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SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING: LASTING SUCCESS, UNIQUELY EXPERIENCING GOD pg. 15

VOLUME 5 . ISSUE 2

Embracing local culture: Country Church thrives in East Texas pg. 20

Tried and true: Six steps to planting a church pg. 18

Go Now students reaching the border for Christ pg. 8


TEXAS BAPTISTS EVENT CALENDAR Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

26

27

28

29

30

31

1 April

Hispanic Preaching Conference, DFW North Texas YEC, Burleson

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Bible Drill/Speakers’ Tournament, Allen and Houston

Introduction to Interim Ministry, Marshall

Leader’s Edge Summit, Irving

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10

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12

13

14

15

Good Friday 16

17

18

19

20

Easter

21

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Bible Drill/Speakers’ Tournament, Grand Prairie, Lubbock, Tyler Campus Missionary Interview Day, Dallas

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24

25

26

Texas Baptists Golf Classic, Houston

27

28

MinistrySafe Workshop, Midland

Congreso, Waco

Texas Baptists Educator’s Retreat, New Braunfels

Leader’s Edge Summit, San Antonio State Bible Drill/ Speakers’ Tournament, Dallas

Director of Missions Team Meeting, Houston

30

1 May

2

3

4

5th Sunday Hunger Offering

6

[un]Apologetic Conference, Corpus Christi

8

9

10

MinistrySafe Workshop, Lubbock

14

5

Retiro Enriqueciendo el Matrimonio (Marriage Enrichment Retreat), Fort Worth

Congreso, Waco

7

29

15

16

11

12

13

19

20

MinistrySafe Workshop, Dallas

17

18

Go Now Missions Orientation and Commissioning Service, Dallas

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

29

30

31

1 June

2

3

Go Now Missions Orientation and Commissioning Service, Dallas

28

Save the date for Annual Meeting, November 12-14, 2017 in Waco.

Visit texasbaptists.org/events for more info and to register for an event today.


LASTING SUCCESS,

TEX AS BAPTISTS LIFE / VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 2 / MARCH 2017

UNIQUELY

EXPERIENCING

GOD

pg. 15

F E AT U R E S

SPOTLIGHT

Go Now students reaching the border for Christ

Texas Baptists reaching an expanding state through church starting

A look into the life and legacy of James B. Simmons

Tried and true: Six steps to planting a church

How 25 chickens transformed a family: A Texas Baptist Hunger Offering story

Embracing local culture: Country Church thrives in East Texas

IN E VE RY ISSU E

Event calendar

Homes of transformation En Español: Hogares de transformación

Letter from Executive Director Impact: Texas Baptists news Staff spotlight: Church Starting Resources

P U B L I C AT I O N T E A M

Joshua Seth Minatrea, Director of Communications Kalie Lowrie, News Director Jeremy Honea, Art Director Jordan Parker, Multimedia Specialist Brittany Thomas, Communications Assistant

You are receiving a free copy of Texas Baptists Life because of your generous support of the Cooperative Program. To subscribe, call 214.828.5232 or email subscriptions@texasbaptists.org. MARCH 2017

3


Hello, Texas Baptists!

I am sometimes asked, "What makes Texas Baptists

When you give through your church to the Texas

First, we have great people in leadership as I have just

Baptists Cooperative Program, you are assisting in the most effective and efficient church planting movement in the United States. Over the past five years, you have helped us start more than 400 new churches in Texas, and 94% of those are still in operation today. Compare that to the national Church Starting success rate of around 30% and you get my point. Thank you for helping us make a difference, for the sake of the Gospel, through Church Starting. I am so very grateful for the leadership that Dr. Joe Loughlin is providing to our Connections Team and, as a part of that team, Paul Atkinson who directs our Church Starting Team. Working with Paul are six very capable Church Starting consultants. Collectively, these servants are being faithful and responsible stewards of the resources you provide.

Church Starting so successful?" My answer is two-fold. mentioned. Second, these leaders, over the last few years, have developed a wonderful program complete with an accurate initial assessment of potential church planters, appropriate partnerships between the Convention and the local association, the sponsor church (or churches) and the church planter and adequate funding. We are always on the lookout for new church planters. We are always seeking new people groups and new population centers where a new church might be needed. Please join me and our Church Starting Team in praying for continued success. These new churches reach people for Christ, give back financially and start other new churches. It is good work. Thank you, Texas Baptists, for making it all possible. Blessings,

D AV I D H A R D A G E E XECU TIVE DIRECTOR

4

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


APRIL 24, 2017

__________________________ GOLF CLUB OF HOUSTON 5860 WILSON ROAD, HUMBLE, TEXAS 77396 Home of the Shell Houston Open

TITLE SPONSOR:

BENEFITING:

texasbaptists.org/golf


IMPACT: TEXAS BAPTISTS NEWS

Hunger Offering celebrates 20 years of giving, totaling $15.5 million The Texas Baptist Hunger Offering celebrated its 20th year, connecting Texas Baptists churches through support of ministries which meet immediate nutritional needs of people living in poverty and developing long-term solutions. Through 20 years of giving, Texas Baptists have raised $15.5 million, which has been disbursed through worldwide ministries combatting hunger and poverty. “These past 20 years have been bright and full,” Ali Hearon, hunger and care ministries specialist, said. “Churches have connected with ministries and ministries with churches. Individuals have gathered around the issue of hunger. The future of the offering is to continue to generate opportunities for people who feel called by God through support and ministry.” In 2016, Texas Baptists churches' gifts to the Hunger Offering, totaling $640,784, went to support the work of 182 distinct ministries worldwide. Read on pages 12-13 about how one family was transformed through a ministry in Northern Thailand and the gift of 25 chickens.

Cuban partnership forms global connection for Congreso Two Texas Baptists leaders from the Great Commission Team traveled to Cuba in November to network with local Baptist ministers and form a partnership with Congreso events in Cuba and Texas. For Joshua del Risco, evangelism lead for Texas Baptists’ Great Commission Team, it was a return to the country of his birth. The trip was planned when the Eastern Baptist Convention of Cuba invited del Risco and Delvin Atchison, director of the Great Commission Team, to speak at their Congreso youth evangelism event. Congreso was hosted by Primera Iglesia Bautista Bayamo, with 800 students and youth ministers from around the eastern region of the country in attendance. “It was a phenomenal experience to be with them,” del Risco said. “I shared a message of hope for the change that will come. I told them God is looking for a generation of young people to bring about change, not knowing Castro would pass away a week later.” Atchison also shared a message with the young leaders about following the dreams God has designed for each of their lives which was very warmly received.

6

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


TEXAS BAPTISTS AWARDED $1 MILLION GRANT FROM LILLY ENDOWMENT TO ASSIST PASTORS The Baptist General Convention of Texas has been awarded a $1 Million implementation grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to participate in its National Initiative to Address Economic Challenges Facing Pastoral Leaders. Through the grant, Texas Baptists will create a Center for Ministerial Excellence, which will conduct regional financial retreats for pastors and laity, award financial grants of up to $5,000 to pastors facing economic challenges, and recruit a statewide network of financial planners to help Texas Baptists pastors seeking financial advice.

ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FOUR STUDENTS SERVE ON GO NOW MISSIONS CHRISTMAS TRIPS One hundred forty-four students served on Go Now mission trips over Christmas break in two Texas cities, four U.S. states and eight countries. At least one Go Now missionary was serving on the mission field every day in 2016. Justin Lynch served on a Go Now trip to South Asia over Christmas. “Before the trip, I had a fear of sharing the hope of Jesus with others,” he said. “As I ended the trip, God opened my heart. Now, I want to share this news with everyone. I learned many ways to spark a conversation, turn the subject and share the Gospel.”

“As a pastor, I am well aware that financial struggles can impact a pastor’s family and their church,” said Steve Vernon, associate executive director of Texas Baptists. “The support the grant makes available to pastors will have far reaching benefits for our Texas Baptists family and encourage our pastors in their fulfillment of the Great Commission and the Great Commandment.” For more information, call 888.244.9400 or visit texasbaptists.org/cme.

Mustaches raise $17,000 for missions An unconventional fundraising strategy for missions has made a big impact on two Central Texas university campuses. The Mustache Wheel of Doom fundraiser brought in a combined $17,000 on the campuses of Tarleton State University in Stephenville and Howard Payne University in Brownwood through the Baptist Student Ministries. The fundraiser has an easy premise. Teams of students grow beards (or wear fake mustaches) during the month of November and gain pledges and gifts for Go Now Missions. At the end of the fundraising time, the teams with the highest fundraising totals are exempt from spinning the dreaded Mustache Wheel of Doom. Raising money and awareness for Go Now Missions was a valuable emphasis, according to Keith Platte, BSM Director at Howard Payne University. “The Great Commission really transforms students in their walk with Christ as well as their worldview and their outlook for their campus,” Platte said. To read more Texas Baptists news stories, visit texasbaptists.org/news.

MARCH 2017

7


8

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


Go Now students reaching the border for Christ BY JENNIFER DE IBEL , CONTRIBUTING WRITER

constant spiritual warfare,” Ortiz explains.

spread the Gospel, had a profound impact

course of your life? That’s the question

“Everyone got sick with a stomach flu, one

on both Garcia and Ortiz. “God taught

Daniel Ortiz was asking when he heard

girl’s father was ill and we faced lots of

me that it is not my job to change people,

about a short-term missions opportunity

delays. But we pulled together, prayed over

it’s His,” Garcia explains. “I am simply an

through Go Now Missions. Ortiz, a

one another, and God worked through us.”

instrument that He uses to share the Good

Can one week really change the

sophomore nursing student at University

Freshman UTRGV student Lizette

News.” She wants everyone to know God

of Texas Rio Grande Valley (UTRGV),

Garcia also participated in the Border

can—and does—use every person who

had been interested in serving through

Outreach trip, coordinated by Texas

is willing, no matter their weaknesses.

missions, but was unsure about heading

Baptists' River Ministry Coodinator

Ortiz, who prior to the trip was studying

overseas at this time in his life. When

Osvaldo Lerma, and was impacted by

aerospace engineering, changed his major

he learned of an opportunity to serve

the spiritual connection forged through

to nursing after the experience. “I saw how

in Brownsville, Texas for a week during

the difficulties the team faced. “Having

I had been pursuing something that was

the Christmas break, Ortiz was excited—

that kind of support really affected me

selfish,” he explains. “I came away from

and curious. “I’d hear things like, ‘These

in my walk with God,” Garcia explains.

this trip asking myself, ‘How am I going to

trips will change your life!’ and I used to

“Knowing that He is in control and has

use my talents to expand the Kingdom

wonder how that was really possible,”

a plan.”

of God?’”

Ortiz recalls. “How could one week really

Each afternoon, the team was divided

Go Now Missions mobilizes Texas

into two groups—one led Vacation Bible

university students to share the love of

School at the church building, while the

Christ across the world. A ministry of

change those Ortiz was serving more than

other led it in a local park. “The highlight

Texas Baptists, Go Now Missions offers

God would change him, Ortiz prayerfully

of this trip for me was sharing the Gospel

a variety of service options ranging from

applied for the trip, and was accepted.

with two girls, and them receiving Christ,”

as short as ten days, to a few weeks in the

Ortiz and the 12 other members of his team

Garcia shares. Ortiz—who led an 11-year-

summer, or even a full semester. Students

served Primera Iglesia Bautista Mexicana

old boy to the Lord—holds a similar

who are active in both their local church

and Iglesia Bautista el Buen Pastor

excitement, sharing that almost daily

and campus Baptist Student Ministries

through cleaning projects, packing and

someone reported another person had

have the opportunity to serve. Go Now has

delivering food boxes to needy families,

placed his or her faith in Christ.

a wide range of positions and locations

make that much of a difference?” With the expectation that God would

handing out flyers for church activities,

Seeing the body of Christ in action,

available. Learn more about Go Now

and hosting Vacation Bible School for

and witnessing firsthand how God used

Missions and view service opportunities

the local children. “Every day we faced

each individual’s gifts and talents to

at gonowmissions.com.

MARCH 2017

9


A look into the life and legacy of James B. Simmons B Y D R . T R AV I S L . F R A M P T O N , P R O F E S S O R O F B I B L I C A L S T U D I E S , L O G S D O N S C H O O L O F T H E O L O GY, H A R D I N -S I M M O N S U N I V E R S I T Y

Dr. Travis L. Frampton developed a growing interest in

In 1858, just three years before the Civil War

Dr. James B. Simmons' life and works several years ago

commenced, Simmons was threatened with a “coat of

upon reading The Cause and Cure of the Rebellion,

tar and feathers” and subsequently lost the meeting

an abolitionist sermon published by Dr. Simmons in

house of his church in Indianapolis, which burned to

1861. The following story details Dr. Frampton’s journey

the ground in 1861, because of what he was preaching

on his sabbatical to learn more about the life and

from behind his Baptist pulpit.

legacy of the institution’s founder. Having taught at Hardin-Simmons University for

Southeastern United States 10 colleges, most of which

almost two decades, I am more invested in Hardin-

were for freed slaves. He believed in educating all

Simmons than in any other school of which I have been

people. He was a close friend and associate of John D.

a part. As my own life has been inspired and changed

Rockefeller and Booker T. Washington. His circle of

for the better by Dr. James B. Simmons’ story, I wanted

friends included the Beecher family (especially the

to know more about our university’s founder, especially

brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of Uncle Tom’s

his early life. Who was he? From where did he come?

Cabin). Needless to say, Simmons was highly respected

What was his family like?

and well connected, corresponding frequently

In the summer of 2014, I headed to the Northeast for my sabbatical. I visited the places he lived, the churches he pastored and schools he attended. Why? Because I believed that, in his story, our university would find an answer to the question: Why Hardin-Simmons? I learned that our identity rests in his story and therein is our reason for being. In addition, I learned to be a better Christian, to have greater thoughts and to carry them dutifully to completion and, in the end, to direct my own life’s work toward making the world a better place. I also learned we must tell his story.

A Voice Cries Out One of the most formative periods of Simmons’ life (1827-1905) occurred while he was pastor of the First Baptist Church of Indianapolis. Once, during the progress of a trial, a fugitive slave broke away from the marshal and began to run away. “The Presbyterian marshal pursued his Methodist brother [the fugitive] with revolver in hand, shooting at him twice before he caught him. My soul was horrified,” Simmons said. “I said to myself, ‘When in the name of heaven, shall a man who fears God speak, if not now?’ I did speak. My subject was ‘The American Slave System tried by the Golden Rule.’”

10

In the postwar era, he helped establish across the

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

with several prominent American icons of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Christlieb College Three years after the death of his wife Mary, Dr. Simmons mailed 20 copies of a book from New York to Abilene. He stated in a letter he affixed inside the cover of each volume that “Christlieb College,” which means the College of Christ’s Love, was his chosen name for the new educational enterprise in West Texas. In addition, he also intimated that two questions should be asked of “the Faculty, the Trustees, the Patrons and the Pupils of this College.” For more than 40 years, no two questions had influenced him so strongly as these: 1. What is the greatest thought that has ever occupied your mind? 2. What is your duty toward fulfilling it? Although we are known as Hardin-Simmons by name, we must be Christlieb in spirit, with greatest thoughts and a duty toward fulfilling them. We must be good stewards of Simmons’ vision for our school and, as such, work to inspire others to action—as students, alumni, faculty, staff, administrators and trustees—to realize and participate in the worthy cause he set into motion 125 years ago: the College of Christ’s Love.


The story of James B. Simmons brings gravitas to the work we do. The $5,000 he donated in 1891 may have aided the completion of Old Main, but the rich legacy he left continues to this day to encourage people to make a difference in the world.

Why Hardin-Simmons University? It would be difficult to name an individual who had more influence in the 19th century on higher education for the betterment of all people than Dr. James B. Simmons. It would be difficult to name another more influential, whose impact reached from the East Coast to the Western Frontier of the United States, helping establish 10 colleges in all—six of which still remain. James B. Simmons’ story is our university’s story. It is the Hardin-Simmons University story par excellence. It is a Gospel about doing—a Gospel of not just knowing Christ, but being Christ to the world. The reason Simmons’ story is so compelling is because it exemplifies the Christian narrative by incarnating the Gospel. What did Simmons have to gain as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Indianapolis when he spoke out with such vehemence and resolve against slavery? More importantly, consider what he could have lost. His life was a Christian witness of a Gospel that proclaims that we die to ourselves so that others might gain. The Gospel for him was simple, yet profound and costly. Simmons did make the world a better place, and this is a goal, a purpose in life, to which we want our graduates to aspire. We have more than a donor buried in our midst; we have a luminary. Simmons was a man who had “the greatest thoughts” and carried out his “duty toward fulfilling them.” Since the day he was buried beside his wife, just south of Old Main, in what was then a cow pasture, we have had the answer to what makes us different from more than 500 Christian

founded : location :

1891 Abilene, Texas

[

[

2,205 STUDENTS

With a current enrollment of 2,205 students, HSU offers an exceptional, life-changing educational experience.

12:1 A 12:1 student-to-faculty ratio allows students personal attention as they pursue over 65 fields of study.

200 ACRES

Nicknamed the Forty Acres, the campus now encompasses more than 200 acres.

1 of 9

1 of 9 Texas Baptists higher education institutions.

liberal arts colleges across the country. Simmons provided us with an inspiring example of the ways in which Christian education could change the direction of a nation

Visit hsutx.edu for more information.

by reconfiguring its moral compass.

MARCH 2017

11


How 25 chickens transformed a family: A Texas Baptist Hunger Offering story BY K ALIE LOWRIE , NE WS DIRECTOR

12

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


Soontorn Inthayok is a day laborer and part-time guard, serving as the

primary wage-earner for his family in Northern Thailand. The 49-year-old provides for his older sister, who is mentally disabled, and his son, who is

5TH SUNDAY HUNGER OFFERING DATES:

attending technical college. He also overcomes his personal disability to bring home earnings of approximately $300 US dollars per month. While Soontorn works extremely hard, often the monthly expenses of food, utilities and tuition are more than what he earns.

MAY

APRIL

JULY

14

30

30

Special Mother’s Day Hunger Offering

When Soontorn learned he was selected

to participate in the Social Development and Service Unit (SDSU) Chicken and Cattle Farming Project, he was elated. He received training on budgeting, preparation, and how to care for chickens, and was then entrusted with grant money to begin a small chicken farm. The funds were used to build a chicken coop on his property, as well as to purchase

DECEMBER

OCTOBER

31

29

Visit hungeroffering.org for more resources to promote the Hunger Offering in your church.

the needed equipment and feed to care for 25 chickens. “When we first started to raise chickens, we used the eggs for family use in cooking,” Soontorn said. “Every 3-5 days we collect more than 10 eggs, we have plenty of eggs to fry and boil. We do not have to buy eggs at the market anymore.”

Soontorn’s family has plenty of eggs for consumption and even has enough

to sell to friends and neighbors. By selling each egg for 3 bath (about 8.5 cents) the family is earning an additional 300-400 bath per month. Some of the chickens are

182 $

MINISTRIES SUPPORTED BY THE HUNGER OFFERING

15.5

MILLION

HUNGER OFFERING GIFTS GIVEN OVER 20 YEARS

used for eating, adding much needed protein to their diets, and others have been shared with his local church and neighbors. He has also been able to sell several chickens to provide much needed income for his family. Participants in the SDSU Chicken and Cattle Farming Project are selected based upon greatest need, with preference given to those with disabilities who have need

TEXAS HAS THE HIGHEST PERCENTAGE OF FOOD INSECURE HOUSEHOLDS IN THE NATION

for additional income. Local churches recommend people in their community for consideration and oversee the projects for three years. One hundred percent of funds given to the project through the Texas Baptist Hunger Offering directly support local families. “Without the Hunger Offering, this project would not be able to happen,” said Hunter Huff, staff member for SDSU.

IN 2015

4.2 MILLION

AMERICANS WERE UNABLE TO ACCESS ADEQUATE FOOD

IMPACTING MORE THAN 13 MILLION CHILDREN

“The lives of the participants are changed forever and they are able to see the love of Christ through the actions, care and love of local believers. The funds are making a huge difference in the lives of many people who society has forgotten. The participants are truly the ‘least of these.’”

Lives are being changed, as participants see hope for the future and a way

out of the poverty they have experienced. As Soontorn said, “Raising chickens is good, easy, and brings great joy!” In 2016, Texas Baptists churches’ gifts to the Hunger Offering, totaling $640,784, supported the work of 182 distinct ministries

SOME

795 MILLION

PEOPLE ON EARTH ARE REPORTED TO BE UNDERNOURISHED

THAT'S 1 IN 9 PEOPLE

which met short-term relief needs and developed long-term solutions to poverty. MARCH 2017

13


How Can I Support Missions Beyond My Lifetime? You can leave a legacy for missions through: • A gift in your will: A dollar amount or percentage of your estate can be used for a specific mission need or wherever it is needed. • A gift annuity: Receive income for as long as you or your spouse live, then whatever funds are left will be used for the mission cause you choose.

The Texas Baptist Missions Foundation can help guide you through this important step in your estate planning.

• A charitable trust: Like a gift annuity, a charitable trust provides income for a period of years or your lifetime, then the remaining balance will be used for your favorite missions cause. • An endowment: A permanent fund to which you can give as often and as much as you like. Only the income is spent, so the fund will support missions for generations to come.

Contact us at 214.828.5343 or texasbaptists.org/tbmf.


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

SPOTLIGHT

Texas Baptists Church Starting: Lasting success, uniquely experiencing God 16

TEXAS BAPTISTS REACHING AN EXPANDING STATE THROUGH CHURCH STARTING Paul Atkinson, director of Church Starting, shares how Texas Baptists Church Starting is helping equip church planters with the skills and strategies necessary to reach a changing state.

18

TRIED AND TRUE: SIX STEPS TO PLANTING A CHURCH With a 94% success rate, the Texas Baptists Church Starting process is more efficient and effective than any other. Learn more about six simple steps that can lead to a lasting legacy with our Church Starting Model.

20

EMBRACING LOCAL CULTURE: COUNTRY CHURCH THRIVES IN EAST TEXAS Seven churches in East Texas joined together to plant the Tyler County Country Church because they saw a segment of the community that was not being reached. Read how church planter Jordan Wilson has experienced great success reaching the unchurched in Woodville by embracing the local culture.

26 28

HOMES OF TRANSFORMATION Read about a network of 28 house churches in San Antonio that are seeing great multiplication as they seek to reflect the communities they serve.

EN ESPAÑOL: HOGARES DE TRANSFORMACIÓN Read the Spanish translation highlighting the growing network of house congregations in San Antonio.

MARCH 2017

15


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

TEXAS BAPTISTS REACHING

AN EXPANDING STATE THROUGH

CHURCH STARTING B Y PA U L AT K I N S O N , D I R E C T O R O F C H U R C H S TA R T I N G

Church Starting is a collective effort, but it is also the pursuit of a unique and personal experience with God. The Texas Baptists Church Starting experience consists of partners interested in assuming the responsibility God has given them. It provides new churches with assistance in 20 critical success factors and 100 behaviors which include:

„ Vision Empowerment

„ Doctrinal Integrity

„ Administrative Maturity

„ Church Type

„ Covenant Expectations

„ Financial and Legal Matters

Core Group Development

„ Partner Relationships

„ Organization and Structure

„ Launch and Development

„ Member Relationships

„ Discipleship Strategy

„ Planter Commitment

„ Coaching Relationships

„ Evangelism Strategy

„

„

Planter Development

„ Planter’s Spiritual Vitality

„

Facilities and Location

„ Missional Reproduction

„ Furniture and Equipment

The Church Starting Team also provides materials which support these success factors and behaviors. Church Starting is not just for traditional churches but a wide range of church experiences which include, but are not limited to, Acts 29, African American, Biker, Burmese, Contemporary, Country, Cowboy, Filipino, Hispanic, Karen, Korean, Liberian, Lisu, Mizo, Myanmar, Soma, Zimbabwean, Zotung and any other affinity imaginable.

WHAT BREAKS YOUR HEART? When you see a people group, a community or a neighborhood that is not being reached with the Gospel, are you compelled to action? Does your heart break when you see someone who may never hear the name of Jesus unless you do something? If you answered “yes” to these questions, you might be an ideal Church Starting candidate. Texas Baptists Church Starting works to equip church planters with the skills, encouragement, mentoring and coaching, strategies and funding

16

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

needed to successfully plant a church in an unreached area or with an unreached people group. Through years of implementation, evaluation and refinement, we have developed a remarkably effective model for reaching the lost in a community. Today, thousands of people are making professions of faith and being baptized because of the efforts of new church plants around the state. If your heart breaks for the lost, this process might be one God is calling you to.


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

In 2016, Texas Baptists Church Starting began a new chapter. A residency program called the Church Planting Center was created. It is our prayer that this process will encourage, facilitate and connect churches in their work to fulfill God’s mission of reconciling the world to Himself. We know that when all parties have a clear, strong, common vision, new churches can grow,

TEXAS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING BY THE NUMBERS 2011-2016

reproduce and replenish mission funds. Our goal is to provide a process for developing church planters through residency programs in partnership with local churches. This residency program can be applied across cultures, areas and creative strategies while valuing our Texas Baptists process

403

Churches started

and policies. This process is designed to create a church planting community by providing training and fellowship opportunities for church planters and leadership of existing church plants. This intensive training process includes formal and informal components exhibited in three hours per week in the classroom, covering topics such as administration, coaching, preaching,

20,280 Professions of Faith

strategy planning, evangelism/discipleship and leadership. In addition, the residents spend seven hours a week being mentored in a local church plant that is similar to the style and affinity that the resident feels called to plant. It equips church planters to plant churches when the program is completed.

3,790 Baptisms

Each candidate must present a preliminary church planting proposal that includes their calling, vision, values and demographics. Each resident must be a member of a church that is affiliated with Texas Baptists. The Church Planting Center is a partnership between the affiliated church in full cooperation with Texas Baptists, the Church Planting Center leadership team, and

$2,168,853

of Cooperative Program Missions giving

Texas Baptists Church Starting. Many people only think of a church start in the first year, but the reality is that we as Texas Baptists work with a new church start for five years. During that five years we see a church go from not only supporting itself, but planting a new work which needs support. It truly becomes missional – not only in statement, but in action.

94% survival rate *

as compared to 30% national average

Texas is growing exponentially. Church Starting must keep up if we are to impact our changing demographic and culture. Our desire is for Texas Baptist churches to plant churches that will reach people groups that they are not reaching. If God is calling you to plant a church, call us. If God is calling your church to plant and sponsor a church, call us. If you want to join God in this work of reaching the

*This means 94% of the churches that covenant with Texas Baptists are still active churches at the end of our five-year process, as of October 2016.

lost of Texas, you can give to the Cooperative Program.

For more information about starting a church, contact Paul Atkinson at 888.244.9400 or paul.atkinson@texasbaptists.org. You can also visit texasbaptists.org/churchstarting for more details.

MARCH 2017

17


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

TRIED AND TRUE

SIX

INTEREST MEETING Church planters and/or sponsors attend a preliminary interest meeting to learn more about the Church Starting process.

TO STEPS STARTING

A NEW CHURCH

STRATEGY MEETING

Contact Paul Atkinson Director of Church Starting 888.244.9400 paul.atkinson@texasbaptists.org texasbaptists.org/churchstarting

18

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

The Church Starting group discusses new church start strategy, including expectations, success factors, covenant interests, accountability and goals. Within five years of the covenant agreement, the new church should be self-supporting, self-governing, and able to serve as a primary sponsor for another new church.


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

SUBMIT APPLICATION Church planters and/or sponsors submit the new church application online. Following the submission, applicants will be contacted by a member of the Church Starting Team.

MISSION FUNDING COUNCIL APPROVAL The new church start receives funding from Texas Baptists after the Mission Funding Council approves the signed covenant agreement and the church start submits its first monthly report.

DISCOVERY MEETING Church planters and sponsors, once secured, attend a discovery meeting to explore details of the new church start. This meeting includes a member of the Church Starting Team, the church planter and church sponsor, the Director of Missions or other associational representative, and a representative from an affinity group as needed.

GROWTH REVIEWS A strategic planning team reviews the growth and development of the new church start through quarterly growth reviews, and redesigns the church’s budget as needed. A new church evaluation is conducted every three to six months and placed in the church’s permanent file.

MARCH 2017

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SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

EMBRACING LOCAL CULTURE:

COUNTRY

CHURCH THRIVES IN EAST TEXAS BY K ALIE LOWRIE , NE WS DIRECTOR

20

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

As Pastor and Church Planter Jordan Wilson stands back and

reflects on all God has done in the three-and-a-half years since Tyler County Country Church (TC3) began, he is truly in awe. Standing in a 16,000-square-foot, two-story building in Woodville, which opened its doors in October 2016, Wilson can point to so many moments of God’s faithfulness and provision.

TC3 was started by Wilson and his wife, Emily, in 2013 after

being approached by First Baptist Church Woodville and six other area churches who saw the need for a new church in the area to reach a different segment of the population. Initially, the church was started as a Cowboy Church, but they soon found that the model did not quite work for the people they were trying to reach.

Wilson learned about a new Country Church model through

his work with Texas Baptists and found it was just the right fit. “There are certain elements that make Country Churches successful and we believe we can take those tools and use them within our context to reach people,” he said. From playing country music to enjoying a relaxed dress code and atmosphere, the model has allowed visitors to feel right at home. It also embraces the “Southern” culture of the country, as many in the community enjoy recreational activities like hunting and fishing. From the beginning, Wilson knew TC3 would be a church that would reach people who were not already in church. “We never aspired to reach people who were at other churches. We aspired to reach people who were at home on Sunday mornings,” he said. “We are also a church for people who know they don’t have it all together,” Wilson continued. “It’s okay to come to Country Church. To come home and be who you are. We embrace the grace God has given us through Jesus. No matter what they’ve experienced, they will not be judged. They are just going to be loved.” The church has seen 50 baptisms and professions of faith. Starting out with just a handful of members, the church now averages well over 300 each Sunday and prays to fill every seat in the 450-seat worship center one day.

As you drive up to TC3, trucks line the parking area and a bluegrass band fills the air

with soothing rhythms and harmonies. Walking into the lobby, six large whitetail deer mounts line the wall of the balcony, with a bison, elk and turkey at eye level. A welcome center and “outpost” with church apparel also draw you in. For Wilson, each component of the first impression makes a difference and each element was selected intentionally. Striving for excellence in everything they do has also been a primary motivator. “It sets the stage for country people to feel at home and for God to move,” he said.

WATCH a video of Jordan Wilson sharing about church planting and TC3 online at texasbaptists.org/life.

MARCH 2017

21


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

When TC3 began, they met on the local county fair

grounds, then moved outside when they outgrew the space. As summer months approached, meeting outside was no longer possible, so the church moved to a school cafeteria for several months. Then one day, Wilson received a call that changed everything – a donor wanted to give the church 30 acres of land to have as their own. “God blessed us with this property of 30 acres, debt-free. There is no other explanation than it was God’s blessing,” Wilson recalled. “We purchased our own tent and for two years we met for church right here on the property.”

In October 2016, TC3 opened the doors on their new two-

story facility, with six children’s classrooms and a spacious multipurpose lobby. “Anytime a blessing comes in life, there’s always a temptation to relax and stop moving forward,” Wilson said in a 2016 church report. “While that’s good for a season and maybe necessary, what’s happening at the Country Church over these last few years is only the beginning of what we believe God wants to do through this church. We pause for a moment and give thanks to the Lord and those who He’s used to make all of these great things possible up to this point, but we also continue to look forward to our future. It is our hope that God would use this church as an example of what could be and will be all throughout our region and to other rural parts of the country.”

Although the congregation is only three years old, TC3

has a heart to start new churches as the opportunity arises. “Other churches came together a few years ago to plant our church, and we feel called to do the same,” Wilson said. With an average of 5,500 churches closing their doors in America each year, Wilson sees the need for new church models to reach the state and country for Christ. Through the success they have seen at TC3, he believes many aspects of the Country Church could be duplicated to reach nearby communities similar to Woodville.

Reflecting on his work as a church planter, Wilson said,

“It’s easy to see the glamorous side of church planting – and it is the most rewarding thing you will do in your whole life. But I want people to understand and know that it is some of the hardest work you will do as a minister.”

Wilson is thankful for the support he has received through Texas Baptists Church Starting. He encourages

other individuals prayerfully considering planting churches to utilize the resources which have led to their church’s success. “It means a lot to know that somebody is ready to come alongside, support and build you up and help you,” he said of the Church Starting Team. “It would be really easy to feel like you are an island on your own. But we’ve got a team of people who really come alongside us and supported us through local churches, our association and our Growth Review team. When we join together, we can accomplish great things – a lot bigger things than we can when we are separate.”

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TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

WHERE DOES IT GO? Every minute, every day, everywhere, your CP dollars are hard at work sending laborers into the harvest.

MISSIONS (38%) 3,000+ Worldwide Missionaries 159 BSM Missionaries on 115 Campuses River Ministry/Mexico Texas Baptist Missionaries BOUNCE (Student Disaster Recovery)

EDUCATION & HUMAN CARE MINISTRIES (28%)

MINISTRIES (16%)

9 Texas Baptist Universities

Bible Study

8 Seminaries

Church Starting

Evangelism Discipleship

6 Baptist Hospitals

Music & Worship

5 Child/Elder Care Ministries

Church Architecture Student Ministry

463 Go Now Missionaries

Interim Church Services

Texas Baptist Men

800+ Endorsed Chaplains

Hispanic Ministries

Counseling

African American Ministries Intercultural Ministries

texasbaptists.org/cp 888.244.9400

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT TEAM (11%)

COMMUNICATIONS (4%) News

CHRISTIAN LIFE COMMISSION (3%)

Accounting

Web

Ethics & Justice

Technology

Design

Social Issues Advocacy

Human Resources

Social Media

Public Policy

Marketing

Hunger & Community Care

Please visit texasbaptists.org for detailed 2016 Budget and Reports as well as a complete listing of Texas Baptists Missions and Ministries.


STAFF SPOTLIGHT

Paul Atkinson

Director, Church Starting paul.atkinson@texasbaptists.org 214.801.7195

CHURCH STARTING

John Silva

The Texas Baptists Church Starting experience involves many people—not just convention staff and Executive Board members, Church Starters, core groups and Church Starting partners, but ultimately the unchurched people in every part of the state. It is the prayer of all those people that this process will encourage, facilitate and connect churches in their work to fulfill God’s mission of reconciling the world to Himself. We know that when all parties have a clear, strong, common vision, the results are new churches that can grow, reproduce and replenish mission funds. Church Starting is a collective effort, but it is also the pursuit of a unique and personal experience with God. Church Starting is not just for traditional churches.

Church Starter - Area 1 john.silva@texasbaptists.org 806.392.6902

AREA

1

Gary Patterson

Church Starter - Area 2 gary.patterson@texasbaptists.org 210.710.0998

Visit texasbaptists.org/churchstarting for more information. Terry Lynch

Ministry Assistant, Church Starting terry.lynch@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5397

Jason Bryant

Western Heritage & Church Starting Consultant jason.bryant@texasbaptists.org 903.480.1386

24

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

Julie Galindo

Ministry Assistant, Church Starting julie.galindo@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5297


WHAT DO YOU LIKE DOING ON THE

Mateo Rendon

Church Starter - Area 5 mateo.rendon@texasbaptists.org 817.694.3966

Clay Jacobson

Church Starter - Area 4 clay.jacobson@texasbaptists.org 325.436.1219

WEEKEND? Spending time with my husband

AREA

AREA

4

5

Smoking barbecue and grilling Hiking and biking with my wife, Val Working my eight hives of bees

AREA

6

Playing with my grandsons AREA

3

Watching movies with my family Spending time with my wife and three girls Spending time with my husband and our dogs

AREA

2

Anthony Cobbs

Church Starter - Area 3 anthony.cobbs@texasbaptists.org 210.449.5766

Playing Candy Land with my daughters Feeding and caring for my horses Reading, writing and working out

Joe Loughlin

Director, Connections Team joe.loughlin@texasbaptists.org 214.887.5475

Patti Adams

Lead Ministry Assistant, Connections patti.adams@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5111

MARCH 2017

25


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

HOMES O OF

TRANSFORMATION BY JOHN HALL , CONTRIBUTING WRITER

26

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

Monica was like a lot of women who come to the

house churches would come

growing network of house churches Paul Gonzales

together for worship at a

leads on the west side of San Antonio. She was

traditional church where they’d

struggling in her relationship with her live-in boyfriend

rent space for a small fee.

of 10 years and didn’t know where to turn. She found

“When we decided to

support and encouragement from the roughly 20

open up different homes, it

Christians who gathered weekly. They talked about

grew to at least 200, 300,”

what God desires in a relationship between a man and

Gonzales said. “I don’t keep

a woman, including marriage.

track of the numbers. They

Little by little, she shared what she was learning

open up their homes and do

with her boyfriend, Matthew Flores. Once or twice he

a lot of ministry within their

even acquiesced to her requests to come with her to

neighborhoods and have

church. After a year, Gonzales married the couple in a

Bible studies.” Now Gonzales

park. Eventually, Monica and Matthew came to church

helps 28 house churches that

together. One day, Matthew surprisingly stood up.

spread across San Antonio.

With tears in his eyes, he thanked his wife for being so

The congregations reflect

patient with him. He had given his life to Christ. Soon

the communities they serve.

he’ll be baptized, and he and his wife will open their

They’re largely Hispanic and

home to their neighborhood for Bible studies so others

include singles and families

can hear the gospel as well.

ranging from young children to

Gonzales beams as he shares the couple’s story as well as the life transformations of others who

older adults. In many ways, they feel

have become part of the house church network. God

like family gatherings. The

is changing people through prayer, Bible study and

meetings are rather informal

relationships. “When we look at church gatherings,

and often include food. Leaders

it’s a wide open field,” Gonzales said. “We don’t look

guide a group conversation

at church buildings. Church doesn’t mean building.

about the Bible passage of the

It means people or the assembly. It has nothing to do

week. Because it is relaxed,

with the location it’s going to be, brick and mortar or

many people regularly share. Members learn from

whatever. Where believers gather, that’s where

each other and grow together. “There’s a hominess

church is.”

to it,” Gonzales said. “It’s family. We’re together. You

In Texas, more than 500 house churches are

don’t have to wait until Sunday to get in contact with

reaching people who likely would never come to

the church members. Most everyone feels comfortable

traditional churches. With the help of the Mary Hill

calling each other up asking for help or advice. That’s

Davis Offering for Texas Missions, Texas Baptists is

difficult to build up in a typical church setting.”

training these church leaders, equipping them to make disciples of those around them. Gonzales’ network began in 2002 when he and his

As each house church grows and individuals mature in the faith, they want to open their homes for worship like Monica and Matthew. As a result, a wave

wife opened up their home to relatives for a Bible study.

of disciples are being made much like they were in the

More and more people came until 50 individuals were

New Testament. “One of the first things I tell people

filling his small home. At that point, the group needed

who open their homes is this is what we aim for: Acts

to make a decision: Do they look at renting or buying

2,” Gonzales said. “They received the apostles. There

property or do they multiply by opening another

was Bible teaching. There was sharing the word. There

home? They settled on a combination of the two. House

was baptizing.”

churches would meet throughout the week for Bible study and worship in neighborhoods across the city. Once a month, they’d host a game night to encourage connections between members. And every week, the

To learn more about the work of the Missions Team with Multi-housing and House Congregations, contact Mario Alberto Gonzalez at marioalberto.gonzalez@texasbaptists.org or call 214.828.5389. MARCH 2017

27


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

HOGARES O DE

TRANSFORMACIÓN B Y J O H N H A L L , AU T O R C O N T R I B U I D O R

28

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS CHURCH STARTING

Mónica era como muchas de las mujeres

Ahora Gonzáles ayuda a 28 iglesias hogares

que vienen a la creciente red de iglesias

dispersas por todo San Antonio. Las

hogares que Paul Gonzáles dirige en el área

congregaciones reflejan las comunidades

oeste de San Antonio. Ella estaba luchando

donde sirven. Son predominantemente

en su relación con su pareja de 10 años, y

hispanas e incluyen a solteros y familias

no sabía a dónde recurrir.

con niños pequeños hasta adultos mayores.

Ella encontró apoyo y ánimo en los pocos

En muchas maneras se sienten como

20 cristianos que se reunían cada semana.

reuniones familiares. Las reuniones son

Ellos hablaban del deseo de Dios para la

informales y con frecuencia incluyen

relación entre un hombre y una mujer,

comida. Los líderes guían la conversación del grupo acerca del pasaje bíblico de la

incluyendo el matrimonio. Poco a poco, ella compartió lo que había estado aprendiendo con su pareja. Una o dos veces él aceptó las invitaciones de ir a la iglesia con ella. Después de un año, Gonzáles casó a la pareja en un parque.

En Texas, más de 500 iglesias hogares están

semana. Debido a su informalidad,

alcanzando a personas que probablemente

muchos comparten con regularidad. Los

nunca asistirían a iglesias tradicionales.

miembros aprenden los unos de los otros

Con la ayuda de la Ofrenda Mary Hill Davis

y crecen juntos.

para las misiones en Texas, los Bautistas de Texas entrenan a estos líderes de iglesia,

Por fin, los Flores fueron a la iglesia juntos.

equipándolos para hacer discípulos de los

Un día, Mateo sorpresivamente se puso de

que les rodean.

pie. Con lágrimas en sus ojos, le agradeció a su esposa por haber sido paciente con él. Él había entregado su vida a Cristo. Pronto se bautizaría, y él y su esposa abrirían su casa en su vecindario para tener estudios bíblicos para que también otros puedan escuchar el evangelio. Gonzáles irradia de alegría cuando comparte la historia de esta pareja así como la transformación de otras personas que han llegado a formar parte de la red de iglesias hogares. Dios está cambiando a las personas a través de la oración, el estudio bíblico, y las relaciones.

Gonzáles comenzó la red en el 2002 cuando él y su esposa abrieron su hogar para un estudio bíblico con sus familiares. Más y más personas llegaron hasta que 50 individuos llenaron su pequeña casa. En ese momento, el grupo tuvo que tomar una decisión: ¿Buscar alquilar o comprar una propiedad o

“Se sienten como en casa,” dijo Gonzáles.

multiplicarse abriendo otro hogar?

“Es familia. Estamos juntos. No tienes que

Decidieron hacer una combinación de

esperar al domingo para comunicarte con

ambas. Las iglesias hogares se reunirían

los miembros de la iglesia. La mayoría se

durante la semana para estudio bíblico y

sienten cómodos llamándose y pidiendo

adoración en vecindarios por toda la ciudad.

ayuda o consejo. Eso es difícil de desarrollar

Una vez al mes, auspiciarían una noche de

en un contexto de iglesia regular.”

juegos para fomentar las conexiones entre

“Cuando miro las reuniones de la iglesia,

Según cada iglesia hogar crece y los

los miembros. Cada semana, las iglesias

es un campo abierto de par en par”, dijo

individuos maduran en la fe, quieren

hogares se reunirían para adorar en una

Gonzáles. “No nos fijamos en los edificios.

abrir sus hogares para adorar como

iglesia tradicional donde alquilarían espacio

La iglesia no quiere decir el edificio.

lo hicieron Mónica y Mateo. Como

por una tarifa baja.

resultado, una ola de discípulos se está

“Cuando decidimos abrir hogares

formando muy parecido a como lo hacían

diferentes, crecimos hasta 200 o 300,”

en el Nuevo Testamento.

dijo Gonzáles. “No mantengo récord de

“Una de las primeras cosas que les digo

los números. Ellos abren sus hogares y

a las personas que abren sus hogares es

ministran en sus vecindarios y tienen

lo que buscamos: Hechos 2,” Gonzáles

estudios bíblicos.”

dijo. “Ellos recibían a los apóstoles. Había

Significa las personas o la asamblea. No tiene nada que ver con la localización, si es de ladrillo, cemento, o lo que sea. Donde quiera que los creyentes se reúnan, ahí es donde está la iglesia."

enseñanza bíblica. Compartían la Palabra. Había bautismos.”

Para aprender más acerca de la obra de nuestro Equipo de Misiones con Congregaciones en casas y apartamentos, comuníquese con Mario Alberto González a marioalberto.gonzalez@texasbaptists.org o llame al 214.828.5389.

MARCH 2017

29


RESOURCES CONNECT WITH THE CLC ON PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES During the 85th legislative session of Texas, the Austin-based Christian Life Commission is focused on the following public policy priorities: „

Children and Families

„

Religious Liberty

„

Hunger and Poverty

„

The Poor and the Vulnerable

„

Foster Care

„

Gambling Expansion

„

The Stranger Among Us

„

Predatory Lending

„

Human Trafficking

„

Criminal Justice Reform

„

Immigration

„

Human Life

Connect with the CLC staff today to learn more about how you can get involved in the political process. texasbaptists.org/clc

SPONSOR AN INDIGENOUS MISSIONARY THROUGH NEW MISSIONARY ADOPTION PROGRAM USE MINISTER CONNECTION TO SEEK OR POST MINISTERIAL POSITIONS

Are you a new minister seeking a position on a church staff? Are you a church looking to hire a new minister? Visit Minister Connection, a place where we connect ministers and churches with interested applicants and positions. This confidential resource is designed to share information about candidates open to a new field of ministry and churches with open ministerial positions. texasbaptists.org/ministerconnection

HOST A DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING FOR LEADERS AT YOUR CHURCH Discipleship provides one-day Sunday School/small groups consultations and training for Sunday School general leadership and church revitalization. Our staff is available to consult on site, by phone or by video conference with you and your church leaders regarding discipleship ministry in your church. We can also work with you and your association or area to provide leadership training events for those who lead the areas of Bible study and discipleship in your congregations. To schedule a consultation, or for more information, please contact Phil Miller at 214.828.5213. texasbaptists.org/discipleship

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TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

Is your church looking for a way to get involved in international mission work? Consider joining our new Missionary Adoption Program (MAP), which will allow your church to partner with a church in a host country to jointly sponsor an indigenous missionary. Contact Jair Campos at jair.campos@texasbaptists.org for more information on this exciting new mission program. texasbaptists.org/map


ONLINE EXCLUSIVE CONTENT

Join the conversation

ONLINE texasbaptists.org/life

READ an article from Church

Starter Gary Patterson about the 11 components of the Texas Baptists Church Starting experience and the success we have seen through this process over the past 10 years.

WATCH an interview with Jordan Wilson, pastor of Tyler

County Country Church, as he shares about the power of cooperation in reaching his community with the Gospel.

WHO WE ARE AND WHAT WE DO For more than 130 years, the Baptist General Convention of Texas has helped churches fulfill the Great Commission and the Great Commandment. Today, we are more than 5,300 churches working together in harmonious cooperation to share the Gospel and love others. The ministry of the Convention is organized into five teams: Great Commission Team, Missions Team, Christian Life Commission, Connections Team and Collegiate Ministry Team. These teams inform and inspire churches through events, resources, consultations and more. In addition, we proudly partner with 27 education, advocacy and human care institutions around Texas. Through gifts to the Texas Baptists Cooperative Program, you and your church enable missions and ministry across the state and around the world. Because you give, love is shown, the Gospel is shared and lives are transformed. Learn more about affiliation at texasbaptists.org/affiliation. MARCH 2017

31


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SAN ANTONIO, TX PERMIT NO. 1517

7557 RAMBLER ROAD, SUITE 1200 DALLAS, TX 75231

Contact us about adding subscriptions or updating your staff information at subscriptions@texasbaptists.org.

Profile for Texas Baptists

Texas Baptists Life, Volume 5 - Issue 2  

Spotlight: Texas Baptists Church Starting: Lasting success, uniquely experiencing God

Texas Baptists Life, Volume 5 - Issue 2  

Spotlight: Texas Baptists Church Starting: Lasting success, uniquely experiencing God

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