Page 1

Parent V a l l e y

www.valleyparentmagazine.com March 2014 • Free

Linn & Benton Counties

Are toy Guns okay? Pros and cons of banning them at home

St. Patrick’s Day Party Planner Finish the School Year Strong Homemade Cleaning Supplies • Expectant Siblings • Valley’s Biggest Family Calendar


Get behind the wheel with a friend like Erik Fedler!

Independent SchoolS FaIr 

  Saturday, March 15 10:00am-1:00pm  Library   CorvallisPublic 

Erik knows that looking for a good auto loan can really grind your gears. Fortunately, your friends at Central Willamette Community

In Main Meetingroom   the

 

 

     

Credit Union know what drives you, with great fixed rates* and

 For more information contact Anais Alexander 541-758-4674  



     





   





     



  







   



 

flexible repayment plans up to 84 months for all your automotive needs. So get revved up and stop by your nearest Central Willamette branch today!



 



*Credit requirements apply. Annual Percentage Rates (APR) are fixed. The APR range is 1.99% to12.00% with Auto Pay. Actual APR is based on credit qualifications and other pricing factors.

 

Good Samaritan School Preschool -

Preschool 5th Grade - 5th Grade • Small class sizes • Small class sizes • Individual • Individual educational plans education plans • High test scores • High test scores • Educational • Educational based preschool based preschool • All-day • All-day kindergarten kindergarten program in grades 1st -5th • Robotics • Robotics program in grades 1st - 5th

Nurturing Hearts, Challenging Inspiring Dreams Nurturing Hearts, Minds, Challenging Minds,

333 NW 35th St. Corvallis, OR 97330 541-758-1255 • www.goodsamschool.org 2 Valley Parent, March 2014

Inspiring Dreams Federally insured by the NCUA.

ALBANY

CORVALLIS

LEBANON

SALEM

800.950.4536

CENTRALWCU.ORG


Parent V a l l e y

Tax Return Preparation Personal • Corporate • Estate • More!

Since 1973

Linn & Benton Counties Vol.13, No.3 March 2014

757-1945 Toy Guns Pages 8&9

316 SW Washington Corvallis Lic #2250C

Nothing says ‘I love you’

like a good meal!

Counseling with Heart

Visit our stores for great gift basket ideas like the Italian Dinner!

Linda Harris, MA http://linda.m.harris.googlepages.com

Publisher Steven J. Schultz Editor Chris Barrett

What’s Inside? Non-Toxic Homemade Housecleaning . . . . 4 Products; Eight Expectant Sibling Prep Tips

Holistic Health Care for Women of All Ages Linda Lieberman, CNM, MSN, NP

Findings; Kids’ View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 When Will My Child Read? . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

833 NW Buchanan, Suite #7 Corvallis, OR 97330 envisionwellness.org

Design Director & Advertising/Design Bobbi Dickerson

Finish The School Year Strong . . . . . . . . . . 7

541-753-6000

Weapons Ban: Are Toy Guns Okay? . . . . . .8

Annual Exams • Contraception • Menopause Preventative Care • Maternity and Newborns Herbal and Prescriptive Therapy • Nutrition

A Dozen Ways to Celebrate St. Patricks . 10 Day

Two Corvallis locations!

Envision Women’s Health & Wellness, LLC

Calendar Editor Melissa Spualding-Ross

Contributors: Nanette Dupuy Marianne Peters Meagan Ruffing Nathaniel Brodie Lora Shinn Heidi Smith Luedtke, Ph.D. Malia Jacobson Pam Molnar

www.firstalt.coop

Insurance • OHP • Self-Pay

Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Law practiced thoughtfully, compassionately and carefully. “My commitment is to listen, to empower you with options, and view not only your needs today, but also your interests over the long term.”

Visit Us:

valleyparentmagazine.com Updated Daily!

Contact Us:

541-758-7848 I Box 796 • Corvallis, OR 97339

-Karen Misfeldt

Attorney at Law

Estate Planning Family Care Real Estate Law

(541)754-7477

310 NW 7th Street • Corvallis March 2014, Valley Parent

3


VP

Strategies

Non-Toxic Homemade Housecleaning Products

Marketing messages for household cleaning products shout that the only good germ is a dead germ. However, the average American home does not need to be as sterile as a surgery. Many cleaners on the supermarket shelves clean and disinfect with the use of chemical irritants that are so hazardous they require warning labels and safe disposal instructions. Is a clean house worth exposure to irritating toxins? Recently I switched to milder, less-toxic household cleaning products to reduce my family’s exposure to chemicals. Homemade cleaning products are gentler and, in most cases, just as effective as using the store brands. Most of the common solutions used for homemade cleaners have been around for decades or longer, such as vinegar, baking soda, borax, rubbing alcohol and olive oil. The task of mixing up my own solutions sounded perilously close to high school chemistry class, but I was surprised by how little time it took. Most homemade solutions require only a few ingredients, and some ingredients go solo. For instance, according to the product label, I can use undiluted white vinegar as a fabric softener, to clean the toilet bowl or remove scale from my shower head, and to remove mildew. I can use baking soda to scour sinks, unclog slow drains and absorb odors in the refrigerator. Putting vinegar, borax, and detergent together make a great all-purpose cleaner (see sidebar). Starting a new habit takes time and a little work up front. For convenience and to

help me remember what to use when, I wrote recipes and tips on 3x5 cards and pinned them to a bulletin board above my utility sink. I also bought new, reusable containers for my solutions and wrote the ingredients and their amounts right on each container in permanent marker. What about my old products? Since some commercial products do contain toxic materials, I didn’t want to pitch them in the regular garabage. Landfills and local watersheds are no place for these substances. I took my leftovers to my local recycling center so that they could be properly disposed of. Most communities have a place that handles hazardous waste. The website Earth911 (www. earth911.org) will help you locate the closest one to your location. Some big commercial brands have responded to customer preferences for gentler cleaners and now make plant-based formulas such as Clorox’s Green Works line. Not all “natural” brands list all their ingredients, though. Brands such Ecover and Seventh Generation offer a wide array of products and they are completely transparent about their ingredients. They are available on the Web and at some big discount stores. The Environmental Working Group (www.ewg.org) has several guides that rate the toxicity of household products. Try making your own safe, non-toxic cleaners! It’s much easier than you think.

— Marianne Peters

Some Starter Recipes Tried and true tips for homemade cleaners have been around for years and are widely available in books, magazines, and on the Web. Here are a few recipes if you’d like to make your own solutions: Recipe for a Homemade All-Purpose Cleaner Mix in a spray bottle: ½ cup of white vinegar and ¼ cup of baking soda (or 2 teaspoons borax) plus a ½ gallon of

4 Valley Parent, March 2014

water. Use for showers, chrome, windows, mirrors, and other surfaces. (Source: www. eartheasy.com) Recipe for a Homemade Glass Cleaner Mix in a spray bottle: 1 cup of rubbing alcohol, 1 cup of water, and 1 tablespoon of white vinegar. Use with paper towels or microfiber cloths for a streak-free shine. (Source: http://organizedhome.com).

Eight Expectant Sibling Prep Tips There’s nothing more exciting than finding out that you are expecting; again. Thoughts of tiny toes and sweet baby breath flood your mind, and your world is all of a sudden in total bliss. Having another baby, whether it’s your second, third or fourth, can be an exciting and overwhelming time. There are lots of things to consider; including how everyone’s life is going to change once your due date has arrived. Here are eight effective tips on how to make a smooth transition from one baby to two, or more. 1. Belly Banter – Prepare your son for the upcoming arrival of his baby sister. Let him touch and kiss your belly while you are still pregnant. Having a handson experience will help him make the connection that there is something special inside of your belly and you want him to be a part of it. 2. Gift Giving – Pick out a gift from your unborn baby to ‘give’ to your older child after she is born. If you are allowing your older child to visit you at the hospital, give the gift to him and tell him it’s from his baby sister. This will make him feel extra special during a time that may be a little scary for him. 3. Hold on Tight – Help your daughter hold your newborn son. Let her sit in an adult’s lap (or yours if you feel up to it) and let her ‘hold’ the baby with help. Once she sees that this baby is a living, breathing person, she will start to take on the role of big sister. 4. Nursing/Bottle Basket – Whether you’re breastfeeding or bottle feeding, fill a basket, bin or bucket with special toys that your older children have never seen before (think dollar-store toys). Then only take out the basket when you are feeding the new baby. Your older children can play with their new toys and feel like they are still a part of what you’re doing.

5. Date Day/Night – Have your husband watch the baby while you and your older child go on a date. Take her to her favorite restaurant or stop by the park to push her on the swing. It’s important that you continue to take time just for you and her, so that she gets that one-on-one attention with you. 6. Tummy Time – Have your daughter help you with the baby’s tummy time by letting her pick out which toys to put in front of the baby. This small act of helping out will make her feel like she is taking an active role in the baby’s life. 7. Special Play Time – Newborns tend to sleep for most of the day. In between catching up on your naps, make it a point to have special play time with your son. Whether it’s rolling out play dough or baking brownies, this time at home with him will make both of you appreciate the special bond that you have had from the beginning. 8. Spread the Love – Be sure to hug and kiss your husband in front of the kids. When they see Mom and Dad are happy, they, too, will be happy. This public affection will reassure your other children that they are safe and loved on by two happy parents.

Meagan Ruffing is a freelance parenting writer and stay-at-home mom to her two children. She and her husband are expecting their third child this fall and are starting to prepare for their new addition.


Findings

VP

Kids’ View

by Nathaniel Brodie

Too Much Praise for Toddlers Effects of Bullying Remain Even After It Stops ​According to a new study in the journal Pediatrics, the effects of bullying last beyond the time it occurs and can carry over into the future health and well-being of children. Study authors found that any bullying at any age was associated with worse mental and physical health, increased depressive symptoms and lower self-worth. But children who experienced bullying in the past and were also experiencing bullying in the present showed the lowest health scores. Though recent events may be more important than distant ones, health consequences compound over time and may remain even after the bullying ends. The authors conclude that this study reinforces the importance of early intervention to stop bullying and to be aware of the need to intervene again, even if the bullying is not ongoing, to address the persistent effects.

Moms Who Drink Wine While Pregnant Have Better Behaved Kids

According to new research in Denmark, women who drank a glass of wine a week while pregnant had children who were more well-adjusted than women who didn’t drink at all. Researchers looked at the drinking habits of 100,000 Danish moms-to-be between 1996 and 2002. They asked 37,000 of those women about the behavior of their children, and found the kids were generally more emotionally stable and more well-behaved. Psychologist Janni Nicalsen with the University of Copenhagen explains, “It is a question of taking account of childhood-related psychological factors like attachment between mother and child in this type of study.” Nicalsen warns this is not an invitation to pregnant women to start drinking—an excess of alcohol while pregnant can have dangerous consequences for the unborn child. Rather, it seems to confirm that choices and habits of the mother have a huge influence over the children: women who drank about a glass a week tend to be better educated and make healthier lifestyle decisions.

What is your favorite thing about Spring?

Ray 5 years old “Going outside and playing on the swing set.”

Mother’s Exercise May Boost Baby’s Brain According to new research at University of Montreal in Canada, if a woman is physically active during pregnancy, she may boost the development of her unborn child’s brain. The findings bolster a growing scientific consensus that the benefits of exercise can begin to accumulate even before someone is born. Previous research has shown that babies born to active mothers tend to have more robust cardiovascular systems from an early age than babies born to mothers who are more sedentary. How gestational exercise can remodel an unborn child’s brain is not clear, since, unlike circulatory systems, a mother’s brain is not hardwired directly to that of her child. Elise Labonte-LeMoyne, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Montreal, who led the study, said: “We suspect that when mom exercises, she generates a variety of chemicals,” including many related to brain health, which can move into her bloodstream and eventually mingle with the blood of her baby. “If a woman can be physically active during her pregnancy, she may give her unborn child an advantage, in terms of brain development.” And the commitment required can be slight. “We were surprised,” Labonte-LeMoyne said, “by how much of an effect we saw” from barely an hour of exercise per week.

Automn 11 years old “Playing in the water.”

Growing Number of Chemicals Linked With Brain Disorders in Children

According to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), toxic chemicals may be triggering the recent increases in neurodevelopmental disabilities among children — such as autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and dyslexia. “The greatest concern is the large numbers of children who are affected by toxic damage to brain development in the absence of a formal diagnosis. They suffer reduced attention span, delayed development, and poor school performance. Industrial chemicals are now emerging as likely causes,” said Philippe Grandjean, adjunct professor of environmental health at HSPH. The study outlines possible links between newly recognized “developmental neurotoxicants,” or chemicals that can cause brain deficits, and negative health effects on children. Researchers forecast that many more chemicals than the known dozen or so identified as neurotoxicants contribute to a “silent pandemic” of neurobehavioral deficits. But controlling this pandemic is difficult because of a scarcity of data to guide prevention and the huge amount of proof needed for government regulation. The authors propose mandatory testing of industrial chemicals and the formation of a new international clearinghouse to evaluate industrial chemicals for potential developmental neurotoxicity.

Money Makes Parenting Less Meaningful New research suggests that merely thinking about money diminishes the meaning people derive from parenting. Kostadin Kushlev of the University of British Columbia studies which aspects of life might influence how much pleasure and pain people got out of being parents, specifically the influence of wealth on meaning in parenthood. In one study, he found that a having a higher socioeconomic status lowers people’s sense of meaning while taking care of their children, but not during other daily activities. In another study, he designed experiments to see “whether money compromises meaning because of the conflict between the goals associated with money and the goals and the behaviors that parenting normally demands.” He found that activating goals for both money-making and satisfying the needs of their children at the same time did indeed form a conflict: It made parents feel that what they were doing was less meaningful. One solution, according to Kushlev, is to keep work and family life as separate as possible, “so that work- or money-related goals are not active when parents are spending time with their children. The less we mix our various goals and motivations, the more meaning in life we may be able to experience from our various daily activities.”

Anthony 9 years old

Baby Affects Dad’s Body Too A new study conducted by Dr Lee Gettler, of Notre Dame, suggests that parenthood not only affects the biology of mothers but also of fathers. During the first year new fathers experience a drop of testosterone of around one-third, with those who help out with childcare for three or more hours a day seeing a further drop of 20 per cent. The new fathers who took part in the research also reported having less sex. Researchers believe that “the sensitising effect” is driven by the psychological and cultural impulse to protect a newborn and would have the same impact on adoptive fathers. Previous research has shown that men with high testosterone levels feel less need to respond to the cries of a baby. It means new mothers should not worry about their partners straying after the birth, or feel anxious if they do not want sex. They are biologically programmed to concentrate on looking after their children at the expense of their sex drive. “If you think about fathers in other mammalian species, they don’t really help taking care of the children,” Dr Gettler said. “So it seems that natural selection has stepped up men’s hormone system to respond to the needs of their offspring.”

“The sun.”

Jonah 5 years old “Flying kites.”

Lilly 8 years old “The flowers.”

March 2014, Valley Parent

5


VP

Education

How Kids Learn to Read • Pre-reading: Children at this age have a basic knowledge about books: how to find titles and page numbers, that text moves from left to right, and letters make sounds. Children may memorize books or symbols important to them, such as their favorite car logo or a McDonald’s sign. • Emergent readers: As they begin to grasp letter-sound relationships, children slowly begin to “break the code” in books. Sight readers see whole words – but get confused when guessing the wrong word. They enjoy reading books describing everyday life. • Beginning fluent: Children read faster with the help of memorizing sight words, develop tricks for comprehension (like contextual clues), and their decoding skills improve. Reading is still hard work, but getting easier. Some children can decode at a higher level than they comprehend, so watch out for age-appropriate books. • Fluent: Children readily read a variety of materials, from kid lit to game rules. Reading for entertainment and/or information, they’re still adding vocabulary to their internal dictionaries. As kids advance into the teen years, they’ll learn to read critically and take on more complex texts.

When Will My Child Read?

When it comes to reading, some first graders are already skipping through sentences or even delving into chapter books. But perhaps, your child struggles to sound out words or make sense of “Green Eggs and Ham.” Jim Trelease, author of The Read-Aloud Handbook, says you can’t hurry lit. “Just as not all children are born with a full of head of hair, not all kids are ready to read at the same age,” he says. Trelease offers the following analogy: Suppose you’d like your infant to have a full head of hair for his six-month-old baby pics. But he’s bald as a cue ball. “You can’t put any hair on the kid,” Trelease says, no matter what you do. Some countries accommodate developmental differences. In Finland, children begin formal reading lessons at age 7, long after their American counterparts. But by age 9, their reading scores surpass American scores. Trelease points out a critical difference: Finnish TV features many close-captioned shows. Those words are a big motivator for Finnish kids who want to get grown-up jokes. “Reading is equal parts will and skill,” says Nancy Place, an education professor at the University of Washington. “Will is composed of the emotional commitment and connection,” she observes. If kids feel positively about reading, “they’re much more likely to do some of the hard work.”

And as Place points out, proficiency is a process, not an end product. As adults, we still learn how to “read” new texts, whether poetry or instant messages. Place calls this “multiple literacies.”

Children move through the process at varying rates and ages. Some kids progress quickly, while others take their time. And some of us still struggle over deciphering Chaucer. But here’s how you can help your child — without pressure: Prime the pump. “You couldn’t get too far without gas in the car,” Trelease says. “And oral vocabulary is the gas in our car.” An abundant word tank allows readers to draw meaning when encountering new words later on, so take time to discuss everyday life with your child and explain unfamiliar terms. Provide a variety of experiences to

build little lexicons, which help make sense of text. Select texts. “One of the key factors in motivation is choice,” says Place. So if your child brings home a book beyond his reading level, try letting him read a word every few pages, or a short sentence here and there. At the bookstore, if she wants a video game guide, don’t push Pollyanna. Read the write way. Encourage writing as an expressive path to reading. Write notes to one another and place them in envelopes at your imaginary post office. Or help your child write real letters to Grandpa, and she’ll begin to pick up those sound-letter connections — and don’t worry about “correct” spelling. Play games. Take the drudgery out of decoding by playing the label game: Write easy-to-read names of items on Post-Its, then ask your child to help “label” your home, from “RUG” to “DAD.” Play charades with simple words or spell funny words with letter magnets on your fridge. As children get older, break out the Mad Libs and crossword puzzles. Or play mini-spelling bee as a traffic distraction, asking your kids spell rhyming words (PIG WIG JIG). For more ideas, see “Games for Reading” by Peggy Kaye.

Lora Shinn is a mother, writer and children’s librarian.

Central Valley Christian School Central Valley has been offering quality education for over 50 years to anyone of any faith.

Now Enrolling for 2014-2015

Your child deserves the attention a small class size delivers. We believe education is a lifetime investment. Don’t you? Pre-K to 8th Grade Centrally located west of Tangent on Hwy 34

Call or visit us today! 541-928-7820 • www.cvcs.edu

6 Valley Parent, March 2014


Education

Finish the School Year Strong Don’t let spring fever and summer vacation planning interrupt academics: endof-year projects and exams help kids consolidate what they learned this year and form the foundation for future knowledge. Encourage your kids’ efforts right up to the final bell. Here’s how. Reassess the Requirements Consult the online grade book or meet with the teacher to see what work remains to be done. Clear up confusion over missing grades and complete past-due work, even if there’s a penalty. Later learning builds on early lessons, and all course concepts may be covered on final exams. Large projects and papers may require a series of steps. If your child skimped on initial steps – like research – or received poor grades for his work, he may need to redo it now. Add remedial work to the academic to-do list. It may take extra effort to complete a project and earn a good grade, but it may be impossible for kids to finish end-of-school assignments without filling in gaps. Even if students can’t recoup grade points, they shouldn’t ignore past failures, says Ned Johnson, self-proclaimed tutorgeek and president of PrepMatters, a Washington, D.C.-based test preparation company. “A student’s job is not just to learn, but to learn how to learn better,” says Johnson. “Study what went wrong with previous assignments or exams and help kids reengineer their approach.” Ask a teacher or tutor for a study-skills tuneup. He may suggest learning strategies you hadn’t considered.

end-of-year events and spring sports. Make time for fun and friends. The transition between the school year and summer vacation can be emotional.

Make a Plan Heading into the home stretch, check kids’ binders to make sure they can go the distance. Reorganize. Put notes in order. Get a bigger notebook if needed. Stock up on paper and printer ink. You don’t want to run out the night before a class project is due. Break term papers, projects and study sessions into do-able chunks and write project milestones and deadlines on a large desk calendar. Experts recommend students focus on a subject for no more than 45 minutes before taking a break – younger learners need even shorter sessions. Downtime allows the brain to consolidate learning and reenergize. Kids’ schedules can get crowded with

Ease Anxiety Late-night studying can leave kids too tired to concentrate. Maintain a healthy sleep schedule and sustain energy with good eats. Start kids off with a proteinpacked breakfast and plan healthy snacks throughout the day. Brainwork burns fuel. Kids may over-focus on failures in an effort to improve. Remind them of their strengths. Star students use their academic talents to overcome (or compensate for) weaknesses. Use teacher-provided study guides or create one using past homework, quizzes and exams. Study guides keep students from skipping over concepts accidentally and do double duty as at-home practice tests. If your child has to make an oral presentation to the class, encourage her to rehearse in front of siblings or friends first, says Johnson. “It’ll be a little awkward, which is exactly the point.” Confronting jitters in a low-threat situation builds confidence and shows kids what to improve. Hard work on spring academics will pay off in the fall when your student is in the next grade. Take time during the summer to reflect on the past year’s learning and address major challenges. Learning is a year-round endeavor.

VP

Online Resources For School Success Oral presentation pointers http://www.jshs.org/Articles/ Tips%20for%20Oral%20 Presentations.pdf Project planning guide http://www.ehow.com/ way_5765087_steps-planningout-school-project.html Test anxiety tips http://kidshealth.org/kid/feeling/ school/test_anxiety.html Healthy snack ideas http://www.pinterest.com/skinnyms/healthy-snacks-for-kids/

— Heidi Smith Luedtke, Ph.D.

March 2014, Valley Parent

7


VP

Development

Weapons Ban: Are Toy Guns OK? Tacoma, Washington, mom Emily Waggoner, wasn’t crazy about the idea of guns in her home—real or fake. But one day last summer, her husband Dustin and nineyear-old stepson Will came home with a cadre of toy Nerf artillery. “Shot gun, sniper, semiautomatic—everything” she says. Waggoner balked at the pile of foam ammunition. Father and son were happily bonding over their new toys, fashioning armor and shields out of cardboard and duct tape, but sharing a home with all those toy guns still made her squirm. She was in a bind—one shared by countless modern parents trying to navigate the world of toys, boys, and pretend guns. When it comes to pretend guns, parents often find themselves at odds with their kids’ natural tendencies, and without much guidance from science. One study by Malcolm Watson at Brandeis University found that toy guns increase aggressive behaviors, but scores of parents, experts, and researchers heartily disagree. And a growing school of thought around child-led play suggests that maybe toy

guns have a place in early childhood, after all. Pointed play As shootings dominate the news month after month, pretend gun play has never been more maligned, says Katie Morse, LCSW, a psychotherapist in private practice in Seattle. Many school districts have a zero-tolerance policy. And then there’s the culture-clash: gun play just makes many who didn’t grow around guns uncomfortable. “It’s easy to see violence and aggression in society and in the media, and then your sweet, innocent boy is saying ‘bang bang’ and ‘I killed you’ and you get overwhelmed with fear about whether he could grow up to be violent,” says Morse. Even so, our collective discomfort over fake artillery doesn’t stop kids from turning everything they find into a weapon. After Gloria Lunsford of Seattle realized that Caleb, 4, and Jacob, 3, didn’t need actual toy guns to lob pretend gunfire at each other, she surrendered. Now, Lunsford allows pretend guns, “but they cannot point them at people,”

she says. “They have to pretend there’s a bad guy to shoot.” As parents like Waggoner and Lunsford have learned, banning pretend gun play usually doesn’t work. Kids with a drive for pretend gun play will find way to make it happen, says Johnson. “I’ve seen children chew toast into handguns,“ says child-led play advocate Jeff A. Johnson, owner of Explorations Early Learning and author of numerous books, including Let Them Play: An Early Learning (Un)Curriculum. Another reason parents cringe at pretend gun play: it’s a stubbornly stereotypical “boy” behavior that persists, even in families that dial down traditional gender roles. Parents who are careful not to impose strict gender paradigms are often dismayed to find that their little boy finds them anyway, racing around the house shooting bad guys with a hairbrush. Once again, it’s biology 1, parents 0, say neuroscientists Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang, authors of Welcome to Your Child’s Brain. Gender-influenced toy preferences appear across cultures by one year of age;; by three, children overwhelmingly choose

fall in love with print.

make an impression.

Special Discounts for New Parents

Magazines . Newspapers Mailing Services . Graphic Design

541.926.3000

www.oregonwebpress.com

Discounts also available on home and auto for: • Teachers/Police/Fire • MD’s & RN’s • Scientists/Engineers/CPAs • Active Military

Register for Spring n Spring CLASSES begin Mar. 31 n Spring SHOWCASE on June 13 & 14 n BirTHDAY pArTiES & rEnTALS TOO!

Schroff Insurance

Now Offering! ZUMBA and Flow Yoga Downtown Dance

Rick Schroff 520 NW Oak Ave 541-754-7102 800-942-7892 Serving the Mid-Willamette Valley for over 20 years 8 Valley Parent, March 2014

Results Guaranteed! Two Convenient Locations in Corvallis

Two Convenient Locations in Corvallis

948 NW Circle Blvd 5246 SW Philomath Blvd 5246 SWCorvallis, Philomath Blvd Corvallis, OR OR.

948 NW Circle Blvd

ResuLTs GuaRanTeed!

Hip-Hop, Contemporary, Jazz, and Creative Dance Classes (for kids and adults)

223 nW 2nd Street (2nd & Van Buren) Corvallis

541-829-0070

www.DowntownDanceCorvallis.com


Development toys associated with their own gender. Even primates distinguish stereotypical male toys from female ones, according to Aamodt and Wang, male monkeys prefer to play with trucks, and girl monkeys with dolls. Arms ban While toy gun play can be alarming to parents, it’s usually harmless, says Morse. In fact, many child experts agree that forbidding this type of play only gives pretend guns more power. “Banning gun play may result in boys hiding it and feeling shameful for their desire to play in this innate way,” she says. And stripping childhood of gun play doesn’t benefit boys, she notes. Gun play has developmental value, helping boys make sense of their world as they grapple with input about masculinity and power from numerous sources—male role models, TV and movies, friends and schoolmates. “Toy gun play isn’t about violence as much as it is about symbols. Toy weapons are symbols of power, leadership, authority, strength, and control,” says Johnson. Pretend arms give children the chance to unravel these complicated concepts in the safe realm of play. So a little “good guy-bad guy” role play is probably harmless, and may even have benefits—but experts say parents can and should set limits around this type of play.

Rule number one: Kids shouldn’t hurt each other during pretend gun battles. Rules such as not pointing or shooting at others faces and not shooting family members or pets are

important in laying the framework for safe imaginary play, says Morse. Parents don’t have to agree to purchase or keep toy guns in the home if they’re uncomfortable about it; kids can get creative with household objects like paper-towel rolls or empty soap dispensers. Keep an eye out for red flags during

Valley Parent

Online! Biggest Mid-Valley Family

Events Calendar

Everything in Print & More

pretend gun play, like hurting people or animals “accidentally,” lack of remorse or empathy, or other aggressive behaviors. These are cause for concern, and may warrant a chat with your child’s pediatrician. Limiting exposure to violent TV programs and video games may be a better way to protect boys from aggressive influences than banning gun play. Research consistently links violence-glorifying video games with reduced empathy and increased aggression. A recent study from The Ohio State University showed a clear relationship between violent video games and numbness to the suffering of others. Unlike pretend gun play, violent video media has little to no redeeming learning value, says Morse. As for Emily Waggoner, she’s slowly warming up to toy weapons. She’s learned to value the bonding experience her husband and stepson share as they build forts and shoot down imaginary invaders. “Toy guns still make me uncomfortable, but that’s my own issue. I’m coming around.”

Malia Jacobson is an award-winning parenting and health journalist and mom of three. Her most recent book is Sleep Tight, Every Night: Helping Toddlers and Preschoolers Sleep Well Without Tears, Tricks, or Tirades.

VP

The toy gun play reading list • Killing Monsters: Why Children Need Fantasy, Super Heroes, and Make-Believe Violence by Gerard Jones • The War Play Dilemma: What Every Parent and Teacher Needs to Know by Diane E. Levin and Nancy CarlssonPaige • Grand Theft Childhood: The Surprising Truth About Violent Video Games (and what parents can do about it) by Lawrence Kutner, Ph.D. and Cheryl K. Olson, Sc.D. • Boys: Changing the Classroom, Not the Child by Daniel J. Hodgins • Get Over It! Relearning Guidance Practices by Daniel J. Hodgins • Play: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul by Stuart Brown,MD

Full Service Event Planning x Weddings x Conferences x Presentations

x Parties x Reunions and more

Our professional staff will assist you through every detail from start to finish with only one goal in mind, to exceed your expectations. For Information Call Albany Golf & Event Center at (541) 926-6059 or visit www.albany-golf.com

An Alternative and Empowering Fitness Environment • Personal Training • Boot Camp Classes • Private Yoga Instruction • Prenatal Yoga • Parent-Child Yoga

Safety Recalls ecofusion fitness fitness www.valleyparentmagazine.com ecofusion

Customized Group Classes 116 SW 4th Street • Corvallis, OR 97333 541-740-2516 • www.ecofusionfitness.com

A private fitness studio offering personal training & small group fitness with an eco-friendly attitude March 2014, Valley Parent

9


Blending Families?

Toge ther we can iron out the wrinkles

VP

Celebration

A Dozen Ways to Celebrate

St. Patrick’s Day

The celebration of St. Patrick’s Day has spread throughout the world. Originating in Ireland, March 17th was spent at church and with family, celebrating the teachings of Christianity. When the Irish emigrated to the United States and Canada, the festivities evolved to the wearing of the green, watching parades and eating corned beef and cabbage. Whether you are Irish or not, take time to explore these fun activities with your family. With a dozen ideas to choose from, you can extend your celebration right through the month of March. 1. Grow a Leprechaun. Decorate a terra cotta pot with a Leprechaun face. Fill the pot with soil and add shamrock seeds (found online at Amazon.com). Place the pot in a sunny place and watch the “hair” of your Leprechaun grow. 2. Watch Irish movies together. Try “The Secret of Roan Inish,” “The Magical Legend of the Leprechauns” or “The Luck of the Irish”. 3. Live a greener life. Use this “green” month to teach your children how their efforts can help the environment. Conserve water by taking shorter showers, save energy by shutting off electronics when not in use and walk instead of drive when possible. 4. Make Irish Soda Bread. Combine 4 cups of flour, 4 tablespoons of white sugar, 1 teaspoon baking soda, 1 tablespoon baking powder, ½ teaspoon of salt and ½ cup of softened margarine in a bowl. Add 1 cup of buttermilk, 1 egg and 1 cup of raisins (optional) and mix well. Knead dough slightly and form into a round. Place on baking sheet. Cut “X” in bread top and brush with 1 egg white. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). 5. Have the Leprechaun visit every night while you sleep. Similar to

10 Valley Parent, March 2014

6. 7.

8.

9.

the Elf on the Shelf, the Leprechaun comes by every night to do mischievous things like empty the tissue box or hide the remote. Hunt for four leaf clovers. If the weather doesn’t allow, get crafty by creating your own. Research your family tree even if you don’t have Irish roots. Start with a free trial on Ancestry.com and see how far back you can trace your family’s history. You may be surprised to find a few Leprechauns hanging out in your family tree. Pull out the cards, board games or video games and challenge your family to see who has the Luck of the Irish. Make rainbow cupcakes. Prepare a box of white cake mix as directed. Place equal amounts of the batter in 6 separate bowls. Add food coloring to each bowl to make yellow, orange, red, green, blue and purple batter. Spoon equal amounts of the colored batter into a prepared muffin tin. Do not mix. Bake as directed. Decorate with green icing and yellow mini chocolate candies to represent the gold at the end of the rainbow.

10. Incorporate a green vegetable into your dinner plan each night. Try broccoli, kale, peas, spinach, asparagus, cucumbers and green beans. Tell your kids that Leprechauns love everything green and that you made some of their favorite meals. It’s a great way to get them to try new veggies. 11. Make your own green flowers. Buy a bouquet of white carnations. Fill a vase with water and several drops of green food coloring. Make a fresh cut in the bottom of the flower stem before placing them in the vase. Watch as the green food coloring slowly makes it way up the stem and into the white flowers. 12. Share your blessings with someone else. Although the December holidays are over, the need for volunteers and charitable gifts are still vital. Use your family’s time and talents to give back to the community.

Pam Molnar is a freelance journalist and mother of three. With Irish roots in their family tree, St. Patrick’s Day is always celebrated in their home.


VP

Calendar

March 2014 Ongoing Events

Albany Historic Carousel and Museum. 503 First Ave. W, Albany. 10a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday; 10a.m.-9p.m. Wednesday. Free. Come see the creative processes taking place every Monday through Saturday on this hand-carved carousel project. In the lobby, view finished animals and watch the painters work on a number of animals and other hand-crafted projects. In the carving studio, see and touch over two dozen carvings in progress. For information visit albanycarousel.com. Cool Tools! Exhibition. Benton County Museum, 1101 Main St., Philomath. 10a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday through 2014. Free. Tools for agriculture, engineering, robotics, textiles, distilling, lumbering, surveying, and woodworking are all represented. Visitors can see the surveying tools used by Oregon pioneer Joseph C. Avery to lay out the town of Marysville (later Corvallis) in 1851, as well as a theodolite used to survey Lake Superior in 1869. This exhibition contains a chain saw that might be the largest you’ve ever seen! The HP35 calculator and the Hewlett-Packard ThinkJet printer had profound effects on American life--and the museum has these objects and shares their stories. For information call (541) 929-6230 or visit http://www.bentoncountymuseum.org. Corvallis Pokémon League. Corvallis Elks Club, 1400 NW 9th St., Corvallis. 2-4 p.m. Sundays. Free. All skill levels. Play, trade and learn the rules of Pokémon. Bring your own cards or DS games. For information visit http:// corvallispokemon.wordpress.com. Drop N Shop. Wacky Indoor Bounce, 202 NW 3rd St., Corvallis. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays, and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 3-7 p.m. Thursdays. $12 per child. It’s parent time to shop or run errands, have a lunch date with a friend or spouse, or work out. Reservations are required one week in advance and are for a two-hour time slot. Child must be out of diapers. Snack crackers and beverages are provided. Call (541) 757-6512 or visit www.wackybounce.com to reserve your spot. Family Climb Time. Indoor Climbing Center, 425 SW 26th St., Corvallis. 1-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Cost is $3 per child, $6 per adult with a two-kids-per-parent limit. Parents who are RecSports members bring only their current OSU ID to get in. Parents/guardians must sponsor and belay the child at all times. Visit http://oregonstate.edu/ recsports/node/58#Family%20Climb or call (541) 7371595 for information. Fifth Annual Cultural Connections Exhibit: Pacific Island Culture. Giustina Gallery, LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday, February 11th-March 28th. The vastness of the Pacific Ocean and the isolation of islands allowed many animals, plant life, and cultures to develop and thrive. The Pacific Island cultures are each unique. All add wonderful color to the culture of humanity. For information visit oregonstate.edu/lasells/gallery. Hoolyeh International Dance. 1180 25th Ave., SW, Albany. 7-9 p.m. every Monday. $4. For information call (541) 967-8017 or grholcomb96@gmail.com. La Leche League of Corvallis and Lebanon. Free services. La Leche League provides breastfeeding information and encouragement for families by phone, e-mail, group meetings, and online. We serve expectant and/ or breastfeeding mothers and their families. We offer information and resources on the normal course of breastfeeding, help with overcoming breastfeeding challenges, and encouragement and peer group support for parents of infants and toddlers. For information about local meetings and programs call (541) 766-0055 or visit http:// www.parentingsuccessnetwork.org/community-resources/ community-resources/1185-2. Mommy and Me Dance. Dance Corvallis, 1898 SW 3rd St., Corvallis.1:30 p.m. Thursdays. First class is free. $40/ month plus registration fee. Ages 24 months-3 ½ yrs. with an adult. This 40-minute class focuses on teaching young children coordination and the fundamentals of a dance class. They will sing and dance along to their favorite songs, while having fun with new friends. Visit www. dancecorvallis.com for details or call (541) 556-2470. MOPS–Mothers of PreSchoolers. First Baptist Church. 125 NW 10th St., Corvallis. 9-11 a.m. First and third Fridays, October-May. $45/year. It is a great opportunity for mothers of preschoolers to get to know each other in an accepting, small-group atmosphere. At every meeting

there will be a speaker or video that gives practical tools and insight into specific things. Childcare is provided during this time. For information contact Sarah MacClary at sarah.macclary@gmail.com or visit www.mops.org. Music a la Carte. OSU Memorial Union Lounge, 2501 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis. Noon-12:45 p.m. most Fridays during the fall, winter, and spring terms. Free. These “brown bag” concerts showcase a wide variety of musicians and performance ensembles. Bring your lunch or purchase something from one of several restaurants in the MU. Call (541) 737-4061 or visit http:// mu.oregonstate.edu/events-amp-entertainment/music for details. Open Recreation Swim at Osborn Aquatic Center. 1940 NW Highland Dr., Corvallis. 1-3 p.m. MondayThursday, 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, 1-9 p.m. Friday, 1-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $4.75/Adults, $3.75/youth 7-17, $2.50/children 0-6. Visit www.corvallisoregon.gov/pool or call (541) 766-7946 for information. Parent/Child Swim Class. Albany Community Pool, 2150 36th Ave. SE, Albany. 6-6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. $4/child, free/parents or $37/10 class punch card. Drop in class, no registration required. Visit www. cityofalbany.net/departments/parks-and-recreation/aquatics/albany-community-pool for details or call (541) 9674521. PEACE Parent Support Group. Osborn Aquatic Center Meeting Room, 1940 NW Highland Dr., Corvallis. 6:458:45 p.m. Wednesdays. Suggested donation: $5/adult/ evening. Parents deserve a little PEACE. Join this fun, relaxed, ongoing Parent Enrichment and Continuing Education (PEACE) group. Different topic each night. Children swim for free while parents grow in their parenting skills! For more information contact Dave Jackson at (541) 760-9637 or familyconnectionsnight@gmail.com. Recreation/Open Swim at Albany Community Pool. 2150 36th Ave. SE, Albany. 6:30-8 p.m. Mondays; 2-3 p.m. Wednesdays; 1-4 p.m. Saturdays. $3/youth, $3.50/ adult, $3.25/senior, $10/family. Special rate $2.75/person on Wednesdays. Children 6 and under must be accompanied by an adult in the water. Visit www.cityofalbany.net/ parks/facilities/acp.php for details or call (541) 967-4521. Story Time with Puppets. Downtown Carnegie Albany Public Library, 302 Ferry St. SW, Albany. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesdays. Free. Kids and YA. For information call (541) 917-7585. Toddler Time Swim at Osborn Aquatic Center. 1940 NW Highland Dr., Corvallis. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. MondayFriday. $4.75/Adults, $3.75/youth 7-17, $2.50/children 0-6. Children 6 and under are invited to enjoy a fun, mellow time in the pool. Siblings 8 and under welcome. The relaxed experience during this special session is designed to help infants and toddlers grow comfortable in the water. A parent or guardian needs to accompany their children. Visit www.corvallisoregon.gov/pool or call (541) 7667946 for information. Whiteside Theatre Tour. Whiteside Theatre, 361 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. Noon-1p.m. first Mondays. Free/ members; $5/non-members. All tours of the Whiteside Theatre start promptly. Once a tour enters the building the doors are closed and joining the tour is not permitted. Videography of any kind is not permitted. To reserve your space simply e-mail reservations@whitesidetheatre.org with your name, any special arrangements, and the number in your group. Admission is paid at the door on the day of the tour.

Friday 7

Children’s Matinee Concert. Albany Public Library, 2450 SE 14th Ave., Albany. 4-5 p.m. Free. Part of the Tcha Tee Man Wi Storytelling Festival. Performances by Olga Loya, bi-lingual Latina performer, Joe Herrington, cowboy poet and storyteller, and Steven Henegar truth-and-liesfor-all-occasions storyteller. For information visit www. tchateemanwistorytelling.com. Dances for Birth. Ecofusion Fitness, 116 SW 4th St., Corvallis. 4:30-5:30 p.m. $10/drop-in; $8/pass. Dances for Birth combines gentle dance from the Middle East and Africa with yoga to prepare the body for birth. The movements are great conditioning for pregnancy and will help the baby move into the optimal fetal position during labor. The movements are also great for postpartum healing. Having fit abdominal muscles, flexible hips, a strong pelvic floor, and healthy, toned thighs will aid in pregnancy, labor, and recovery. For information visit ecofusionfitness. com or brittabandit.com. Family Swim. Albany Community Pool, 2150 36th Ave.

SE, Albany. 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays. $3/ youth, $3.50/adult, $3.25/senior, $10/family. Children 15 and under must be accompanied by an adult in the water. Visit www.cityofalbany.net/parks/facilities/acp.php for details or call (541) 967-4521. Fiddler on the Roof. Corvallis Main Stage Theater, 1400 NW Buchanan Ave, Corvallis. 7 p.m. March 7th & 8th; 2 p.m. matinee March 8th & 9th. $10/adults; $8/students; $5/youth; Free/4 and under. Fiddler on the Roof is another great example of a Corvallis School District production that relies on community artisans and professionals to help shape the future of young performing artists in the school district. For show times and ticket information, visit https://app.arts-people.com/index.php?theatre=csd. Meet the Author: Julian Hoffman. Grass Roots Books & Music, 227 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. Free. 7 p.m. Julian Hoffman will speak about his work and read from his award-winning book The Small Heart Of Things: Being At Home In A Beckoning World. For information visit www. grassrootsbookstore.com or call (541) 754-7668. Monty Python’s Spamalot. Albany Civic Theater, 1st Ave., Albany. 8 p.m. March 7th, 8th, 13th –15th; 2:30 p.m. March 9th. $14/general; $11/Senior/Junior. Lovingly ripped off from the classic film comedy Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the musical Spamalot retells the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table and features a bevy of beautiful show girls, not to mention cows, killer rabbits, and French people. For information visit albanycivic.org/13-14-spamalot.htm. Northwest Fly Fishing Expo. Linn County Fair and Expo Center, 3700 Knox Butte Rd., Albany. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Free/ members/veterans/youth under 18; $7/general. Classes, vendor booths, tying and casting demos, raffles, and benefit banquet and auction. For information visit http://www. nwexpo.com. Nymphs in Nature: Bird Bop. Avery House Nature Center, 1200 Avery Park Dr., Corvallis. 9-10 a.m. Ages 2-5 (adult participation optional). $24/three-weeks (no class during Spring Break). Kids will dance with the birds and discover local species, types of flight, and places they live. All classes include songs, stories, art, hands on activities, and outdoor investigation. Bring coats and boots. For information/registration e-mail ahnc@corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org or call (541) 758-6198. Storytelling at the Troubadour. Troubadour Music Center, 521 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. 7-9 p.m. $10. The Tcha Tee Man Wi Storytelling Festival continues with this evening concert for adults and older children. Funny, moving stories share life’s experiences, transport us to other times and places, and draw us into the world of myth and imagination. For information visit www.tchateemanwistorytelling.com/schedule.html%20. Teens Modern Dance. Oddfellows Hall, 223 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. 4:15-5:35 p.m. Mondays, 4-5:30 p.m. Fridays. $42/month/1 class per week-$75/month/2 classes per week. Beginning or continuing students learn a variety of Modern Dance styles. All classes include floor and center work, body swings, balance, footwork, jumps, leaps, turns, and choreography. Notify Donna at ervin95@comcast.net or call (541) 752-6329 if you would like to stop in for a free trial class or to observe. For information visit www. moderndancetechnique.com.

Saturday 8

Audubon Society Field Trip. Benton Center, 757 NW Polk Ave., Corvallis. 7:30 a.m. Second Saturdays. Membership varies starting at $15. Of interest to beginner birders and birders new to Oregon’s mid-valley area. Time is spent identifying local birds by sight and song in the valley’s National Wildlife Refuges—Finley, Baskett Slough, and Ankeny, as well as other birding areas locally. For information visit www.audubon.corvallis.or.us/ field_trips. Beginner Bonsai Class. Garland Nursery, 5470 NE Hwy. 20, Corvallis. 2-4 p.m. $45 including supplies and instructions to complete one group bonsai. For information/registration call (541) 929-9520. Between the Cracks Musical Series: Vinny Golia, Woodwinds. The Arts Center, 700 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. 7 p.m. Free/students; $10/members; $15/general. For information visit http://theartscenter.net/event/ between-the-cracks-music-and-technology-forum or call (541) 754-1551. Clemens Community Pool Open Rec. Philomath High School, 2054 Applegate St., Philomath. 1-3 p.m. Saturdays during the school year. $3.25/adults, $2.50/student/seniors,

Nymphs in Nature: Bird Bop

Kids will dance with the birds and discover local species, types of flight, and places they live. All classes include songs, stories, art, hands on activities, and outdoor investigation. Bring coats and boots. Where: Avery House Nature Center, 1200 Avery Park Dr., Corvallis. When: Friday, March 7 at 9-10 a.m. Ages 2-5 (adult participation Who: optional). Cost: $24/three-weeks (no class during Spring Break). Info/Reg: email ahnc@corvallisenvironmental center.org or call (541) 758-6198. free/age 5 and under, $8/family (Attendant of at least 14 years old must accompany children under 7). Also offered are lessons, lap swim, aqua fitness, and swim team. Visit www.philomath.k12.or.us/pool or call (541) 929-3584 for information. Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. Benton County Fairgrounds, 110 SW 53rd St., Corvallis. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. through April 12. One of western Oregon’s oldest weekly indoor winter markets, it offers a broad variety of products to the local shopper. From organically grown vegetables and fruits to artisan baked breads, this weekly market offers a broad selection for those wishing to support locally grown foods. Browse displays of fine quality crafted items from artist drawings to handcrafted jewelry. Local musicians perform each week. For information visit corvalliswintermarket.wordpress.com. Kid’s Night Out: Nerf Guns with Laser Lights. Wacky Indoor Bounce, 202 NW 3rd St., Corvallis. 5:30-9:15 p.m. $12/child for Valley Parent readers! Parents go wacky while your kids enjoy a night out. Snacks and beverages are provided. For reservations call (541) 757-6512 or visit www.wackybounce.com/kidsnightout.html for information. La fiesta de su biblioteca. Corvallis Public Library, Youth Activity Room, 645 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis. Free 11 a.m.-noon, second Saturdays. Come and enjoy a fun bilingual English/Spanish program. Children of all ages welcome. Crafts are made after story time. Refreshments served. Venga y disfrute de la fiesta de su biblioteca. Un programa bilingüe cada mes en la biblioteca. Gratis Refrescos. Call (541) 766-6794 for information. Little Sprouts: Seed Starting and Garden Planting. Garland Nursery, 5470 NE Hwy 20, Corvallis. 11 a.m. $10/child. Starting and growing a garden is a great way to show kids that fresh, healthy foods can be fun. Registration required. Call (541) 753-6601. Prenatal Yoga. EcoFusion Fitness, 116 SW 4th St., Corvallis. 11 a.m.-Noon. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. $10/class or $70/10 classes. Prenatal yoga is a great way to prepare the body and mind for birth, boost mood, and reduce pregnancy aches and pains. Modifications are available to meet various backgrounds and levels of experience. This class is open to women in any stage of a complication-free pregnancy. For information, call (541) 740-2516 or visit www.ecofusionfitness. com. Spring for Kids Run/Walk. Corvallis School District’s Western View Center, 1435 SW 35th St., Corvallis. Dayof-race registration starts at 7:30 a.m.. 10K and 5K runs

Calendar

continued on page 12

March 2014, Valley Parent

11


Calendar

continued from page 11

start at 9:00 a.m., 2K run starts at 9:10 a.m. $25 for 5/10K; $12 for 2K. This 11th annual run is the primary fundraiser for the Corvallis Public Schools Foundation’s Innovation Grants. Event will include Healthy Moves Expo from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m., featuring dozens of ideas and activities to show you how to lead an active and healthy life. For the safety of everyone, please no dogs, bicycles, or rollerskates/blades on the walk run. Strollers are allowed in the 2k only. Story Time for Kids. Imagine Coffee, 5460 SW Philomath Blvd., Corvallis. 10 a.m. Free. Story Man, James Warren, reads to children (of all ages). For information visit http://imaginecoffee.net/events-in-corvallis. Storytelling Festival Finale Concert: Sanctuary. Unitarian Universalist Church, 2945 NW Circle Blvd., Corvallis. 7:30 p.m. $10. This beloved storytelling festival presents the finale concert for adults and older children featuring Olga Loya, Joe Herrington, and Steven Henegar sharing funny, moving stories. For information/tickets visit www.tchateemanwistorytelling.com/schedule.html. Vagabond Opera. The Majestic Theatre, 115 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. 7:30 p.m. $15-$20. Vagabond Opera presents the new wave of opera–lusty voices singing in 13 languages and presenting a cabaret of rich musical phrasing, sparkling lyrics, and indomitable stage presence all played with exuberance, skill and a gritty Vagabond edge. This is Opera liberated and reinvented for everyone. For information/tickets visit www.majestic.org/vagabond-opera. Workshops with Olga Loya & Steven Henegar. Unitarian Universalist Church, 2945 NW Circle Blvd., Corvallis. 9 a.m. & 1 p.m.$30/each or $50/both. Participants will examine a story and learn to see and tell it more clearly, and will learn how personal and family stories strengthen families and communities. For information on each workshop/tickets, visit www.tchateemanwistorytelling.com/schedule.html. Fiddler on the Roof. See 3/7. Monty Python’s Spamalot. See 3/7. Northwest Fly Fishing Expo. See 3/7.

Sunday 9

Angry Planet: Volcanoes. Russell Tripp Performance Center, LBCC, 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany. 2 p.m. $3-$8. Angry Planet series host Peter Rowe captures the intense beauty and danger of active volcanoes in Costa Rica, Mexico, Congo, Italy, Hawaii, and Indonesia and the gripping stories of those living beside them. See trailer at http://vimeo.com/55177702. For information/tickets visit http:/www.linnbenton.edu/current-students/involvement/ russell-tripp-performance-center/current-season”www. linnbenton.edu/current-students/involvement/russell-trippperformance-center/current-season. Slow Food Corvallis Potluck and Annual Meeting. Chintimini Senior Center, 2601 NW Tyler Avenue, Corvallis. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Free with dish to share. Bring ideas for programs and events for the coming year for promoting food that is “good, clean, and fair for all.” Any and all ideas are welcome. We’ll also be looking for volunteers to put some of these ideas into action. For information visit http://slowfoodcorvallis.org/home/eventscoming-up. Fiddler on the Roof. See 3/7. Monty Python’s Spamalot. See 3/7. Northwest Fly Fishing Expo. See 3/7.

Monday 10

Pu’uwai O Ke Kuawa Heart of the Valley Hula. First Baptist Church, 125 NW 10th St., Corvallis. 5:30-8:15 p.m. Mondays. $5/class. All shapes, sizes, and levels of ability are invited to try this gentle form of Hawaiian dance and expression. For information call Barb Landau at (541) 908-9190 or visit http://www.corvallishula.com. Raising Your Spirited Child Workshop. Corvallis. $25/series; $10/single. 6:30-8 p.m. Mondays through March 17th or 9:30-11 a.m. Tuesdays through March 18th. Parenting workshops on understanding your child’s temperament based on the book Raising Your Spirited Child by Mary Sheedy Kurcinka. Appropriate for any age child. For information/location e-mail Esther at contactme@sharingstrengths.com, call (541) 602-2254, or visit http://sharingstrengths.com. Science Pub – The Science of Skin. Old World Deli, 341 2nd St., Corvallis. 6-8 p.m. Free. Arup Indra, associate professor in the Oregon State University College of Pharmacy, will present information about skin development, composition, and disease risks. Call (541) 737-4717 or visit http://oregonstate.edu/terra/science-pub-corvallis for information. Southtown Performers Spotlight. FireWorks Restaurant, 1115 SW 3rd St., Corvallis. 8-10 p.m. Free. Enjoy a great new show every Monday at FireWorks! The Southtown Performers Spotlight is a family-friendly evening of entertainment featuring music, song, and poetry

12 Valley Parent, March 2014

Transforming Our Local Food System A workshop with Vicki Robin for community members working to strengthen the local food system – advocates, growers, processors, grocers, investors, and educators. Celebrate what the community already has, identify barriers and gaps, and turn challenges into opportunities for new enterprises and projects. Where: Corvallis Public Library, Main Meeting Room When: Tuesday, March 11; 1:30-4 p.m. Cost: Free Info/Reg: Contact Annette Mills at info@sustainablecorvallis.org or call (541) 230-1237.

by local artists. Visit http://southtownlive.com/events.html. Sign up in advance on Facebook by messaging Öcean LiffAnderson or call (541) 754-6958 for information. Sustainability Coalition’s Fair and Town Hall Meeting. CH2MHill Alumni Center, 725 SW 26th St., Corvallis. 5-7 p.m. Fair; 7-9 p.m. Town Hall meeting. Free. Fair includes exhibits by partner organizations and action teams, music by local musicians, and fabulous local food. Town Hall meeting includes a slide show featuring sustainability accomplishments of partner organizations and action teams during the past year, keynote speaker Vicki Robin, and sharing among community members. Robin is the author of Your Money or Your Life and Blessing the Hands That Feed Us: What Eating Closer to Home Can Teach Us About Food, Community, and Our Place on Earth. For information/registration visit http://sustainablecorvallis. org/2014/01/registration-open-town. The Jordan World Circus. Benton County Fairgrounds, 110 SW 53rd St., Corvallis. 7 p.m. $18.99/adult; $14.99/ child. Witness a human shoot out of a cannon, watch the Globe of Death riders, and see camels, white tigers, elephants, zebras, clowns, jugglers, and aerialists perform awesome acts. (Acts are subject to change.) For tickets and free child’s ticket visit http://thejordanworldcircus. com/home.php. Teens Modern Dance. See 3/7.

Tuesday 11  

Baton Twirling Class. Dance Corvallis, 1898 SW 3rd St., Corvallis. 4:30 p.m. $40/month, first class is free. Boys and girls welcome, ages 4+. Baton twirling classes taught by Kailey McKay, former OSU Feature Twirler. Private lessons are also available. Please email Kailey at reignbatontwirling@gmail.com if interested or call (541) 7603467. Like our Facebook page at https://www.facebook. com/ReignBatonTwirling. Beginning Cuban Salsa Dancing. Impulse Bar & Grill, 1425 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis. 6-7:30 p.m. $40/fourweek course. Beginner course (16 and older) in Cuban Salsa (Casino) and Rueda de Casino (a fun, group dance from Cuba). Learn the first set of fundamental motions and basics to this amazing dance, and be immediately infused into an incredible community of people who love the music and culture of Cuba. Call (541) 230-1114 or see http://www.rumbanana.org/Classes.html for information. Celtic Jam. Imagine Coffee, 5460 SW Philomath Blvd., Corvallis. 7 p.m. Tuesdays. See http://imaginecoffee.net/ events-in-corvallis/ for information. Irish Dance/New Beginner. An Daire Academy of Irish Dance, Eastgate Business Ctr., 33815 Eastgate Cir., Corvallis. 4-4:45 p.m. Tuesdays. $50/month. First class is free. For information visit http://andairecorvallis.com/ schedule.html or e-mail corvalliscelticarts@gmail.com. Mama Baby Yoga. EcoFusion Fitness, 116 SW 4th St., Corvallis. 9:45-10:45 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. $70 for 10 sessions or $10 drop in rate. A yoga class for moms and babies 2 weeks to 4 months. For information, call (541) 740-2516 or visit www.ecofusionfitness.com. Ready Together-School Success! Presbyterian Church,114 8th Ave., Corvallis. 6-8 p.m. Tuesdays through March 18th. Free. Be a Ready Parent and raise a Ready Child. Class will teach parents techniques to build skills in their 2-6 year old children that research shows are most important for school success. Topics include how to help children express feelings, calm down, share, wait, take turns, and develop knowledge of shapes, numbers, and early reading skills. Free child care available. Call (541) 917-4899 at LBCC Family Connections to register. Rotary Club of Albany Meeting. Pop’s Branding Iron, 901 Pacific Blvd. SE, Albany. Noon. Free. Rotary of Albany has purchased and helped install playground equipment, sponsored an annual Christmas party for underprivileged children, provided grants to local service organizations, given scholarships to deserving students, and sponsored recognition programs for outstanding young

people. E-mail dale.stowell@linnbenton.edu for information. Teen Tribal Dance. Live Well Studio, 971 NW Spruce St., Corvallis. 4-5 p.m. Tuesdays through June. Free. American Tribal Style (ATS) dance is welcoming to females from all backgrounds and body types. The focus on positive and supportive team mentality provides a great environment in which teen girls can flourish during this challenging time in their lives. The class will present tribal dance moves from around the world including Africa, Egypt, Native America, Spain, and India, and will offer the opportunity to learn about costuming techniques from around the globe. For information e-mail instructor Antigone Cook at antigonepilates@comcast.net, call (541) 740-4632, or visit www.tribalrisingdance.com. Teen Writers Group. Corvallis Public Library, Youth Activity Room, 645 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis. 6 p.m. Free. Every Tuesday. Teen Writers Group is open to teens 12-18 yrs. who are interested in writing. This group is led by a local YA author, Bryan Bliss. For information call (541) 766-6794. Transforming Our Local Food System. Corvallis Public Library, Main Meeting Room, 1:30-4 p.m. Free. A workshop with Vicki Robin for community members working to strengthen the local food system – advocates, growers, processors, grocers, investors, and educators. Celebrate what the community already has, identify barriers and gaps, and turn challenges into opportunities for new enterprises and projects. To pre-register contact Annette Mills at info@sustainablecorvallis.org or call (541) 230-1237. Tuesday Tea Community Event. Live Well Studio, 971 NW Spruce Ave., Corvallis. 11 a.m.-Noon. Free. Gather for tea in the studio. Bring your favorite tea to share and a mug. Visit http://www.livewellstudio.com for information. Yoga in the Gallery. The Arts Center, 700 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. 10-11 a.m. $5 suggested donation. Explore the world of yoga and enjoy a sense of community in the beautiful setting of The Arts Center’s main gallery. The hour-long session will be led by Marcy Keuter, a certified yoga instructor and The Arts Center volunteer. Marcy will lead you through a series of gentle yoga poses inspired by the art in the gallery. Beginners are welcome. Please bring your own mat if possible. For March dates/information visit http://theartscenter.net/calendar/events. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Raising Your Spirited Child Workshop. See 3/10.

Wednesday 12

Albany Fitwalkers. Villas of Courtyard Villa, 1929 Grand Prairie Road. SE, Albany. 7 p.m. Second Wednesdays. This group sponsors walking events and presents walks around the community. Their motto is “walk for the health of it.” For information, contact Rozy Weatherby at (541) 926-7890 or email her at wrozy@yahoo.com. All Boys Hip Hop. Dance Corvallis, 1898 SW 3rd St., Corvallis. 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays. First class is free. $40/ month for returning students. Boys can benefit from dance and from the concentration and strength that dance builds. These classes are designed to encourage athleticism. Boys will work on individual skills as well as a group combination. Visit www.dancecorvallis.com for details or call (541) 556-2470. Baby and Me Storytime. Lebanon Public Library, 55 Academy St., Lebanon. 10 a.m. Free. Designed for ages 0-24 months and their caregivers.  Enjoy interactive time with your tot through stories, finger plays, and music. Call (541) 258-4926 or visit www.lebanon.plinkit.org for information. Creative Movement. Oddfellows Hall, 223 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. 3:30-4:20 p.m. $12/single class, $40/month. Children 4½ to 6 years explore the elements of dance: shapes, rhythm, tempo, pathways, and more. Notify Donna at ervin95@comcast.net or call (541) 752-6329 to stop in for a free trial class or to observe. For information visit www.moderndancetechnique.com.

Geisel Book Club for Beginning Readers. Corvallis Public Library Youth Activity Room, 645 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Second Wednesday. Open to any child in grades K-2 who is beginning to read. Monthly meetings include a discussion about the book, activities, and other stories. This month’s title is Penny and Her Marble by Kevin Henkes. A limited number of copies of each title will be available at the Youth Reference Desk. For information call (541) 766-6794 or visit www.thebestlibrary.net/library-events-kidslinks-119. Hey! Look us Over Maternity Program. Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, 3600 NW Samaritan Drive, Corvallis. 7-9 p.m. Second Wednesday. Free. Expectant parents will tour the Center for Women and Families and meet the delivery staff. Call (541) 768-4752 for information. OSUsed Store Sale. 644 SW 13th St., Corvallis. 5:307:30 p.m. 1st Wednesday; 12-3 p.m. other Wednesdays; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 3rd Saturday. Free admission. Items for sale include computers and computer accessories, furniture (desks, file cabinets, tables, chairs, bookcases, etc.), office supplies, sporting goods, household items, bicycles and much more. See www.surplus.oregonstate.edu for information. Pre-Natal Yoga. Live Well Studio, 971 NW Spruce Ave., Corvallis. 7-8:15 p.m. $11-12. Using a carefully chosen set of poses, students learn to support their changing bodies and develop the strength and openness needed for giving birth and the breath and mindfulness skills which are essential to childbirth and motherhood. For information, call (541) 224-6566 or visit www.livewellstudio.com. Relaxing Flow Yoga. Downtown Dance, 223 NW 2nd St., Corvallis. 8-9 p.m. Wednesdays. $7 or punch card available, $30/5classes. Adult fitness. This fun, all-levels class takes students from energizing sun salutations and strengthening standing poses to deeply relaxing floor work to stretch and open. Students leave class feeling joyful, restored, and ready for whatever tomorrow may bring. For information visit www.DowntownDanceCorvallis.com or call (541) 829-0070. Rise and Shine Storytime. Philomath Community Library, 1050 Applegate St., Philomath.10-10:45 a.m. Wednesdays. Free. Children 2-5 will wake up with reading, singing, movement, and art projects. For information call (541) 929-3016 or visit www.thebestlibrary.net/ library-events-kidslinks-119. Rotary Club of Corvallis Mornings. The Osborne Aquatic Center. 1940 NW Highland Dr., Corvallis. 6:45 a.m. Free. Meet every Wednesday for fellowship, breakfast, and an informative and interesting presentation from a guest speaker. Local projects have included stage curtains for Lincoln School, clothing for residents at Jackson Street Youth Shelter, and art supplies for schools. For information visit www.corvallismorningrotary.org. Teen Makers. Corvallis Public Library, Youth Activity Room, 645 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis. 6 p.m. Second and fourth Wednesday. Free. Arduino and Raspberry Pi are low cost, open-source, physical computing platforms that can be used to learn programming, detect sensor input, blink LEDs, and control motors. The Library has purchased SparkFun Inventor’s Kits and Raspberry Pi boards for Teen Makers to learn programming and explore electronics. Bring your own laptop if you would like. For information call (541) 766-6794. Zumba! Adult Fitness. Downtown Dance, 223 NW 2nd St., Corvallis. 9:30-10:20 a.m. Wednesdays; 8:309:20 a.m. Fridays. $7/drop-in. $30/5 classes. Punch card available. Join the fun! For information visit www. DowntownDanceCorvallis.com or call (541) 829-0070. Family Swim. See 3/7.

Thursday 13

Hearts of the Valley Talent Search Open Mic Entry. Old World Deli, 341 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. 7-9 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays. The first and second place winners from this event will be entered into the Next Level, a bi-monthly talent search, where they will compete for a cash prize, a one hour recording session at Wild Rose Studios, and entry into the Hearts of the Valley Talent Search. The first and second place winners of the Next Level go on to compete at the bi-annual Hearts of the Valley Talent Search. For information contact clay@ wildrosestudios.com. La Leche League of Lebanon Meetings. Lebanon Community Hospital, 525 N. Santiam Hwy., Lebanon. 6 p.m. Second Thursday. Free. Breastfeeding information and support for expectant and breastfeeding mothers. Fathers and babies welcome. For information call (541) 766-0055 or visit www.llli.org. Little Bookworms Preschool Storytime. Lebanon Public Library, 55 Academy St., Lebanon. 11 a.m. Free. Children ages 3-6 to explore their world interactively through books, songs and finger plays. A craft follows every story time. Call (541) 258-4926 or visit www.lebanon.plinkit.org for information.


Modern Dance I. Oddfellows Hall, 223 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. 3:45-4:45 p.m. $12/single class, $40/month. Children 8-10 years will learn basic ballet and Modern technique in a variety of contemporary dance styles. All classes include floor and center work, body swings, jumps, leaps, turns, and choreography. Notify Donna at ervin95@comcast.net or call (541) 752-6329 if you would like to stop in for a free trial class or to observe. For information visit www.moderndancetechnique.com. Open Studio at The Arts Center. 700 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $15/session. Punch card available. Ages 6-16. Enjoy guided projects by artist Diana Ryan, or work independently in the clay or mixed media studios. For information/registration visit https:// secure.theartscenter.net/np/clients/artscenter/event. jsp?event=401 or call (541) 754-1551. Oregon Jamboree Mystery Concert. LaSells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. 7:30 p.m. $15. KRKT and St. Jude present a mystery performer at this benefit concert. For tickets visit www.festivalticketing. com/boxoffice/?cref=98480115-58dd-4d79-9360-db746f4a42b7 or call KRKT at (541) 926-8628. Teen Yoga. LiveWell Studio, 971 NW Spruce Ave., Ste 101, Corvallis. 4-5 p.m. Free. Teens learn to get stronger and more flexible, feel easier and happier in their body, and relieve stress and relax. For information e-mail frontdesk@livewellstudio.com. Winter Choral Concert –Winter Light! Russell Tripp Performance Center, LBCC, 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. Featuring the LBCC Concert Choir, Re-Choired Element Chamber Choir, A cappella groups Blue Light Special and The Sirens, and special presentations by members of the Musical Theater/Opera Workshop. For tickets visit https://secure.boxofficeavenue. com/LinnBenton/Attractions.ashx. Mama Baby Yoga. See 3/11. Monty Python’s Spamalot. See 3/7. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8.

Friday 14

Family Movie Night. Albany Community Pool, 2150 36th Ave. SE, Albany. 7-9 p.m. $3/youth, $3.50/adult, $3.25/senior, $10/family. Bring a float and watch a movie in the pool. Children under 16 must be accompanied by an adult; children under six must have parent in water with them. Visit www.cityofalbany.net/parks/facilities/acp.php for details or call (541) 967-4521. Kid’s Night Out: Hide and Seek with Laser Lights and Fog Machine. Wacky Indoor Bounce, 202 NW 3rd St., Corvallis. 5:30-9:15 p.m. $12/child for Valley Parent readers! Parents go wacky while your kids enjoy a night out. Valentine treats will be provided. For reservations call (541) 757-6512 or visit www.wackybounce.com/kidsnightout.html for information. Nymphs in Nature Nest Builder. Avery House Nature Center, 1200 Avery Park Dr., Corvallis. 9-10 a.m. Ages 2-5 (adult participation optional). $24/three-weeks (no class during Spring break). Hands on investigation of real birds’ nests. Make your own nest with speckled eggs. All classes include songs, stories, art, hands on activities, and outdoor investigation. Bring coats and boots. For information/registration e-mail ahnc@corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org or call (541) 758-6198. Parents’ Night Out. Osborn Aquatic Center, 1940 NW Highland Dr., Corvallis. 6-10 p.m. $15/child. Ages 3-12. Ages 3 to 6 yrs. will play games in our Activity Room, and kids 7 to 12 will go for a swim. Visit www.corvallisoregon.gov/index.aspx?page=275 or call (541) 7667946 for information and pre-registration. Parents’ Survival Night. The Little Gym, 958 NW Circle Blvd., Suite A, Corvallis. 6 p.m. $30/members; $35/general. Parents call it a break from the kids; kids call it a break from their parents. Parents enjoy some adult time while the children get quality “kid time” in a safe, fun, familiar place with trained instructors who lead them through games and music-filled activities. Call (541) 7530950 to register. Zion Lutheran School Annual Auction. OSU Alumni Center, 725 SW 26th St., Corvallis. 6-11 p.m. $37.75/ single; $69.25/couple. The theme is “Fly Me to the Moon ...a night among the stars in all the glamor of Old Hollywood”. Support Zion Lutheran School while enjoying dinner catered by Valley Catering and live music by the Bringetto-Cameron Jazz Orchestra. There will be a live, silent, and dessert auction, prizes, and props for photos. Tickets are available in the school office and online at http://zionauction.ticketleap.com/fly-me-to-the-moon. Dances for Birth. See 3/7. Family Swim. See 3/7. Monty Python’s Spamalot. See 3/7. Teens Modern Dance. See 3/7. Zumba! Adult Fitness. See 3/12.  

Saturday 15

Children’s Performing Art Series: Wild Wonders

Exotic Animals. Linn-Benton Community College Forum, 6500 SW Pacific Blvd., Albany. 10 a.m. Free. Trained biologists present the wonders of wildlife with six different exotic animals from around the world. For information call (541) 917-7777 or visit www.cityofalbany.net. Family Music Fun. Corvallis Public Library, 645 NW Monroe Av., Corvallis. 11-Noon third Saturdays. Free. Kids under 12. Family participation music and movement program led by experienced music instructors. For information contact Peik-Kuan Lim at (541) 766-6481. St. Patrick’s Day 1K Kids Run & Family Walk. Riverfront Bike Path, First and Monroe Ave., Corvallis. 2:30 p.m. $10-$20; Free/kids under 3 with parent. Part of the “Run to Get Lucky” St. Patrick’s Day race. Join in the fun for the costume contest. For information/registration visit www.runtogetlucky.com/registration.html. The Ins and Outs of Insects and Insecticides. Garland Nursery, 5470 NE Hwy 20, Corvallis. 1 p.m. Free. Learn the various roles of insects in the garden’s ecosystem, the proper use of insecticides, and some less-lethal options for protecting plants. For information/registration call (541) 929-9520. Willamette Sportsman Show. Linn County Fair and Expo Center, 3700 Knox Butte Rd., Albany. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. $5. Event includes keynote speakers, vendors, raffles, and door prizes. The Willamette Sportsman Show started as a trophy show and chili cook-off, but over the years it has grown into a fun event for sportsmen from all over the area. For information visit www.willamettesportsmanshow.com. Willamette Valley Concert Band Spring Concert. Russell Tripp Performance Center, LBCC, 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany. Free. 2 p.m. The Willamette Valley Concert Band is a community ensemble formed of area musicians ranging from teenagers to seniors. The group’s purpose is to further the cultural environment of the community and to provide entertainment to the public. For information visit www.linnbenton.edu/current-students/ involvement/russell-tripp-performance-center/currentseason. Clemens Community Pool Open Rec. See 3/8. Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. See 3/8. Monty Python’s Spamalot. See 3/7. OSUsed Store Sale. See 3/12. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Story Time for Kids. See 3/8.

Sunday 16

G2T (Garden to Table): Pears, Blueberries, Potatoes and Leafy Greens. Garland Nursery, 5470 NE Hwy 20, Corvallis. 1 p.m. Free. Learn how to how to prep, plant, harvest, and bring this wonderful produce to the table. For information/registration call (541) 929-9520. Getting Into Beekeeping. Shonnard’s Nursery, 6600 SW Philomath Blvd., Corvallis. 1-2 p.m. $20. Interested in keeping bees but unsure how to get started? This class will provide an understanding of the financial and time requirements associated with beekeeping, basic tools and equipment, the right style of hive, and frequently-asked questions about bees and their care. For information/registration visit http://nectarbeesupply.wordpress.com or call Karessa Torgerson at (541) 220-8919. Hoolyeh International Dance. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 4515 West Hills Road, Corvallis. 7-9 p.m. first and third Sundays. $3/admission. The first Sunday of the month will be dedicated to Balkan dances. For information call (971) 237-2000. International Brotherhood of Magicians. Red Cross Building, 3388 SW Pacific Blvd., Albany. 2 p.m. third Sundays. 7 yrs. and up. Fees start at $35/yr. A social club dedicated to advancing the art of magic performance,

interest, and fellowship. For information contact Janet Vance (541) 752-3900. Linn Historical Society’s “Frank & Warren Shedd’s Civil War Involvement.” Lakeside Center, Mennonite Village, 2180 54th Ave., Albany. 2-3 p.m. Free. For information call (541) 926-4680. Willamette Sportsman Show. See 3/15.

Monday 17

Homeschool Hangout: Brother Bear. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village, 116 Marion St. NE, Salem. 1-4 p.m. $10/member; $12/non-member plus admission. Ages 5-12. Come out of hibernation and stop by the Discovery Village to learn how important bears were to human culture. Explore how bears contributed to everything from medicine to crops to hugs and even pets. Parents can join in on the fun or have fun exploring the Village with younger siblings. For information visit http://acgilbert.org/march or call (503) 371-3631. Pu’uwai O Ke Kuawa Heart of the Valley Hula. See 3/10. Raising Your Spirited Child Workshop. See 3/10. Southtown Performers Spotlight. See 3/10. Teens Modern Dance. See 3/7.

Tuesday 18

Dining for Women. Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship Church, 2945 NW Circle Blvd., Corvallis. 6:30 p.m. third Tuesdays. An organization funding programs fostering good health, education, and economic self-sufficiency through potlucks where the money saved on the meal is donated to international programs. Bring a potluck dish to share and a donation (any amount, check or credit card preferred). For visit http://www.facebook.com/pages/ Dining-for-Women-Corvallis-Chapter/201679226520781 ?sk=info. Baton Twirling Class. See 3/11. Beginning Cuban Salsa Dancing. See 3/11. Celtic Jam. See 3/11. Irish Dance/New Beginner. See 3/11. Mama Baby Yoga. See 3/11. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Raising Your Spirited Child Workshop. See 3/10. Ready Together-School Success! See 3/11. Rotary Club of Albany Meeting. See 3/11. Teen Tribal Dance. See 3/11. Teen Writers Group. See 3/11. Tuesday Tea Community Event. See 3/11. Yoga in the Gallery. See 3/11.

Wednesday 19

LEGO Club. Lebanon Public Library, 55 Academy St., Lebanon. 4-5 p.m. Free. Kids ages 6-13 work independently to create LEGO masterpieces with the LEGOs provided. Call (541) 258-4926 or visit www.lebanon.plinkit.org. R.E.A.D. Philomath Community Library, 1050 Applegate St., Philomath. 2:30-4:00 p.m. Free. Experience reading time with a four-legged friend. R.E.A.D. stands for Reading Education Assistance Dogs. The program’s mission is to improve the literacy skills of children through the assistance of registered therapy teams as literacy mentors. For information call (541) 929-3016 or visit www. cbcpl.net or www.welcomewagger.org/read.html. All Boys Hip Hop. See 3/12. Baby and Me Storytime. See 3/12. Creative Movement. See 3/12. Family Swim. See 3/7. OSUsed Store Sale. See 3/12. Pre-Natal Yoga. See 3/12. Relaxing Flow Yoga. See 3/12.

Getting Into Beekeeping Interested in keeping bees but unsure how to get started? This class will provide an understanding of the financial and time requirements associated with beekeeping, basic tools and equipment, the right style of hive, and frequently-asked questions about bees and their care. Where:

Shonnard’s Nursery, 6600 SW Philomath Blvd., Corvallis. When: Sunday, March 16; 1-2 p.m. $20 Cost: Info/Reg: visit http://nectarbeesupply.wordpress.com or call Karessa Torgerson at (541) 220-8919.

Rise and Shine Storytime. See 3/12. Rotary Club of Corvallis Mornings. See 3/12. Zumba! Adult Fitness. See 3/12.

Thursday 20

Anime Club. Main Library, 2450 14th Ave., SE, Albany. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Third Thursday. Ages 11 to adult. Fans of Japanese animation meet monthly to play Yu-GiOh or other games, share books, practice drawing in the Japanese style, and meet others with similar interests. Participants are encouraged to come in costume and to bring snack foods and drinks to share. For information about this program, call Young Adult Services Librarian Doris Hicks at (541) 791-0015 or email doris.hicks@ cityofalbany.net. La Leche League Corvallis. Multicultural Literacy Center, 128 SW 9th St., Corvallis. 10 a.m. first Wednesday; 6 p.m. third Thursday. Free. Breastfeeding information and support for expectant and breastfeeding mothers. Babies and children welcome. For information call (541) 766-0055 or visit http://lalecheleagueoregon. webs.com/localcorvallis. Find us on Facebook as LLL Willamette Valley. Northwest Horse Fair and Expo. Linn County Fair and Expo Center, 3700 Knox Butte Rd., Albany. 5 p.m. Thursday; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. $10/adults; $5/children 6-12 yrs. Event hosts educational clinics and seminars, showcases a wide variety of horse breeds, and entertains with activities and competitions on horseback. Vendors will share the latest innovations, products and services available. For information visit equinepromotions.net/northwest-horse-fair. Third Thursday. Downtown Albany. 4-8 p.m. Free. Third Thursdays is a monthly stay-open-late shopping event. Eat at one of Downtown’s 22 locally owned restaurants and stay for Third Thursday happenings. Contact the Albany Downtown Association at (541) 928-2469 or see www. albanydowntown.com for information. Little Bookworms Preschool Storytime. See 3/13. Mama Baby Yoga. See 3/11. Modern Dance I. See 3/13. Open Studio at The Arts Center. See 3/13. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Teen Yoga. See 3/13.

Friday 21

Nymphs in Nature: Hoot Owl. Avery House Nature Center, 1200 Avery Park Dr., Corvallis. 9-10 a.m. Ages 2-5 (adult participation optional). $24/three-weeks (no class during Spring break). Make an owl mask, go on a mouse hunt, explore owl food chains, and investigate an owl pellet. All classes include songs, stories, art, hands on activities, and outdoor investigation. Bring coats and boots. For information/registration e-mail ahnc@corvallisenvironmentalcenter.org or call (541) 758-6198. The Sketchbook Club. Brownsville Art Center, 255 N. Main St., Brownsville. 6 p.m. $10/annual membership. All ages. The Sketchbook Club provides a community of artists, beginners and advanced, young and old, of all types of art. Monthly meetings allow members to increase their drawing skills, expand their use of art mediums, and network with other artists. For information e-mail shavonne. schu@gmail.com, call (541) 990-9478, or visit http://thesketchbookclub.wordpress.com. Dances for Birth. See 3/7. Family Swim. See 3/7. Northwest Horse Fair and Expo. See 3/20. Teens Modern Dance. See 3/7. Zumba! Adult Fitness. See 3/12.

Saturday 22

Discover the Art of Paper Collage. 956 North Pointe Dr., Albany. 1-4 p.m. $50/materials included. A workshop with paper collage artist Anna Tewes. The theme is “Everything Roses.” Working in handmade papers offers the wonderful possibility of working in texture as well as design and color. To register call (541) 223-1478. For artist information visit www.gallerycalapooia.com/artists. Insights Into Gardening. La Sells Stewart Center, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. 8:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $30/pre-registration; $35/door. This is a day-long seminar offering practical, hands-on learning for home gardeners and gardenersto-be. Whether you are an experienced or novice gardener, new to the area or an Oregon native, you will find plenty of ideas to make your gardening easier, more enjoyable, and more successful. For information/registration/schedule visit extension.oregonstate.edu/benton/insights. Kid’s Night Out: Nerf Guns, Laser Lights, and Fog Machine. Wacky Indoor Bounce, 202 NW 3rd St., Corvallis. 5:30-9:15 p.m. $12/child for Valley Parent readers! Parents go wacky while your kids enjoy a night out. Snacks and beverages are provided. For reservations call

Calendar

continued on page 14

March 2014, Valley Parent

13


Library Story Times Albany Public Library, Main

Mon: 7 pm with puppet show Wed: 10:30 am with puppet show Thurs: 10:30 am with puppet show

Albany Public Library, Downtown Tues:

10:30 am with puppet show

Philomath Public Library Wed:

Philomath Story Time, 10 am, 3-5 years old

Corvallis Public Library Mon: Bedtime Story Time, 7 pm, all ages  Tues: Toddler Story Time, 10 am, 18-36 months old Wed: Infant Story Time, 10 am, Birth-18 months old Thurs: Preschool Story Time, 10 am, 3-5 years old 1st Sat: 11 am, 0-36 months old with dads

116 Marion St. NE, Salem. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.$25/members; $30/non-members or 9 a.m.-Noon $12/members; $15/ non-members. Ages 5-12. Discover the science behind favorite superpowers. Budding superheroes will learn the secrets of immortality, flight, invisibility, and more. For information/registration visit http://acgilbert.org/march or call (503) 371-3631. Comic Book Creation Day. Lebanon Public Library, 55 Academy St., Lebanon. 1-3 p.m. Free. For ages 10 and up. Kids will learn different techniques for drawing and creating comics. For information visit www.lebanon.plinkit.org or call (541) 258-4926. Baton Twirling Class. See 3/11. Beginning Cuban Salsa Dancing. See 3/11. Celtic Jam. See 3/11. Irish Dance/New Beginner. See 3/11. Mama Baby Yoga. See 3/11. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Rotary Club of Albany Meeting. See 3/11. School’s Out Swim. See 3/24. Teen Tribal Dance. See 3/11. Teen Writers Group. See 3/11. Tuesday Tea Community Event. See 3/11. Yoga in the Gallery. See 3/11.

Wednesday 26

Calendar

continued from page 13

(541) 757-6512 or visit www.wackybounce.com/kidsnightout.html for information. Clemens Community Pool Open Rec. See 3/8. Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. See 3/8. Northwest Horse Fair and Expo. See 3/20. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Story Time for Kids. See 3/8.

Sunday 23

Discover the Art of Paper Collage. See 3/22. Northwest Horse Fair and Expo. See 3/20.

Monday 24

Festival of Illusions Magic Camps and Performances. Lincoln City Cultural Center, 801 SW Hwy. 101, Lincoln City. 9-11 a.m. camps; 7 p.m. performances. $15/camp session; $4-$12/evening performances. Ages 8-18. Lincoln City is magic at Spring Break! Camp instruction is by local magician Danny Roberson. Each evening features a different professional magician or illusionist. Performers will roam through the crowd teaching guests tricks and illusions. Audience participation is encouraged. The most dedicated young magicians will have the option to perform at the Lincoln City Talent Show, presented by Beachtown Coffee, set for 7pm on Friday, March 28.For information/tickets visit www.oregoncoast.org/festival-ofillusions or call (541) 994-9994. Monday Movie Extravaganza. Lebanon Public Library, 55 Academy St., Lebanon. 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Family movies will be shown on the big screen, and snacks will be provided. Movie titles are available at the library. For information visit www.lebanon.plinkit.org or call (541) 258-4926. School’s Out Swim. Albany Community Pool. 2150 36th Ave. SE, Albany. 1-3 p.m. $3/Youth, $3.50/Adult, $10Family. Visit http://www.cityofalbany.net/departments/ parks-and-recreation/classes or call (541) 967-4521 for information. Spring Break Camps. The Little Gym, 958 NW Circle Blvd., Suite A, Corvallis. 9 a.m.-Noon ages 3-8; 1-4 p.m. ages 6-12 March 24th-28th. $29/session/members; $34/ session/non-members. Super Kid’s Quest Camps and Grade School Skill Thrill Camps are available to fit parents’ schedules. For information/enrollment visit www. thelittlegym.com/CorvallisOR/Pages/camp-schedules.aspx or call (541) 753-0950. Pu’uwai O Ke Kuawa Heart of the Valley Hula. See 3/10. Southtown Performers Spotlight. See 3/10. Teens Modern Dance. See 3/7.

Tuesday 25

Stick to Joystick: The Archaeology of Toys. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village, 116 Marion St. NE, Salem. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.$25/members; $30/non-members or 9 a.m.Noon $12/members; $15/non-members. Ages 5-12. Travel back in time with Alfred Carlton Gilbert while exploring the evolution of play. Join in hunter-gather games, make handmade pioneer toys on the frontier, experience the toys from parents’ childhoods, and design the toys of the future. For information/registration visit http://acgilbert. org/march or call (503) 371-3631. Superhero Science. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village,

14 Valley Parent, March 2014

Junk Art. Lebanon Public Library, 55 Academy St., Lebanon. 1-3 p.m. Free. All ages. Get creative with junk. The library will provide the materials; kids provide the imagination. For information visit www.lebanon.plinkit. org or call (541) 258-4926. All Boys Hip Hop. See 3/12. Baby and Me Storytime. See 3/12. Creative Movement. See 3/12. Family Swim. See 3/7. OSUsed Store Sale. See 3/12. Pre-Natal Yoga. See 3/12. Rise and Shine Storytime. See 3/12. Rotary Club of Corvallis Mornings. See 3/12. School’s Out Swim. See 3/24. Stick to Joystick: The Archaeology of Toys. See 3/25. Superhero Science. See 3/25. Teen Makers. See 3/12.

Thursday 27

Children’s Performers Cowboy Buck & Elizabeth. Lebanon Public Library, 55 Academy St., Lebanon. 11 a.m. Free. Popular children’s performers Cowboy Buck and Elizabeth will entertain and educate through songs, dance, and puppetry. For information visit www.lebanon. plinkit.org or call (541) 258-4926. Eco Camp. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village, 116 Marion St. NE, Salem. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.$25/members; $30/non-members or 9 a.m.-Noon $12/members; $15/non-members. Ages 5-12. Spring is the perfect time to get outdoors. Kids will enjoy a nature hike along the river, play in the village garden, and make wildflower seed balls to take home. Don’t forget boots and a raincoat. For information/ registration visit http://acgilbert.org/march or call (503) 371-3631. Mini Maker Camp. A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village, 116 Marion St. NE, Salem. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.$25/members; $30/ non-members or 9 a.m.-Noon $12/members; $15/nonmembers. Ages 5-12. Kids will create buttons using LED lights, make bristle-bots from toothbrushes, and explore how play-dough can conduct electricity. For information/ registration visit http://acgilbert.org/march or call (503) 371-3631. Hearts of the Valley Talent Search Open Mic Entry. See 3/13. Little Bookworms Preschool Storytime. See 3/13. Mama Baby Yoga. See 3/11. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. School’s Out Swim. See 3/24. Teen Yoga. See 3/13.

Friday 28

Audubon Weekend Field Trip. Hesthavn Nature Center, 8590 NW Oak Creek Dr., Corvallis. Friday-Sunday. $50 deposit. All Audubon Society members and prospective members can participate. Explore Bandon and the southern coast of Oregon. The trip is led by an experienced crew of birders who take pride in their abilities to help beginners. Comfortable vans supply transportation. Accommodations include comfortable motels and lodges. Expenses are shared by all participants. For information/ registration e-mail flramsey5@comcast.net. Brown Bag BINGO. Lebanon Public Library, 55 Academy St., Lebanon. 6-8 p.m. Free. Bring the whole family and own dinner. Play BINGO for a chance to win fun prizes. For information visit www.lebanon.plinkit.org or call (541) 258-4926. Eco Camp. See 3/27.

Peter Pan This production is based on John Caird and Trevor Nunn’s adaptation of Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up, which they developed for London’s Royal Shakespeare Company in 1982. In the spirit of J.M. Barrie’s original tale, director David Schechter has chosen to tell the story through the eyes of six children who are living in Edwardian England and decide on Peter Pan for that evening’s play-acting. Where: When: Cost: Info:

The Whiteside Theatre, 361 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. Tuesday, April 1; 10 a.m.-Noon and 1-3 p.m. $5. Ages 7 and up. http://whitesidetheatre.org/events.php or www.facebook. com/whitesidetheatre/events.

Family Swim. See 3/7. Mini Maker Camp. See 3/27. School’s Out Swim. See 3/24. Teens Modern Dance. See 3/7.

School’s Out Swim. See 3/24. Teen Tribal Dance. See 3/11. Teen Writers Group. See 3/11. Tuesday Tea Community Event. See 3/11.

Saturday 29

Wednesday, April 2

Rock and Mineral Show. Sweet Home High School Activity Gym, 1641 Long St., Sweet Home. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $.50/adults; Free/ children 12 yrs. and under with adult. Events includes displays, dealers, and demos. For information call (541) 451-2740. Clemens Community Pool Open Rec. See 3/8. Corvallis Indoor Winter Market. See 3/8. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Story Time for Kids. See 3/8.

Sunday 30

Sunday Matinee Stitching. Stash Headquarters, 110 SW 3rd St., Corvallis. 1-3 p.m. last Sundays. Free. Bring a knitting project or your spinning wheel and socialize with other fiber enthusiasts! For information call (541) 7539276 or visit http://stashlocal.com/classes. Vietnam Veterans of America Breakfast. American Legion, 480 Main St., Lebanon, 8-11 a.m. last Sundays. $5. All you can eat breakfast includes Belgian waffles, strawberries, bacon, sausage, eggs to order, biscuits and gravy, hash browns, orange or tomato juice, and coffee. For information call (541) 451-1351. Rock and Mineral Show. See 3/29.

Celebrate Hope 2014. Linn County Fair and Expo Center, 3700 Knox Butte Rd., Albany. 5:30-8 p.m. Free. Learn more about the issue of child abuse and neglect in the community and what ABC House is doing to address it at this benefit dinner supported by the business community and child abuse partner agencies. For information visit www.abchouse.org/Celebrate_Hope.html. All Boys Hip Hop. See 3/12. Baby and Me Storytime. See 3/12. Creative Movement. See 3/12. Family Swim. See 3/7. La Leche League Corvallis. See 3/20. LEGO Club. See 3/19. OSUsed Store Sale. See 3/12. Pre-Natal Yoga. See 3/12. Red Cross Learn-To-Swim Lessons. See 3/31. Rise and Shine Storytime. See 3/12. Rotary Club of Corvallis Mornings. See 3/12.

Thursday, April 3

Cartoon Afternoon. The Arts Center, 700 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. 3:30-5 p.m. Mondays through May 19th. $11/session. Ages 9-12. Create your own comics, flip books, mini graphic novels, and posters with skills learned with artist Diana Ryan. Experience in drawing preferred but not required. Scholarships available. For information call (541) 754-1554. Red Cross Learn-To-Swim Lessons. Clemens Community Pool. Philomath High School, 2054 Applegate St., Philomath. 6-7 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays through April 30th. $40/10 lessons. Ages 6 mos.-6 yrs. Children will learn to become comfortable in the water and practice basic water safety skills depending upon age and level. For information call (541) 929-3584 or visit www.philomath.k12.or.us/resources/clemens_pool.php. Pu’uwai O Ke Kuawa Heart of the Valley Hula. See 3/10. Southtown Performers Spotlight. See 3/10. Teens Modern Dance. See 3/7.

Art About Agriculture 2014: Agricultural Bounty Exhibit. LaSells Stewart Center, Giustina Gallery, 875 SW 26th St., Corvallis. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday through April 28th. Art About Agriculture encourages artists to investigate the visual resources of the science and practice that sustains human life: agriculture. It strives to develop an understanding and appreciation of food and fiber production, especially among people not traditionally acquainted with agriculture. For information visit http://oregonstate.edu/lasells/gallery. Friday’s Harbor - Orcas in Captivity. Corvallis Public Library, Main Meeting Room, 645 NW Monroe Ave., Corvallis. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. With the release of the controversial documentary “Blackfish”, killer whale captivity has become a hot-button topic. Novelist Diane Hammond will give a slide presentation about her experiences as killer whale Keiko’s press secretary in the late 1990’s and how it inspired her latest novel, Friday’s Harbor. For information visit www.thebestlibrary.net or call (541) 766-6793. Little Bookworms Preschool Storytime. See 3/13. Mama Baby Yoga. See 3/11. Open Studio at The Arts Center. See 3/13. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Teen Yoga. See 3/13.

Tuesday, April 1

Friday, April 4

Monday 31

Peter Pan. Whiteside Theatre, 361 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. 10 a.m.-Noon and 1-3 p.m. $5. Ages 7 and up. This production is based on John Caird and Trevor Nunn’s adaptation of Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up, which they developed for London’s Royal Shakespeare Company in 1982. In the spirit of J.M. Barrie’s original tale, director David Schechter has chosen to tell the story through the eyes of six children who are living in Edwardian England and decide on Peter Pan for that evening’s play-acting. For information/tickets visit http://whitesidetheatre.org/events.php or www.facebook. com/whitesidetheatre/events. Baton Twirling Class. See 3/11. Beginning Cuban Salsa Dancing. See 3/11. Celtic Jam. See 3/11. Irish Dance/New Beginner. See 3/11. Mama Baby Yoga. See 3/11. Prenatal Yoga. See 3/8. Rotary Club of Albany Meeting. See 3/11.

The Glass Menagerie. Albany Civic Theater, 111 First Ave. SW, Albany. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. $12/general; $9/senior/junior. An aging Southern Belle, longing for her youth, dreams of a better life for her children. Tennessee Williams tears at the heart strings in this iconic classic. For information visit http:// albanycivic.org or call (541) 928-4603. Art About Agriculture 2014: Agricultural Bounty Exhibit. See 4/3. Family Swim. See 3/7.

FREE: Your Event in Our Calendar

Deadline 3/28/14 www.valleyparentmagazine.com


Come Visit our Open House April 5, 2014 10am to 12pm At Corvallis Waldorf School, rigorous academics is taught without the use of screens in the classroom. Our curriculum is fully integrated with art and music which cultivates freedom to think and act in a changing world.

For enrollment details (541)758-4674 Pre-Kindergarten through 8th Grade www.corvalliswaldorfschool.org

Positive youth development program since 1961 College of Public Health and Human Sciences

PROGRAMS RUNNING DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR

Gymnastics

ACES

Girls on the Run

YEAR ROUND

NO SCHOOL, NO PROBLEM!

SPRING 20134 SEASON

Gymnastics is an all-year activity for kids 2-18. In class, participants will increase coordination, flexibility, and self-esteem in a safe & fun environment. It is the perfect foundation for any physical activity your child participates in, and a great way to develop fitness skills.

Who - Grades K-8 What - Full & Half Day Option. Activities include: Sports, Arts, Science and Cooking When - No School & Early Friday release days. Also Thanksgiving week Monday through Wednesday.

Inspires 3rd through 8th grade girls to stay true to themselves and live free from societal stereotypes. Our 10-week after-school curriculum innovatively weaves training for a 5K run with lessons that empower girls to celebrate their bodies, honor their voices and embrace their gifts. Registration closes December 14th

541.737.5437 (KIDS) 125 Langton Hall Oregon State University kidspirit@oregonstate.edu Register Online at: kidspirit.oregonstate.edu

March 2014, Valley Parent

15


Yogurt

Follow Your Feet to Footwise for Spring Break Shoes by Keen

Extreme rve Yogur e S f l e t S Packed with probitoics to

promote a healthy immune and digestive system

• Low in cholesterol and sodium • A good source of calcium • Gluten free, sugar free and dairy free yogurt and topping options

Corvallis

2001 NW Monroe Ave. (across from OSU)

541-230-1660 Circle & 9th

(next to Market of Choice)

301 SW Madison Ave • Corvallis • 541.757.0875 • Mon-Sat 10-6 & Sun 11-5

541-368-5621

Albany

2536 Santiam Hwy SE (next to Fred Meyers)

www.yogurtextreme.com Follow us on facebook

Education that uses every tool Progressive and Proven — We combine the latest techniques and technologies with time proven methods; all in an environment that meets each child’s individual needs We Become Family — Even before school starts, our teachers meet with students and parents in their homes; we also maintain enough staff to genuinely respond as needs arise. academically rich — Zion students exceed national standards in all subjects, we use standardized testing every fall; the ITBS/CogAT (Iowa Tests of Basic Skills), for grades 1-8. Pre-k – 8th grade — Convenient in town location Christian education that welcomes all

oPen hoUse

tuesday, march 18 8:30 am to 3 pm or 6 to 7:30 pm

2800 NW Tyler Ave I Corvallis, OR 97330

(541) 753-7503 I zioncorvallis.com www.facebook.com/zionlscorvallis

Let us show you the difference ... Drop-by tours every Friday or by appointment any day.

Vp mar 2014 finalweb  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you