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2014 JOIN TODAY!

TEESSIDE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

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8 Lectures and Finds Handling Fieldwork Opportunities eNews and

TEESSCAPES

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Finds Handling!

TAS Lectures take place at Stockton Central Library, Stockton-on-Tees TS16 9HU on Tuesdays at 7.30pm. Stockton is served by regular rail and bus services, free parking at the rear of the library. Free Wifi is available and refreshments are provided after each meeting.

January 28

TAS Annual General Meeting and Members’ Evening

7.00pm for 7.30 start Renew your subscription

Committee elections, Society business, proposals and motions, project update briefings, cake—refreshments—conversation—planning.

February 25

Up the creek with a pinch of salt: The archaeology of Greatham nature reserve Gavin Robinson & David Fell, Northern Archaeological Associates During the winter of 2012 a team from NAA discovered and excavated a prehistoric and Roman-period settlement at the site of a new nature reserve near Greatham Creek to the south of Hartlepool. The work represents a unique investigation into long-lived prehistoric and Romanperiod habitation in an area known for salt-working on the north bank of the Tees estuary.

March 25

Treasures in the river: Artefact biographies from the bed of the Wear Gary Bankhead, University of Durham In 2007 Gary discovered many gold, silver and bronze religious artefacts belonging to a former Archbishop of Canterbury in the River Wear in Durham City. In recent years he has gone on to recover an assemblage of 3,000 medieval and post-medieval artefacts from the same river. Gary’s illustrated talk will explain how he is working with Durham University to research the context of his finds and using them as individual historical documents to reveal information about their past.

April 29

Dead but not forgotten: Early Bronze Age burials in North East England Chris Fowler, Newcastle University The period between c. 2500 and 1500 BC saw dramatic changes in how the remains of the dead were treated. This talk draws on the results of a recent analysis of over 350 Early Bronze Age burials in Northumberland, Tyne & Wear and County Durham. How and why did funerals here change during the Early Bronze Age? What kinds of objects were buried with the dead and why? Not all funerals led to burial—so why were some of the dead buried in this period, and what impact did this have?

WWI CENTENARY 1914—2014 Recording the legacy

The Archaeology of The Great War on Teesside At our January AGM Tees Archaeology’s Robin Daniels announces a partnership with TAS to record our unique WWI archaeological heritage for posterity. Success will need volunteers and a Heritage Lottery Fund grant application. If you are interested, please contact us at:

http://teesarchsoc.com/projects/ https://www.twitter.com/teesarchsoc @TeesArchSoc

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Farmer-forager relations in Mesolithic/Neolithic Europe: Beyond the anthropological comfort zone

May 27

Peter Rowley-Conwy, University of Durham After Early Neolithic farmers reached central Germany in 5500 cal BC, there was a 1,500 year pause in the spread of farming until 4000 cal BC, when farming spread into southern Scandinavia. Many items were exchanged in both directions across the farmer/forager border. This contact has, however, always been considered in the light of European colonial contacts with hunter-gatherers in the last few centuries. Peter will argue that this is inappropriate: the situation in Europe in 5000 BC was unlike any known to historical anthropology. Archaeology must deal with this without help from any other discipline.

The North East turned upside down: Military activity during the English Civil Wars

June 24

BONUS LECTURE

Phil Philo, Middesbrough Museums 2014 marks the 370th anniversary of the Battle of Marston Moor, probably one of the most decisive and best known events of the English Civil Wars. The North East is not noted for other landmark events during this conflict but its people played a significant role during the wars. Phil’s talk will give the background to the conflict, particularly the first civil war, the armies, their equipment and tactics, and try to give a more detailed look at the importance of engagements fought, in particular at Piercebridge, Yarm and Guisborough early on in the war, to the later sieges at York, Scarborough, Newcastle and Skipton.

Two chipped lithic assemblages from the North of England: Stainton West, Carlisle, Cumbria and Ronaldsway Airport, Isle of Man

September 30

Antony Dickson, Oxford Archaeology North Separated by over 4,000 years and 40 miles the assemblages represent two very different landscape and contextual settings. The presentation will look at their typological and technological details, describing their salient characteristics and their contexts within the wider understanding of Mesolithic occupation in the North of the United Kingdom.

MORE LECTURES

SEASONAL EVENTS Stay in touch SUMMER 2014 WINTER 2014 December 2014

More details to follow

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to cost and sufficient interest.

Walk*

TAS Guided Fieldtrip or Heritage TAS “Behind The Scenes” Experience* Elgee Memorial Lecture hosted by Cleveland Industrial Archaeology Society

The biggest archaeology festival in the world! Coordinated by the Council for British Archaeology, the Festival offers over 1,000 events nationwide, organised by museums, heritage organisations, national and country parks, universities, local societies, and community archaeologists.

FESTIVAL OF ARCHAEOLOGY 12—27 July 2014

A

www.archaeologyfestival.org.uk/

Guests are welcome for £4 each on the door, but… your subscription is a commitment to our shared success


Header image © Joe Cornish by kind permission.

October 28

Prehistoric archaeology and landscape change in the North Sea Basin: Investigations at Low Hauxley Clive Waddington, Archaeological Research Services Mesolithic to Bronze Age activity on an eroding cliff-face site at Low Hauxley, Northumberland, has been known since an evaluation excavation in 1983.

Clive presents the latest results from a new large-scale and widely publicised investigation of the site. Finds include substantial and complex geo-archaeological sequences with multiple phases of Mesolithic settlement, Neolithic occupation, Bronze Age burial, Iron Age and Romano-British settlement with structures, a large lithic assemblage, human bones, ceramics, and botanical macrofossils. The results have relevance both for wider studies of prehistoric Britain but also for understanding prehistoric settlement around the North Sea Basin and the effects of sea level rise since the last ice age.

November 25

Anglo-Saxon Teesside: 30 years on from the Norton Saxon Cemetery Stephen Sherlock, Archaeologist Extraordinaire Much has changed since the excavation of a sixth-century Anglo-Saxon cemetery, the largest in northern England, at Norton in 1984-5. Steve’s lecture will address a number of themes, beginning with the date of the Norton cemetery based on recent research.

The second theme will be to update the known burial record for Anglo-Saxon cemeteries in the Tees Valley, incorporating the latest discoveries and new finds found in the area by Steve in 2013. The last theme will be the placement of attractive objects within Anglo-Saxon graves. Steve will also discuss the role of heirlooms and antiques, possibly passed down from one generation to the next, that are placed within graves for a brief period during the seventh century. All images © the respective speakers. Cover image courtesy of S. Sherlock.

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We're an enthusiastic, friendly group who share an interest in the rich, distinctive archaeological heritage of the Tees Valley, Cleveland and surrounding area. teesarchsoc.news@gmail.com http://teesarchsoc.com

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TEESSIDE ARCH SOC Programme 2014