro a g w o t it e d m n a ed nt nd no venie n d w a nt nt ry I w a s i n, a u a b l e, it w a s c o n o c rt w h o lo v ed G od a t fo a h m o w c r s e a t t w a I s lo n g a s m e t o s h a re n c e s w e re , n o m t o fo llo w H i m a i m , t h e y w a nt ed a t m y c i rc u m st a h H w w r e llo t t fo a o m t o e n m o v e rf lo w o f nt m e t o fo llo w H i m c l u b s o ut o f t h e n ly di d t h e y w a o y t m o n N i . d ht n g a u o s h e t s s one o rm, i n m y c l a matter what any e people in my d h t h it w s i od G a b o ut w h o and o c o n fe s s s i n t o, m. i t H e n r o e fo m d o a s h d I a h e lo v fa it h m y od e l a f t e r. I re a n d m a d e m y er class man to m o p p m u n n e v a e d s a u h s I Je llo w s h i p, p i rit u a l o w t o p ra ct i c e s T h ro u g h di s c i p l e s I l ea rn ed t o fo h a s, rt y o a p w p u s w e d n n n a i b ili t y a d the Bible y that co mes a s k fo r a c c o u nt a g ht m e h o w t o re ra c e a n d h u m ili t u g a e t h o t h News g w n i e c i n o ct e ra m w h il e p s h a re t h e G o od ll o e t w e l o w n. I h a d s o rs b e a h n ot e e e l b p i e h o w t o di s c o rl d a n d h a v i o n s, t ri b e s, di s c i p li n e s, a n d m a ro u n d t h e w a G od o f a ll n a t ro f s i e l p od o e G p r t u e o m t a e h hav u r t ru st . h a v e l ea rn ed t a lo n g w it h it. I a n d w o rt h y o f o t h e f i rs t t i m e. I r od o fo g e , l p ly o o e h p s i h it o f Je s u s w rn ed t h a t G od i nt i n m y u a g e s. I h a v e l ea g n a l d n a s e e n a t u rn i n g p o e b l p e o v a pe h d n a e m o di b ly ea nt t h e w o rl d t s 1: 3. I a m i n c re m n e a i v p a p h ili h M P S f B o e k h t t hat I have thin nd the women t M y fo u r y ea rs a time ma kes me a s , i h m t ro n f o g ed n i rn ct ea e l l e rs t o ave . Ref g a n d i n v it e ot h t h e m e nt o rs I h n i p u rs u it o f C h ri st K e, d e a h t m e e u v a rs h u p I f ri e n d s UT A u st in B SM . Our job is to t h a n kf u l fo r t h e n ex t ye a r at th e ime at the BSM t y y m m st g ve n in ri u d to d d ci te u s is, ho w ki n d b e e n a b l e t o l ea gi ft a n d I a m ex ho w be a ut ifu l Je s l ed ifu rn ut a a le be ve a a h ’s I It . ho le he a rt ed ly . la ti o n 7:9 -1 0. join the kingdo m rw a rd to in R ev e to pu rs u e Je s u s w fo s k nt o de lo u to st r ve he a h ot e a n d in vi te d w h at jo y w di n g B i b l e G oo d N e w s is, a n is H s ou ci ra T h a n k y o u fo r l ea g s. d n n o a i t ra e n e g r e t ea c h i n g o u r ung y o u i n v e st i n y o s. T h a n k y o u fo r p t i a h h t rs a s l y o h a c w s e p h t m r hf u l n e s s t o r ca T h a n k y o u a ll fo y o u fo r y o u r fa it g to our su mme n i k n iv a g h r T fo s. u u o g y n i k ed o t h e rs han u e G od , p u rs u e T h a n k y o u fo r fe St u dy a t V B S. T rs s. u u p r u o fo y g n w i o y h ra p ss , and o u fo r c o u l d e v e r e x p re it i s a p p re c i a t ed e , w ed c l a s s e s. T h a n k y n c i a t h o t n s s u i o t It ea n s m o re a di f fe re n c e. o u r B S M s. It m re a lly d o e s m a k e s) nt e d u st e g e ll o a n d p u rs u e u s (c it. t h e s a m e w it h o ut e b ot n we would K a t i e B u rk h ea d o f 20 17 t A u st i n, C l a s s a s a x Te f o y it T h e U n iv e rs


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Being a n

p a st o r

BY DAN NY

REEVES

, TEXAS BAPTIST

S PRESI DEN

T

An oxymoron is the combination of contradictory words that have been

you, brothers, to keep away from every brother who is idle.” Sometimes

linked together. You probably already know a few of these – such as jumbo

we laugh at lazy people or lazy pastors, but Paul wasn’t laughing.

shrimp, pretty ugly, working vacation, or humble Texan – but have you ever considered this one: Lazy pastor? There is no doubt that a healthy church is not possible with an unhealthy or lazy pastor. So as a fellow pastor within the Texas Baptists family, I want to take this subject headon with you and encourage the idea of being an industrious pastor. I want to talk about three principles that pastors must adopt to be diligent rather than lazy. First, pastors have to remember that God values honest labor. Paul wrote, “We worked night and day, laboring and toiling so that we wouldn’t be a burden to any of you.” Paul was a tentmaker, and by doing this he showed each of his churches the value of good hard work. This was important because most of the people living in the first century thought manual labor was undignified.

Paul’s command was to stay away from every believer who was lazy. I had a friend tell me that if I ever found a fellow pastor chilling out on the sofa eating Cheetos and drinking a Coke, I had better get away. Why? Because soon I may find myself chilling on the sofa with orange lips. I love the sayings from Ben Franklin in Poor Richard’s Almanac. Two of my favorites are: “Plough deep while sluggards sleep and you shall have corn to sell and to keep,” and “If you lie down with dogs, you wake up with fleas!” Be careful. Laziness is contagious. The third principle for healthy and industrious pastors is that our excellence at work should be an example to others. I like how Paul explains why he made tents in Thessalonica.

The problem is that some Christians today have the same negative view

He said, “We did this...in order to offer ourselves as a model for you to

toward work. Even some uninformed Christians think hard work was

follow.” In other words, he was trying to set a good example by working

part of the curse God put on humanity after Adam and Eve sinned, but

hard. As pastors, we should be the kinds of workers that serve as an

the Bible makes it clear that God put Adam to work in the Garden of Eden

example to others. I don’t know if you have someone like this in your life,

before he sinned.

but my dad was this for me. He was a hard worker, and he always said,

Genesis 2:15 says, “the Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it.”

“Son, if a job’s worth doing, it’s worth doing right!” Friends, that’s a Biblical principle! Paul said, “Whatever you do, work at

As a matter of fact, all through the Bible, God commends the value of work. The fourth commandment was about taking a day of rest because

it with all your heart, as if you were working for the Lord, not for men.” (Colossians 3:23)

we had been working so hard all the other six.

The best way a pastor can glorify God is by working with all of his heart.

So, God says work is good. It’s something we should do six days of the week.

I close with the words of Zig Ziglar. He had enthusiasm to spare. He used

He didn’t give us four rest days a week; He gave us only one. We would do

to tell a story about a young couple lost on a country road. They spotted an

well to remember the words of legendary football coach Vince Lombardi,

old farmer, so they stopped their car to get directions. The young man said,

who said, “The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.”

“Sir, could you tell us where this road will take us?” With a twinkle in his

The second principle for pastors is that laziness is contagious, so we should avoid lazy people. Paul says in 2 Thessalonians 3:6, “We command

world you want to go—you just have to keep moving in the right direction.” Our churches will move in the right direction if each pastor is moving in

our excellence at work should be an example to others.

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eye, the wise old farmer said, “Son, this road will take you anywhere in the

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

the right direction. Find ways to be hard-working, diligent and industrious.


SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

SPOTLIGHT

Engaging diverse cultures for Christ

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CONNECTING, COLLABORATING AND CONTEXTUALIZING CULTURES ACROSS TEXAS

20

Read an article from Lorenzo Peña, director of the Cultural Engagement Team, about the changing diversity of Texas and how Texas Baptists are seeking to reach new people groups with the Gospel.

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COMPELLED TO MAKE DISCIPLES THROUGH HISPANIC MINISTRIES

Learn how Texas Baptists Intercultural Ministries is partnering with various churches to reach and minister to the diverse ethnic groups represented in Texas.

22

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Shadrack Ruto, pastor of Upendo Baptist Church in Garland, shares how his church body overcame barriers in their refugee ministry. Read how Project Start helped provide the church with the resources they needed to serve the refugee families in this Kingdom initiative.

FILLING HEARTS THROUGH LUNCH PROGRAM In Lubbock, over 300 sack lunches are served weekly to those in need. Learn how the African American Ministries and New Light Baptist Church of Lubbock are making a difference in the community by sharing the Good News of Jesus Christ to those with empty stomachs and hungry souls.

God’s plan to change the world is to “make disciples.” Read what Rolando Rodriguez, director of Hispanic Ministries, has to say about what it means to be a disciple and make disciples in the 21st century.

PROJECT START HELPS KENYAN CHURCH EXPAND CAPACITY FOR REFUGEE MINISTRY

INTERCULTURAL CHURCHES CONNECT PEOPLE GROUPS TO THE GOSPEL

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HACER DISCIPULOS A TRAVES DE MINISTERIOS HISPANOS Read the Spanish translation from Rolando Rodriguez, director of Hispanic Ministries, about what it means to be a disciple and make disciples in the 21st century.

J U LY 2 0 1 7

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CONNECTING, COLLABORATING AND CONTEXTUALIZING

CULTURES ACROSS

TEXAS

B Y L O R E N Z O P E Ă‘ A , D I R E C T O R O F C U LT U R A L E N G A G E M E N T T E A M

The Cultural Engagement Team works with the cultural

in size. The CET sees that change coming and is preparing

diversity of Texas. Through Hispanic, African American and

now for what that will mean for Texas Baptists.

Intercultural Ministries, our team is the primary resource for 45 percent of Texas Baptist churches. Through these offices, contextualized training and service is provided to strengthen the leaders and congregations ministering in over 69 languages. It is a crazy big endeavor that grows by the day. In the last 20 years, Texas Baptists' churches increased by 36 percent. In this increase, 76 percent of new Texas Baptists' churches were non-Anglo. Forty-five percent of all Texas Baptists' churches identified themselves as ethnic. The Texas population is close to 28 million and is projected to grow to 33 million by 2030. The graphs on page 15 illustrate the changing demographics from 2010 to 2030, with the Hispanic population projected to increase by eight percent, becoming the largest ethnic group in Texas.

Currently 12 million Texans are unchurched, a number greater than the total population of 45 different states. But, as the state grows, more and more of the unchurched will be from languages and cultures that are not Anglo. Our team works to equip churches to respond to that growing reality. We are called to follow Christ in bringing the Gospel to all people, in every language and culture in our state. Our calling leads us to connect, contextualize and collaborate with Texas Baptists' churches to reach our growing state. The challenge for Texas Baptists is to embrace the diversity of the changing culture. Over the next few pages, you will read stories from our three teams about the work they are doing to fulfill the Great Commandment and Great Commission throughout Texas and around the world.

The other minority groups are also projected to increase

CONNECT 14

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

THE CULTURAL ENGAGEMENT TEAM Lorenzo PeĂąa

Director/Mega Associations, Cultural Engagement lorenzo.pena@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5345

Roy Cotton

Director of African American Ministries roy.cotton@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5130

Sharron Bradley

Ministry Assistant, African American Ministries sharron.bradley@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5131

Rolando Rodriguez

Director of Hispanic Ministries rolando.rodriguez@texasbaptists.org 214.887.5425

Gabriel Cortes

Director, Hispanic Education Initiative gabriel.cortes@texasbaptists.org 214.887.5426

Leonid Regheta

Director, Project: Start leonid.regheta@texasbaptists.org 817.773.1097

Patty Lane

Director of Intercultural Ministries patty.lane@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5372

Mark Heavener

Strategist, Intercultural Ministries mark.heavener@texasbaptists.org 281.728.8585

Carol Powell

Ministry Assistant, Intercultural Ministries carol.powell@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5379

TEXAS POPULATION BY RACE/ETHNICITY, 1990-2010-2030 Anglo 2%

Black

Hispanic

6%

7%

26%

12%

60%

45%

38% 11%

1990

Other

2010

46%

36% 11%

2030

*Figures for 1990 and 2010 obtained from U.S. Census Bureau, 2030 from Texas Demographic Center. J U LY 2 0 1 7

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SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

compelled

to make

disciples

T HROUGH

hispanic ministries B Y R O L A N D O R O D R I G U E Z , D I R E C T O R O F H I S PA N I C M I N I S T R I E S

The problem in this world is not the economy. If so,

The world has understood the secret of the multiplication and

God would have sent us an economist. The problem of the

has practiced it in an effective way. Think about this. God's plan

world is not education. If so, God would have sent an educator.

for the church, "make disciples" – everyone has gotten it except

The problem of this world is called sin, so God sent us a

the church. There are groups that grow and spread around the

Savior. God's plan to change the world is: "Make Disciples."

world by "making disciples." But these are groups that have as

The message of our Lord Jesus Christ to his disciples after his

their goal to bring harm and destruction to the lives of

resurrection, and before He ascended to heaven, was:

people. And the Church, which has been given the

Therefore go and make disciples. (Matthew 28:19)

power (Matthew 28:19-20) to change lives and transform

I have found in some Hispanic churches today, leaders are involved in so many things except in that, which is not only the most important ministry in the life of the Church, but the plan that our Lord Jesus Christ gave the Church to change a world that lives in darkness – discipleship. Christianity without discipleship is a hollow Christianity, and that is the picture of the church of the 21st century. Rightly, the church is not having an impact in its community and around the world and, therefore, it is not multiplying itself.

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families in the world, has been paralyzed. The reality is that the church does not grow because members have not learned to live as disciples. What is discipleship? It’s a disciple helping other disciples to be conformed to the image of his Master (Luke 9:24-25). Discipleship is not a program, or an event – it is a way of life.


SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

Let's look at some essential elements to make disciples:

In the film Son of God Jesus leans in to Peter and says to him:

1) The formation of the disciple. Teach the disciple to obey,

"Come, follow me and I will make you fishers of men." Peter

not only to learn. "Teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you." (Matthew 28:20)

2) The formation of character

responds by saying: "What are we going to do?" And Jesus turns his face, looking toward the city, and beyond he says: "We are going to change the world." Church, are you ready to change the world one person at a

3) Accountability of what he is learning and living.

time? It is not a great suggestion. It is the great mandate.

4) Being with the disciple. "And He ordained twelve, that

"For the love of Christ compels us." (2 Corinthians 5:14)

they might be with Him and that He might send them to preach." (Mark 3:14) The only way of making disciples is by being with them.

5) Invest in the life of the disciple. It takes time, resources. But above all, a love for the person.

6) It’s to multiply/replicate yourself in the lives of other people. "The things that thou hast heard of me among many witnesses (Paul to Timothy), commit these to faithful men, who shall be able (Timothy to other men) to teach others (men to other men) also.” (2 Timothy 2:2) To be a disciple is to be called to make disciples. "And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brothers, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for

FOR THE LOVE OF CHRIST COMPELS US. (2 CORINTHIANS 5:14)

they were fishermen. Then He said to them, 'Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men.'" (Matthew 4.18-19)

CONTEXTUALIZATION The Cultural Engagement Team recognizes that churches need training in their language and context, and our commitment is to train and equip leaders in relevant ways. We believe that if we can impact the lives of pastors and leaders, they will impact the life of their churches. Through Hispanic Ministries, Director Rolando Rodriguez has contextualized a discipleship program for Hispanic churches to better reach and engage believers to grow in their faith and create new disciples.

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PROJECT:

START

HELPS KENYAN CHURCH EXPAND CAPACITY FOR REFUGEE MINISTRY

In January, members of Upendo Baptist Church in Garland

As needs arose, the congregation saw fellow believers serve

gathered to fast and pray that God would grow their church.

and give far beyond what they anticipated. One Thursday in

Only a week later, Pastor Shadrack Ruto was connected to 60 people in search of a new church home. The initial three visitors to the church were not from a Kenyan background, like the majority of the church membership, but were refugees from the Central African Republic who lived within 10 miles of the church. The families had recently moved to the United States from refugee camps. Ruto heard story after story of trauma and need from the families, and the church leaders gathered to see how they could help. Transportation to and from church was a necessity, so church members stepped up to provide rides. There was also a language barrier, as the refugees primarily spoke French. One of the refugees was fluent in English and volunteered to translate worship services and conversations. The translator started teaching English classes after church on Sundays to help refugees learn to adapt to American culture. While Upendo church members were thankful to God for the answered prayers, they realized the refugees’ needs far outweighed the capacity of the church. In March, Ruto learned about Project: Start through Texas Baptists, a refugee resource center created to connect refugees with churches and ministries. Housed in the Vickery Meadow area, Project: Start began in 2015 to provide a centralized place for refugee resources. Ruto saw great value in the center and called Leonid Regheta, director of Project: Start, for help with needs. Regheta connected him with several area churches and ministries who provide resources to refugees, such as food, medical care, furniture, job search assistance and more.

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BY K ALIE LOWRIE , NE WS DIRECTOR

May, through Regheta’s help, three members of Park Cities Baptist Church in Dallas drove their personal vehicles to a warehouse in Plano to pick up furniture. The PCBC members were greeted by Charles Pyles, with the Collin Baptist Association, and Win Brown, Jr., deputy executive director of Victim Relief Ministries. The men loaded the vehicles to the brim with bookcases, dressers, desks and other household furniture, and drove 10 miles to deliver the gifts to Upendo Baptist Church.


“We are honored to have this as a joint project,” said Brown. “This is a Kingdom of God initiative. We are excited that this will be a blessing to many.” The furniture, provided by Victim Relief Ministries, was later given to refugee families. Clothing donations came from Hunters Glen Baptist Church, and volunteers from First Baptist Church of Corsicana assisted with a ministry day at the church on June 10. Ruto was humbled by all of the generosity they received. “This is a true picture of the church of Christ. It is wonderful to be able to see this,” he said.

MEET Moinlari

For Ruto, serving the refugee families is part of the church’s responsibility to live out the Gospel. He also saw his church members grow in appreciation for the missionaries who shared the Gospel in Kenya. Many church members also remember coming to the U.S. for the first time and experiencing culture shock and uncertainties. “We are happy to help. We understand life in America for a newcomer. We came in as strangers and learned. When they come, they don’t feel like strangers. They feel at home,” Ruto said. The refugee families also added a new vibrancy to the Upendo Baptist Church, leading worship songs and participating in the study of scripture, according to Ruto.

"This is a good testimony for people to see the love of believers from all cultures,” he said. For more information on volunteer opportunities and connection to refugee resources in the Dallas area through Project: Start, contact Leonid Regheta at

Many of the refugees fled war-torn Central African Republic and entered the United States with next to nothing. Moinlari Albertine, a mother of six, lost her husband in the Central African Republic during the war. As she described the terror her family faced in 2006, when war began, tears filled her eyes. Villagers helped her and her children escape to the Cameroon borders, where they lived for 10 years, until receiving passage into the U.S. in February. Albertine expressed deep gratitude for the safety, security and hope she found in her new church, Upendo Baptist Church. “This is my home now,” Albertine said of Upendo Baptist. “I have received benefit through counseling and prayers.”

projectstart@texasbaptists.org or 817.773.1097.

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SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

l a r u t l u c

r e t c t e n n i n o c s e h c r s u p ch u o r g e l p peo to the

l e p s go E BY K ALI

EM G. SCHR Z I L A N AND A LOWRIE

In heaven, people of every tongue, tribe and nation will worship together, yet we tend to separate ourselves out when we congregate. At first glance, it may seem wrong to serve

MER

CARING FOR REFUGEES AS BURMESE AMERICANS

separately, but when you put yourself in the shoes of a recent

When Americans think of a diverse church, they probably

immigrant, trying to navigate around a foreign culture and

think of a congregation where two, maybe three languages

an unknown language, it makes perfect sense.

are spoken. But the members of Greater Houston Burmese

“If you go visit a church where you can’t understand the language, and the culture is confusing, how are you going to meet Christ?” asked Intercultural Ministries Director Patty Lane. “Even if you do somehow meet Christ, how are you going to get discipled when the message of Jesus isn’t communicated in a way that you understand? If it isn’t spoken in your heart language?” Lane emphasized the importance of giving people the opportunity to serve God in a way that doesn’t feel like “a transplant of Americanism.”

Christian Fellowship speak more than 20 dialects. The church, which focuses on ministering to refugees, has a membership of more than 350. “Refugee ministry is very important because they are strangers to the land...culturally, socially and emotionally,” said GHBCF Pastor Thong Lun. “No matter what kind of mindset they bring in, providing hospitality to refugees can change their minds and hearts. Whenever a new family or a newcomer visits our church for the first time, we give them rice, cooking supplies, clothes, etc. We try our best to show them that we love them, we care for them and we warmly welcome them.” GHBCF rents an apartment to serve as a mission point for their church and a place where partner

Each of the following churches is reaching out to a specific

organizations can offer ESL classes and

ethnic group in Texas. Their ministries and missions

host an after-school

work are as varied as their native languages and cultural

program. In addition,

backgrounds.

Lun provides pastoral

“These churches are all doing an amazing job serving their community not only here, but also overseas. A lot of them may come from places where the Gospel isn’t easily shared, so they don’t take that for granted and have used that freedom to reach out to people with the Gospel in places where they may otherwise not hear it.”

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TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

care by visiting homes to do Bible studies and offers guidance on things like navigating American culture and job applications.


SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

REACHING INDIGENOUS TRIBES IN THE PHILIPPINES WITH THE GOSPEL Members of First Philippine Baptist Church of Houston were looking for a way to serve and prayed for the Lord’s guidance. “We asked, ‘To whom are you sending us and what are we supposed to be doing?,’” said Cecile Dagohoy, mission team leader. The Houston-based congregation is a self-described commuter church, with members traveling from across the city and suburbs for fellowship each week. Through a variety of circumstances and connections, the members felt called to the southernmost island of the Philippines. This summer, 26 members of the church traveled to the Filipino island to share the Gospel with two indigenous tribes - Mamanwaw and Bisayan.

and school supplies from members of First Philippine Baptist

CREATING A NETWORK OF NEPALI-SPEAKING BELIEVERS

Church and a partnering Filipino church from the area. While

Pastor Bhadra Rai, from the Canaan Bhutanese Church

there, the group also helped build a community center, provided

in Houston, had a vision to build a worldwide leadership

drug rehabilitation training and hosted a pastors’ conference.

network of Nepali-speaking Christians. While his

“We see the results of being faithful to His call,” Dagohoy said.

congregation ministers to Bhutanese Nepali people in their

“We realize who He is – He is able and that is powerful. The

community, he wanted to join together like-minded pastors

realization makes for a very dynamic church.”

and leaders around the world to provide encouragement

The people groups, who are primarily nomadic, walked four-tosix hours down a mountain to receive medical care, kits of food

and support. Rai desired to create a platform for ministers to discuss contemporary issues facing Nepali-speaking

UNITING EASTERN EUROPEANS IN SERVICE AND LOVE River of Life Church in Plano has a congregation that consists of people groups that are not always as amicable overseas. The 50-person congregation, which meets at the Hunter’s Glen Baptist Church building, hosts its gatherings in Russian. Members are immigrants or refugees from Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, Uzbekistan, Estonia, Armenia, Georgia and Russia, among others. Despite some political conflicts overseas, the

Christians and to build a virtual network to connect and partner for Kingdom work. In March, the Global NepaliSpeaking Fellowship was held in Siliguri, India, drawing pastors from 13 different countries. “Every church has its vision in one way or another to strengthen the believers in faith in Christ and to spread the Good News,” Rai said. “In the same way, we were able to host the Global Nepali-Speaking Conference to empower the Nepali-speaking leaders around the globe. My church and I were encouraged by this event to continue this work in future.”

congregation members are connected by language, faith and family. The church focuses on what Russian speakers have in common by hosting outreaches that serve families, such as an egg hunt on Easter and a summer camp for children. “What a beautiful picture of God’s Kingdom and His Church when we all are working together to see people of all nations and tribes get to know Him whether here, in North Texas, or overseas,” said River of Life Pastor Leonid Regheta, who also serves as director of Texas Baptists’ Project: Start Refugee Resource Center.

CONNECTION The Cultural Engagement Team is called to connect and engage with the population of our state and find those new people groups that now call Texas home. Intercultural Ministries, led by Patty Lane, works with new people groups, many of whom are from countries where the Gospel cannot be freely shared. To do that, we must connect in authentic ways by sharing God’s love and meeting needs.

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s t r a e h filling through

program

BY ANALIZ G . SCHREMMER , CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Every Wednesday, at least 300 people line up outside of New

Jackson said the lunch program, which is open to

Light Baptist Church of Lubbock for a sack lunch. They receive

anyone who comes, is also an evangelistic effort.

food, but are also served a helping of love, respect and kindness.

“What we are trying to do is give people an

“I don’t care what they look like or what their hygiene is like,

opportunity to accept Jesus as their Lord and Savior.

we will treat them with dignity and respect,” said New Light

The lunch programs give us the opportunity to

Baptist Church Pastor Kenneth Jackson. “I think a lot of them

interact with members of the local community, the

are shocked by the reception they get; but we are Christians,

homeless community and those down on their luck,

so we are supposed to be full of compassion.”

and talk to them about God. We also invite social

The Love and Lunch program started in 2008 with a

service agencies to come in and offer help.”

distribution of 15 sack lunches. Jackson said 337 were served

Jackson, who studied social work in college, said the

the second Wednesday in May.

church assesses the needs of the clients so that they

Jackson, who serves as president of the African American

can direct them to services that are available in the

Fellowship of Lubbock and networks with Texas Baptists

community.

African American Ministries, said that John 21 inspired him

“The church secretary is our social services resource

to start the lunch program.

person and she has a book with services in the

“That really stayed with me,” he said.

area. We get a chance to direct people to services,

because a lot of people don’t know where to get the help they need. It’s been a great opportunity to offer

I THOUGHT, ‘WOW, WHAT A WONDERFUL THING TO DO. WE ARE GOING TO START A LUNCH PROGRAM.’ WE PUT FLYERS OUT IN THE COMMUNITY AND THE WORD OF MOUTH GOT OUT AND PEOPLE STARTED COMING.

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TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

help. I have a survey form that I use to capture their information so that we can see what their physical


SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

needs are. Then, when we do a home visit, we can share

Offering for assisting us with the work here. They have been a

the plan of salvation. We want them to know that we are

big help to us in terms of assisting us with resources to provide

concerned about them totally.”

items that we need for the lunch program.”

Jackson shared the story of a lady who came to Love and Lunch asking for help for her five grandchildren. "She said she didn’t know what to do and was at her wit’s end because she didn’t even know where the children’s mothers were," Jackson said. “Can you envision a grandmother taking care of five additional children on her income? So I referred her to social services and they have helped her. She came back one Sunday and told the whole church, ‘I’m so glad pastor talked to me because I didn’t know what to do.’” “I get chills thinking about it,” Jackson added. “Who knows how many people have been impacted greatly that we don’t

COLL ABOR ATION For the Cultural Engagement Team, collaboration means working together to accomplish the greater good of reaching and ministering to people through the Great Commission and the Great Commandment. Texas Baptists’ African American Ministries, led by Director Roy Cotton, collaborates with churches like New Light Baptist Church in Lubbock to help them love their neighbors through the Love and Lunch program. Pastor Kenneth Jackson and NLBC show God’s love by treating those who are often neglected by society with dignity and respect.

even know about. I’m so thankful to the Texas Baptist Hunger

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hacer discipulos A T RAV ES DE

MINISTERIOS HISPANOS B Y R O L A N D O R O D R I G U E Z , D I R E C T O R D E M I N I S T E R I O S H I S PA N O S

El problema de este mundo no es la economía. Si así fuera,

El mundo ha entendido el secreto de la multiplicación y lo

Dios nos hubiera enviado a un economista. El problema del

ha practicado de una manera efectiva. Piensa en esto. El

mundo no es la educación. Si así fuera, Dios hubiera enviado

plan de Dios para la iglesia, "hacer discípulos," todos lo han

a un educador. El problema de este mundo es el pecado, por

captado, menos la iglesia. Hay grupos que su manera de crecer

eso Dios envió a un Salvador. El plan de Dios para cambiar el

y esparcirse alrededor del mundo es por medio de "hacer

mundo es: “Hacer Discípulos.” El mensaje de nuestro Señor

discípulos." Estos son grupos que tienen como meta

Jesucristo a sus discípulos después de su resurrección y antes

traer daño y destrucción a la vida de las personas. Y la

de ascender al cielo fue:

Iglesia, a la cual se le ha dado el poder (Mateo 28:19-

Por tanto ir y hacer discípulos. (Mateo 28:19)

20) para cambiar vidas, y transformar familias, ha

La iglesia de hoy en día está involucrada en tantas cosas, menos en aquello, que no solo es el ministerio más importante en la vida de la iglesia, sino es el plan que nuestro Señor Jesucristo le dio a la iglesia para cambiar a un mundo que vive en tinieblas. El cristianismo sin discipulado es un cristianismo hueco, y esa es la fotografía de la iglesia del siglo 21. Con toda razón, la iglesia no está teniendo un impacto en su comunidad ni en el mundo entero, y por lo tanto no se está multiplicando.

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TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

quedado paralizada. La realidad es que la iglesia no crece porque los miembros no han aprendido a vivir como discípulos. ¿Qué es discipulado? Es un discípulo ayudando a otros discípulos a ser conformados a la imagen de su Maestro (Lucas 9:24-25). El discipulado no es un programa, ni un evento, es una forma de vida.


SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

Veamos algunos elementos esenciales para hacer discípulos:

1) La formación del discípulo – Enseñar al discípulo para que obedezca, no solo para que aprenda. “Enseñándoles a guardar todo lo que os he mandado.” (Mateo 28:20)

En la película Son of God Jesús se arrima a Pedro y le dice: “Ven, sígueme y te haré pescador de hombres.” Pedro responde diciendo: “¿Qué vamos a hacer?” Y Jesús voltea su rostro mirando hacia la ciudad, y más allá dice: “Vamos a cambiar el mundo.”

2) La formación del carácter

Iglesia, ¿Estás lista para cambiar el mundo una persona a la

3) Rendición de cuentas de lo que está aprendiendo y viviendo.

vez? No es una gran sugerencia, es el gran mandato. “Porque el

4) Estar con el discípulo – “Y estableció doce, para que estuviesen con él, y para enviarlos a predicar.” (Marcos 3:14) La única manera de hacer discípulos es estando con ellos.

5) Invertir en la vida del discípulo – Esto toma tiempo y recursos, pero por encima de todo, un amor por la persona.

6) Es multiplicarte en la vida de otras personas – “Lo que has oído de mí ante muchos testigos (Pablo a Timoteo), esto encarga a hombres fieles que sean idóneos (Timoteo a otros hombres), para enseñar a otros (hombres idóneos a otros hombres idóneos) tambien." (2 Timothy 2:2) Ser discípulo es ser llamado a hacer discípulos. “Andando Jesús junto al mar de Galilea, vio a dos hermanos, Simón, llamado Pedro, y Andrés su hertmano, que echaban la red en

amor de Cristo nos constriñe.” (2 Corintios 5:14)

PORQUE EL AMOR DE CRISTO NOS CONSTRIÑE. (2 CORINTHIANS 5:14)

el mar; porque eran pescadores. Y les dijo: Venid en pos de mí, y os haré pescadores de hombres.” (Mateo 4.18-19)

CONTEXTUALIZACION El Equipo de Interacción Cultural (Cultural Engagement Team) reconoce que las iglesias necesitan entrenamiento en su lenguaje y contexto; por eso nuestro compromiso es entrenar y equipar líderes en maneras relevantes. Creemos que si podemos impactar las vidas de pastores y líderes, ellos impactarán la vida de sus iglesias. A través de los Ministerios Hispanos, el Director Rolando Rodríguez ha contextualizado un programa de discipulado para iglesias hispanas para alcanzar e interactuar mejor con los creyentes para que crezcan en su fe y desarrollen nuevos discípulos.

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TRAINING DBU BUSINESS STUDENTS

WORLD

TO SERVE IN THE MARKETPLACES OF THE

BY ROSS O’BRIEN , PH .D. DIRECTOR , CENTER FOR BUSINESS A S MISSION

It has become apparent that too many Christians in the business

Through this life-changing program, men experience

world believe they are an auxiliary to mission work. They think

spiritual, emotional, relational, and mental growth. A part

of themselves as providing means and finances, but they rarely

of this program involves volunteers from the community

view themselves as missionaries.

attending programs and providing ongoing support.

Jesus’ commandments to serve others in Matthew 25 and to

I’m so proud of our DBU students as they demonstrate

make disciples among all peoples in Matthew 28 were not

God’s grace and love to these men. Bryan Kelley, Executive

directed solely to those employed by churches or mission

Relations Manager for PEP, agrees, stating, “DBU students

agencies.

have embraced and empowered our prisoner population by

Incredibly, all followers of Jesus have the privilege and

modeling Matthew 25 and meeting them in the prison in

responsibility of serving God in these ways, and He has

which they reside, sharing hope and showing them a better

equipped each one of us with unique skills, abilities, interests

way to live. Priceless.”

and gifts, and has put us in a world in which we can work from

Another group of students engage the local Dallas

our individual callings.

community through collaboration with H.I.S. Bridge

Some people He calls to business—to serve Him in the

Builders, Bonton Honey, and Bonton Farms. H.I.S. Bridge

marketplaces of the world. These men and women come in contact with and work alongside more individuals who are lost than many pastors or missionaries ever could. They have access to hurting and spiritually desperate individuals in countries closed to traditional missions. They have the opportunity to reflect God’s glory in the products they make, the services they offer, the care they show, and the example they provide. Through Dallas Baptist University’s Center for Business as Mission, we want to show students and others outside of the University what it means to intentionally walk with God at work. One method of doing this is to partner with organizations that share our philosophy. For example, each semester we take students to a prison in Venus, Texas, to volunteer with Prison Entrepreneurship Program, a non-profit organization that serves carefully selected offenders through life and business training programs.

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Builders is an incredible ministry that works alongside residents of one of the economically poorest and physically least healthy communities in Dallas, all with the mission to see God’s transforming work among individuals and families.


SPOTLIGHT / ENGAGING DIVERSE CULTURES

In 2002, Ross O’Brien began teaching

in the College of Business at DBU. Later in 2013, God allowed him to combine the experience and calling He had given in missions and in

business by establishing the Center for Business as Mission within the Dallas Baptist University College of Business. The Center for Business as Mission seeks to educate and equip current and future business leaders to restore lives through effective engagement in the marketplaces of the world, by integrating God’s biblical call to mission with His vocational call to business. This mission is accomplished through various means, including undergraduate and graduate classes in business as mission (BAM); classes in social entrepreneurship; engagement in the local community; travel study classes to Sierra Leone,

H.I.S. Bridge Builders addresses poverty in all its forms in this

Bangladesh, Chile and Israel; guest speakers

community, through spiritual discipleship, job training, and also

experienced in BAM; and hosting The Lion’s Den

through access to healthy foods at Bonton Farm.

DFW, a business plan competition for Kingdom-

The community is a food desert, lacking access to healthy food. The Farm, now its own nonprofit organization, grows a variety of vegetables, provides jobs, and teaches people about the importance of a healthy diet. DBU students volunteer at the Farm and in the community in a variety of ways. Some work at the Farm, pulling weeds, planting, and harvesting. Others have come alongside Bonton Honey to help develop a strategic business plan to help this innovative company launch. Often we see the world through a secular or sacred divide, believing that God’s work happens primarily through full-time church ministers. Yet, He has provided for us an incredible mission field right in the midst of the world of commerce. The Lord of the harvest gives us the privilege of being co-laborers with Christ in the harvest fields, but He also has commanded it and will hold us accountable. With thanksgiving and humility, let us pray that we will all be found faithful to the call.

oriented businesses.

DALLAS BAPTIST UNIVERSITY

founded :

1898

5,156 STUDENTS

12: 1

FACULTY/STUDENT RATIO

106

DEGREES OFFERED 73 Undergraduate 31 Master's 2 Doctoral

1 of 9

TEXAS BAPTISTS HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS J U LY 2 0 1 7

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A REPORT FROM THE TEXAS CAPITOL B Y K AT H RY N F R E E M A N , D I R E C T O R O F P U B L I C P O L I C Y

AFTER 140 DAYS , the 85th Texas Legislative

The crisis in Texas’ foster care system had been the subject

Session has ended and, even though a special session will

of many headlines and discussions in the lead-up to the

begin on July 18, several important bills were passed over the

legislative session. The Legislature took many positive steps

last five months.

toward improving the system. Some of the major bills signed

Religious liberty concerns topped the list of Texas Baptists Christian Life Commission priorities. The CLC helped lead efforts to protect religious conscience rights of faith-based child welfare agencies. HB 3859 protects the rights of religious child welfare agencies to place children in homes consistent with their religious beliefs about the best environment for raising children. In addition, the CLC helped stop bills that would have preempted

by the governor include:

• HB 4 Authorizes monthly payments to relative caregivers

whose household income is below 300 percent of the federal poverty level. Maintaining family connections should be the first priority wherever possible, as children placed with relatives experience better outcomes (fewer mental behavioral health issues and placement disruptions).

• SB 11 Contains many reforms, but the most important and

sports. The CLC has long stood against gambling and payday

prominent change is the move to community-based foster care. This change is designed to allow for more community engagement, including with local churches and pastors, in hopes of placing more children in forever families.

lending because both lead to financial exploitation of the poor.

CLC commissioners set criminal justice reform as another

city ordinances that regulate payday and auto title lending and bills to expand gambling in the state, including daily fantasy

priority. The CLC is a member of the Texas Smart on Crime Coalition, which champions reforms that keep our cities safe,

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TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


reduce recidivism, and promote effective use of taxpayer

The CLC supported eight bills designed to protect the sanctity

dollars. Here are some of our priority bills in the area of

of life. Here are two of the pro-life bills that passed this

criminal justice reform that passed this session:

session:

• HB 3130 Establishes a pilot project for educational and

• SB 8 Bans partial-birth and dismemberment abortions, in

• SB 1584 Requires judges to conduct a risk and needs

• HB 2858 Was passed as part of HB 2552, an omnibus anti-human

vocational training in state jail facilities. This pilot project is designed to fill gaps in programming in state jails and therefore reduce recidivism. assessment before setting the conditions of community supervision. Studies show community supervision or probation are most effective in rehabilitating when the needs of the offender are personalized to the factors that led to criminal involvement.

• SB 1913 Protects poor offenders from excessive fees and fines.

Often, poor people are imprisoned simply because they lack the resources to pay. This bill makes it easier for judges to give offenders convicted of fine-only offenses community service and other work options. It would require judges to evaluate a person’s ability to pay before issuing a warrant for failure to pay.

addition to banning the sale of fetal tissue and research on the body parts of aborted babies. It also requires the humane disposition of the bodies of aborted babies.

trafficking bill. It protects women and girls from forced abortions and requires abortion facilities to post the phone number for the National Human Trafficking hotline in prominent places.

The CLC’s legislative priorities are set by a diverse group of 18 Texas Baptists who serve as commissioners. Christian discipleship includes the pursuit of justice through advocacy and public policy, and our priorities reflect a wide array of justice concerns for the poor, the vulnerable, and the marginalized. We work in a nonpartisan manner to advance the common good.

J U LY 2 0 1 7

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TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


WHO WE ARE & WHAT WE DO For more than 130 years, the Baptist General Convention of Texas (Texas Baptists) has helped churches fulfill the Great Commission and the Great Commandment. Today, we are more than 5,300 churches working together in harmonious cooperation to share the Gospel and love others. The ministry of the Convention is organized into teams that inform and inspire churches through events, resources, consultations and more.

Through gifts to the Texas Baptists Cooperative Program, you and your church enable missions and ministry across the state and around the world. Because you give, love is shown, the Gospel is shared and lives are transformed. Learn more about affiliation at texasbaptists.org/affiliate, and learn more about the Texas Baptists Cooperative Program at texasbaptists.org/cp.

GREAT COMMISSION TEAM

COLLEGIATE MINISTRY TEAM

Evangelism Discipleship Music & Worship

Baptist Student Ministries Church College Ministry Go Now Missions

MISSIONS TEAM

CONNECTIONS TEAM

CHRISTIAN LIFE COMMISSION

CULTURAL ENGAGEMENT TEAM

Multi-housing & House Congregations Urban Missions MAP River Ministry BOUNCE Ethics & Justice Public Policy Community Care Hunger Offering

Church Starting Area Representatives Counseling Services Church Architecture

Camps Minister Connection Interim Services Bivocational Pastors

African American Ministries Hispanic Ministries Hispanic Education Initiative Intercultural Ministries Project: Start Associations

In addition, we proudly partner with 28 education, advocacy and human care institutions around Texas.

AUGUST 2017

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7557 RAMBLER ROAD, SUITE 1200 DALLAS, TX 75231

We are sending enough copies to share. Contact us if you would like to receive additional subscriptions or update your church staff information. Please email subscriptions@texasbaptists.org.

Profile for Texas Baptists

Texas Baptists Life, Volume 5 - Issue 4  

The Cultural Engagement Team works with the cultural diversity of Texas. Through Hispanic, African American and Intercultural Ministries, ou...

Texas Baptists Life, Volume 5 - Issue 4  

The Cultural Engagement Team works with the cultural diversity of Texas. Through Hispanic, African American and Intercultural Ministries, ou...

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