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The Mohawk Workers delegation of Ellis Hill, Bill Squire and Frank Smith was in Ottawa Monday meeting with Liberal Aboriginal Affairs Critic Dr. Caroline Bennett and with Swiss Ambassador, Ulrich Lehner to discuss issues concerning the Mohawks and Six Nations at large. (submitted photo)

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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

TEKAWENNAKE

Mohawks bring Deskahe’s message to Ottawa and the world By Jim Windle KANATA VILLAGE

Details of Monday’s Mohawk Workers meetings in Ottawa with Liberal Aboriginal Affairs Critic Dr. Caroline Bennett and Swiss Ambassador Ulrich Lehner are to be shared Wednesday night at Kanata Village in Eagles Nest (Brantford) beginning at 7:30 P.M. All interested parties are welcome. Armed with pages of historical documents the delegation representing the Mohawk Workers was in Ottawa on Monday for a one on one meeting with MP and Liberal Aboriginal Affairs Critic Dr. Caroline Bennett at Centre Block of the Parliament Buildings to discuss the longstanding historical complaints of the Mohawk Nation against Canada, the Province of Ontario, and the City of Brantford. There was a second meeting later in the day with Ulrich Lehner, Ambassador for Switzerland, and his staff to discuss the same issues but at an international level. Switzerland enjoys close political and economic ties with a large number of countries around the world and is a member of various international organizations. The goals of Swiss foreign policy are: Peaceful co-existence of people of all nations; promotion of and respect for human rights; environmental sustainability; representing the interests of Swiss businesses abroad; and com-

bating need and poverty in the world. Upon arrival on Parliament Hill, Minister Bennett was presented with a sweetgrass rose crafted by a member of the Mohawk Workers organization which was greatly appreciated, according to Bill Squire, delegated spokesperson for the Mohawk Workers. The Mohawk delegation also consisted of Jason Bowman, special assistant to Bill Squire and the Kanyengehhakah of the Grand River, Ellis Hill and Frank Smith. The delegation was in Ottawa on the authority of Principal Mohawk Chief Edwin (Ted) Squire-Hill of the Wolf Clan, who carries the horns and title of Ohrerekó:wa and who has been recognized as such by the Crown of England on several occasions over the past 35 years. “During the meeting, Dr. Bennett expressed genuine concern for the situation, and revealed her passion for these issues,” according to a media release drafted upon the return of the delegation to the Kanata Village.  “She has asked the Mohawk Workers to continue to dialogue with her, and that Justin Trudeau (Federal Liberal Leader) wishes to engage on these issues personally as well.” It was only the first of what promises to be several more in depth meetings with various levels of the Canadian government, the British Crown, United Nations and the the Swiss Ambassador. “We agreed to continue to

CORRECTION We apologize for ourselves and the Lieutenant - Governors official website spelling hometown hero Marcus Montures’ name wrong in our article last week. Mr. Monture’s act of selfless courage should stand as an example to all Six Nations and Onkwehon:weh young people everywhere. (Photo by Jim Windle)

communicate and work together on solutions which can bring people together while at the same time educating on the critical issues,” says Squire. The complaint of the Mohawks covers many of the same issues attempted to be brought under consideration of the world community by Cayuga Chief Levi General in his capacity as Deskaheh in the early 1920’s, and the Mohawk delegation of 1945 in San Francisco during the formation of the League of Nations following WW2. In both cases, political sabotage perpetrated by the British Crown, Canada and the United States prevented the evidence and arguments from being presented. Through Minister Bennett and Ambassador Lehner they hope to finally have their and Deskahe’s voices heard. In these initial meetings the Mohawk delegation covered in broad strokes issues of Human Rights and Aboriginal Rights violations. The delegation also explained known and documented frauds and land and trust funds thefts throughout the past 200 years, right up to today’s legislated policies being brought forward by Prime Minister Stephen Harper. It is believed by most First Nations that these policies are designed to cover over historical wrongs and make “legal” Canada’s ongoing principals of forced assimilation, resource theft and cultural genocide. Of immediate concern to the Mohawks is Harper’s political assault on Onkwehon:we people across Canada in the form of a dozen Parliamentary Bills intended to derogate and dismantle historical treaties and agreements for the sake of corporate gain and natural resources exploitation. According to Squire, there was genuine concern about that expressed by both Bennett and Ambassador Lehner. “He (Lehner ) had already been made aware of Canada's human rights issues, particularly in respect of Indigenous Peoples - and pointed out that this past comprehensive review of the State of Canada in Geneva did not go well for Canada in his mind,” Squire said.  “He applauded and supported our efforts with James Anaya the UN Special Rapporteur who met with our delegation in New York on May 20th, which he had not known about.  In fact, he sup-

ported this avenue stating that it was precisely the right way to go in these circumstances.” Bowman and Squire describe the meeting as warm and friendly. According to their media release, “The Ambassador also appreciated the back ground material which was provided to him, took considerable interest, and agreed to review it as well as seeking instructions from his superiors in order to determine the level of involvement or assistance which may be offered. We were very thankful for the opportunity to meet with the Ambassador and look forward to remaining in contact.” In June of this year, the Mohawks sent a formal request for clarification on a Mohawk Workers delegation of Ellis Hill, Bill Squire and Frank Smith outside the Governor General’s office in Otnumber of matters to the Oftawa. (submitted photo) fice of the Secretary to the Governor General of Canada, the United Nations Declara- Nations of the Grand Rivincluding questions regardtion on the Rights of Indig- er Confederacy, the Elected ing the Indian Act’s definienous Peoples, as presented Band Council and the Motions of “band,” “council of to Anaya. hawks in particular. They the band,” the term “special  To be discussed at high- use the case of the Nathan reserves,” and the Haldimand er levels as well are mat- Gage lands, upon which the Deed itself, which they are ters concerning the City of Brantford Civic Centre and still awaiting response to. Brantford’s past and present the Casino are built upon as They also listed for both dealings with the Five Na- an example of the pattern of the Minister and the Ambastions League of Peace, Six fraud and theft. sador, 10 direct violations of


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Council accepts Summerhaven deal By Stephanie Dearing OHSWEKEN

A lawsuit filed by NextEra Energy Canada against the municipality of West Grey has prompted one Six Nations Elected Councillor to oppose accepting a negotiated deal with the company for the Summerhaven wind

farm. District Five Councillor Bob Johnson told his colleagues during Monday's Committee of the Whole Meeting he couldn't remember which municipality was being sued, but he had learned of the suit through the broadcast news. A Google search on the in-

ternet turned up the news, revealed by West Grey Mayor Kevin Eccles that NextEra Energy Canada was suing his municipality. “Do we want a partner like that,” Councillor Johnson asked his colleagues. However, no one else seemed to be aware of the lawsuit against a municipal govern-

ment, only the law suit NextEra has launched against one Middlesex-based antiwind farm activist for copyright infringement. The Committee of the Whole voted in favour of accepting the benefits offered by NextEra to Six Nations for the Summerhaven wind farm. According to Bayshore

Broadcasting, NextEra is suing West Grey over a bylaw on fees and charges. The case will be heard on June 20 in the Kitchener Superior Court. Earlier this year, NextEra Energy Capital Holdings took on 16 Spanish banks after Spain's tariff laws were changed for solar projects, reported Bloomberg news agency. Elected Council ratified the decision to accept the NextEra deal during Tuesday's council meeting. Summerhaven is a 56 turbine farm is expected to generate 124.4 MW of electricity, and is currently being built in Haldimand County. The project will be online this year, and Six Nations will begin to receive benefits next year. Six Nations will receive $435,000 a year for 20 years (a total of $8.7 million, which will be dispersed through the Community Trust); as well as another $15,000 a year for scholarships. In addition, NextEra

will commit $50,000 for a deer and eagle monitoring program. Amy Lickers, the Six Nations Community Planner, told the Committee of the Whole that 216 people had attended four community meetings on the proposed offer from NextEra. In addition, 36 comment cards were completed and eight on-line forms were filled out. A deal with Samsung is also in the works, but the details will not be available until some time in July. Six Nations Communications Officer, Karen Best, said in a press release issued June 18 that Samsung C&T had invited Six Nations representatives to travel to Korea, presumably to finalize negotiations on the solar partnership. Elected Councillors Ava Hill (District Two) and Darryl Hill (District Five) will leave for Korea on June 22 along with Director of Economic Development, Matt Jamieson. Samsung is paying for the trip.

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING The West Haldimand General Hospital Corporation Chiefswood National Historic Site was the setting for two special performances of Pauline Johnson's poetry set to music. The two different styles (contemporary and choral) brought Johnson's poetry to life, and the event, organized by Curator Karen Dearlove, demonstrated how powerful and alluring Johnson's poetry is today, even though the author died 100 years ago. Rick Hill spoke briefly about Pauline Johnson, calling her a Mohawk nationalist, and explaining how that was ironic because Johnson did not have a nation. The poet was “caught in a cultural crossfire,” Hill said. Johnson created new images of Natives through her work at a time when Natives were either seen as 'noble savages,' or as impediments to progress. Born into an era with mixed messages and stereotypes, Hill said Johnson felt a need to connect to her Indigenous roots. “She strived hard to say something about the Indian soul she felt burning in her.” Performances by Rosemary Hurst and the Woodstock Fanshaw Singers rounded out the event. Hurst has produced a CD of her work featuring Pauline Johnson's poetry called 'Faithfully Yours.' The Woodstock Fanshaw Singers have been recording an album that celebrates the lifetime work of Pauline Johnson. Three different choirs contributed to the album, which is anticipated to be released in November. The album is called The Song My Paddle Sings. Three historians attended a special performance organized to commemorate Pauline Johnson on Saturday at Chiefswood National Historic Site. Keith Jamieson (right) and Rick Hill (center) were accompanied by a visiting American professor, Dr. Arwin Smallwood (left) who is collaborating on the history of the Tuscarora Nation with Hill. (Photograph by Stephanie Dearing).

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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

TEKAWENNAKE

Ball rolling on potential deal with Chinese energy company By Stephanie Dearing SIX NATIONS

The first meeting between a Chinese energy company and Six Nations representatives went well, said one of those representatives, Phil Monture. Monture and Six Nations Elected Councillor, Daryl Hill (District Five) travelled to China to meet with China Longyuan Power Group Corporation Limited for the first meeting of what is hoped to be negotiations leading to some sort of business deal that will benefit both Longyuan and Six Nations. Government cuts mean “it's absolutely critical that we get out there and get a source of revenue to support ourselves,” said Monture. But that doesn't mean Six Nations will jump at every offer. “Not every offer is going to be accepted, and we've got to make sure it's acceptable to our people.” Monture said he expected Longyuan would likewise be checking out what Six Nations can bring to the table but said company representatives were impressed with our “strong viable construction workforce.” Entering into an agreement with a Chinese company would not take away from Canada's obligation to consult with First Nations on it's trade deal with China (known as the Canada-China FIPA). Monture said First Nations should challenge Canada on its deal because “they're actually going against the law.” Canada, he said, is not informing other nations “that there's outstanding liability the Crown owes to First Nations.” Even if Six Nations successfully negotiates a deal with the Chinese, “We're not going to let the government off the hook,” Monture said. “But it's obvious the federal and provincial governments aren't the ones that are going to meet our needs. They have lawful obligations to do it and they're failing.” He stressed that the negotiations between Six Nations and Longyuan are just getting started and the outcome has yet to be determined. He and councillor Hill had travelled to China at Longyuan's expense after the company had invited Six Nations to visit with them. Monture said while they in China, they were shown one wind farm and Longyu-

an's control center, as well as Longyuan's manufacturing plant in Baoding City. “Baoding City is their [China's] green energy production center,” said Monture. “I visited a competitor [to Longyuan] there last year.” “It was time well spent,” said Monture. He said Chinese companies are not being told by the federal government about the duty to consult and accommodate, but said if it is done right, a positive relationship can be built. Darryl Hill proved to be a great ambassador for the trip, Monture said. “In his ironworking days, he has put up some power structures, and he knew some logistics, and actually the construction side, the engineering side, they were most impressed with his knowledge of all of that. So he brought a lot of credence to our visit.” Tekawennake contacted Hill for this story, but the councillor said he could not comment to the media until he had tabled his report with Elected Council, which he expected would happen during the June 17 meeting of council's Committee of the Whole. However, if Hill's report was discussed, it was done during the in camera portion of the meeting, and was not listed on the meet-

ing agenda. Monture said the relationship with Longyuan began because the company, which has an office located in Toronto, will be constructing a wind farm in Ontario soon. The farm will produce 99.1 mg of electricity with 49 industrial wind turbines, which Dufferin Wind Power says will be spaced out over 6,000 acres in Melancthon Township. Longyuan owns the controlling interest in Dufferin Wind, which was granted conditional approval in a 28 page notification letter, issued on June 10 by the Ontario Minister of the Environment Vic Schroter. The project is listed on Ontario's Environmental Registry, and Ontario residents have until June 25 to ask for an environmental review. Monture said the next steps with Longyuan would be discussions that would include topics such as what sort of partnership or revenue-sharing relationship could be developed, including employment and manufacturing opportunities. However, Ontario is changing its rules about wind power, Monture said. “Who knows what the government will do next week, that's the big problem.”

Six Nations Elected Councillor Darryl Hill (middle left) and Phil Monture (middle left) met with China Longyuan Power Group Corporation Limited representatives in China after being flown there at Longyuan's expense. The meeting was the first of what is hoped to be further meetings to negotiate a mutually beneficial business deal between Longyuan and Six Nations. (Photograph submitted by Darryl Hill).

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Estates Douglas Creek of was then called at the site now began the occupation #6, a sunrise ceremony women and eldersbecome a tradition, there was Sixth Line Road to Highway of Six Nations as has in the recrally site on years since a groupon Highway #6. This year, from Silver Pines shared by those who participateddevelopers, marked seven Caledonia were followed by a march it from the February 28th just outside of protected place, Food and lively remembrances after Ontario purchased housing development as Kanonhstaton, or the the land. over to Six Nations site and on to officially handed known to Six Nations gate of the reclamation has still not been down to the front After seven years, the land lamation of 2006. 2008. (Photo by Jim Windle) in Henco Homes

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TEKAWENNAKE

EDITOR/PUBLISHER – G. Scott Smith EDITOR – James Windle ADVERTISING MANAGER – Marshall Lank P.O. Box 130, Ohsweken, Ontario N0A 1M0 Phone: 519-753-0077 • Fax: 519-753-0011 email: teka@tekanews.com NO PORTIONS OF THIS NEWSPAPER INCLUDING ADVERTISEMENTS, PICTURES OR EDITORIAL CONTENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT PERMISSION

Back to the future We find ourselves in a bit of a quandary regarding the deals being made by Six Nations entities, left right and centre, with foreign corporations these days. While futurists and other forward thinking experts like David Suzuki, Noam Chomsky and others, are telling us, smaller government, smaller business, smaller manufacturing and most importantly, smaller farming is the only sustainable way into the future, even the caretakers of the earth are now being seduced by big money. Admittedly, we are somewhat confused about that. Is this a road towards economic independence or a road to further dependency on people who have no connection with the earth they destroy? When Prime Minister Harper says that Canada’s free trade agreement with China will boost the Canadian economy, it should be automatic that we all take a step back because historically we know that if short term prosperity happens, it will be on the backs of the Onkwehon:we people in the longer term. We are not afraid of the the future, but rather afraid for the future. Should the Haudenosaunee take the bait right along with mainstream Canada? The sole purpose of the realignment of the world’s corporate powers is to create more profits and power for fewer people. Should Six Nations be a part of this get rich quick process or should the Haudenosaunee be the beacon of long range wisdom, to the seven generations. Some would call it backwards to be “resisting progress”. But what is this road progressing towards? Freedom, peace and independence or to be imprisoned by a system, that turns countries into work camps and people into chattel. At the same time that there are world wide protests against corporate globalism, are we too being blinded by the promises of globalization? In British Columbia, some First Nations are challenging Canada’s so called Free Trade agreement with China in court. One has to ask why Six Nations is being drawn into the corporate meat grinder made in China and Korea. The fact that these Asian investors and corporations are crawling all over Canada these days and now coming directly to poor Native Nations with the promise of financial independence, is telling a much bigger story. Maybe time for sober second thought on some of these ventures is required. Others are already recognizing that the future these globalists envision does not include recognition of traditional lands, historic treaties, or indigenous people. Staying small and working towards self-sufficiency is the only way into a sustainable future not only for Onkwehon:we people, but for all people. If the British Crown had only left the Haudenosaunee people alone and did not interfere with it’s economy, Canada would be coming to Six Nations for funding, as they did in the early 1800’s. The problem then was, they didn’t ask. They just took. As a people, getting off the dole and out from under the Indian Act will be as hard as a junkie getting off of smack, but every bit as necessary. The withdrawal will be nasty and painful but will ultimately save the dependent addict and his family from continuing down the road we already know may lead to short term prosperity for ourselves but long term destruction for the coming generations. To survive the future, Haudenosaunee and tribal people everywhere must go back, not ahead.

EDITORIAL POLICY

Tekawennake welcomes letters, comments and other submissions to these pages. However, we must reserve the right to edit them on the basis of length, clarity, and freedom from libel. Care will be taken to preserve the essential viewpoint of each letter. All published letters must be hand signed and accompanied by an address and telephone number for verification.

SECOND CLASS MAIL - REGISTRATION NO. 0490849

Hazel Hill’s radio show For the second time I listened to Hazel Hill’s radio show on CKRZ 100.3 FM. What a negative experience! The question in my mind throughout her show was: Why is Hazel Hill, director of HDI and Confederacy Council spokesperson, allowed to go on public radio and mislead, misinterpret and misrepresent facts to the listeners, subject listeners to her personal comments and personal situations and to say slanderous things about people? When I asked a CKRZ radio personality recently I was told “She pays money for it.” So just because Hazel pays money she can go on the radio and say whatever she wants. That doesn’t seem right. Hazel made some pretty accusatory and damaging comments about Brantford businessman Steve Charest last Saturday which potentially puts the radio station in a libelous situation I would think. Now I was schooled in Media Law for newspapers but I don’t know much about radio. All the same I think it would be wise for the radio station manager to seek a legal opinion on Hazel’s show last week. To make matters worse none of the people Hazel negatively targeted on her show had opportunity to dispute her claims and accusations. Nor do the listeners have an avenue to challenge, disagree or agree with and respond to her comments. As a listener I was quite upset when Hazel took it upon herself to bring the listeners into her bedroom so to speak when attempting to defend herself against an editorial in last week’s Teka. Clearly, Hazel was angry that a person released some not-so-nice emails she had sent to the Teka who in turn wrote a somewhat scathing editorial about the emails and her perception of people who are either leading the Mohawk Workers or following the Mohawk Workers. Hazel was aghast that the person would violate her trust and confidence. So what does Hazel do? She spent a good portion of her time slot reading emails to the listeners that the person had sent to her and she had sent to the person believing I guess one violation of trust deserves another. I myself write a lot of opinion pieces to newspapers but the newspaper allows its readers to comment on my opinion pieces through its Letter to the Editor section. As a journalist I’m quite aware of what I can say and what I can’t say in my letters. Unfortunately, I listened to Hazel’s show the second time to give her the benefit of the doubt but after listening to her personal tirade last Saturday there’s no way I will be tuning in any more. Helen Miller

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KA-NYEN-GEH-HA-KAH OF GRAND RIVER (AS THE MOHAWK WORKERS) STATEMENT REGARDING THE TOBACCO SITUATION WITHIN THE GRAND RIVER TERRITORY AND POSITION IN RESPECT OF ENBRIDGE BLOCKADE / PROTEST MEASURES KANATA – GRAND RIVER TERRITORY - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Ohrerekó:wa is the Principle Chief for Ka-nyen-geh-ha-ka Wolf Clan (Mohawks) of Grand River, and carries Chief’s antlers and a title for our people as set out within the foundation of what is known as the 5 Nation Confederacy or League of Great Peace. As spokesperson for the Mohawk Workers, I wish to clarify the position of the Mohawk Workers in respect to two significant issues which I feel can either serve to unite – or further divide Onkwehon:we living in the Grand River Territory. Accordingly, earlier today, I wrote to M.P.P. Dave Levac, on an urgent basis, in order to propose the establishment of a peaceful resolution protocol, and in order to clarify the position of the Mohawk Workers in respect of the tobacco situation within the Grand River territory as well in respect of various imminent and anticipated protest actions on the part of other parties. On February 15, 2013 Ohrerekó:wa’s office requested Anne Losier of the National Energy Board (NEB) to provide information pertaining to Pipeline 9B. Specifications for the pipeline were requested as well as copies of the right-of-ways obtained. Later that day, Michael Benson, the NEB’s project process advisor responded in writing and confirmed that the original pipeline was approved by the NEB in May 1975, and the original pipeline was 520 miles of 30-inch outside diameter pipe that was designed to transport 250 thousand barrels per day of oil from Sarnia to Montreal. Copies of any right-of-ways obtained for the Grand River territorial portion of the pipeline were NOT provided. On March 14th, 2013, Information Requests were submitted by the NEB to Enbridge Pipelines Inc. requesting additional information on the proposed Line 9B Reversal and Line 9 Capacity Expansion Project.[Filing A50832]. The request stated: “In examining the Application, the Board has found that additional information is required, as set out in the attached IR No. 1. Please respond on or before 28 March 2013.” In the request, the NEB noted that not all affected “Aboriginal groups” had been consulted, and cited dozens of other areas where further information would be required in order to further proceed with the application. It is the Mohawk Workers’ position that the pipeline 9B is “not fit for purpose”, does not conform to industry standards, and is operated unlawfully in lieu of Ka-nyen-geh-ha-kah consultation and consent. To be clear, not only is the pipeline operated without Ka-nyen-geh-hakah permission, there is no type of safety protocol, material or method that will limit the risk posed by the operation of this pipeline to our satisfaction. The Mohawk Workers share many of the concerns set out by Ontario Pipeline Landowners Association (OPLA) in submissions made by Mr. Goudy contained in Hearing Order OH-005-2011. These concerns, as articulated by Ohrerekó:wa to Queen Elizabeth II have been forwarded to the Governor General and are in the process of being addressed accordingly. The Mohawk Workers do not, in any way, endorse or sanction blockades or confrontation in respect of this project at this time and trust that peaceful engagement remains the appropriate approach.

Dear Mr. Levac, I write to you on an urgent basis in order to propose the establishment of a peaceful resolution protocol, and in order to clarify the position of the Mohawk Workers in respect of the tobacco situation within the Grand River territory as well in respect of various imminent and anticipated protest actions on the part of other parties. I have attached a brief statement of position for your records, which will be released publicly later today (Tuesday). As you are also aware, in addition to having engaged the United Nations’ Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on May 20th 2013 in New York, our delegation met yesterday with various parties in Ottawa in order to engage officials, and discuss peaceful and meaningful steps which are being taken in order to address various issues of monumental concern to our people. Such steps include discussions which are being set up to take place between our ally, your Queen Elizabeth II who has recently agreed to act in her capacity as a constitutional monarch through the Governor General on the advice of her Canadian ministers. As these important processes move forward, it is important to us that our position is clearly understood by all relevant parties. We wish to propose the establishment of a tobacco industry resolution protocol whereby affected parties, stakeholders and government can come together for the purpose of facilitation. In order to discuss this in greater and meaningful detail, we propose an initial meeting be set to take place, at a time of your convenience, but on an urgent basis, between Grand River Onkwehon:we business leaders, the Mohawk Workers, and interested provincial, federal, and even municipal officials / representatives. If this is agreeable to you, I will take steps in order to arrange a time and place which is agreeable to the parties and revert back as soon as practicable. In Peace, RATSIÁHAWE (Bill Squire) Spokesperson for the Mohawk Workers of Grand River Mohawk

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TOBACCO SITUATION – RESOLUTION PROTOCOL PROPOSAL AND CLARIFICATION OF POSITION OF THE KA-NYEN-GEH-HA-KAH OF GRAND RIVER (AS THE MOHAWK WORKERS) PERTAINING TO PROTEST MEASURES

SUMMER SWIM LESSON REGISTRATION begins online

Monday, June 24

Saturday SaturdayJUNE JUNE22, 22,2013 2013 11:30 11:30AM AM–2:30 –2:30PM PM

11:30 11:30 Opening Openingceremonies ceremonies  Drum and Drum andPrayer Prayer  Ribbon && Elder RibbonCutting: Cutting:Chief, Chief,Building BuildingCommittee, Committee,Youth Youth Elder  Speeches Chief & Building Committee & other dignitaries TBD Speeches Chief & Building Committee & other dignitaries TBD  Special Presentation to Valarie King “Gathering of Minds”  Special Presentation to Valarie King “Gathering of Minds” 12:10 12:10 Unveiling Unveiling ‘First ‘FirstNations Nationsand andthe theWar Warofof1812’ 1812’Display Display  Chief LaForme, Councillor Erma Ferrell, Carolyn King  Chief LaForme, Councillor Erma Ferrell, Carolyn King

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12:30 LUNCH 12:30 LUNCH 1:30 1:30

Ontario Historical Society Honours & Awards Ceremonies Ontario Historical Society Honours & Awards Ceremonies With Keynote Address: A presentation entitled “NINE MISSISSAUGA PORTRAITS” With Keynote Address: presentation entitled “NINEofMISSISSAUGA PORTRAITS” where Dr. Donald B. Smith,AEmeritus History University Calgary, will speak to his new where“Mississauga Dr. Donald B. Smith, Ojibwe Emeritus History University of Calgary, Canada” will speakand to his book Portraits, Voices from Nineteenth-Century Dr. new book Sherwin, “Mississauga Portraits, Ojibwe Voices from Nineteenth-Century Canada” and Dr. Allen professor emeritus of Neurology at McGill University will speak to his book Allen Sherwin, professor emeritus at-1909”. McGill University to his book “Bridging Two Peoples, Chief Peter of E. Neurology Jones, 1843 Their bookswill willspeak be available “Bridging Twoand Peoples, Chief Peter E. Jones, 1843 -1909”. Their books will be available for purchase, signings. for purchase, and signings.


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Annual graduation celebration at Six Nations Polytechnic

The annual graduation celebration at Six Nations Polytechnic saw a lot of proud families attending the ceremony. With 17 students receiving certificates of completion in their chosen studies, and another 23 students celebrating having completed their first year of Native University Program. Social Service Worker certificates of completion were awarded to: Daylan D. Bomberry; Andria M. Doolittle; Jonathan B. Fraser; Cynthia J. Hill; Wendy Johnson; C. Dion Jonathan; Zachary T. Lewis; Lyle E. Longboat; Jessica M. Miller-Williams; and Marsha W. Reany.

Aboriginal Teacher Education Program certificates of completion were awarded to: Gabrielle Doreen; Jessica Bomberry (Cohort 2); Kristin Jacobs; Velma Noah; Lori Powless; and Sonya Sault. Native University Program – First Year: Daylan D. Bomberry; Lynn E. General; Michele General; Kyah K. Green; Danee S. Greene; Erin J. Hill; W. Simon Hill; Jacqueline A. House; Evan Jamieson-Eckel; Michelle L. LaForme; Pamela L. Longboat; Steven R. Maracle; Jagojijade T. Martin; Rebecca L. Montour; Kaylin A. Parker; Honey

Kayanase offering free workshops

L. Powless; Jennifer N. Sault; Nicole M. Shawana; Rachel C. Styres; Melanie F. Vamos; Melissa L. VanEvery; Amber N. White; and Miranda D. White. Harvey Longboat Memorial Scholarship: Steven R. Maracle, Native University Program. Marge & Reg Henry Cayuga Language Award: Miranda D. White, Native University Program Vina Loft Mohawk Language Award: Nicole M. Shawana, Native University Program Watson Parojcic Financial Bursaries

A Six Nations company and industry leader in ecological restoration is offering to teach anyone interested how to grow indigenous plants like traditional tobacco, sage and boneset. Kayanase will be offering free workshops beginning at the end of this month. Lindsey Stapleton (far left) said Kayanase will offer the workshops every two weeks during the summer. The first workshop is scheduled to run on June 29. Shelley Clark, Greenhouse Supervisor (far right) said the goal is to make the greenhouses more productive while giving people an opportunity to engage with the company. “We would like more people here,” said Stapleton. That includes volunteers. Stapleton said the Kayanase receives a lot of interest from passers-by, and have had a number of people offer their volunteer services. Kayanase not only undertakes habitat restoration projects (the company is currently working at the former Douglas Creek Estates), it also sells plants and seeds. People interested in receiving their tree seed-keeper certification can attend a two day course to be held at Kayanase later this year. Julia Garlow (middle) will be taking over Stapleton's job in the near future. For more information or to register for a workshop, contact Kayanase at 519-770-0013. (Photograph by Stephanie Dearing).

Outstanding Achievement: Marsha E. Reany, Social Services Worker; Julia Jo-Anne Thomas, OLD-Cayuga Watson Parojcic Financial Bursaries Highest Program Average: Sonya G. Sault; Aboriginal Teacher Education Program Dion Jonathan & Lyle E. Longboat, Social Service Worker Ginger M. White, OLD-Mohawk Kaniehtenhawi R. Deer, OLD-Cayuga Aboriginal Institutes Consortium Student Scholarship Award: Karen V. General, OLD-Cayuga Aboriginal Institutes Consortium Instructors Award Kathy Foxall, Native University Program


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Native prowess in war featured in new Heritage Minute By Stephanie Dearing OHSWEKEN Six Nations Polytechnic's great room was filled to the rafters with a brief yet lasting war cry, one that lifted the hairs on the backs of necks, causing the person who had emitted the cry to get antsy. “It just makes you want to do something,” said actor Gregory Dominic Odjig. Odjig plays the part of a warrior who gives a chilling whoop in a brand new Heritage Minute commercial featuring the Battle of Queenston Heights, and more importantly, the role First Nations people played in that battle. The commercial, the second created by the Historica-Dominion Institute this past year, was showcased during a special launch June 12 at Six Nations Polytechnic. There were approximately 80 warriors who fought the Americans at Queenston Heights during the War of 1812. Six Nations historian Rick Hill said the warriors had held off about 1,000 Americans. Hill said

three things enabled the Indigenous warriors to stand their ground: their naturalborn ability; medicine and genius. Hill helped ensure the accuracy of the Heritage Minute commercial, while Brian Maracle provided Mohawk translation and coached one actor. Maracle was not able to attend the launch. Scriptwriter and co-director Bill Taylor said he was attracted to the battle at Queenston Heights because it “was extraordinary. It was an act of heroism and a story Canadians wouldn't know.” A lot of the background, including a segment of John Norton's speech that is featured in the commercial, was taken from Norton's journal. “We know a lot about the war from his [Norton's] journal,” said Hill. “He does deserve credit for what he was able to accomplish.” Hill said he was nervous about what the commercial might end up communicating. “In 60 seconds, you can't tell the whole story,” he noted. But he was pleased with the final product. “It's a message of courage and victory, that's

what you brought. Half of the warriors left when they saw the enemy.” “It's incredibly difficult to tell a story in one minute,” said Taylor during a question and answer period. “I started with, 'What does the audience need to know?” He said he added colour through Norton's words and the use of the Mohawk language in the commercial. The process of creating the one-minute commercial took about five months. The heritage minute is an attempt to “get people curious” about that moment in history, said Brigitte D'auzac, a Senior Manager at the Historica Dominion. The commercial has an education guide that teachers can use in their classrooms, using the commercial as a jumping-off point to learn more about Six Nations history, John Brant and John Norton, as well as the Battle of Queenston Heights. The commercial can be watched online through https://www.historica-dominion.ca/. The heritage minute will also be aired on television.

Billy Merasty (far left) played John Norton in a brand new Heritage Minute featuring the heroics of a small group of Native warriors at the Battle of Queenston Heights during the War of 1812. With him is fellow actor, Gregory Dominic Odjig (far right) and commercial co-director and scriptwriter, Bill Taylor. The three were at Six Nations Polytechnic for the launch of the commercial. (Photograph by Stephanie Dearing).

Push on to commemorate Six Nations role in World War One By Stephanie Dearing OHSWEKEN

The idea of commemorating Six Nations men who went to fight in World War One brought an author who specializes in decolonization to Elected Council's Committee of the Whole on Monday morning. Decolonization figured prominently in Michael G. Doxtater's presentation to the Committee, often to the point of drowning out Doxtater's wish to commemorate those veterans who served in the first Great War. The Chiefs voted to accept the Indian Act on June 21, 1880, Doxtater said, showing typed minutes that purported to show the vote.

While many view the Indian Act as a discriminatory piece of legislation used to force Natives to assimilate; Doxtater said when Six Nations voted in favour of the act, they placed Canada under them. “A single line in the Chiefs minutes say the Chiefs confirm acceptance of the Indian Act,” said Doxtater. “The vote was 23 to 11 in favour of acceptance of the Indian Act,” he said. “This isn't a value judgement, good or bad, it's just the truth. What does it mean?” Doxtater also said Queen Victoria “admitted the Six Nations as a member of the Commonwealth and the women here made a flag to celebrate that.” The Queen

died, Prince Edward was later made a Chief by the council, That was significant, Doxtater said, because in 1914, Six Nations declared war on the Kaiser. The information became confusing after Doxtater said the Confederacy Council had disbanded at Buffalo Creek in 1838, and the present-day Confederacy Council was formed in 1950. While Doxtater did not present a clear idea of how he wanted to recognize those Six Nations men who had fought in World War I, he said he had learned of a missing headstone at the grave of one veteran, and began to wonder how many other veterans were missing a headstone.

Elected Chief Montour said he has wanted to bring home the remains of a relative who fought in the war and is still in Europe, but said Canada won't bring him home. “They don't do that anymore,” he said. Doxtater said he had grown up hearing stories from men in his family who had fought during the Great War, saying the Indians would be sent in to clear out the Germans, then the whites would take all the recognition. World War One started on July 28, 1914, ending on November 11, 1918. The Committee accepted the presentation as information and expressed a desire to meet with Doxtater again.

Michael G. Doxtater gave an interesting presentation Monday morning to Six Nations Elected Council. Doxtater wants to commemorate the role Six Nations members played in World War One. (Photograph by Stephanie Dearing).

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Chiefs settle for one point against Redmen By Jim Windle SIX NATIONS The Brooklin Redmen and the Six Nations Chiefs have a long and storied history of tough, closely contested play and the tradition continued Saturday evening at the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena with a 9-9 tie after a full OT period. Johnny Powless, from Alex Hill, and Colin Doyle combined to give Six Nations a 1-0 lead but the Chiefs went on the wobble throughout the middle of the first period allowing the Redmen at 4-1 lead. Roger Vyse and Cody Jamieson scored almost iden-

tical goals from outside on Redmen goalie Zack Higgins four minutes apart to end the period with Brooklin ahead 4-3. Cody Jamieson scored early in the second period to tie it up at 4-4 before Roger Vyse planted back to black goals on Higgins at 3:12 and 4:44, the second on a powerplay. But late in the period the Redmen cashed in on two of their own. At 17:51, and with Tom Montour off serving time for slashing, Kevin Brownell scored for the visitors and Derek Hopcroft added another at 18:29 to end the second period tied at 6-6.

Six Nations Chiefs Cody Jamieson pulls up to elude the checking of the Brooklin Redmen in Saturday night’s 9-9 over time tie game at the ILA. The Chiefs missed a number of opportunities to put some distance between themselves and the Redmen but penalties prevented them from getting any forward momentum while four power play goals on eight chances allowed the Redmen to stay close. (Photo by Jim Windle) Each team traded goals in the third period to send the game into overtime tied at 8-8. Cody Jamieson and Craig Point accounted for the Chief’s third period goals. In the OT period, Steven Keogh scored first at 3:47 from Doyle and Vyse, but Alex Kedoh Hill is always dangerous at the edge of the crease. Jake Hayes answered at 8:10 Here he gets in close for a very good scoring chance. Maybe and neither side could score a little too close this time with a foot in the crease. (Photo by the game winner by the end of OT. Jim Windle)

Looking back on the game, it was a poor performance by the penalty killers that forced the Chiefs to be satisfied with one point and share second place with the Redmen. Brooklin scored four power play goals on eight chances while the Chiefs netted two on seven extra man opportunities. Meanwhile, Higgins made 45 saves on 54 Chiefs shots

on goal while Evan Kirk made 30 saves on 39 shots on goal. This coming week, the Chiefs and the Brampton Excelsiors engage in a home and home series beginning in Brampton Thursday night and the second leg scheduled for the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena the following Sunday, June 23, at 7 pm. Currently Brampton sits

Arrows taking aim at first place By Jim Windle SIX NATIONS

The Arrows Express continued to roll this past week in OLA Jr. A lacrosse action with two decisive wins, improving their record to 9-30 and getting a firm grip on second place heading into this week’s games. Sunday night at the ILA the Arrows walked over the St. Catharines Athletics 12-3 shutting out the A’s in both the second and third periods. The nine goal deferential could easily have been much wider but after blowing out the walls with a 6-0 second period and a 10-3 lead, the Arrows shifted the machine into cruise control for the final 20 minutes. The Arrows were also without the services of a

handful of their starters due to injury and family commitments causing general manager Scott Maracle to call up two Jr. B Rebels and more from the Six Nations Minor Lacrosse League Midgets. After opening the game with three goals within the first three minutes, including a goal by 15 year old Randy Staats at 43 seconds, Haodias Maracle at 1:31, and Brier Jonathan at 2:13. St Catharines finally got some traction and evened the score at 3-3 with goals by Mike Morris, Matt Giampetroni and Brad Thomas. Tehoke Nanticoke gave the Arrows the lead back at 18:32 by depositing a rebound behind Eric Penny in the A’s goal. From that point on the Athletic’s may as well have

got back on the bus The Arrows shifted it into the next gear, leaving St. Catharines standing in their dust. Associate Player, AP, Joel Shipley started the second period onslaught at 1:19 from Danton Miller, another AP and young Tehoka Nanticoke. Captain Johnny Powless added another at the 9 minute mark from Josh Johnson and Brendan Bomberry. At 10:13, Brandon Montour chased down a long rebound off the Arrows crossbar and found himself alone in front of Penny. Not breaking stride, he drilled it home for the 7-3 goal. St Catharines came within an inch of scoring their fourth of the game when a shot squeezed past Alton and was slowly rolling to-

in fourth place with a dismal 2-6-0 record compared to Six Nations’ 5-1 record. Brooklin have two games scheduled this week as well, both against teams they should, on paper anyway, win. The following week, both the Redmen and the Chiefs get kicks at the first place Peterborough Lakers so the standings could change dramatically over the next two weeks.

The traffic got heavy once in a while in front of the net during the Arrows’ 12-3 romp over the St. Catharines Athletics at the Iroquois Lacrosse Arena. Arrows #38 Haodais Maracle and #39 Josh Johnson take care of business. (Photo by Jim Windle) wards the goal line. Brier Jonathan reached in behind Alton to freeze the ball before it crossed over to save a goal and take possession.

Alton frustrated a few very good scoring chances to keep the A’s off the score sheet late in the second period. Meanwhile, Josh

Johnson, Randy Staats and Brendan Bomberry has success at the other end of the floor to finish the second peContinued on page 13


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Arrows taking aim at first place Continued from page 12 riod with the Arrows leading 10-3. The Arrows concentrated on ball control and defense in the final 20 minutes, but still managed goals by Bomberry and Shane Simpson. Despite being more or less a scrimmage as opposed to a regular league game, coach Marshall Abrams says his team can still learn by it. “I guess one thing we can take away from a game like this is the fact that we have to work every game,” said Abrams. “We made some mistakes that need to be corrected. We’re still working on a lot of things

defensively. There’s still mistakes we’re making — guys shooting the ball rather than moving it. Every game you make mistakes, you just try to eliminate them as you go.” The three goals against part of the score wasn’t a given either. Goalie Don Alton was called upon several times to make hard saves which he did on at least 10 occasions while handling 29 of 32 shots on goal. “Alton is playing really sharp and Warren (Hill) is also sharp and it’s good to have two really good goalies. On any given night both of them can stop shots and it’s good to have that.”

By Jim Windle SIX NATIONS

two guys back and that’s all we’re going to need.” Big strong defenseman and former Rebel’s captain Alex Martin came back from the Arrows recently and made his presence felt, laying out bodies in front of his goaltender and making opposition attackers pay the price. The hardest thing Porter has had to deal with so far this season is deciding who to sit out with a lineup as packed with talent as his. In fact, it might be a very close game if ever the Jr. A Arrows and the Jr. B Rebels went head to head in an exhibition game.

Abrams hopes to have his missing members back in action when they take on Burlington this Wednesday, June 19, at 8 pm, at the ILA. It really won’t matter much with an available talent pool as deep as he has to work with here at Six Nations. But the Burlington Chiefs surprised the Arrows earlier this year and they account for one of the Arrows three losses, so far. They then head off to Brampton for a Friday night date with the third place Brampton Excelsiors. They return to action at the ILA next Tuesday, June 25th for an 8 o’clock start against the Arrows’ #83 Randy Staats is mugged in front of the St. Catharines goal by three blue shirts. (Photo by Jim Windle) Mississauga Tomahawks.

Can the Six Nations Rebels get any better?

they pursue their third national championship in a row. Danton Miller struck 35 The Rebels are still standseconds into the game assisting with an unblemished reed by Ian Miller and Marcus cord at 13-0-0 after two more Elvin. Jesse Johnson added weekend wins. another at the one minute Friday night at the ILA, the mark from Zed Williams and game was pretty well decidKyle Isaacs. Ian Martin made ed in the first 20 minutes as it 3-0 from Mitch Green and the Rebels filled the BrampAustin Staats. Green made ton Excelsiors’ net with nine good on a power play to goals while Chase Martin almake it 4-0 from Ian Martin lowed only one for the Reband Austin Staats at 11:07. els. Jonathan Batten broke “We were ready to play Chase Martin’s shut out bid right from the start,” said at 13:54, but the Rebels just coach Murray Porter. “We kept coming. Staats made it scored two goals in the first 6-1 from Martin and Green minute. I knew we were at 14:32 and Brodie Tansley Dallas John deposits the ball behind Brampton goalie Craig Charteris in Friday night’s 15-3 added another quick one at walk-over against the Brampton Excelsiors. (Photo by Jim Windle) 14:55. Rebels Gary Dylan John- Friday night at the ILA in an Sound to face the North Stars That was enough for son scored at 1:31 of the 8 o’clock start. Sunday June who are yet to win a game Brampton starting goalie third period and Staats add- 23 the Rebels are in Owen this year. Craig Charteris who allowed ed his third goal or the night seven goals on 14 Rebels’ at 14:30. shots to that point in the The Rebs continued to fill game and he was replaced by the opposition nets Saturday back up, Austin Cairns. But night with 19 goals against it really didn’t matter much the Point Edward Pacers of as Danton Miller scored on the Far West Division. the first shot Cairns saw and Fifteen Rebels collected Staats scored shortly thereaf- points in the one sided 19-7 ter to end the first 20 minutes affair as the Rebels piled with the Rebels ahead 9-1. up a 9-4 first period lead. Bo Henhawk kept the Reb- They would add seven more els attack going with back to goals in the second and coast back goals to begin the secThe Rebels made the rope dance 15 times Friday night blast- ond period, the first short- through the third period with three more goals, out shooting through both Brampton goalies in their 19-3 win. handed and the second on ing the hosts 71-39. a power play. Brampton’s Leading the Rebels offense ready to play in the dressing “I know we could beat a Batten scored the Excelsiors were Greg longboat (2G,5A), room before the game just by lot of the Jr. A with this team, second goal at 6:39, but Dal- Ian Martin (3G,3A), Six Nathe way the guys were fired the lower half anyway,” said las John answered that with tions‘ minor lacrosse call up up. We got off to a real good Porter. And even that was a another power play goal at Rhys Tansley earned a lot of start and coasted to victory humble statement given the 7:56. Justin Higgins scored respect scoring twice and asafter that.” power of this year’s Rebels what would prove to be sisting on three. Austin Staats Porter was very happy in- organization. Brampton’s last goal of the (3G,2A) and Tyler Longboat deed to get two of his graduAfter the game, team pres- game at 10:08 on a Brampton (2G,3A) also had five point ating Rebels back from the Jr. ident Scott Maracle gave power play, but Staats made games. Jacob Bomberry A Arrows before the game. credit to his new head coach it a 13-3 game at 13:22 from scored four times. “That’s all the moves we’re Porter for honing the two Tyler Longboat and Chase The Rebels were in Niaggoing to do,” said Porter. time Founders Cup winners Martin, which is how the pe- ara Tuesday night and will “We did get better with these to an even sharper edge as riod ended. host the London Blue Devils


14

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

TEKAWENNAKE

Rivermen capture the James Gang at the GPA By Jim Windle OHSWEKEN

Saturday, the Sr. B Six Nations Rivermen moved into a second place tie with the Norwood James Gang thanks to a solid 14-9 win on the hard floor at the Gaylord Powless Arena. Since the Gang have played

one more game than the Rivermen, Six Nations officially hold onto second place. “We were without some of our key guy so I was pleased with the win,” said coach Stew Monture. “But we still have to improve on our penalty killing and stay out of the penalty box to start with. Norwood has a great power-

play and we can’t give teams like that a chance to use it. ” The Rivermen and the Gang played a wide open, see-saw battle in the first period each team scoring in bunches. Holden Vyse, Wayne VanEvery and Delby Powless got things going for Six Nations before Brendan Mun-

Six Nations Sr. B Rivermen #15 Torrey VanEvery almost connects with this behind the back shot but his toe happened to be in the crease as he shot. (Photo by Jim Windle)

#88 Cody Jacobs blasts a shot past Norwood goaltender Angus Dinely Saturday night at he Gaylord Powless Arena. Jacobs also picked up a pair of assists in the 14-9 win over the James Gang. (Photo by Jim Windle)

60

SIGNS &

ENGRAVING 17 EASTON RD, BRANTFORD

roe broke the string at 9:07. Mike Miller and Jeremy Johns added two more goals for the Riverhawks to build a 5-1 lead by the 13:20 mark. But the James Gang rallied with three goals to end the first period with the Riverhawks hanging on to a tenuous 5-4 lead. VanEvery scored his second of the game at 28 seconds of the middle frame which Cody Jacobs followed up on to give the Rivermen some breathing room. Norwood matched those two goals at 5:53 and 8 minutes respectively.

The Rivermen gathered three more goals by the end of the period as Jeremy Johns, Justin Gibson and Torrey VanEvery put the Rivermen up 10-6 with 20 minutes remaining in the game. The lead was reduced to 10-8 after Norwood notched a pair of goals to begin the third period. Justin Gibson, VanEvery and Cory Bomberry put the game on ice with three goals within a minute, between 11:23 and 12:23. The Gang scored one more but Chancey Johnson delivered the last blow to the James Gang at 17:23 from

Mike Miller to put the game on record as a 14-9 Six Nations win. VanEvery led the Rivermen with an 8 point game, 3 goals and five assists. Angus Goodleaf recorded the win in Six Nations net. Next on the schedule for the Rivermen is a trip to Owen Sound Sunday June 23 where they will face the North Stars. Although the Stars are currently in sixth place in the seven team league, they have also played the fewest games and could become a factor should the suddenly get hot.


15

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

TEKAWENNAKE

The annual Larry Lewis Memorial School Lacrosse Tournament saw the new Six Nations outdoor lacrosse fields put to the test. Despite being a bit squishy with all the rain that had Now that’s BIG save! At times it was a David and Goliath situation in the Bantam Game befallen in the days before, the tournament got underway on June 12 and the field held up tween Six Nations and Norfolk played in Simcoe in weekend games. Six Nations lost to the to the feet of students from seven local schools (including Lloyd S. King and Kawenni:io much bigger Norfolk team, 4-2. (Photo by Dave LaForce) Gaweni:yo), their coaches and teachers. The competitors might have been small in stature, but they played the game in a big way, with a lot of action to be seen over the two days time and an exciting double knock-out game played. That game saw Junior Division competitors, OM Smith team taken down by Jamieson in a double knock-out round. OM Smith had sailed through the first part of the competition unbeaten, while Jamieson ended up playing three games in a row – two against OM Smith, to win their division with a score of 10 to 9. In the Primary division, Kawenni:io out-played Jamieson in a double knock-out round by a score of 7 to 5. In the Intermediate division, OM Smith (above in white jerseys) trounced IL Thomas (blue jerseys) with a score of 7 to 1. (Photograph by Stephanie Dearing).

Iroquois Nationals will play in the Blue Division STAFF

After being relegated to the B division for the upcoming World Championship’s by the Federation of International Lacrosse, on June 13th, the other member countries agreed to reinstates the all Haudenosaunee, Iroquois Nationals back into the category of top ranking teams.

After the passports controversy in 2010 when Team Iroquois were denied entry first by the United States and then by England, who refused to accept the Haudenosaunee Passports they traveled on for years, the team was eventually disqualified. As a result they were relegated to the consolation division. Positioning is based on the record from the

previous games. Since they did not compete, the Nationals were automatically relegated to the B division. The decision was challenged by the Nationals and the Federation sought the input from the other competing Nations who overwhelmingly called for their reinstatement as one of the elite teams in the prestigious championship.

The Six Nations House League Novice Warriors took on the Norfolk Timberwolves in Simcoe this past weekend. Six Nations came away with the 8-4 decision. Six Nations came with a full compliment of players and even a few extras while the hole club was only able to muster 10 runners and a goalie. But even so, the Timberwolves gave a great third period effort, but it wasn’t enough against the Warriors. Kevin Henhawk lead Six Nations with three goals. (Photo by Dave LaForce)

HAPPENINGS

SIX NATIONS PARKS & RECREATION 519-445-4311 Gaylord Powless Arena GAYLORD POWLESS ARENA ICE/FLOOR BOOKINGS MUST BE MADE 24 HOURS IN ADVANCE. EFFECTIVE NOVEMBER 15, 2010. SIX NATIONS PARKS AND RECREATION

Main Diamond Diamond No. 2

WED • JUNE 19 THUR • JUNE 20

FRI • JUNE 21

Sports Field East

SUN • JUNE 23 MON • JUNE 24 TUE • JUNE 25

12 - 1pm Roller Blading 5pm Paperweight 6pm Tyke 1 vs Burlington 1 7pm Tyke 2 vs Welland 8pm Peewee 1 vs Welland 9pm Bantam 2 vs Simcoe

5pm Paperweight 6pm Tyke 1 vs tyke 2 7pm Novice 3 vs Novice 2 8pm Bantam 3 vs St Kitts 2 9pm Midget 2 10pm Intermediate 1

6 - 8pm Lassie #1 vs Caledonia 8 - 10pm Ohsweken Redmen vs Jarvis

8 - 10pm SN Storm vs Fisherville

6 - 8pm Tyke #3 (P)

SNMSA Tyke Tournament 9am - 5:30pm

Old Buzzards vs Bucks 6 - 8pm Tyke #2 vs Cayuga 5 - 5:45pm T-Ball 10am - 12pm 6 - 8pm Tyke #1 vs Hagersville 8 - 10pm SN Juniors vs 12:30 - 2:30pm Bantam Thunder (P) 8 - 10pm SN Lightening vs SN Storm Hamilton

6 - 8pm Peewee Boys vs Jarvis

6 - 8pm Peewee Girls vs Hagersville 8 - 10pm Bantam Boys vs Jarvis

8 - 10pm Women 3-Pitch League

Mustang Bantam Girls 10am - 12pm (P) Atom Boys 12 - 2pm (P)

5 - 5:45 T-Ball 10am - 12pm 8 - 10pm Mustang Bantam Atom Girls (P) Girls (P) Bantam Boys 12 -2pm (P)

12 - 1pm Rollerblading SNMLA 5 - 11pm

Batting Cage

Sports Field West

SAT • JUNE 22

FOR MORE INFORMATION

12:30 - 2:30pm Bantam Thunder SN Girls Field Lacrosse Under 15 5 - 6:30pm Under 19 6:30 - 8:30pm

SN Girls Field Lacrosse Under 15 5 - 6:30pm Under 19 6:30 - 8:30pm

SN Girls Field Lacrosse Seniors 6:30 - 8:30pm 8:30 - 10pm Ladies Field Hockey

SN Girls Field Lacrosse Seniors 6:30 - 8:30pm

Elders Euchre Sports Den 12 - 3pm JC Hill 1:30 - 2:30pm Main Hall

JC Hill 5:30 - 8pm Main Hall

SNMLA 5 - 9pm

6 - 8pm Lassie #2 vs Hagersville 8 - 10pm Midget Girls vs Waterdown

7 - 8pm SN Lightning

Maintenance 8am - 12pm

SN Girls Field Lacrosse Under 15 - 5 - 6:30pm Under 19 6:30 - 8:30pm

8am - 12pm Maintenance SN Girls Field Lacrosse Under 15 - 5 - 6:30pm Under 19 6:30 - 8:30pm

Maintenance 8am - 12pm

SN Girls Field Lacrosse Seniors 6:30 - 8:30pm

8am - 12pm Maintenance SN Girls Field Lacrosse Seniors 6:30 - 8:30pm

Running/Walking Track

Community Hall (k) - kitchen (mh) - main hall (sd) - sports den (f) foyer

Discussion Group Sports Den 7:30 - 9:30pm

PROGRAMS 1. ROLLERBLADING – MONDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY AT GAYLORD POWLESS ARENA. 12:00 TO 1:00 PM. 2. SUMMER SPORTS CAMP – REGISTER AT PARKS AND RECREATION. LIMITED SPACE LEFT. SESSION 1 – AGES 11-12 FROM JULY 9 TO 12. SESSION 2 – AGES 7-8 FROM JULY 16 TO 19, SESSION 3 – AGES 9-10 FROM JULY 23 TO 26, SESSION 4 – AGES 7-8 FROM AUGUST 6 TO 9, SESSION 5 – AGES 9 -10 FROM AUGUST 13 TO 16. COST PER SESSION - $40.00. 3. SUMMER YOUTH TRIPS – AGES 13 TO 16, $20.00 PER PERSON/TRIP. AUGUST 1 – PLAYDIUM MISSISSAUGA, AUGUST 12 – BLUE JAY GAME, AUGUST 20 – PAINTBALL BRANTFORD. REGISTER AT PARKS AND RECREATION FROM 8:30 TO 4:00 PM, MONDAY TO FRIDAY. 4. SUMMER DROP IN – AGES 8+, GAYLORD POWLESS ARENA & SPORTSFIELD. MONDAYS. JULY 8, 15, 22, 29 IS DODGEBALL AND FLAG FOOTBALL. TUESDAY JULY 30 IS LACROSSE. WEDNESDAY JULY 31 IS FLOOR HOCKEY. ALL DROP INS RUN FROM 12:00 TO 3:00 PM. NO COST.


16

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

New Credit Council Briefs By Stephanie Dearing Contract for waterline work extended The contract for the New Credit water line installation was extended to August 30, 2013 at an additional cost of $25,000 after delays, largely weather-related, meant the project wasn't finished on schedule. The cost of the delay is less than one percent of the overall project cost. New Credit is also looking into creating a paved bike path on New Credit Road, so far cost estimates for the project range between $165,000 to just under $200,000, and has not yet been approved by council.

Tire Collector wants to rent industrial facility Covenant Industries, a tire collection company, attended New Credit council on Monday June 17 to ask for consideration from council. The company wants to expand its operations and is looking for another building. Dave Alder said the New Credit industrial facility is ideally situated for his employees, who mainly live in Norfolk County. The company had approached New Credit several months ago, but were turned down because their business deals in waste products. Covenant Industries had asked for an opportunity to meet with council to explain how their business works. Essentially, the company collects tires, cleans and shreds them before shipping them out to other processors. Alder said he was looking at another space, and hopes to have an answer

by June 28 from New Credit. The new facility would create six new jobs. The company currently has 12 employees. Council said the matter would be considered. Covenant Industries collects tires from Six Nations as well as communities from Niagara Falls to Stratford and Cambridge. Alder said the tires are not stored on site, and usually each day's collections are shipped off that same day to other processors or customers. The company also collects plastic, which is ground up and cleaned before being returned to those companies for re-use.

Gas tanks to be upgraded The three gas holding tanks at the Variety and Gas Bar, located on Highway Six and First Line will get a health and safety upgrade at a cost of $15,000. Chris Askewe, New Credit's Director of Economic Development, advised council the tanks were dug up and are in “pretty Dodge Caravan was dam- poor condition.” Replacaged, or give any possible reasons for the collision. A man who was identified as the driver by police, was found ling on the ground, and taken to Hamilton General Hospital for treatment. The nature of man's injuries and his current health status have not been disclosed. Police have not said if there were passenPOSITION gers in the vehicle.

Six Nations Police Briefs Staff Man injured in collision A single vehicle collision is under investigation by Six Nations Police. In a very brief statement, the police said they were dispatched to a collision on Cayuga Road on June 16 at 3:30 pm, where they found a van had collided with a tree. The police did not say how badly the blue 2000

ATTENTION: Are you an apprentice or journeyperson working in a skilled trade? On April 8, 2013 the College of Trades was implemented in Ontario. This is a regulatory body put in place to govern skilled trades people (apprentices and journey people) in Ontario. Learn more about the College of Trades and how it will apply to you including fees, deadlines and membership class. For more information please attend our Apprenticeship Information Night June 19, 2013 In the GREAT Theatre at 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. If you are interested in how to get started in apprenticeship you will also want to attend this event!!!! Please call Brandi @ (519)445-2222 for more information.

TEKAWENNAKE

David Alder (left) attended New Credit council to explain the nature of his business, called Covenant Industries. The company collects tires which are then sorted, shredded, cleaned and sent off to processors. Alder wants to expand his capabilities and has inquired into renting the New Credit industrial space. He was accompanied by a colleague from Covenant named Hans (right). (Photograph by Stephanie Dearing). ing the tanks with new fiberglass tanks would cost about $50,000, a cost Askewe said was not sustainable for the

J O B

band-owed business. Council voted in favour of proceeding with the $15,000 option, which will see the

gas storage brought up to standards. The money will come from the store's operations account.

B O A R D

EMPLOYER/LOCATION

SALARY

CLOSING DATE

AZ Driver

Isaacsons Carriers Inc., Six Nations

TBD

June 19, 2013

Administrative Assistant

Aboriginal Employment & Training Centre, Brantford

TBD

June 19, 2013

2 Contract Services Inspectors

Ministry of Transportation, Cayuga

$937.07 $1,134.90 wkly

June 21, 2013

Child & Youth Workers

Atlohsa Native Family Healing Services, London

TBD

June 24, 2013

Mohawk Language Teacher

Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte, Tyendinaga

TBD

June 24, 2013

Lands & Estates Administrator

Oneida Nation of the Thames

$65,000

June 25, 2013

2 Administrative Assistants

Grand Erie District School Board, Brantford

POSITION

EMPLOYER/LOCATION

Health Advocacy Officer

$48,124 - $56,616 June 25, 2013

TERM

SALARY

LTC/HCC, Health Services

Full Time

TBD

June 19, 2013 @ 4pm

Case Manager

LTC/HCC, Health Services

Full Time

TBD

June 19, 2013 @ 4pm

Dietary Aide

Iroquois Lodge, Health Services

Casual Contract

TBD

June 19, 2013 @ 4pm

Policy Analyst

Central Administration

Full Time (3rd Posting)

TBD

July 3, 2013 @ 4pm

Community Support Worker

LTC/HCC, Health Services

Full Time

TBD

July 3, 2013 @ 4pm

Job descriptions are available at GREAT Weekdays... Monday through Friday from 8:30 - 4:30 pm 16 Sunrise Court, Ohsweken

CLOSING DATE

Phone: 519.445.2222 • Fax: 519-445-4777 Toll Free: 1.888.218.8230 www.greatsn.com


17

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

TEKAWENNAKE

Elsipogtog First Nation members stand their ground By Stephanie Dearing NEW BRUNSWICK

In their attempts to protect their traditional lands and water from the threat posed by the future extraction of oil and natural gas, the Mi'kmaq from Elsipogtog First Nation have been

County, New Brunswick since June 5. Initially arrests were fairly light, but that has changed as of Thursday June 14, when 12 people were arrested. Another 7 were arrested on Friday. “The protesters were in mid-ceremony and praying, never resisting arrest,” wrote

A Mi’kmaq elder with a peace pipe (standing) was arrested Thursday by RCMP for blocking seismic testing trucks on Highway 126 in Kent County New Brunswick. The Mi’kmaq, aided by Maliseet members and non-Natives, have been trying to stop oil and shale gas exploration on their traditional lands. (Photograph submitted by Marcus Angel). facing an unprecedented police presence. With a ratio of approximately one police officer to one protester, the Elsipogtog, aided by Maliseet members and non-Natives, have been blocking exploratory testing for shale oil and gas in Kent

Six Nations member Marcus Angel, who currently lives in New Brunswick. Despite their peacefulness, the protesters “still faced police brutality.” During one of those arrests, a second protester was injured, allegedly by the ar-

  



 

 

 



resting police. A Mi'kmaq grandmother had suffered a possible broken arm when she was arrested on June 12 by the RCMP. According to Angel, “a Mi'kmaq youth from Burnt Church was manhandled so hard during his arrest that they broke his hand.” The young man was taken to the hospital for medical attention by Warrior Chief John Levi. The RCMP “plowed through the place where the camp was set up, going through the Sacred Fire and arresting a man holding an Eagle staff,” said Angel. The Mi'kmaq are determined to protect their lands and waters from potential pollution, and have now set up a Sacred Fire camp on Highway 126, although the camp is not near the testing area. “While protesting is illegal,” Angel wrote, “polluting the water remains legal?” He said the protesters, himself included are not backing down, because it is important to protect the water and the land. Angel relayed a message he had received from another protester who asked for support, saying the army is on standby. Tekawennake

                

has not been able to confirm that allegation. The protests are working, getting the attention of others, although not yet succeeding in stopping the exploration studies. New Brunswick's NDP leader, Dominic Cardy issued a statement on June 14 calling on Premier Alward to intervene. "Following today's arrests in Kent County the Premier needs to step in,” Cary wrote. “SWN [the company undertaking the exploration]   cannot delegate their require-

ment to consult with First Nations by hiring a consulting firm ... that has no democratic legitimacy. The authority of elected Chiefs and band councils must be respected by SWN and the provincial government. The Premier must take the lead in calling for three way talks between the government, SWN, and the elected Chiefs." When reached by telephone last week, RCMP spokesperson, Corporal Chantal Farrah said the protesters were arrested because

they had stopped the movement of trucks on the highway. She also said there had been some damage caused to equipment, but would not specify who was responsible. The shale gas protesters have the support of the Council of Canadians and the Sierra Club of Canada, who condemn what they say is the repression of the protesters. Last week, Warrior Chief John Levi asked that readers lend their support through prayers for the protesters.

Become  A  Speaker    

Onkwawenna   Kentyohkwa   is   currently   accepting   applicants   for   admission   into   our   full-­‐time   First   Year   Adult   Immersion   Program   beginning   in   September,   2013.   Applications   are   especially   welcome   from   people   who   are:   between   18   and   50   years   of   age;   who  live  or  work  on  the  reserve;  have  small  children;  are  teachers   or  are  studying  to  become  teachers.  Please  reply  by  e-­‐mail  only  to:   owennatekha@gmail.com.     Onkwawenna  Kentyohkwa  is  supported  by  the  Six  Nations  Council,  Six  Nations  Community   Trust,   Grand   River   Post   Secondary   Education   Office,   Grand   River   Employment   and   Training,   the   Six   Nations   Language   Commission   and   is   accredited   by   the   University   of   Western  Ontario.  

   


18

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

TEKAWENNAKE

CLASSIFIEDS obituary

obituary

GARLOW: JEAN

Olivia Grace King Born June,11, 2013-passed away later that day

Peacefully at the Iroquois Lodge, Ohsweken on Tuesday June 11, 2013 in her 98th year. Predeceased by her husband George (1978) and daughter Janet (1990). Survived by her children, Ruth (late Bob) Hazlett of Calgary; Herb (Norma of Fort Erie); George (Barb), Ron (Marion) of Six Nations; and Donna (Hugh) Johnston of Brantford. Gram will be lovingly remembered by her grandchildren and their families: Roxanne, Candy, and Suzie of Caledonia; Kim, Tim, and Connie of Calgary; Amanda, and Herb Jr., of Ridgeway and Six Nations; Chad of Six Nations, and Cindy, South Carolina. Aunt Jean to many nieces and nephews, and loyal friend to many. Special thanks to mom’s caregivers at Iroquois Lodge and the residents who treated her like family, and to the members of both Caledonia and Ohsweken Baptist Churches for their unwavering support. Mom’s wishes for cremation followed by private burial will be honoured. Jean lived her life as she died, at peace and with God by her side. As an expression of sympathy donations may be made to the Iroquois Lodge, P.O. Box 309 Ohsweken, Ont. N0A 1M0. www.rhbanderson.com

obituary

PEPPER, ALAN J. (PEP), it is with great sorrow, we announce the passing of Pep, Saturday June 15, 2013, at the Brantford General Hospital, in his 49 year. Leaving common in-law partner Brenda Rus, children: Nicholas Anthony, Jamie-Lee, Colton, Brayden-Ty, Sage & Harmonee. Son of Lynda Green (Kanasa) and Alan Pepper (Kettle Point), brother to Joyce, Clinton, Peter and Step brother to Robin and Chris. He is predeceased by daughter Charlesa (2006). Grandson of Jessie Carpenter, Pep will be missed by his extended family and friends. Visitation Monday June 24, 2013, 9am – 12 pm, in the Carriage House @ Thorpe Brothers Funeral Home, 96 West Street. Cremation and celebration of his life to follow.

wedding fundrasier

wedding fundrasier

wedding fundrasier

Yard Sale & BBQ Yard Sale & BBQ Hamburgs, hot dogs, corn soup, ham & scone and home made pies for sale. Saturday, June 22, 2013. 8am – 2pm. Cayuga Longhouse.

First beautiful Daughter of Jared and Miranda King, sister to Austin and Dante. Niece to Brandon King, Bronson Hill and Allissa Sowden. Beloved Granddaughter of David and Crystal Sowden and Beverly King. Private funeral service to be held Friday,June,14,2013 for family and close friends. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the family in their time of need.

Garage sale

Garage sale June 21 & 22 212 Chiefswood Rd. 9AM – 5PM. Furniture, clothes, misc. items.

For Sale

Thank you

Thank you to the Dreamcatcher Fund for covering Coming events the cost of my hockey registration for the 2012-2013 Six Nations Heart Health season. Committee Presents Rez Preston W. Hill Relay Sunday June 30, 2013 Rain Date July 7th Family reunion 18th Tobicoe Family Reunion & Picnic Saturday July 6, 2013 at Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nations Recreation Grounds & Ball Park #2789 Mississauga Rd., R. R. #6, Hagersville, Ont. 12:00 NOON - ? Pot Luck BBQ, Games & Races for everyone. Bring lawn chairs, ball gloves. For further info – Carolyn (905) 768-5147, Carol (905) 768-5853.

Congratulations

3 per team-no exceptions 12 years and up Need $25 in pledges minimum Cash prizes $300, $150, $75 Walk, Bike, Run Please contact Lois Bomberry 519-445-4019 press 1 to register or for more information

Coming events Turkey Shoot For Randi Skye Travis Fraser June 22/13 12 pm – 7 pm

Location: 1022 Hwy 54 (across from LONEWOLF) Top Prize: BIG 50” Screen TV. Other prizes to be won. Food and Games: Dice Games, Toonie Toss, Crown and Anchor, 50/50 Draw. Drinks for sale. For more info., Call 226-388-0092.

Notice

Congratulations Darren Thomas

Fish & Chip Dinner At St. Luke’s Church

1246 Onondaga Road, SATURDAY June 22/13. 4:00On completing your MA in 7:00pm. Adults-$10.00; Psychology. Job well done! Child (6-12)-$5.00; Preschoolers Free. Strawberry Shortcake for dessert. Karen & Family Takeouts Available. Ron, Winnie & Family

Notice

Notice

Fundraiser Breakfast For Team Iroquois Lacrosse Midget Girls

Six Nations Parks & Recreation request Proposals from interested persons to lease, operate & manage the New Ball Hockey Rink, located at 1738 Fourth Line, Ohsweken on June 1/13. Lease conditions are available at the Parks & Recreation Office. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday. Direct questions to 519445-4311. Deadline for Proposals is 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday June 26, 2013.

Date: Saturday, June 22, 2013. Time: 8am – 12:00 pm. Place: Onondaga Longhouse Dining Hall. Adults $8.00, Children 4-12 years - $5.00, Seniors 65+ years - $5.00. Take Out Text: 226802-0859. Come out and support our young athletes who will be travelling to Halifax July 23-28, 2013 to participate in the Girls National Lacrosse Tournament.

Notice

Guest Speaker Dr. Kay Fairchild From Ft. Wayne IN. Dr. Fairchild was given three days to live by her doctors. Come and learn how to change your mind…. Your heart…. Your life!!!!!! Can a healthy mind and a healthy heart result in a healthy body????? Pro. 17:22. Place: Chiefswood Christian Fellowship, 506 4th Line, 7 km West of Ohsweken, Six Nations of The Grand River Territory. Date: June 21, 22, 23 starting Fri. night 7:30 PM; Sat. 10:30 AM, 7:30 PM; Sun. 10:30 AM. Info. Phil Sault 905 768 5442. www.chiefswoodchristianfellowship. com

Clearout sale

Floor Model Soft Ice Cream Machine (Sweden) good condition $800.00 or Best offer. 3 Head Slushi Machine good condition $1500.00 firm. Ross 519533-1564.

Services

6 NaPresidentialLimo. com 6NaLimo@gmail.com Ohsweken, ON (905) 7659928 or 519-865-6546. Let 6Na Tour you around.

Clearout sale

Children’s Clothing Clearout Sale Newborns – 6X & Baby Toys & Accessories. Behind Nancy’s Variety & Gas Bar, 3613 1st Line. Saturdays & Sundays 9AM – 4PM.

Employment

Employment

Garden and Medicine Teacher looking for young women interested in Gardening and Learning about Herbal Medicine. Two mornings per week. Call 519-445-2442.

services

services

Pure, Safe & Beneficial Ask me about my monthly specials! Shelby White 519-445-2983 or 519-761-7199 shelby-white@hotmail.com


19

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

TEKAWENNAKE

Tekawennake News Weather Summary Tekawennake's Seven Day Forecast

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21

Taurus, you may have a difficult time taking sides when friends ask for your help in settling a dispute. Let your friends know you prefer to stay out of the squabble.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

Gemini, you are in need of some down time, so plan a weekend jaunt or a brief vacation to relax and recharge your batteries this week.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

It would normally be quite an effort to pull the wool over your eyes, Cancer. However, in the next few days you will be so distracted with other things that fooling you is possible.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Leo, take a few days to act foolish, throw caution to the wind and have a good time. If you don’t, there may not be another such opportunity anytime soon.

Wednesday Sunny 21 / 9

Thursday Sunny 24 / 11

Friday

Do tornadoes occur on every continent?

?

www.WhatsOurWeather.com

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Peak Fishing/Hunting Times This Week

Today we will see sunny skies with a high temperature of 21º. Northeast wind 11 km/h. Expect clear skies tonight with an overnight low of 9º. Northeast wind 5 km/h. Thursday, skies will be sunny with a high temperature of 24º.

Weather Trivia

Saturday

Partly Cloudy Isolated T-storms Isolated T-storms Isolated T-storms Partly Cloudy 26 / 14 27 / 18 27 / 18 27 / 18 21 / 9

Detailed Forecast

Answer: Yes, except on the continent of Antarctica.

This is a good time to overhaul your approach to fitness, Aries. If you have been thinking about scheduling a physical or getting a gym membership, do so this week.

Day Wed Thu Fri Sat

Full 6/23

Last 6/29

Day Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue

Peak Times AM PM 8:03-10:03 7:33-9:33 9:02-11:02 8:32-10:32 10:04-12:04 9:34-11:34 11:08-1:08 10:38-12:38

Day Sun Mon Tue

Peak Times AM PM 11:30-1:30 11:00-1:00 ---11:41-1:41 12:41-2:41 1:11-3:11

Sun/Moon Chart This Week

Sunrise 5:40 a.m. 5:40 a.m. 5:40 a.m. 5:40 a.m. 5:41 a.m. 5:41 a.m. 5:41 a.m.

Sunset 9:02 p.m. 9:02 p.m. 9:02 p.m. 9:03 p.m. 9:03 p.m. 9:03 p.m. 9:03 p.m.

Moonrise 4:48 p.m. 5:59 p.m. 7:09 p.m. 8:14 p.m. 9:11 p.m. 10:00 p.m. 10:42 p.m.

Moonset 2:29 a.m. 3:09 a.m. 3:57 a.m. 4:53 a.m. 5:59 a.m. 7:10 a.m. 8:25 a.m.

New 7/8

First 7/15

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

Virgo, the only way to get through a bumpy week is to keep your head down and your focus intense. Concentrate on the tasks at hand, and the week will be over before you know it.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

Libra, sometimes practicality gets in the way of your imagination. Though this can sometimes be stifling, you have to find a balance between whimsy and reality.

40. Consumed food 41. Peels 42. Emerald Isle 43. Duties helpful to others 45. Fragments of cloth 47. Frozen water 48. Spanish river 49. Stated an inquiry 56. Laid-back California county 57. Fearless and daring 58. Sound after its source has stopped 59. Blackboard rock 60. A domed or vaulted recess 61. Six (Spanish) 62. French city 63. Herringlike clupeid fish 64. Oriental sauce

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22

No one can put your plan into action better than you, Scorpio. Stop making excuses and really get started this week. Don’t expect immediate results.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

Sagittarius, you may not feel that something you did is funny, but others are bowled over with laughter. Play along so you don’t come across as a spoil sport.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

Expect your schedule to become quite hectic in the next few days, Capricorn. You may want to tie up any loose ends now and use any free time to rest.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

Aquarius, a burst of energy has you flying through all of those little projects that you have been putting off. Once you are done, you may have to create a new list.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

Pisces, though you feel like you have just been going through the motions, others are far more impressed than you think.

C L U E S D OW N

C L U ES A C R O S S 1. __ Dhabi, Arabian capital 4. Invests in little enterprises 8. Stalk of a moss capsule 12. Beach material 14. Maneuver in a game 15. A castrated male chicken 16. Write bad checks 17. Sewer inhabitants 18. Farewell (Spanish)

19. Player makes 3 goals in one game 22. Greek rainbow goddess 23. Tax collector 24. Make unhappy 27. Hygienic 32. Double-reed instrument 33. Beetle Bailey’s dog 34. Fee, ___, foe, fum 35. One dish meal 38. Goatlike antelope

1. Requests 2. Spoken in the Dali region of Yunnan 3. Up to the time of 4. Common ankle injury 5. Tedium 6. 9th Greek letter 7. Abnormal closed body sac 8. One who obtains pleasure from other’s pain 9. Long narrative heroic poem

10. Possessed by force 11. Autonomic nervous system 13. Treats with contempt 15. Bears 20. Before 21. Light ringing sound 24. Blends of soul and calypso 25. Fall off in intensity 26. Gives medicine 27. Gross receipts 28. Square measures 29. Ablaze 30. Incapable of flexibility 31. Bears, sheep or goats 33. An open skin infection 36. Effeminate 37. Competed in a speed test 39. Supplies with air 44. Short stays 45. Sown a lawn 46. 60 min. units (abbr.) 48. Second largest Oklahoma city 49. Fence picket 50. 2nd largest Algerian port city 51. Camel or goat fabrics 52. 19th Hebrew letter 53. Frosts 54. 17th state 55. Inquisitorial 56. Manuscripts (abbr.)


20

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

www.rooms4u.ca

TEKAWENNAKE

“BRANT’S FAVOURITE FURNITURE STORE!”

www.rooms4u.ca

559 Loveseat $ 489 Sofa

In Brant County

$

Reg $699 Reg $609

Also available in Chocolate & Dune

3 Piece Table Set

339

$

Reg $419

Includes Cocktail Table & 2 End Tables

With thick padded arms and supportive divided back cushions surrounded by the comfort of the padded crinkle effect upholstery fabric, the “Coral Pike-Pewter” upholstery collection takes comfort to a whole new level.

Dining Table

Buy Now, Pay Later Ask Us How!

Dining Chairs Each

289 $ 119 $

Reg $359

149

Bench $

Reg $149

Reg $189

Find the RIGHT BED at the RIGHT PRICE! STRATA HAVEN QUEEN MATTRESS

$

339

Matching Chests & Night Stands Also On Sale

Reg $419

STRATA HUDSON QUEEN SET

$

499

Reg $629

STRATA CHELSEA DOMINION QUEEN SET

$

649

Reg $809

STRATA MADISON QUEEN SET

$

679

STRATA MAJESTY QUEEN SET

$

Reg $849

839

Reg $1049

TWIN set ........................$399 Reg $529

TWIN set ........................$559 Reg $699

TWIN set ........................$589 Reg $739

TWIN set ........................ $749 Reg $939

FULL set .........................$459 Reg $579

FULL set .........................$599 Reg $759

FULL set .........................$639 Reg $799

FULL set ......................... $799 Reg $999

KING set ......................... $769 Reg $959

KING set .........................$899 Reg $1139

KING set .........................$939 Reg $1179

KING set ...................... $1099 Reg $1399

349 $ 759

Queen Panel Bed $ Includes headboard, footboard and rails.

5 Piece Bedroom

Includes queen panel bed, dresser and mirror.

289 Reg $359

Dresser $

Reg $439 Reg $949

Also available with storage footboard (as shown)

119 Reg $149

Mirror $

*SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. Although every precaution is taken, errors in prices and/or specifications may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. Circulars may not be used with any other promotion. Some items may not be on display but may be available via our special order program. See store for details. †DURABLEND® upholstery products feature a seating area made up of a combination of Polyurethane and/or PVC, Polycotton, and at least 17% Leather Shavings with a skillfully matched combination of Polycotton and Polyurethane and/or PVC everywhere else.**Leather Match upholstery features top-grain leather in the seating areas with skillfully matched vinyl everywhere else. Printed in the U.S.A. © 2013 Banner Marketing. All rights reserved.

www.rooms4u.ca STORE HOURS:

Printed in the U.S.A.

Mon. thru Wed. 10 am to 5:30 pm Thurs. & Fri. 10 am to 9 pm Sat. 10 am to 5:30 pm Sun. 12 pm to 4 pm

© 2013 Banner Marketing. All rights reserved.

84 King George Road, Brantford, ON N3R 5K4 • (519) 720-0333


Teka News June 19