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SPOTLIGHT / CELEBRATING THE SERVICE OF TEXAS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS pg. 15

VOLUME 5 . ISSUE 1

The impact of institutional giving: Natalie’s story pg. 22

HPU student leads teammates to better understanding of Christ’s love pg. 21

Missionary Adoption Program opens doors for expanded ministry pg. 28


TEXAS BAPTISTS EVENT CALENDAR Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

29

30

31

1 February

2

3

4

Introduction to Interim Ministry Training, Waco

Bivocational Pastor & Spouse Retreat, Lubbock Abide, Spicewood Renovación, Lubbock VBS Overview, Austin

5

6

Renovación, Lubbock

12

7

8

VBS Overview, Dallas

13

14

9

10

11

MinistrySafe Workshop, Tyler

15

16

VBS Overview, Lubbock

17

18

Go Now Discovery Weekend, Midlothian VBS Overview, Corpus Christi 19

20

21

22

Go Now Discovery Weekend, Midlothian

23

Worship Summit, San Antonio

24

25

Bivocational Pastor & Spouse Retreat, San Antonio [un] Apologetic Conference, Austin Renovación, San Antonio VBS Overview, Rio Grande Valley

26

27

Renovación,

San Antonio

5

6

28

1 March

Worship Summit, Plainview

Renovación, Tyler

7

8

14

9

10

BGCT Camp Day,

15

Everlasting Choir Celebration for Boomers and Beyond, Abilene

Leader’s Edge Summit, Houston

Childhood Ministry Certification Program, Dallas

Beach Reach, South Padre Island

16

17

Introduction to Interim Ministry Training, Dallas 21

22

23

Everlasting Choir Celebration, Plano

26

27

28 MinistrySafe Workshop,

18 Instrumental Convergence, Tyler

Intentional Interim Ministry Spring Update, Dallas

BOUNCE Spring Break Mission 2, Houston

20

11

BOUNCE Spring Break Mission 1, Houston

Beach Reach, South Padre Island

19

4

African American Leadership Workshop, Waco

Dallas

13

3

CLC Advocacy Day, Austin

Everlasting Choir Celebration for Boomers and Beyond, Woodlands

12

2

24

25

Leader’s Edge Summit, Houston

29

30

31

1 April

Hispanic Preaching Conference, DFW

Woodway

Visit texasbaptists.org/events for more info and to register for an event today.


TEX AS BAPTISTS LIFE / VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 1 / JANUARY 2017

F E AT U R E S

Texas Baptists gather in Waco for 131st Annual Meeting Photos: Annual Meeting experience Missionary Adoption Program opens doors for expanded ministry in Brazil and beyond SPOTLIGHT

Providing hope, help, training and care through institutions Hendrick Breast Institute and The Hope Fund save patients, change lives Single father discovers joy in new beginning through Buckner HPU student leads teammates to better understanding of Christ’s love The impact of institutional giving: Natalie’s story En Español: Evidencia de la esperanza, la ayuda, el entrenamiento, y el cuidado por medio de nuestras instituciones

TING CELEBR A of ice the Serv TISTS P A B TE X A S IONS INSTITUT

p 15

IN E VE RY ISSU E

Event Calendar Letter from Executive Director Impact: Texas Baptists News Staff Spotlight: Texas Baptists Leadership Team Resources

P U B L I C AT I O N T E A M

Joshua Seth Minatrea, Director of Communications Kalie Lowrie, News Director Jeremy Honea, Art Director Jordan Parker, Multimedia Specialist Brittany Thomas, Communications Assistant

You are receiving a free copy of Texas Baptists Life because of your generous support of the Cooperative Program. To subscribe, call 214.828.5232 or email subscriptions@texasbaptists.org.

JANUARY 2017

3


Hello Texas Baptists!

Baptist church partners with a BBC Church and,

At the very heart of who we are and what we do as a

for one indigenous Brazilian missionary working

cooperative family of churches are evangelism and missions. Every Sunday, I have the chance to preach in a Texas Baptist church and each week the heartbeat of evangelism and missions is confirmed. For a while now, we have been thinking and praying about a specific or unique role we, as Texas Baptists, might be able to have in the field of missions beyond our borders. Most of our churches support the work of international missions in one way or another. They give to international mission offerings supporting missionaries overseas. Some churches are able to send their own missionaries to various parts of the world in

together, they provide the monthly financial support among the 147 unreached people groups in 10,000 villages along the Amazon region. The cost of this monthly support would be approximately $300 per month for each of the two partner churches, totaling $600 in monthly support to the indigenous missionary. Read more about this new opportunity on page 28. We have agreed to partner with them in this endeavor, believing it to be a very effective and efficient use of both human and financial resources. We are also pleased to have Jair Campos, a Brazilian member of our Texas Baptists staff, help us lead in this new venture.

which they have contacts or connections. These are all

So, if you have interest in this exciting venture, please

good, and we hope and pray for their success.

visit texasbaptists.org/map and we'll trust the Lord for

However, a new opportunity was presented to Texas Baptists by the Brazilian Baptist Convention.

success and increase. Blessings,

They have asked us to walk alongside them in an opportunity called "Missionary Adoption Program." A very brief explanation would be as follows: A Texas D AV I D H A R D A G E E XECU TIVE DIRECTOR

4

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


GREATER AUSTIN FEBRUARY 24-25, 2017 AUSTIN BAPTIST CHURCH

7016 RIBELIN RANCH DR

AUSTIN, TX

78750

ADDRESSING CURRENT WAYS TO REMOVE OBSTACLES TO EVANGELISM

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

LEE STROBEL

MARK MITTELBERG

DEBATE BETWEEN

MIKE LICONA

(CHRISTIAN)

MATT DILLAHUNTY (ATHEIST)

Topics include: “The Unexpected Adventure,” “Confident Faith: 20 Arrows of Truth” and many more. Visit texasapologetics.org to see a list of all the topics and to register online.

CONFERENCE RATES

ADULT RATES

early bird through February 9

$35

beginning February 10

$45

STUDENT RATES

early bird through February 9

$20

beginning February 10

$30

texasapologetics.org

But in your hearts set apart Christ as Lord. Always be prepared to give an answer to everyone who asks you to give the reason for the hope that you have. But do this with gentleness and respect. 1 Peter 3:15


IMPACT: TEXAS BAPTISTS NEWS SUMMIT ATTENDEES LEARN HOW TO CARE FOR FAMILIES WITH SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN When Jason and Maggie Whitt shared about the impact of special needs ministry during the Childhood and Family Ministry Summit on August 12, they spoke from their personal experience parenting their 7-year-old daughter, Camille. "It is important for the awareness to be heightened for families of children with special needs,” Whitt shared. “This will raise the awareness of the entire church." The Childhood and Family Ministry Summit, hosted by First Baptist Church in Arlington, prepared 375 leaders in how to become better teachers, ministers and parents.

RALLIES TRAIN LEADERS ON REACHING BOOMERS

Texas Baptists took the Boomer Life message on the road this fall, with one-day rallies hosted by Green Acres Baptist Church in Tyler, North Fort Worth Baptist Church in Fort Worth and Crestview Baptist Church in Georgetown. Altogether, more than 120 people came to discover how they can adapt their ministries to more effectively reach and minister to this diverse and exciting generation of aging adults.

TBMF awards $242,000 in ministry grants

TEXAS BAPTIST MISSIONS FOUNDATION

6

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

The Texas Baptist Mission Foundation has awarded $242,000 in grants to be used for ministry by Texas Baptists ministry staff in 2017. In August, the TBMF Council considered and approved 28 grant requests, funded by undesignated donor gifts, to be used for ministry projects by Texas Baptists, Texas Baptist Men and WMU of Texas.

Worship Summit held at ETBU Texas Baptists Music and Worship sponsored a Worship Summit October 27 on the campus of East Texas Baptist University, with over 70 in attendance. Designed for music and worship pastors to come together with others who share in the worship field, these events are also beneficial for church music majors, providing a day of discussion, round table topics and fellowship. The keynote address was delivered by Dr. Doran Bugg, music and worship minister at First Baptist Dallas.

Renovación conferences encourage ministers to revive the evangelistic fire Four regional Renovación Hispanic Evangelism Conferences were held in 2016, with more than 2,500 Hispanic pastors and leaders being challenged, inspired and equipped to fulfill the Great Commission and the Great Commandment throughout Texas. The most recent Renovación conference was held in the Houston area at Crosspoint Church in Bellaire on October 28 & 29. “One of the highlights of the Houston conference was the coming together of Hispanic pastors and leaders from the three Baptist associations to celebrate a unified conference in the region,” said Joshua del Risco, evangelism lead and director of Hispanic evangelism. “From all indications, this event will serve as a catalyst to further evangelistic collaboration and work between the congregations in these associations.”


TEXAS BAPTISTS PARTNER WITH TEXAS BAPTIST MEN FOR LONG-TERM DISASTER RECOVERY Texas Baptists have entered into a new partnership with Texas Baptist Men to provide disaster relief and long-term recovery solely through TBM. Texas Baptists Disaster Recovery will now be known as Texas Baptist Men Long Term Disaster Recovery, with staff members Marla Bearden and Gerald Davis officing through TBM headquarters in Dallas. This new partnership strengthens the long-time relationship with TBM and Texas Baptists are excited about the direction moving forward by joining these two valuable ministries together to meet needs and share Christ to victims of disaster.

NINE CHURCHES RECOGNIZED FOR CP GIVING During Texas Baptists’ Annual Meeting in Waco, nine churches were recognized for their Cooperative Program giving. Since 1925, the Cooperative Program has provided the fuel to fund mission work in Texas, the United States and around the world.

Top-giving churches among ethnic congregations:

Top-giving churches based upon church size:

The Fort Bend Church, Sugar Land

Green Acres Baptist Church, Tyler

Chinese Baptist Church, Houston

Pioneer Drive Baptist Church, Abilene

Northside Community Church, San Antonio

Bacon Heights Baptist Church, Lubbock

Vietnamese Baptist Church, Houston

First Baptist Church, Caldwell South Seminole Baptist Church, Seminole

Texas Baptists endorse first Native American Chaplain Texas Baptists have endorsed Joe Donnell as the first Baptist General Convention of Texas tribal chaplain, with responsibility to serve the indigenous people of North America. “Joe has been serving his people in a ministry capacity for a number of years, but at our recent conference, he expressed a desire to be affiliated with Texas Baptists,” said Bobby Smith, director of chaplaincy. “An endorsement by Texas Baptists will be beneficial to Joe, but even more beneficial to us as we launch an initiative to win the First Nation to Christ,” Smith said.

Dan Curry joins Texas Baptists as Area Representative In October, Texas Baptists welcomed Dan Curry to the staff as the new Area Representative for Area 9 from Fort Worth to Wichita Falls. Curry has served in ministry across Texas for more than four decades, with pastorates in Coahoma, Tahoka, and a longtime tenure of 24 years at South Oaks Baptist Church in Arlington.

To read more Texas Baptists news stories, visit texasbaptists.org/news. JANUARY 2017

7


Texas Baptists

gather in Waco for 131 Annual Meeting st

BY K ALIE LOWRIE NE WS DIRECTOR

8

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


Texas Baptists joined together for the 131st Annual Meeting Nov. 13-15 in Waco, focusing on “Celebrating

Service” through worship and business sessions, workshops and a variety of events with 1,157 messengers and 663 visitors in attendance. Messengers approved the 2017 Texas Baptists budget of $36.6 million, used to fund ministries, missions and institutional partnerships all focused on spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

In Monday’s business session, officers for 2016-2017 were elected, including Danny Reeves, pastor of

First Baptist Church in Corsicana, as president; Joseph Fields, pastor of New Beginnings Baptist Church in Lewisville, as first vice president; and Jim Heiligman, pastor of First Baptist Church in Bryan, as second vice president. Reeves previously served as second vice president and this is the first time of service for Fields and Heiligman.

Keynote speakers included New York Times best-selling author Lee Strobel, professor of Christian

Thought at Houston Baptist University, and esteemed preacher and theologian Cleophus LaRue, Francis Landey Patton Professor of Homiletics at Princeton Theological Seminary. President René Maciel, community life pastor at First Baptist Church in Woodway, moderated worship and business sessions. “This Gospel is to be proclaimed to everybody, even if only received by some,” said LaRue during his Monday evening address.

Executive Director David Hardage shared about new Texas Baptists initiatives during his report on

Monday evening. He introduced several staff members overseeing key ministry areas. Leonid Regheta joined the staff this year as Director of Project:Start, a refugee resource center serving 30,000 refugees in the Dallas area of Vickery Meadow. Leighton Flowers was introduced as Director of Apologetics and Youth Evangelism, providing churches with information on how to contend for faith in an ever-changing culture through regional [un]Apologetic conferences featuring national leaders in apologetics such as Strobel, Mike Licona and Mark Mittelberg.

Hardage also highlighted a new partnership with the Brazilian Baptist Convention called the Missionary

Adoption Program (MAP) through which churches can co-sponsor an indigenous missionary in the Amazon along with a partnering Brazilian church. “It’s going to take more ways and more people to reach the world for Christ than what we are doing now,” Hardage said emphasizing the need for expanding ministries.

During Tuesday’s morning worship and business session, messengers voted to approve two motions

regarding how and for what reason a church may be removed from harmonious cooperation with the churches of the Convention. The first motion, brought to the floor by Steve Wells, pastor of South Main Baptist Church in Houston, set in place a procedure to consistently address churches considered to be outside of harmonious cooperation. The procedure granted the Executive Board the authority to remove a congregation outside of harmonious cooperation with a two-thirds vote.

The second motion, brought to the floor by Craig Christina, pastor of Shiloh Terrace Baptist Church in

Dallas, reaffirmed Texas Baptists’ longstanding historical position on biblical human sexuality and marriage, specifically within the context of considering whether or not churches are within harmonious cooperation. The motion stated, “because of the historical and biblical positions of the BGCT as stated in multiple resolutions, motions, and actions, that any church which affirms any sexual relationship outside the bonds of a marriage between one man and one woman be considered out of harmonious cooperation with the Baptist General Convention of Texas.”

Many workshops were standing room only, addressing pressing topics such as the end of religion, the

future of Christian higher education, the historicity of the Gospel, refugee assistance and 5-point Calvinism. Woven throughout the annual gathering was a common thread of cooperation, with an emphasis on the necessity of partnership to reach the state of Texas and beyond with the Gospel through commitment to fulfilling the Great Commission and the Great Commandment. During his address, Hardage noted he preaches in different Texas Baptists congregations each week and, while each church is uniquely different, “one thing remains the same. Our pastors are diligently preaching the Gospel. Thank you, churches. Thank you, pastors. God bless you.”

JANUARY 2017

9


131st Annual Meeting of Texas Baptists

“It’s going to take more ways and more people to reach the world for Christ than what we are doing now,” Executive Director David Hardage said, emphasizing the need for expanding ministries.

10

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


131st Annual Meeting of Texas Baptists

NEWLY ELECTED OFFICERS

Joe Fields, 1st vice president, Danny Reeves, president and Jim Heiligman, 2nd vice president

JANUARY 2017

11


131st Annual Meeting of Texas Baptists

12

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


131st Annual Meeting of Texas Baptists

“This Gospel is to be proclaimed to everybody, even if only received by some.” – Cleophus LaRue

JANUARY 2017

13


BOUNCE Student Disaster Recovery offers middle school, high school, and college students the opportunity to make a difference in the world by impacting communities through disaster recovery and community rehabilitation. Through a BOUNCE pre-packaged mission experience,

students are mobilized for challenging mission service and encounter God through inspiring times of worship. For information on 2017 Summer Missions, BOUNCE over to texasbaptists.org/bounce.

2017 SUMMER MISSION TRIPS Mission 1 June 12-17 Dallas, TX

Mission 2 June 19-24 Bartlesville, OK

Mission 3 June 26-July 1 Baton Rouge, LA

Mission 4 July 10-15 Jennings, LA

Mission 5 July 17-22 Waco, TX


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

SPOTLIGHT

Celebrating the service of Texas Baptists Institutions

Natalie Rodriguez, raised at Texas Baptist Children’s Home, shows a childhood photo with her sister. Read Natalie’s story on pages 22-23.

16

PROVIDING HOPE, HELP, TRAINING AND CARE THROUGH INSTITUTIONS

21

Steve Vernon, associate executive director, shares how Texas Baptists institutions have impacted millions around Texas through their services.

18

HENDRICK BREAST INSTITUTE AND THE HOPE FUND SAVE PATIENTS, CHANGE LIVES Leaders of the Hendrick Breast Institute in Abilene have seen God move in mighty ways through assistance provided with The Hope Fund.

20

SINGLE FATHER DISCOVERS JOY IN NEW BEGINNING THROUGH BUCKNER Hector Flores is a single dad of four with a new beginning through support including parenting classes, shoes and clothes for his children and a new home — all of which he received through Buckner International services.

HPU STUDENT LEADS TEAMMATES TO BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF CHRIST’S LOVE Howard Payne University student athlete Chad Anders encountered God during his time at HPU and now is a leader on campus, sharing the hope he has found with his teammates and friends.

22

THE IMPACT OF INSTITUTIONAL GIVING: NATALIE’S STORY Read about Natalie Rodriguez’s journey from a foster child at Texas Baptist Children’s Home to now studying to become a nurse through Scott and White Nursing School at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor.

24

EN ESPAÑOL: EVIDENCIA DE LA ESPERANZA, LA AYUDA, EL ENTRENAMIENTO, Y EL CUIDADO POR MEDIO DE NUESTRAS INSTITUCIONES Read the Spanish translation of Steve Vernon’s overview of the impact of Texas Baptists institutions on millions around Texas. JANUARY 2017

15


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

Providing HOPE, HELP, TRAINING

& CARE through institutions BY STE VE VERNON , A S S O C I AT E E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R

or. A young rb a H rl ea P of g in with the bomb It bega n in 1941, r the wa r effort in fo ed ft ra d s a w s exa wa r, deployed fa rmer in West T to t en w , rs ea y o ined for tw ea rly 1942. He tra ted in Alaska, then ea tr s a w e H . ed d s woun in to Alaska a nd wa tment a nd reha b ea tr ve si n te ex d a ally h California, a nd fin Temple, Texas. a ry Ha rdinM ol ho sc s l’ ir g lla stood the Ha rdin-Baylor. In nea rby Belton ry a M of y it rs ve ni the U at Baylor College, now wounded soldiers g n ti si vi s a w s ie tr minis One of the college hool, a native of sc e th t a n a om w e ng ng fa rmer met th the hospital. A you ou y he T . rs to si vi e as one thos nd relocated a d ie rr Okla ho ma City, w a m , ve lo soon they fell in ily that bega n m fa young woma n a nd e th of ct u d as. I a m a pro back to West Tex ists institution. pt a B s a ex T a y b d long ago, facilitate r University, lo y a B to y a w a t as I wen wife, Donna. y m et The story continued m I re he T ptists institution. a nother Texas Ba ape my mind a nd sh ed lp he e er th s ssor The Christia n profe ren to Baylor. My ild ch e re th nt se e W l. hea rt for ministry. s Baptists hospita a ex T a t a y er rg dad had bypass su Texas Baptists a ow n is t a h w in e born My gra ndkids wer fa mily have been y m of es liv e th nd hospital. My life a Texas Baptists. of s n io ut it st in e th shaped by 16

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

I thought of those memories on Monday night of the

Annual Meeting this year, as I read the names of 27 Texas Baptists institutions. Represented on the stage were some of the finest Christian men and women in our state. Their commitment to the Kingdom of God through their institutions tells the story of Texas Baptists. Each of these institutions can tell thousands of stories like mine. In any given year, the institutions of Texas Baptists touch millions of lives.

How can our institutions touch so many? Educational

institutions teach and shape thousands of students each year. Our seminaries prepare hundreds to minister in the name of Christ in churches, Christian

2017 TEXAS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONAL FUNDING $8,322,380

Educational Institutions

organizations and

Baptist University of the AmĂŠricas

Baptist Student

Baylor University

Ministries. Our

Dallas Baptist University

medical centers

East Texas Baptist University

and hospitals care

George W. Truett Theological Seminary

for the physical

Hardin-Simmons University

and spiritual

Houston Baptist University

needs of

Howard Payne University

thousands upon thousands each year. Human care institutions care for children in Texas and across the world, meet the needs of those affected by disasters, support children and families who are struggling, and care for the

Logsdon Seminary San Marcos Baptist Academy University of Mary Hardin-Baylor Wayland Baptist University Valley Baptist Missions Education Center

Advocacy/Care Institutions $2,705,000

aged and mentally and physically challenged.

Baptist Child and Family Services

Baptist Community Services, Amarillo

Texas Baptists institutions manage endowments to support

the needs of other institutions and ministries that touch lives. Institutions provide communication that tells the story of our important work. They provide for refugees and provide housing for those who would minister in unreached areas. In the process, millions of lives are touched with the Gospel.

Several years ago, I was visiting with a friend who was

Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas Baylor Scott & White Health Buckner International Children at Heart Ministries Hendrick Health System

comparing what happened in Texas to the Baptist work in the

Hillcrest Baptist Health System

northwest United States. Baptist work started in both areas at

South Texas Children's Home Ministries

around the same time. A veteran pastor who had spent his career ministering in the Northwest made an observation. The reason

TOTAL

$11,027,380

Baptists are so strong in Texas and not as strong in the Northwest is that the work of the convention was accompanied with the creation of institutions.

As I think of our Texas Baptists forebears, I give thanks for

dedicated Baptists who made a difference through institutions. People like Baylor, Buckner, Wayland, Robnett, Byars, Simmons, Hardin, Guajardo, Rivera, Groner and others had a vision to minister to the needs of Texas through the institutions to which they gave their lives.

You are a part of that as you give to Texas Baptists through

the Cooperative Program. As a product of that legacy, I give thanks. JANUARY 2017

17


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

Before they turned on the office computers

or answered a phone that first day of work at the Hendrick Breast Institute in Abilene, the staff lined a hallway and prayed with Hospital Chaplain Bruce Lampert. Breast Institute Registry Coordinator Melissa Boyd and her staff listened as Lampert spoke to them of the gentle power within the scarred hands of Jesus Christ. “That same power exists in your hands,” Lampert told them. “And, just as the aroma permeates the air around us, the work you do here will be far-reaching.”

Boyd sees that morning as the beginning of

a powerful ministry that would save the lives of countless women and impact not only patients, but also families and the Breast Institute staff as well. “The anointing set the tone,” said Boyd, who had big dreams and hopes for the endeavor, “and God made it bigger than I even thought it could be.”

From that first day of business in October

of 2014, the innovative program began offering a

Hendrick Breast Institute and The Hope Fund save patients, change lives

multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer care,

BY JANER A NARON , HENDRICK MEDICAL CENTER

with goals of improving clinical outcomes and survival rates, reducing patient costs and variation of care, and optimizing the patient experience. Some patients are referred by their family physician or obstetrician/gynecologist, Boyd said, adding that many find the Breast Institute as a result of hearing about The Hope Fund at Hendrick. The Hope Fund is an initiative that provides financial assistance for mammograms and breast care treatment for women without insurance or access to care. Elyse Lewis, coordinator of women’s health and

community initiatives at Hendrick, said the program is aptly named because of the hope it offers to patients and their families. “The Hope Fund bridges the gap in service in our community for women who aren’t otherwise able to access the care they need,” Lewis said. By whatever means these patients come to the Breast Institute, Boyd said, she and her team are blessed to walk beside them through “a very hard time in their lives.” But the staff does much more than that. 18

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

In regular, standing-room-only case conference

they may be at risk. “We look for every opportunity,”

meetings, each patient’s case is reviewed

Boyd said. “We constantly ask ourselves, ‘Now, how

anonymously by multiple physicians, surgeons,

can we get this done? How can we meet this need?’”

nurses, nurse navigators, radiologists, oncologists

and other clinical professionals who discuss options

which is accredited by the National Accreditation

and best recommendations for each patient. The

Program for Breast Centers, has made truth of both

In two years, the Hendrick Breast Institute,

result, according to Boyd, is that patients have a large team combining their knowledge, experience and compassion for each case. “Our service provides a network that puts the patient at the center of care,” said Boyd, who added that she and her team serve as patient advocates by facilitating access to financial resources, providing education to help the patient and family understand diagnoses and treatment options, coordinating appointment scheduling when needed, identifying and removing barriers to care, and serving as liaisons to patients, physicians and hospital staff.

Through a unique system of combined work and

collaboration, the Breast Institute furthers its support to anyone with a breast health issue. “In this work,” Lewis said, “we really do see people becoming the hands and feet of God.”

Lampert’s and Boyd’s words, impacting patients and

families across the Texas Midwest. Boyd and her

A key component to the success of the program

lies in the personal attention given to each patient

team at the Breast Institute have daily reminders

by the nurse navigators. Along with Boyd, Imaging

that the reach of their work is immeasurable. Boyd

Nurse Navigator Andrea Wilson, LVN, and Breast

said she feels the hand of God every day as she

Cancer Nurse Navigator Makenzie Turner guide their

interacts with patients and their families.

patients through the entire process of care. “Once a

patient comes to see us, Andrea starts the process of

Boyd has saved for many months on her answering

imaging,” Boyd said. “She will help the patient with

machine, have cemented her sense of purpose in

scheduling their radiologist appointment, reminds

her job. “This lady wasn’t our patient, but she had

them of their appointments and will go with them

bilateral mastectomy,” Boyd said. “Then, she heard

to the appointment if they want. She helps them

about us and called to ask if we could help her with a

understand their treatment options, and becomes

prescription for special post-surgical garments.” On

their friend and advocate.” In the cases of cancer

the voicemail, the patient asks Boyd if she can help

patients, Turner does the same. “Makenzie stands in

her, if she can tell her where to go for the prescription

the gap for them,” Boyd said. “She gives them such a

and the process for being fitted. “Of course we helped

positive experience through her guidance that they

her!” Boyd said. “Then, we went with her for her

become family.”

fitting, and when she walked out of the curtain, there

were tears of joy because she was walking with her

An additional service provided to patients

Some sweet memories, including one message

is genetic screening through a program called

shoulders pulled back and with dignity.”

MyGeneticsTree, in which patients can complete

a free assessment online. The 15-minute question

asked. Patient impact is only half the story. Working

and answer assessment collects and evaluates the

at the Breast Institute has changed the lives of the

patient’s history and risk of Hereditary Breast and

staff, too. In Boyd’s heart and in her mind, no job

Ovarian Cancer Syndrome. Afterwards, there is

could ever match the one she has now. “I couldn’t tell

follow up by the Breast Institute Team, which may

you what I make an hour. I really have no idea,” Boyd

recommend more testing or genetic counseling.

said, pointing to the open door of her office. “My

rewards come through that door.”

Boyd said her team also helps with personalized

“How can you not see God’s hand in that?” Boyd

plans and prevention strategies for those who find JANUARY 2017

19


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

Single father discovers joy in new beginning through Buckner BY CHEL SE A Q. WHITE , B U C K N E R I N T E R N AT I O N A L

Center and volunteer opportunities. “It’s

built by teams working through

June was hot, dusty and cramped. Tattered

so rare for a man to come forward and

Buckner Domestic Missions.

bed sheets tried to block the blazing South

admit that he needs help, especially in

Texas sun coming through the small

Hispanic cultures,” said Brambila. “We

has been transformed,” Brambila said. “We

square windows. As a single parent with

could see that he was determined to help

believe he is doing it, Buckner is just part

four children, it’s hard to find time to keep

his children.”

of it. But he’s the one who’s determined to

up with the housework.

change his present and, in effect, change

the market at the Hope Center. The Flores

Hector Flores’ home in the middle of

Flores has been a single dad of four –

The following day, Flores went to

Hector Jr., 14, Rene, 11, Sandy, 7, and Tania,

family also attended a Buckner Shoes for

6 – for the past five years, officially. He

Orphan Souls® back-to-school distribution,

used to live in a tiny, trailer-like home

where children each received a new pair

that he slowly assembled by himself in an

of shoes. “I came to life,” Flores said. “I

attempt to give his children a safe place

felt more youthful. When you go for help,

to live. Unofficially, he’s been a single

because Buckner brings shoes and clothes

dad for eight years since his ex-wife left

and many things, you start thinking, those

for Mexico without telling him. Raising

are new things, they are not little things;

four children alone is hard but not being

they are big things, incredible things, the

able to work because the youngest isn’t

things Buckner does.”

school-aged made it even harder. A trained mechanic, he did odd jobs when he could but struggled to make ends meet.

Flores heard about Buckner

International from his neighbors in Peñitas. He caught Ricardo Brambila, director of the local Buckner Family Hope Center, one day in the parking lot. Flores explained his situation and asked if Buckner could help. Brambila told him about the classes offered at the Hope 20

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

“Hector’s life in the past nine months

his future for his kids.”

NEW HOME, NEW BEGINNINGS

During a three-week span last

summer, Flores’ old house was torn down and a new and improved one was built in its place. More than 100 members of Woodlawn Baptist Church in Austin spent a week putting up the walls and siding of the house. They painted, installed sinks and toilets, and set up beds in each of the rooms.

FATHERHOOD 24/7

of the build, church members prayed over

Flores enrolled in family coaching

At an emotional ceremony at the end

and classes at the Family Hope Center

the home and the family. They presented

to become a better father. He completed

Flores with a Bible and the key to his brand

the Fatherhood 24/7 Initiative course,

new home. “I am very grateful first to God

which teaches men about their identity,

and to all the people who have helped me;

discipline, and how to leave a legacy in

since I met them I've had enough support,”

their families. Since Flores completed

Flores said. “I am going to be a good father

classes and family coaching, he earned

now thanks to [Buckner]. Now that we

enough points to qualify for a new home

have a new home, the children and I will live better.”


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

HPU student leads teammates to better understanding of Christ’s love B Y C O B Y S A U C E , H O WA R D PAY N E U N I V E R S I T Y

the opportunity to play baseball in a new

place, spiritually, he was a few years ago.

for Christ when he enrolled at Howard

locale. “The thing about Athletes in Action

“I tell them they don’t understand what

Payne University, he says Christ was

is that it incorporates discipleship and

they’re missing,” he says. “There’s so much

waiting for him there. “You can come to

ministry into athletics,” Chad says. “Every

more to life. The answer to the questions

HPU and find things you never even knew

day we would wake up and do discipleship

they have is Christ.”

you were looking for,” says the senior and

training. We would be in the Word for

four-year member of the Yellow Jacket

about an hour or more, breaking down

a lot of deep conversations with other

baseball team.

passages.”

athletes on campus. “If you’re not actively

pursuing Christ every day, you’re going to

Though Chad Anders wasn’t searching

Chad didn’t attend church regularly

Chad says his heart was hardened

Chad says he’s been blessed to have

growing up. After the death of his stepfather

from past experiences but, about a week

be longing for that,” he says. “I feel like as

during Chad’s freshman year at HPU, he

into the camp, he had a tough conversation

long as I plant the seeds of faith, God will

found himself even farther from God. “I

with himself. “I could either be the cool

grow them.” HPU, Chad says, is a great

focused on what would make me happy,”

guy, play baseball and blow everything

place to grow in faith. “Without HPU and

he says. “I turned to a lot of different

else off,” he says, “or I could open my heart

without the BSM and FCA, I wouldn’t

worldly pleasures for fulfillment. I was

and mind and see what God is trying to do

be where I am today,” he says. “You can

never satisfied and never happy. I knew

in my life. So I did that.” A few weeks later,

come to Howard Payne and do four years

there had to be more to life.”

on July 16, 2015, he fully committed his life

here and leave the same person you were.

to Christ. “From that moment, I started

Or you can come with an open heart and

his brother, Robert Anders, who serves

living for Him,” Chad says.

open mind and let God work through you

as assistant baseball coach at HPU, urged

and leave the exact person He wants

him to connect with Athletes in Action.

campus, Chad immersed himself in

AIA is a Christian organization with the

furthering the Kingdom of God. He

mission of helping “sports-minded people

now serves as president of the campus’

think and live Biblically at the intersection

Fellowship of Christian Athletes and is on

of sport and Christianity.” A team from

the Baptist Student Ministries leadership

AIA was headed to Rochester, New York,

team, through which he ministers to other

for the summer and Chad seized upon

athletes on campus. Some are in the same

Following Chad’s sophomore year,

When he arrived back on the HPU

you to be.”

JANUARY 2017

21


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

THE IMPACT OF INSTITUTIONAL GIVING: Natalie’s Story BY K ALIE LOWRIE , NE WS DIRECTOR

22

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

always encouraged me and told me I

I apply every year and they keep believing

can do anything and God will be there

in me.”

no matter what.” She also built strong

relationships with her foster sisters, with

through a Christ-centered program has

as many as eight girls living in the house

been an uplifting experience for Natalie.

at any given time. While they may not be

Through weekly chapel services, prayers

related by blood, Natalie counts many of

before classes and testimonies from

the girls as her sisters.

instructors and classmates, Natalie has

found constant affirmation of the Lord’s

Following her high school graduation,

Pursuing education to become a nurse

Natalie moved away from TBCH and

calling on her life. “Being a nurse is so

enrolled in a local college to receive training

important to me,” she said. “I know this is

to become a medical assistant. She worked

what I am called to do and that God has

for seven years as a medical assistant

constantly been with me. I love serving my

and greatly enjoyed the opportunity to

patients. Not only am I helping them – they

minister to her patients. While she saw

are helping me.”

Texas Baptists have invested in her in

great worth in her work, Natalie had a

multiple, life-changing ways. At the age

bigger dream of becoming a nurse and was

at Baylor Scott & White, another Texas

of one, Natalie was placed in the foster

unsure how it would be possible to afford

Baptists institution, and is giving back to

care system, where she grew up living in

nursing school.

those who have invested in her life in so

multiple homes with her younger sister.

many ways. She has also found continued

Then, in 1996, she and her sister were

to meet with the Executive Director of

encouragement from her family at Texas

brought to the Texas Baptist Children’s

TBCH, who she saw as a father figure

Baptist Children’s Home. “Through my

Home. During her first few months, she

because he had always been very

trials and tribulations as a child, they have

tried to adjust to new surroundings but

supportive of her. After sharing with him

always provided for me,” she said. “I can

was very overwhelmed and unsure about

about her dream to become a nurse, the

stop by there any time and they will keep

the permanency of her new home. “I heard

director suggested she take two classes on

pushing forward with me. I went to visit

about Jesus daily, but I was so upset,”

her own and then come back and he would

TBCH recently, and I was discussing with

Natalie said. “I wasn’t ready for someone to

help her find funding for more school.

another set of foster parents about the

actually be there for me.”

challenges I was facing at the end of the

Since Natalie Rodriguez was 12,

One day, she made an appointment

She enrolled as a student at the

Now, Natalie works as a student nurse

Scott and White College of Nursing at

semester. Right there, they pulled me aside

Christmas play followed by a candlelit

University of Mary Hardin-Baylor and

and prayed over me. I’ve had that as a kid

service. Having previously heard about

soon found out wonderful news.

and I’ve had that as an adult and it doesn’t

the significance of Jesus’ birth, that

Through connections with Texas

evening, for the first time, she truly

Baptists, the director was able to help

understood how He was her Savior. “I felt

Natalie apply for and become the

a rush over me and I felt God telling me,

recipient of the Roger Hall Opportunity

‘I am going to be there for you no matter

Scholarship, awarded to students

where you live, no matter what happens,’”

attending Texas Baptist universities

she said. “That’s when I decided to accept

who are the products of children’s

Him in my heart. I told everybody the

homes. “I don’t know how I would

next day, and since then my life has been

be paying for school if it wasn’t

dramatically different.”

for Texas Baptists,” Natalie said.

“I feel so blessed and happy.

That December, Natalie was in a

The next few years at TBCH were

filled with joy and growth for Natalie.

There are not many foster kids

Her foster parents, Mom and Pop Toner,

who get to go to college, let

were a constant source of encouragement

alone nursing school.

and strength. “I’ve never had anyone who cared about my emotional and academic needs like they have,” she said. “They’ve

get any better than that.”

WATCH a video of Natalie's testimony online at texasbaptists.org/life. JANUARY 2017

23


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

Evidencia de

, A D U Y A A L , A Z N LA ESPERA , O T N E I M A N E EL ENTR

O D A D I U C L E Y estras instituciones

por medio de nu

IADO JECUTIVO A SOC ON , DIRECTOR E BY STE VE VERN

24

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


SPOTLIGHT / TEX AS BAPTISTS INSTITUTIONS

Comenzó en el 1941, con el bombardeo de Pearl

año. Nuestros seminarios preparan a cientos

Harbor. Un joven campesino en el oeste de Texas fue

para ministrar en el nombre de Cristo en iglesias,

reclutado el servicio militar a principios del 1942. Él

organizaciones cristianas, y Ministerios de

entrenó durante dos años, fue a la guerra, fue enviado

Estudiantes Bautistas. Nuestros centros médicos

a Alaska, y fue herido. Fue tratado en Alaska, luego

y hospitales cuidan de las necesidades físicas

en California, y finalmente tuvo tratamiento extenso

y espirituales de miles y miles cada año. Las

y rehabilitación en Temple, Texas.

instituciones de cuidado humano se encargan de

Cerca de Belton, estaba la escuela para

niños en Texas y a través del mundo, suplen las

señoritas Colegio Mary Hardin-Baylor, ahora la

necesidades de aquellos afectados por desastres,

Universidad de Mary Hardin-Baylor. Uno de los

sostienen a niños y familias en dificultades, y cuidan

ministerios universitarios visitaba soldados heridos

por los envejecientes y personas con necesidades

en el hospital. Una joven de la escuela, natural de

físicas y mentales.

la ciudad de Oklahoma, era una de las visitantes.

El joven soldado conoció a la joven estudiante y

administran donaciones que respaldan las

pronto se enamoraron, se casaron, y regresaron al

necesidades de otras instituciones y ministerios que

oeste de Texas. Yo soy el resultado de esa familia

tocan vidas. Instituciones proveen la comunicación

que comenzó hace mucho tiempo, facilitada por una

que relata la historia de nuestra importante obra.

institución bautista de Texas.

Ellas proveen para refugiados y proveen techo para

aquellos que ministran en áreas no alcanzadas. En

La historia continuó cuando asistí a la

Las instituciones de los Bautistas de Texas

Universidad de Baylor, otra institución bautista de

el proceso, millones de vidas son tocadas con el

Texas. Allí conocí a mi esposa, Donna. Los profesores

Evangelio.

cristianos allí me ayudaron a forjar mi mente y

mi corazón para al ministerio. Nosotros enviamos

comparaba lo que sucedía en Texas con la obra en

a nuestros hijos a Baylor. Mi papá tuvo cirugía de

el noroeste de los Estados Unidos. La obra bautista

corazón abierto en un hospital de los bautistas

comenzó en ambas áreas alrededor de la misma

de Texas. Mis nietos nacieron en lo que hoy es un

fecha. Un pastor veterano dedicado a ministrar en el

hospital bautista de Texas. Mi vida y las vidas de mi

área del noroeste observó que la razón los bautistas

familia han sido forjadas por las instituciones de los

son tan fuertes en Texas y no tan fuertes en el

Bautistas de Texas.

noroeste es porque la obra de la convención estuvo

acompañada con la creación de instituciones.

Pensé en estos recuerdos el lunes en la noche

Hace varios años, visité a un amigo quien

durante la reunión anual de este año, mientras leía

los nombres de 27 instituciones de los Bautistas

Bautistas de Texas, doy gracias por bautistas

de Texas. Representados en la plataforma estaban

dedicados que hicieron una diferencia por medio

algunos de los hombres y mujeres cristianos más

de instituciones. Personas como Baylor, Buckner,

destacados en nuestro estado. Su compromiso al

Wayland, Robnett, Byars, Simmons, Hardin,

Reino de Dios a través de sus instituciones cuenta

Guajardo, Rivera, Groner, y otros tuvieron la visión

la historia de los Bautistas de Texas. Cada una de

de ministrar las necesidades en Texas a través de

estas instituciones comparte miles de historias como

instituciones por las cuales dieron sus vidas.

la mía. En cualquier año, las instituciones de los

Bautistas de Texas tocan millones de vidas.

por medio de los Bautistas de Texas a través del

Programa Cooperativo. Como producto de ese legado,

¿Cómo pueden nuestras instituciones tocar a

tantas personas? Las instituciones educacionales

Cuando pienso en los antepasados de los

Usted y yo somos parte de eso cuando damos

doy gracias.

enseñan y moldean a miles de estudiantes cada

JANUARY 2017

25


STAFF SPOTLIGHT

TEXAS BAPTISTS

LEADERSHIP The Executive Leadership Team, elected by the Executive Board and made up of David Hardage, executive director, Steve Vernon, associate executive director, and Jill Larsen, treasurer and chief financial officer, directs staff to carry out the Convention’s 130-year-old mission of awakening and stimulating among churches the greatest possible activity in evangelism, missions, Christian education and benevolent work. The Leadership Team, made up of Delvin Atchison, director of Great Commission Team, Josue Valerio, director of Missions Team, Gus Reyes, director of Christian Life Commission, Joe Loughlin, director of Connections Team, Bruce McGowan, director of Collegiate Ministry Team, Lorenzo Pena, director of Cultural Engagement Team and Rollie Richmond, director of human resources, ensures that the work of each ministry team fulfills the overall mission of the Convention.

26

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE


WHAT WAS YOUR

FIRST David Hardage

Executive Director david.hardage@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5301

Job? Cotton farm worker in Sinton

Kim Patton

Executive Assistant to Treasurer/CFO kim.patton@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5311

A lifeguard in Hearne Joe Loughlin

Director, Connections Team joe.loughlin@texasbaptists.org 214.887.5475

Minister of Youth/Education at Mountain View Baptist Church in El Paso

Bruce McGowan

Director, Collegiate Ministry bruce.mcgowan@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5255

Working at McDonald's in Arlington

LaDonna Renfro

Committee Specialist ladonna.renfro@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5348

Gus Reyes

Director, Christian Life Commission gus.reyes@texasbaptists.org 512.473.2288

Working in cotton fields near Lamesa Working the concession stand at the local movie theater in Longmont, Colorado Selling shoes at Thom McAn A field maintenance worker at the Almeda Genoa Gas plant south of Houston An assistant at a doctor's office in Fort Worth

Jill Larsen

Treasurer/CFO jill.larsen@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5310

Assembling farm machinery in Happy

Delvin Atchison

Director, Great Commission Team delvin.atchison@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5109

Steve Vernon

Associate Executive Director steve.vernon@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5302

Bethany Frisch

Executive Assistant/ Executive Board Coordinator bethany.frisch@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5118

Working in the nursery at First Baptist Church in Oak Cliff Becky Brown

Executive Administrative Assistant becky.brown@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5301

A singing waitress while I was a student at Dallas Baptist University

Josue Valerio

Director, Missions Team josue.valerio@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5212

Paperboy for the Detroit News Lorenzo PeĂąa

Director/Mega Associations, Cultural Engagement lorenzo.pena@texasbaptists.org 214.828.5345

Cotton farm worker in Ballinger

Rollie Richmond

Director, Human Resources rollie.richmond@texasbaptists.org 214.828-5164 JANUARY 2017

27


MISSIONARY ADOPTION PROGRAM

opens doors for expanded

MINISTRY IN BRAZIL AND BEYOND BY K ALIE LOWRIE , NE WS DIRECTOR

Deep in the Amazon rain forest, in the midst of 10,000

missionaries prepare to go out into more villages in the Amazon.

unreached people groups, lies a community known as Livramento.

Translated in English, “deliverance” is a poetic title for the city

with the Brazilian Baptist Convention, missionaries like Rhuan

where God is actively delivering new believers out of darkness

to receive funding to continue ministry in the Amazon. The

and into light. Rhuan Kaique was delivered from a troubled

Missionary Adoption Program partners churches in the US with

adolescence to a lifetime of ministry by the faithful discipleship

churches in a host country to jointly sponsor a missionary. These

of the youth leaders at Passare Baptist Church. In 2015, Rhuan’s

missionaries will focus on evangelism, discipleship and church

church commissioned him as a missionary to Livramento, a place

planting. Local Baptist conventions will provide training, support

only accessible to locals.

and regular check-ins.

While working in this new mission field, he met Elieuma.

Through the Texas Baptists Missions Team's new partnership

MAP joins Texas Baptist churches with Brazilian Baptist

Rhuan built trust with her family and began to lead them together

churches, in support of national missionaries, taking the Gospel

in Bible study. Elieuma was captivated by the message of Jesus and

to 147 unreached people groups living along the Amazon. “We are

prayed to receive Him. She began to intercede for her family in

a missions people,” Texas Baptists Executive Director Dr. David

prayer and demonstrate her faith at home. The Holy Spirit acted

Hardage said. “You want to talk about efficient missions. This

and everyone in Elieuma's family gave their lives to Christ. Her

seems, to me, to be a great way to go about doing it. I think this

family began to share Christ with their friends. Through their

could spread all over the world, but our first partnership will start

faith, 17 people from their community received Christ and were

with our long-time, dear friends in Brazil.”

baptized in one day.

The community of Livramento is being transformed by

workers obedient to live out the Great Commission in Brazil. So many more stories like Rhuan’s are waiting to get started as

28

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

To find out how your church can join in this new partnership, contact Jair Campos at jair.campos@texasbaptists.org or 713.494.2841. You can also visit texasbaptists.org/map for more information.


FREE COOPERATIVE PROGRAM RESOURCE 52 SUNDAYS IS A QUICK AND EASY-TO-USE RESOURCE TO ENCOURAGE A YEAR OF PRAYER AND GIVING FOR CP MISSIONARIES AND MINISTRIES 52 SUNDAYS I NCL U D E S :

• A 60-second story about a different missionary or ministry for each Sunday in 2017 • PowerPoint Slides • Bulletin Inserts FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS FREE RESOURCE OR ON THE COOPERATIVE PROGRAM, VISIT TEXASBAPTISTS.ORG/CP.

DISPONIBLE EN ESPAÑOL Texas Baptists supports missions and ministries across Texas, North America and around the world through the Cooperative Program. This resource is produced by Texas Baptists in partnership with The Southern Baptist Stewardship Development Association.


RESOURCES EXPLORE MISSION PARTNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUR CHURCH IN VANCOUVER Do you want to build relationships with churches in other cities? The Texas Baptists Missions Team is taking a trip to visit partner churches in Vancouver, Canada. Church leaders will get the chance to catch the vision of the ongoing work of career church planting missionaries there. This is a great opportunity to preview the work and culture of a city with which your church could build partnerships. For more information, contact Gloria Tillman, Missions ministry assistant, at 214.828.5182. texasbaptists.org/vancouvervisits

ATTEND A REGIONAL CHURCH SAFETY WORKSHOP Sexual abusers look for places where the barriers of protection are lowest, where people are more trusting, and where fewer hurdles exist between service applicants and children. The first step toward “raising the bar” is to better understand the problem. Learn more about steps your church can take by attending a Church Safety Workshop, led by MinistrySafe founder, expert and attorney Greg Love.

CONNECT WITH YOUR REPRESENTATIVES AT CLC ADVOCACY DAY Come join our Christian Life Commission staff in Austin during the 85th Legislative Session for Advocacy Day February 28March 1, including workshops on the top issues facing the Texas Legislature in 2017 and an opportunity to visit with your elected officials. Featuring keynote speaker Vincent Bacote, associate professor of Theology and the Director of the Center for Applied Christian Ethics at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. For more information, contact Kathryn Freeman, director of public policy, at 214.828.3193. texasbaptists.org/advocacyday CLC

Advocacy Day

Regional workshops will be available in Tyler, Waco, Midland, Lubbock, Dallas, San Antonio and more. These 5-hour trainings will be offered at no cost to you and your church staff, with the option to purchase a meal if desired. Visit texasbaptists.org/ ministrysafe for more details.

RECEIVE HELP PICKING YOUR VBS CURRICULUM FOR THIS SUMMER There are a lot of Vacation Bible School curriculums, and sometimes it can be hard to choose the best one for your church. Come to one of our VBS overview workshops across the state to explore the various VBS options available and receive training. For more information, contact Diane Lane, childhood discipleship specialist, at 214.828.5287. texasbaptists.org/vbs

30

TEXAS BAPTISTS LIFE

CONNECT YOUR COLLEGE STUDENT WITH A LOCAL BSM Do you have students at your church who are headed to college in the fall? Make sure that they’re ready for that transition by visiting texasfreshmen.com. This site connects college freshmen with the BSM at their university and with local churches in the area. For more information, contact Collegiate Ministry Team at 214.828.5250. Go to texasfreshmen.com for more information.


ONLINE EXCLUSIVE CONTENT

Join the conversation

ONLINE texasbaptists.org/life

READ more stories from our institutions showing the impact of Texas Baptists cooperation and ministry around the state and beyond. From the Uyechi family’s foster-to-adoption story, made possible through STARRY, to a student profile of Josh Fuentes, a working minister in Corpus Christi who was able to pursue his master’s degree from Logsdon Seminary through the South Texas School of Christian Studies, each of the 10 stories featured online demonstrates the life-changing impact of our Texas Baptists institutions.

WATCH a video testimony from Natalie Rodriguez, a nursing student at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, detailing the radical impact Texas Baptist Children’s Home had on her life, beginning at 12 years old. You can also read her full story on pages 22-23.

WATCH a video highlighting the outstanding speakers, worship, workshops and fellowship that took place during the 131st Annual Meeting in Waco in November.

WHO WE ARE AND WHAT WE DO For more than 130 years the Baptist General Convention of Texas has helped churches fulfill the Great Commission and the Great Commandment. Today, we are more than 5,300 churches working together in harmonious cooperation to share the Gospel and love others. The ministry of the Convention is organized into five teams: Great Commission Team, Missions Team, Christian Life Commission, Connections Team and Collegiate Ministry Team. These teams inform and inspire churches through events, resources, consultations and more. In addition, we proudly partner with 27 education, advocacy and human care institutions around Texas. Through gifts to the Texas Baptists Cooperative Program, you and your church enable missions and ministry across the state and around the world. Because you give, love is shown, the Gospel is shared and lives are transformed. Learn more about affiliation at texasbaptists.org/affiliate. JANUARY 2017

31


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Profile for Texas Baptists

Texas Baptists Life, Volume 5 - Issue 1  

Spotlight: Celebrating the service of Texas Baptists institutions

Texas Baptists Life, Volume 5 - Issue 1  

Spotlight: Celebrating the service of Texas Baptists institutions

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