Issuu on Google+

Autumn Festival

Trophy goes to undefeated champions

New ownership of Realty World Neighbors

Page 24

Page 17

Page 11

The newspaper for the new millennium

510-494-1999

tricityvoice@aol.com

www.tricityvoice.com

September 2, 2011

Vol. 10 No. 70

time, we tried quilling (rolling strips of paper into creative designs.) The next morning, we decided it would be great to put the quilled pieces onto cards to sell and help raise money for charity,” Shah explained. Soon other students joined their effort and through the creation of these greeting cards, each one was able to express their unique personality. According to Shah, the average time spent on making cards is between two and three hours. “We try and keep our own costs as minimal as possible, but the cards turn out to cost a lot, due to

Blending charity and art to raise funds for education

continued on page 2

BY MIRIAM G. MAZLIACH PHOTOS COURTESY OF PEARANGE An often heard expression, “What’s in a name?” takes on new meaning with Pearange, a non-profit organization formed by a resourceful group of young teenage girls. By cleverly combining the names of a pear and orange together to form Pearange, they hope to convey their aspirations of blending charity and art to raise funds for the education of needy children in other countries. The group first began about three years ago in Fremont, according to one of its founders, Evani Shah, now 14, who recently relocated to San Ramon. “It all started as just a regular sleepover with me and my neighbor, Isha Vazirani. Every time we would get together, we always would find something artsy to do. This particular INDEX It’s a date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Mind Twisters . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Movie Theater List . . . . . . . . . 8

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Real Estate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Places of Worship . . . . . . . . . 28

Public Notices. . . . . . . . . . . . 20


Page 2

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 2, 2011

continued from page 1

all of the supplies. We consider ourselves as giving a free gift for a nominal donation,” adds Shah. The cards have been sold at various club meetings, events, fairs and festivals in the area, including the San Ramon Art and Wind Festival and Fremont’s Festival of the Arts. Selecting the charities to receive the funds was something that Shah took seriously. “The day Pearange was officially formed,” explains Shah, “I was looking up charities and came across an index of many educational charities. The name Child’s Dream caught my heart out of all of those posted. After much communication with them, we decided it couldn’t get better than this. Being the person I am, I had to dig deeper and this charity exceeded all of my hopes.” Of importance to Shah is that Child’s Dream, based in Myanmar, Laos, Thailand and Cambodia, has a low-overhead as far as office expenditures. Last year, 93.5 percent of its funds went directly where needed, building schools in poverty-stricken or disaster affected areas in the region. (http://www.childsdream.org). To date, Pearange has donated $1,000 to “Child’s Dream.” Recently, the Pearange student group also decided to utilize the proceeds from the quilled cards, to support a second charity in Project Kesho, located in East Africa. Shah explains, “In Swahili, Kesho means tomorrow; a new day with endless possibilities, a day to make a difference in someone’s life.” Project Kesho focuses on improving education in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. It was founded by a team, concerned about the future of Africa’s children, who believed that education has the power to change entire communities. Typically the vast majority of its donated funds go to support various school and educational projects there. (http://www.projectkesho.org/). To ensure that funds are received and used in the way intended, members of Pearange stay in contact with the directors of the charities being supported. Pearange members - oldest to newest are: Evani Shah (co-founder, age 14 grade 10); Isha Vazirani (co-founder, age 13 - grade 9); Rajvee Tibrewala (age 16 grade 11); Trisha Malhotra (age 13 grade 8); Tarika Malhotra (age 11 - grade 6); Arjun Mehta (age 13 - grade 8); Stegi Ilanthiraian (age 15 - grade 10); Kirthana Srikanth (age 14 - grade 10) and Abi Babu (age 15 - grade 10). “I feel like we are making a difference in not just one child’s, life but multiple schools. If we all work together, we will help improve the future in these countries, one child at a time,” adds Shah. “We hope to visit the schools and children themselves one day, to see what a difference we made.” For more information on Pearange or how to support their efforts, visit www.pearange-cards.webs.com. (A quilled card will be gifted in return for a nominal donation.)


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 3

$ = Entrance or Activity Fee R= Reservations Required Schedules are subject to change. Call to confirm activities shown in these listings.

Saturday, Sep 3

Saturday, Sep 3

Saturday, Sep 3 - Sep 5

Monday, Sep 5

Tuesday, Sep 6

Family Nature Hour

Mind and Meditation

Historic Rail Fair

What's Brewing on the Farm

2 - 3 p.m.

11 a.m .- 12:30 p.m.

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

1 - 3 p.m.

Children's Choir begins season

Stories, games, activities for all ages

Free workshop on calmness of mind, increasing energy and focus

Enjoy steam train rides, handcart rides, model railroads, food, games

Brew wheat ale. Taste samples of ale and homemade root beer

6 - 7 p.m.

Union City Branch Library 34007 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 745-1464 (510)709-9209

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd. Fremont (510) 544-2797

Ardenwood Historic Farm 34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont (510) 544-2797

St. Anne Episcopal Church 2791 Driscoll Rd., Fremont (510) 490-0553 (510)461-7478

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220 Saturday, Sep 3

Red Cross Blood Drive Free Event

12:00 p.m. - 5:00pm Give blood, save lives

Upper Level between JC Penney and Burlington Coat Factory NewPark Mall 2086 NewPark Mall, Newark 1-800-733-2767 www.RedCrossBlood.org Saturday , Sep 3

Yosemite Epics: Tales of adventure from Yosemite

11 a.m. - Noon Meet Author Matt Johanson and /artist Christopher Hampson for amazing tales of outdoor adventure, books at discount price

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Saturday, Sep 3

Saturday - Sunday, Sep 3 -Sep 4

Blues and Beer$

Adobo Festival

Monday, Sep 5

5- 9 p.m.

10 am. - 7 p.m.

Labor Day Fun

Live Music, California-brewed beer, Free to Historical Society members

Tastes, sights and sounds of Filipino culture

10 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Hayward Area Historical Society Museum 22392 Foothill Blvd., Hayward (510) 581-0223

Milpitas Sports Center 1325 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3210 (650)290-0542

39737 Paseo Padre Parkway Fremont, CA 94538 510-494-1999 fax 510-796-2462 tricityvoice@aol.com www.tricityvoice.com

Nummi Theatre at Ohlone College 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6031 Wednesday, Sep 7 Sep 7

Amusing Art Critique

Tuesday, Sep 6

7 - 9 p.m.

Ohlone Village Site Tours

5 - 9 p.m.

Learn how to critique your art as well as other works

10 a.m. - Noon

Children of the Anza Expedition - What life was like

Fundraiser dedicated to Mexican card game Loteria (Bingo). Art, tournament prizes

Visit 2,500 year old Ohlone Village site. See artifacts.

Our Lady of the Rosary Church 703 C St., Union City (510) 471-2609

FEATURES Julie Grabowski

What’s Happening’s

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

Theatre Auditions

Sunday, Sep 4

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Sharon Marshak

TRI-CITY VOICE® ™

Old-fashioned games. Have a picnic join in activities.

Auditions Servant of Two Masters

Loteria Tournament and Art Show

EDUCATION Miriam G. Mazliach

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Sharon Marshak

Tuesday, Sep 6

Saturday, Sep 3

PUBLISHER EDITOR IN CHIEF William Marshak

PRODUCTION Ramya Raman

Join the choir. no child is turned away

GOVERNMENT Simon Wong TRAVEL & DINING Denny Stein

Coyote Hills Regional Park 8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont (510) 544-3220

SPORTS REPORTERS Biff Jones Gary van den Heuvel David Nicolas Sanjna Shukla Kevin Yin

4 - 5 p.m. Interactive program of storytelling and activities

Fremont Art Association 37695 Niles Blvd., Fremont (510) 792-9290

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS BOOKKEEPING Vandana Dua

Suzanne Ortt Praveena Raman Rajeswari Ramanathan Alyson Whitaker

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Gerry Johnston

PHOTOGRAPHERS Don Jedlovec Mike Heightchew

WEB MASTER Venkat Raman, RAMAN CONSULTING

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Colleen Ganaye

REPORTERS Janet Grant Philip Holmes Robin Michel

LEGAL COUNSEL Stephen F. Von Till, Esq.

What’s Happening’s The Tri-City Voice is published weekly, issued, sold and circulated in and from Fremont, Newark, Union City, Hayward, Milpitas and Sunol and printed in Fremont, California. The principal office of Tri-City Voice is at 39737 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont, CA 94538. William Marshak is the Publisher.

Subscribe. Call 510-494-1999 or sign up on our web site www.tricityvoice.com.

COPYRIGHT 2011® Reproduction or use without written permission from What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice®™ is strictly prohibited.

ADJUDICATION: What’s Happening’s Tri-City Voice is a “newspaper of general circulation” as set forth in sections 6000, et. seq., of the Government Code, for the County of Alameda, and the State of California.


Page 4

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Wednesday, Sep 7

Friday, Sep 9

Dance Cha Cha, Foxtrot, Big Band Swing$

ComedySportz-Improv Comedy$

7 - 8 p.m.

8 p.m.

Class Beginners - Advanced - Couples only age 16 and up

Interactive comedy show improvising scenes, games and music

Ralph & Mary Ruggieri Senior Center 33997 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City (510) 675-5495

Ohlone College Parking Lots E 43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 659-6285

Friday, Sep 9

Ballroom/Social Dance Classes $R

7 - 8 p.m. Six weeks class, couples only

Fremont Adult School Community Center 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 794-2538 (510) 793-6465 Saturday, Sep 9

Women, Yes! $

7 - 8 p.m. Women's history tea and program

Fremont Adult School - Community Center 4700 Calaveras Ave., Fremont (510) 794-2538 katherinebray@sbcglobal.net

Monday - Friday, Jul 29 Sep 30

Artist's Guild of the East Bay

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. John O'Lague Galleria 777 B Street, Hayward (510) 538-2787 Tuesdays, Aug 2 - Nov 15

Friday, Sep 9

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health R

Science Lectures for Children

1 - 2:.30 p.m.

4 - 5 p.m.

Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Amphibians

Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Continuing Events

Newark Senior Center 7401 Enterprise Dr., Newark (510) 742-4840 (510) 574-2053 Wednesdays, Aug 3 - Nov 16

Mondays - Fridays, Jul 25 Sep 16

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

Flight of Imagination

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics Kennedy Community Center 1333 Decoto Rd., Union City (510) 675-5488 (510) 574-2053

8 a.m. - 6 p.m. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Fridays) Exhibit by artist Vinay Verma

Phantom Art Gallery at Milpitas Community Center 457 E. Calveras Blvd., Milpitas (408) 586-3409 510) 745-1421

50's Diner Style 14 Family Dinner September 4-6pm C’mon everybody, we’re gonna have some fun, re-live the days, when the records played, and Elvis was number one! Join us for a twist of our daily dinners. Come dressed for a shake, rattle and roll Family Dinner with us for only $10/person. Enjoy a Spiffy Supper and a flashback to the Rock N Roll era Reserve you apartment by 10/31/2011 and receive Professional Moving Assistance (Value of $1,200).

Thursdays, Aug 4 - Nov 17

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

September 2, 2011 Friday - Sunday, Sep 2 - Sep 25

Frost/Nixon$

9:30 - 11 a.m.

8 p.m.

Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Dramatized televised interviews between David Frost and President Nixon

Fremont Senior Center 40086 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont (510) 790-6600 (510) 574-2053

Douglas Morrison Theatre 22311 N Third St., Hayward (510) 881-6777

Fridays, Aug 5 - Nov 18

Wait Until Dark

Seniors: Walk This Way to Better Health

8 p.m.

9:30 - 11 a.m. Walking, flexibility, strength and balance exercises with fun games and educational topics

Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 299-2223 (510) 574-2053 Thursdays - Sundays, Sep 2 - Oct 1

Mosaic Sculpture

Noon - 5 p.m. The work of Wilma Wyss

Olive Hyde Art Gallery 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 791-4357

Friday - Sunday, Sep 16 Oct 15

Murder, mystery, cat and mouse "A first-rate shocker" Theatre

Broadway West Theatre Company 400-B Bay St., Fremont (510)683-9218 www.broadwaywest.org


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

BY GEORGE VALVERDE DIRECTOR, CA DEPT. OF MOTOR VEHICLES

Do you have questions about general driving related requirements like registration and insurance? Are you unclear about laws and restrictions related to driving? The California Department of Motor Vehicles has answers. “Save Time by Going Online,” at www.dmv.ca.gov.

Q: I live in an area with light rail (public rail transit) vehicles, which is new to me. What steps should I take to share the road safely with the light rail? A: Light rail vehicles have the same rights and responsibilities as other vehicles on the road, except that they are much larger. To make sure you give them the space they need and share the road properly, take the following precautions: • Be aware of where the vehicles operate and take note of what could be a blind spot for the operator. • Do not turn in front of a light rail vehicle as it approaches • Leave plenty of space between you and the light rail vehicle, particularly if it’s sharing the road with vehicular traffic. • Approach tracks carefully and only cross over them when indicated by a signal or when you are sure there is no approaching light rail vehicle.

Q: Sometimes on the weekends or late at night while I am driving, I see drivers operating their vehicles recklessly, and I am concerned that they may be drunk drivers. How can I report a drunk driver? A: In partnership with the Office of Traffic Safety and the California Highway Patrol, the DMV strongly urges you to report drunk drivers when you see them. Call 911 and help the CHP identify a drunk driver before they harm themselves or anyone else. Your call absolutely makes a difference, and can help keep the roads safe! To learn more about drunk driving, visit www.dmv.ca.gov.

Q: I recently moved and need to submit new information for the DMV’s records. Can I do this online? A: Yes. You can download a “Change of Address” form from the DMV website and submit it to your local field office. Besides submitting a form, you can also change your address online at www.dmv.ca.gov if you are eligible. It’s fast, convenient, and secure! Simply go to the DMV Web site, and then click on “Change of Address” under the “Online Services” tab at the top of the page. From there, it explains the process and you’ll be able to start this process. Please note the restrictions on the page to be sure you are eligible for this particular online transaction. Either way, you can utilize the DMV Web site for this process. Save time. Go online!

Page 5

The DMV is a department under the Business, Transportation and Housing Agency, which is under the direction of Acting Undersecretary Traci Stevens. The DMV licenses drivers, maintains driving records, registers and tracks official ownership of vehicles and vessels, investigates auto and identity-related fraud, and licenses car dealers, driving schools, and traffic violator schools. For more information about the DMV, visit www.dmv.ca.gov.


Page 6

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 2, 2011

Free Class May Help You Find the Coverage You Need “If you are without health insurance, it’s likely you are just one medical crisis away from losing everything you’ve worked for your whole life,” observes Linda Dawal, Health Insurance Information Service Coordinator at Washington Hospital. The enormity of this problem comes into greater focus when you realize that today, because of the poor economy and company lay-offs, there are more uninsured Americans than ever before. In California, nearly one in five is uninsured. In Alameda County, the 2010 Health Needs Assessment estimates 12 percent of residents have no health insurance. The report also concludes that people who are uninsured are far more likely to delay or not seek medical care than those who have insurance. “We see these problems every day in our office,” comments Dawal, who works at the Washington Hospital Health Insurance Information Service, a free and confidential service that can provide people with the information they need to make informed decisions about their health insurance. According to the California HealthCare Foundation, “health insurance is the primary financial vehicle for obtaining access to quality medical care and for reimbursing providers who deliver care.” On Thursday, September 15, Dawal and Health Insurance Information Service Coordinator Kristi Caracappa will

In an effort to provide helpful information about health insurance options, Washington Hospital will conduct a free public seminar covering the many health insurance plans and programs that are available to your and your family. The seminar will take place on Thursday, September 15, from 10 a.m. to Noon at the Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium, located at 2500 Mowry Avenue (Washington West) in Fremont.Visit www.whhs.com to register.

present a free seminar, “Health Insurance Options: What You Need to Know.” Sponsored by Washington Hospital, the class will be held in Conrad E. Anderson, M.D. Auditorium in Room B, next to Washington Hospital (Washington West) at 2500 Mowry Avenue in Fremont. To reserve your spot, go online to www.whhs.com and look under Upcoming Seminars, or call (800) 963-7070. “We will talk about different options for health insurance and what you can do if you are without it,” says Caracappa. “The goal of our service at Washington Hospital is to help people get the health insurance or services they need, whether it be through low cost or free

community programs or through government-sponsored programs. Our service is free and available to everyone, no matter who they are or where they live.” According to Caracappa, under federal health reform young adults can now be covered by their parents’ insurance plan until they are 26. Children under 18 who don’t have coverage may also qualify under the state’s Healthy Families program. Both Dawal and Caracappa are Healthy Families certified application assistants, so they can assist people in filling out the paperwork. When someone goes on COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus Reconciliation Act) as an

extension of previously available health insurance coverage, they may not realize how expensive it is. Dawal and Caracappa recommend that you take the COBRA if your family can afford it. If not, they will offer suggestions on what you can do to keep your family healthy until you can obtain health insurance. During the seminar, Dawal and Caracappa will also talk about insurance options for people who have exhausted their COBRA coverage, as well as those who have pre-existing conditions. The coordinators are knowledgeable about Medi-Cal insurance, too. They refer people who may qualify to Alameda County for help in applying for

coverage. They can also assist people in enrolling for Medicare Part D prescription drug insurance coverage. “In Alameda County alone, people can choose from 33 different drug insurance plans, and it can get very confusing,” explains Dawal. “We use the www.Medicare.gov Web site to help find the correct plan for an individual. We will also hold free seminars about Medicare Part D during the open enrollment period in October.” People who attend the seminar on September 15 will have an opportunity to ask questions about their own health insurance needs, or they can make a free appointment with the Health Insurance Information Service coordinators by calling (800) 770-9447, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The Health Insurance Information Service Office is located in the Washington Community Health Resource Library in the Washington West building on Mowry Avenue in Fremont. Learn More If you have questions about the Washington Health Insurance Information Service or would like to learn more about health insurance coverage options, visit www.whhs.com/healthinsurance or call (800) 770-9447.


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

The Bookworm

BY

RYAN C. MACK

You’ve learned your lesson. In the past four years, you’ve learned that you can’t spend frivolously. You can’t use credit unwisely, there’s no “wiggle room” on bill-paying, and the only way to face your future is to put money back into your own pocket with savings and investments. Easier said than done? Not really, according to author Ryan C. Mack. In his book “Living in the Village”, he explains how money can work for you and for your community. So you’ve come through the Great Recession and you’re rebuilding your financial life, but you’ve come to realize that you want to do more with what you’ve got. Mack says that there’s no time like the present to educate yourself about managing the money you earn. To begin, track your spending and see where your money goes. Be truthful with yourself when looking at your spending habits, then learn how to make a budget you can stick with. It helps to set goals and to understand how millionaires shop. Learn the pitfalls of spending, why you shouldn’t use an ATM, and why those rent-toown places will put a serious hole in your wallet. Become knowledgeable about insurance, and make sure you have enough of the right kind. This should lead you into planning an estate for those you leave behind someday – including family members, charities, and any pay-it-forward groups you want to bequeath. Though you shouldn’t be using credit cards indiscriminately, the wise use of credit is important for your financial future. Your FICO is key, and Mack explains how you can raise that number. He also explains how to get rid of high-risk debt by negotiating with creditors and knowing your rights. Boost your workplace retirement fund then set up an IRA for your retirement. Get rid of low-risk debt, and learn the smart way to pur-

chase a car or house. Select the right advisor, someone who shares your vision for your future. Learn how to invest your money for the best return. Give yourself a good emergency fund for just-in-case situations. Tired of being broke, or close to it? “Living in the Village” can set you on a path away from poverty, but – as you’ve probably guessed – it won’t be easy. Author and financial expert Ryan C. Mack writes with clarity and his step-by-step explanations are doable for anyone who wants to get their house in order, money-wise. He’s thorough, too, and covers all bases in this book, although that may be overwhelming for anyone who’s starting from financial scratch. Still, Mack does some hand-holding and offers enough personal support to keep his readers from becoming discouraged. It’s also helpful that he targets specific groups (religious leaders, parents, the formerly incarcerated, and so on) with specialized tips most useful for them. Overall, if you’re ready to put your money where your future is, or if you want to set a good example for your children, “Living in the Village” may inspire you. Then get ready to be prosperous. Haven’t you earned that? c.2010, St. Martin’s Griffin $14.99 / $16.99 Canada 302 pages, includes worksheets The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and she never goes anywhere without a book. She lives on a hill in Wisconsin with two dogs and 11,000 books.

Page 7


Page 8

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 2, 2011 Tribune Media Services

Bad Teacher (R)Fri. - Thu. 9:35 P.M. Captain America: The First Avenger (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 10:55, 4:45, 10:45

Captain America: The First Avenger 3D (PG–13)Fri. - Thu.

Hit and Runway (R) Sat. 7:30 P.M. 1:50, 7:50 Men Behind the Cars 2 (G) Fri. - Thu. 1:35, 7:00 Megaphone (NR) Cars 2 3D (G)Fri. - Thu. 10:45, 4:15 Butter Fingers (NR) Colombiana (PG–13) Fri. &

30 Minutes or Less (R) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 2:45, 7:55 Sun. 2:45 P.M. Apollo 18 (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 11:00, 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50 Sun. 11:00, 1:10 Bad Teacher (R) Fri. - Thu. 12:00, 5:15, 10:10 Cars 2 (G) Fri. - Thu. 2:00 P.M. Cars 2 3D (G) Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 11:15, 4:45 Wed. 11:15 A.M. Colombiana (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 11:20, 2:00, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 Sun. 11:20, 2:00 Cowboys & Aliens (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 11:15, 2:00, 4:50, 7:35, 10:25 Sun. 11:15, 2:00 Don't Be Afraid of the Dark (R) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 11:10, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30 Sun. 11:10, 2:00

Final Destination 5 3D (R) Fri. - Tue. & Thu. 7:30, 10:00 Our Idiot Brother (R) Fri. Thu. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15

Sat. 11:20, 12:25, 2:00, 3:10, 4:40, 6:00, 7:30, 8:40, 10:35, 11:15 Sun. - Thu. 11:20, 12:25, 2:00, 3:10, 4:40, 6:00, 7:30, 8:40, 10:35 Conan the Barbarian (R) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 11:15, 4:30, 9:30 Sun. 11:15, 4:30 Cowboys & Aliens (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:25, 2:15, 5:15, 8:00, 10:45

Don't Be Afraid of the Dark (R)Fri. & Sat. 12:10, 1:40, 2:45,

5:20, 7:05, 8:20, 9:50, 11:00 Sun. - Tue. & Thu. 12:10, 1:40, 2:45, 5:20, 7:05, 8:20, 9:50 Wed. 12:10, 1:40, 2:45, 7:05, 9:50 Final Destination 5 (R) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 7:10 P.M. Final Destination 5 3D (R) Fri. - Thu. 1:55 P.M. Fright Night 3D (R)Fri. - Thu. 10:00 P.M.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 10:45, 4:10 Our Idiot Brother (R) Fri. Thu. 11:40, 2:05, 4:20, 7:15, 9:45

Rise of the Planet of the Apes (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:35,

2:20, 4:50, 7:35, 10:05

Saving Private Pérez (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:55, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:25 Shark Night 3D (PG–13) Fri. Rise of the Planet of the Thu. 2:55, 7:55 Shark Night(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Apes (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Mon. Thu. 11:20, 1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 10:00 12:15, 5:25, 10:25 Sun. 11:20, 1:55 Spy Kids: All the Time in Shark Night (PG–13) Fri. Sat. the World in 4D (PG) Fri. & Mon. - Thu. 12:15, 5:15, 10:15 Thu. 2:30, 7:20 Sun. 12:15 P.M. Spy Kids: All the Time in Shark Night 3D (PG–13) Fri. - the World in 4D (3D) (PG) Thu. 2:45, 7:45 Fri. - Thu. 12:05, 4:55, 9:40 Spy Kids: All the Time in The Debt (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:25, the World in 4D (PG) Fri. 2:15, 5:05, 7:50, 10:30 Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 11:25, 4:45, 9:45 The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Sun. 11:25 A.M. Spy Kids: All the Time in 11:10, 2:25, 5:40, 9:00 the World in 4D (3D) (PG) The Smurfs(PG)Fri. - Thu. 1:30, 6:50 Fri. - Thu. 1:55, 7:15 The Smurfs 3D (PG) Fri. The Debt (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:00, Thu. 11:00, 4:00 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 Warrior (PG–13)Sun. 7:10 P.M. The Help (PG–13) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15 Wynton Marsalis and Eric Sun. 12:30 P.M. Clapton Play the Blues (NR) Wynton Marsalis and Eric Wed. 7:30 P.M. Clapton Play the Blues (NR) Wed. 7:30 P.M.

Apollo 18 (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 30 Minutes or Less (R) Fri. - 12:25, 2:40, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20 Cars 2 (G) Fri. - Thu. 11:25, 4:35 Thu. 1:05, 3:25, 5:45, 8:05, 10:15 Colombiana(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. A Good Old Fashioned Orgy (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:30, 2:10, 5:00, 11:35, 2:10, 4:55, 7:30, 10:10 Don't Be Afraid of the 7:40, 10:40 Apollo 18 (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. Dark (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:45, 2:15, 4:45,

10:50, 1:00, 3:15, 5:35, 8:10, 10:20 7:20, 9:50

Rise of the Planet of the Our Idiot Brother (R) Fri. Conan the Barbarian 3D (R) Apes (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:20, Wed. 11:00, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 2:00, 7:30

1:55, 4:45, 7:20, 9:50

10:20

Shark Night(PG–13)Fri. - Thu. Rise of the Planet of the 12:45, 5:25, 10:05 Apes (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 11:30, Shark Night 3D (PG–13) Fri. - 2:00, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15 Thu. 3:05, 7:45 Saving Private Pérez(PG–13) Spy Kids: All the Time in Fri. - Wed. 12:05, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:20 the World in 4D (PG) Fri. Shark Night (PG–13) Fri. Thu. 2:05, 7:15, 9:35 The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 12:30, 3:45, 7:00, 10:15

Wed. 2:35, 7:35

Sun. 2:00 P.M.

Cowboys & Aliens (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 10:00 P.M.

Crazy, Stupid, Love.(PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00 Don't Be Afraid of the Dark (R)Fri. & Sat. 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 8:00, 10:00, 10:30, 12:30

Shark Night 3D (PG–13) Fri. - Sun. - Thu. 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, Wed. 12:00, 5:00, 10:15

Spy Kids: All the Time in the World in 4D (PG) Fri. Wed. 1:15, 5:50, 10:25

8:00, 10:00, 10:30

Final Destination 5 (R) Fri. -

Thu. 11:00, 10:20

Final Destination 5 3D (R)

Spy Kids: All the Time in Fri. - Thu. 4:40 P.M. the World in 4D (3D) (PG) Fright Night (R)Fri. & Sat. 9:50,

Astronaut(NR) Fri. Wed. & Thu. 12:00 P.M. Sat. - Mon. 12:00, 3:00 Cosmos 360 (NR) Fri. & Sat. 7:00, 9:00 Secret of the Rocket (NR) Fri. 11:00, 3:00 Sat. Sun. Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 2:00 Mon. 11:00 A.M. Tales of the Maya Skies (NR) Fri. 4:00, 8:00 Sat. 1:00, 4:00, 8:00 Sun. 1:00, 4:00 Mon. 1:00, 2:00, 4:00 Wed. & Thu. 1:00, 3:00, 4:00

Fri. - Wed. 11:00, 3:35, 8:05 The Debt (R) Fri. - Wed. 11:00, 1:45, 4:30, 7:20, 10:00 The Help (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 12:10, 3:45, 7:10, 10:20 The Smurfs (PG) Fri. - Wed. 1:55, 7:05 The Smurfs 3D (PG) Fri. Wed. 11:20, 4:25 Warrior (PG–13)Sun. 7:00 P.M.

12:25 Sun. - Thu. 9:50 P.M.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 5:00 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2: 3D (PG–13)Fri. - Thu. 2:00 P.M. Our Idiot Brother (R) Fri. &

Sat. 12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00, 12:20 Sun. - Thu. 12:40, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00

Rise of the Planet of the Apes (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:30,

Two Small Pieces of Glass (NR) Fri. 2:00, 6:00

2:00, 3:45, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 10:30, 12:01 Sun. - Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 3:45, 4:30, 1:00, 3:00, 7:00 7:00, 9:30, 10:30 Sat. 1:00, 4:00, 8:00 Sun. Mon. Wed. & Thu. 1:00, 4:00 Saving Private Pérez(PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, Mysteries of Egypt (NR) Fri. 6:00, 9:00 10:00, 12:30 Sat. 11:00, 2:00, 6:00, 9:00 Sun. - Thu. 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, Sun. Mon. Wed. & Thu. 11:00, 2:00 10:00 Solarmax (NR) Fri. 4:00, 8:00 Seven Days in Utopia (G) (R) Fri. 30 Minutes or Less Sat. 12:00, 3:00, 7:00 Fri. Sat. & Thu. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, Sun. Mon. Wed. & Thu. 12:00, 3:00 & Sat. 12:55, 3:10, 5:25, 7:40, 9:55, 9:30, 12:01 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 12:55, 3:10, 5:25, 7:40, 9:55 Sun. - Wed. 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Shark Night (PG–13) Fri. & A Good Old Fashioned Orgy (R)Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 1:50, 4:40, Sat. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50, 12:10 Sun. - Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50 7:35, 10:30 Shark Night 3D (PG–13) Fri. Apollo 18 (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 12:05, 1:10, 2:15, 3:20, 4:25, & Sat. 11:20, 1:40, 4:00, 6:20, 8:40, 30 Minutes or Less (R) Fri. - 5:30, 6:35, 7:40, 8:45, 9:50, 10:55, 11:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:20, 1:40, 4:00, 6:20, 8:40 Wed. 10:10 P.M. 12:01 Sat. 6:00 P.M.

Dinosaurs Alive! (NR) Fri.

Gremlins (PG) Sat. 7:00 P.M.

Apollo 18 (PG–13) Fri. - Wed. 11:10, 1:20, 3:35, 5:45, 8:00, 10:10 Bad Teacher (R) Fri. - Wed. 10:05 P.M. Cars 2 (G) Fri. - Wed. 1:40, 7:00 Cars 2 3D (G)Fri. - Wed. 11:05, 4:20 Colombiana (PG–13) Fri. Wed. 11:25, 12:45, 2:00, 3:25, 4:50, 6:00, 7:45, 8:50, 10:25 Conan the Barbarian (R) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Wed. 1:50, 7:50 Sun. 1:40 P.M. Conan the Barbarian 3D (R) Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Wed. 11:10, 4:55, 10:30 Sun. 11:00, 4:20, 10:30

Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 12:05, 1:10, 2:15, 3:20, 4:25, 5:30, 6:35, 7:40, 8:45, 9:50 Bodyguard (NR) Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00, 11:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00 Bol (NR)Fri. & Sat. 11:00, 2:20, 5:40, 9:00, 12:20 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 2:20, 5:40, 9:00

Wed. 3:00, 7:50

Fri. Sat. & Mon. - Thu. 11:15, 4:45, 10:15 Sun. 11:15, 10:15

Spy Kids: All the Time in the World in 4D (PG) Fri. -

Thu. 12:20, 5:00, 9:40

Spy Kids: All the Time in the World in 4D (3D) (PG)

Fri. & Sat. 2:40, 7:20, 12:01 Sun. - Tue. & Thu. 2:40, 7:20 Captain America: The First Wed. 2:40 P.M. Avenger (PG–13) Fri. - Thu. 1:50 P.M. The Debt (R) Fri. - Thu. 11:10, 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:30 Captain America: The First The Help (PG–13) Fri. & Sat. (PG–13) Fri. Thu. Avenger 3D 11:00, 12:30, 2:15, 5:30, 7:10, 8:45, 7:30 P.M. 12:01 Cars 2 (G) Fri. - Thu. 1:40, 7:00 Sun. - Thu. 11:00, 12:30, 2:15, 5:30, Cars 2 3D (G)Fri. - Thu. 11:00, 4:20 7:10, 8:45 Colombiana (PG–13) Fri. & The Smurfs(PG)Fri. - Thu. 2:00, Don't Be Afraid of the Sat. 11:50, 1:10, 2:30, 3:50, 5:10, 6:30, 7:30 (R) Fri. Wed. 11:05, 12:15, Dark 7:50, 9:10, 10:30, 11:50 1:35, 2:45, 4:05, 5:15, 6:45, 7:45, 9:20, Sun. - Thu. 11:50, 1:10, 2:30, 3:50, The Smurfs 3D (PG) Fri. Thu. 11:20, 4:45 10:15 5:10, 6:30, 7:50, 9:10, 10:30 Warrior (PG–13)Sun. 7:00 P.M. Final Destination 5 (R) Fri. - Conan the Barbarian (R)

Final Destination 5 3D (R)

Fri. - Wed. 12:30, 5:30, 10:30

Wynton Marsalis and Eric Clapton Play the Blues (NR)

Wed. 7:30 P.M.


September 2, 2011

SUBMITTED BY VICTORIA CESINO Marshalls, at Fremont Hub has received a fresh, contemporary makeover. The store will continue to offer designer fashions, shoes, home accents and two new features: Marshalls Shoe MegaShop and The CUBE. “Our exciting Marshalls Shoe MegaShop offers thousands of designer shoes with new styles arriving several times each week. Just pick out your favorite style and find your size in the boxes under the display,” said Marshalls spokesperson, Sonya Cosentini. Marshalls high-energy in-store boutique, The CUBE, has a stylish Fresh, new look and feel, with a color scheme, music and lighting that caters to the fashion-conscious younger woman. The boutique-inspired department allows young women to easily shop for fashion-forward designer clothes and accessories at amazing prices. Rather than being organized by size, apparel in The CUBE is organized by style, with coordinating accessories nearby, so shoppers can create a stylish, headto-toe outfit more easily. For more information, visit www.MarshallsOnline.com

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 9


Page 10

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Birth

Marriage

Special Life Events

Susan Sakamoto

Syster Hyacinthe Ruggiero

RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 14, 1947 – July 20, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT October 25, 1909 - August 28, 2011

Beatrice Bravo

Russell Boie

RESIDENT OF NEWARK January 9, 1933 – August 26, 2011

RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 15, 1928 - August 29, 2011

John A. Hagelin RESIDENT OF UNION CITY January 24, 1929 - August 27, 2011

Shih C. Wei RESIDENT OF FREMONT December 27, 1914 - August 27, 2011

September 2, 2011

Obituaries

Gary Okano RESIDENT OF FREMONT February 25, 1952 - August 26, 2011

Larry Littlefield RESIDENT OF FREMONT September 9, 1931 - September 1, 2011

Angela Ku Chow RESIDENT OF FREMONT March 14, 1926 - August 28, 2011

L

Zelma Richard RESIDENT OF FREMONT November 11, 1929 - August 28, 2011

Fremont Chapel of the Roses (510) 797-1900 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont

FD1007

Berge • Pappas • Smith

Chapel of the Angels (510) 656-1226 40842 Fremont Blvd, Fremont

ife Cornerstones will acknowledge important events that occur during the cycle of life in our community. In order to give a broad and fair opportunity for all citizens to be recognized, a basic listing is offered at no cost. Such announcements may include births, deaths, marriages, anniversaries, bar/bat mitzvah, Quinceañera, etc. Many cultures celebrate different milestones in life and this list will be as inclusive as possible. Please contact TCV at (510) 494-1999 or email tricityvoice@aol.com for submissions or further information. Free listings are limited to residents and families of the Greater Tri-City Area.


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

ping Center at the corner of Serra Way and Able Street. Generous sponsors of the event include the Pacific Times who donated $100, Estonami with a donation of $300, and the Huelan, Santora, Folisilda, and Mateo families who gave $1,000 each in support of the festival. Local businesses, non-profit groups, and individual donors can help sponsor the event,

BY ISABELLA OHLMEYER Summer is coming to an end and the fall season is commencing, so celebrate the change of seasons with the City of Milpitas and St. John the Baptist Catholic Church at their 7th annual Autumn Festival. According to Festival Chairperson Rizalina Santoro, “The main purpose of the festival is to bring together the people of different communities and share the cultural diversity in the different venues and events that will be offered throughout the weekend.” The festival is a three-day event starting September 9 with games, food, rummage sale, bingo, silent auction and other fun activities. At 6 p.m. on September 9, there will be musical entertainment from the South Bay School of Music Arts, and on September 11 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. instrumental music will be provided by the Millennium Orchestra. Paul Maurer Shows will be producing the carnival rides at the festival, which include Fun Slide, Dizzy Dragon, Zendar, Mind Winder, Super Trucks and more. Discounted tickets will be sold for a limited time before the festival ($10 for 20 tickets). At the festival, 24 tickets will be $20. Discounted carnival tickets and Extravaganza Ticket Booklets will be available for purchase at all Saturday and Sunday masses at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church. Extravaganza Booklets cost $25 with 5 tickets in each booklet; the purchase includes entry into a raffle for extraordi-

nary prizes. There will be eight winners of the raffle: first place - $10,000, second place - $2,000, and third place $1,000. Consolation prizes are an Xbox 360, Playstation 3, Nintendo 3DS, a Wii, and a Kindle. The fun continues at a variety of game booths where you can test your skills at Balloon Dart, Milk Toss, Obstacle Course, Boom Blaster, Football Challenge and others. Of course, every festival needs food! There will be juicy hamburgers and hot dogs, Philly Cheesesteaks, Mexican food, Vietnamese cuisines and many more zesty meal options. And don’t miss the Pancake Breakfast on Sunday morning where for $5.50 you’ll be served three pancakes, scrambled eggs, two bacon, two sausages, and fruit along with orange juice, coffee or tea. Attendees can purchase strips of tickets for $5 to use at both food and game booths; the cost of food and games will be posted on each booth. Admission to the festival is free, and parking is also free and available in the Serra Shop-

raise funds, or provide equipment for activities. In exchange, coordinators of the Autumn Festival will provide promotional opportunities. For any questions or more information, visit http://www.sjbparish.org/festival. Autumn Festival Friday, Sept 9 – Sunday Sept 11 Friday: 5 p.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday: 11a.m. – 10 p.m. Sunday: 11a.m. – 6 p.m. St. John the Baptist Catholic Church 279 S. Main Street, Milpitas www.sjbparish.org/festival Free Friday, 6 p.m. Performance by South Bay School of Music Arts Sunday 8 a.m. – 11 a.m. Pancake Breakfast 4 p.m. – 6 p.m. performance by Millennium Orchestra Carnival Closes at 10 p.m.

Page 11


Page 12

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 2, 2011

10 lines/$10/ 10 Weeks $50/Year Rotary Club of Niles We meet Thursdays at 12:15 PM Washington Hospital West 2500 Mowry Ave. Conrad Anderson Auditorium, Fremont www.clubrunner.ca/Portal/H ome.aspx?cid=6149

(510) 739-1000

Friendship Force Quarterly meetings Homestays abroad Hosting visitors “Changing the way you see the world” www.ffsfba.org www.thefriendshipforce.org 510-794-6844

Kennedy High School

Flea Market First Saturday Every Month Except January 8 am – 4 pm All Spaces $20 For more info call 510-657-4070 x27150 bsterling@fremont.k12.ca.us 3999 Blacow Rd., Fremont

Homeless Solutions Free, monthly one-hour tour Abode Services housing site Hear resident stories Learn how you can help homeless individuals/families. (510) 657-7409 x203 or visit www.abodeservices.org Because everyone should have a home.

Tamil Radio Show Huge Rummage Sale at Sunol Downtown Park to benefit C.E.R.T Sunday, Aug. 21st 8 am – 4 pm

Tamil Radio Show "Kaalai Thendral" on every Saturday 10 AM to 12 PM on KLOK 1170 AM Also Listen Live @ www.arimausa.com

Fremont Cribbage Club Friends of Heirloom Flowers Garden Club Kiwanis Club of Fremont meets every Tuesday morning at 7:00 a.m. at the Newark/Fremont Hilton. Call Elise Balgley (510) 693-4524 for information.

Garden party every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. – Noon at Shinn Park & Arboretum 1251 Peralta Blvd., Fremont Novice to experienced gardeners are welcomed. Social hour afterwards at Sim Cottage.

Sons in Retirement Retired men-Enjoy leisure time with friends & activities. Lunch & Speaker once a month Newark Pavillion on third Thursday - No Dues No Fundraising Ron Holladay (510) 656 9017 rdholladay@yahoo.com http:www.sirinc.org

Golden Gate Chapter Steamship Historical Society Six Bay Area meetings and Field trips per year Info at 510-276-7520 website: wwwsshsa.org

Karaoke Club Purrfect Cat Rescue Monthly social karaoke Meet VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: If you & sing tamil songs, have fun love cats & kittens & have a while helping people in little time & lots of TLC we need. Open only to Bay area need YOU. We provide (San Jose - Santa Clara - San training. Also, need help Francisco). Register @ with our adoption showcase www.tamilkaraokeclub.com on the weekends. or email Sing@TamilKawww.purrfectcatrescue.org raokeClub.com or call 510-1597

Tues-Beginners-No Entry Fee Wed-Advanced $11 Entry Fee 100% Pay Back Top Winners 6:15pm Round Table Pizza 37480 Fremont Blvd. cribbagegr43@yahoo.com Or call Tracy 510-793-6472 American Cribbage Congress www.cribbage.org

Nurturing Spiritual Growth in Children Through Music SUMMER MUSIC CAMP August 23 – 26 9:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Age 7 – 13 $25 Application and more detail at: www.cbncangelchildrenschoir.com

510-494-1999 tricityvoice@aol.com Shout out to your community Our readers can post information including: Activities Announcements For sale Garage sales Group meetings Lost and found For the extremely low cost of $10 for up to 10 weeks, your message will reach thousands of friends and neighbors every Friday in the TCV printed version and continuously online. TCV has the right to reject any posting to the Community Bulletin Board. Payment must be received in advance.

Payment is for one posting only. Any change will be considered a new posting and incur a new fee. The “NO” List: • No commercial announcements, services or sales • No personal services (escort services, dating services, etc.) • No sale items over $100 value • No automobile or real estate sales • No animal sales (nonprofit humane organization adoptions accepted) • No P.O. boxes unless physical address is verified by TCV

"Bumpers and Brats" September 24th 12pm to 4pm. Car show with a jumpy for the kids, food, beer, wine, music. Enjoy fellowship, food, and cars Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd.,Fremont

Celebrate Dance Concert It's not just a concert but a celebration party. Sunday, August 28 6-8pm Admission Free Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave, Fremont 510-744-2216 Diverse dance groups Many dance style

FREE AIRPLANE RIDES FOR KIDS AGES 8-17 Young Eagles Hayward Airport various Saturdays www.vaa29.org Please call with questions 510 703-1466 youngeagles29@aol.com


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

1 2

5 9 8

8 9

4

Fill in the missing numbers (1 – 9 inclusive) so each row, column and 3x3 box contains all digits.

1

Sudoku Solutions on page 17

6

5 letter words Avoid Onion Order Rev up Viand Xylem

2 7 9 5

6

9 8 6

4

3

6 letter words End-all Endues Foxily In “coded” puzzles, each number represents a letter. For example, 428863 Gdansk could represent PUZZLE. Double letters, the length of words, etc. will help you Haunch crack the code. Studio Trifle Unaged 11 24 2 22 17 2 12 25 14 3 19 2 24 24 24

18 26

10

18

1

4

2

10 8

3

1

14

2

14

24

8

13

5 2

7

7

2

24

3

6

4

18

22

1

13

3

5

14

15 8

23

18 2

12

19

18

14

13

3

19

18

19

14

12

23

11

2

16

22

8

24

3

2

23

7 19

23

3

12

12

3

16

16

14

3

19

8

14

15

1

2

3

4

5

6

14

15

16

17

18

19

14

21

13

21

8

21

23

14

18

15

21

8

19

23 14

14

21

7 letter words Crowded October Theresa Twelfth

2 18

20

14

2 11

20 9

18

13

13

21 16

11

3

8

18

2 21

21

3

12

15 23

14

18

13 24

24

8

1

Sudoku

2 1

Page 13

24

10 14

2 2

24

5 14

2 3

13

2

20

10

23

2

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

19 2

18

25

20

21

3 15

24

25

8 letter words Baby talk Flapjack Literary Stargaze 9 letter words Allowance Avalanche Balalaika Low-minded Out-and-out Unequaled 15 letter words Jumping-off place Noncontributory

Word Search Capitals

Agana Ankara Apia Bangkok Bangui Bern Cayenne Dakar

Doha Hanoi Harare Jakarta La Paz Laayoune Lima Lome

A

E 6 1 F 3 9 2 9 7 3 A 1 E C B 6 2 8 7 5 0 F D 5 6 8 9 D 3 0 B A C F 0 0 2 C C 5 1 A 7 4 D 7 0

M A S E R U E L B A N G K O K

Macau Male Manila Maseru Mbabane Monaco Muscat Nassau

P R A I A J B E S L A B M Y M

A L M O N A C O A K S U E A X

R P Y O N G Y A N G S V C R A

I E S G J S A A A C A A X O N

S L U L O A P P A Q U N M M K

Nuuk Oslo Ottawa Paris Prague Praia Pyongyang Rabat

O I T F O I K T O H J B A E A

D F

4 A 8 B

6 7

9

0

4

7 4

2 1 B B F

A D

5 2

B E 3

D 6 1 E A 4 E 6 F 2 8 C

F B 9 1

L C I E A M A A P R A G U E R

D A B R H S E A R B E R T M A

O A A I O R A B A T L C A V Q

T O K Y O S A N H I A A I R O

T D N A O S E N M A L E P T E

Riyadh Rome Roseau Sanaa Singapore City Sofia Suva Taipei

A O U D R U C A Y E N N E A Y

W H U H G V N M U N D O I A Z

A A K Y B A N E A M A N I L A

Tehran Tokyo Vienna


Page 14

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 2, 2011

HOME SALES REPORT CASTRO VALLEY | TOTAL SALES: 14 Highest $: 660,000 Median $: 380,000 Lowest $: 225,000 Average $: 414,214 ADDRESS

ZIP

4609 Alma Avenue 17450 Almond Road 19567 Barclay Road 3901 Forest Circle 4218 Forest Glen Place 18376 Jill Way 18042 Lamson Road 4380 Moreland Drive 4658 Proctor Road 18604 Sandy Road 20350 Wisteria Street 22046 Young Avenue 19538 Yuma Street 22718 Rancho Palomares Pl

The Fremont Police Department is seeking volunteers to form a volunteer Bagpipe and Drum Band assigned to the Honor Guard Unit representing the Department at various internal and external civic events. Applicants must be active musicians and provide their own instruments; uniforms will be provided. Commitments range from one to three events per month. If you, or anyone you know is interested in this unique opportunity, please contact Sgt. Donn (Tony) Tassano, Honor Guard Coordinator, at dtassano@fremont.gov. All volunteer applicants must be 18 years old and will be required to successfully pass a background check. To apply online go to: http://www.fremontpolice.org/volunteer/volunteer.html

94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94546 94552

SOLD FOR BDS

375,000 428,000 380,000 315,000 525,000 460,000 530,000 313,000 435,000 470,000 351,000 225,000 332,000 660,000

3 3 3 2 3 3 4 3 3 2 3 2 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1320 1735 1480 1239 2364 1890 2088 1025 1905 2067 1557 1169 2964 2560

1952 1952 1963 2009 1990 1960 1958 1950 1955 1952 1951 1948 1962 1997

07-27-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-27-11 07-28-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-27-11 07-27-11

FREMONT | TOTAL SALES: 36 Highest $: 1,089,000 Median $: Lowest $: 102,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1768 Acacia Way 38059 Alta Drive 3562 Altamira Terrace 4846 Balboa Way 4588 Bianca Drive 37433 Gillett Road 2376 Harrisburg Avenue 35864 Killorglin Common 37860 Mosswood Drive 4462 Norris Road 4960 Northdale Drive 38228 Paseo Padre Parkway 36415 Perkins Street 4301 Romilly Way 4925 Roselle Common 37421 Southwood Drive 39495 Albany Common #H 39139 Argonaut Way #112 1013 Avila Terraza 4359 Bora Bora Avenue 43350 Castle Park Court 5089 Conde Court 4739 Griffith Avenue 42740 Jefferson Street 4084 Murray Common 3625 Norfolk Road 4986 Tenor Court 133 Pagosa Way 46662 Paseo Padre Parkway 48812 Semillon Drive 858 Wisteria Drive 34518 Bluestone Common 4563 Deep Creek Road 3638 Pintail Terrace 34652 Tabu Terrace 34103 Webfoot Loop

ZIP

94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94536 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94538 94539 94539 94539 94539 94555 94555 94555 94555 94555

HAYWARD | TOTAL SALES: 38 Highest $: 505,000 Median $: Lowest $: 80,000 Average $:

441,000 472,875

SOLD FOR BDS

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

758,000 555,000 441,000 240,000 375,500 573,000 620,000 525,000 310,000 612,500 648,000 102,000 490,000 455,000 510,000 329,000 188,500 165,000 313,000 592,500 396,000 435,000 450,000 275,000 220,000 395,000 409,500 612,000 1,089,000 760,000 905,000 279,000 580,000 330,000 325,000 760,000

2530 1550 1519 1330 1473 2196 1939 1824 1134 1818 1763 750 1645 1797 2054 1263 881 864 1121 1532 1296 1323 1596 1000 1189 1314 1947 1231 2511 1999 1408 1474 1693 1315 1064 2102

1991 1959 2006 1982 1957 1999 1979 1989 1953 1959 1955 1970 1964 1965 1997 1954 1981 1974 2001 1963 1961 1962 1962 1958 1979 1960 1962 1978 1979 1984 1960 1970 1977 1989 1987 1991

07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11

4 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 1 3 4 4 3 2 1 2 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 5 4 3 4 4 2 2 3

ADDRESS

ZIP

22538 6th Street 22777 Atherton Street 1318 C Street 1947 East Avenue 24651 Fawn Meadow Lane 436 Holly Lane 660 Jordan Way 3183 Madsen Street 24915 Mead Way 21563 Meekland Avenue 22763 Myrtle Street 22300 Ralston Court 929 Sueirro Street 18007 Sunol Road 1591 Ward Street 351 Willow Avenue #9 22743 Yolo Street 2111 Brandywine Place 24559 Marie Drive 2410 Sebastopol Lane #1 3590 Sentinel Court 25729 Westview Way 29401 Chesterfield Court 26720 Eldridge Avenue 256 Fuji Way 124 Hermitage Lane 28042 Ormond Avenue 26358 Regal Avenue 912 Snowberry Court 325 Valle Vista Avenue 335 Westchester Street 954 Westwood Street 24666 Willimet Way 27818 Del Norte Court 24552 Eden Avenue 1193 Huron Lane 27526 Stromberg Court 21367 Gary Drive #16

94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94541 94542 94542 94542 94542 94542 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94544 94545 94545 94545 94545 94546

SOLD FOR BDS

325,000 237,500 296,000 505,000 450,000 165,500 146,000 293,000 252,000 475,000 190,000 380,000 180,000 190,000 175,000 130,000 111,000 310,000 240,000 208,000 475,000 290,000 415,000 262,000 369,000 325,000 200,000 181,000 140,000 80,000 340,000 230,000 252,500 165,000 265,000 310,000 170,000 106,000

3 3 6 2 2 3 9 3 4 3 3 2 2 1 3 3 2 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 2 1 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 2

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1224 984 2610 841 1120 1363 3354 1043 2249 1352 1332 1016 864 644 1458 1178 1132 2552 1194 2198 1159 1647 1690 1216 1042 1020 650 1233 1430 1161 1220 1367 1601 1254 936

1997 1910 1908 1950 1926 1954 1952 1950 1961 1950 1973 1941 1980 1928 1997 1949 1984 1973 1940 2000 1955 1997 1955 1954 1952 1972 1984 1956 1957 1956 1970 1999 1957 1970 1961

07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-28-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-28-11 07-27-11 07-27-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11

MILPITAS | TOTAL SALES: 13 Highest $: 680,000 Median $: Lowest $: 170,000 Average $: ADDRESS

1958 Badgerwood Lane 1957 Conway Street 174 Evergreen Way 383 Falcato Drive 126 Marylinn Drive 2049 Monte Court 41 Moon Shadow Drive 1144 North Abbott Avenue 340 Rio Verde Place #1 495 Roswell Drive 490 Singley Drive

ZIP

95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035 95035

SOLD FOR BDS

550,000 350,000 419,000 565,000 305,000 608,000 395,000 170,000 205,000 485,500 570,000

4 3 3 4 2 3 2 2 3 4 4

240,000 258,803

485,500 456,192

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1785 1130 1247 1502 1378 1990 1353 863 1050 1631 1482

1987 1960 1968 1971 1983 1991 2000 1979 1971 1959 1977

08-05-11 08-08-11 08-04-11 08-04-11 08-05-11 08-03-11 08-04-11 08-08-11 08-03-11 08-08-11 08-05-11


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 15

HOME SALES REPORT 811 Strickroth Drive 303 Summerfield Drive

95035 95035

628,000 680,000

3 4

1778 2316

NEWARK | TOTAL SALES: 14 Highest $: 735,000 Median $: Lowest $: 130,000 Average $: ADDRESS

ZIP

39931 Cedar Boulevard #204 39931 Cedar Boulevard #214 39865 Cedar Boulevard #328 5778 Dichondra Place 5557 Forbes Drive 7619 Hermitage Avenue 8580 Mahogany Place 6007 Peppertree Court 36674 Ponderosa Court 5574 Portsmouth Court 38764 Quince Place 6119 Robertson Avenue 36718 Ruschin Drive 5264 Salisbury Drive

SOLD FOR BDS

94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560 94560

225,000 130,000 169,000 385,000 735,000 379,000 490,000 390,000 473,000 490,000 418,500 439,000 320,000 461,000

3 2 2 4 5 4 3 3 4 4 4 2 4 3

ZIP

13530 Aurora Drive 1550 Bancroft Avenue #311 27 Dorchester Avenue 1664 Gardner Boulevard 1682 Grand Avenue 544 Lewis Avenue 2120 167th Avenue 14861 Boulevard Court 1166 Coburn Court 14950 Donald Avenue 1106 Grace Street 1509 Halsey Avenue 14795 Martell Avenue 14034 Reed Avenue 3845 Yorkshire Street #7 1429 Church Avenue 660 Fargo Avenue #6 15436 Heron Drive

SOLD FOR BDS

94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94577 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94578 94579 94579 94579

315,000 280,000 302,000 295,000 204,000 347,000 175,000 181,000 191,000 250,000 260,000 325,000 310,000 148,500 152,000 338,000 155,000 366,000

4 3 4 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 3 4 3 2 2 3 3 4

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1283 1071 1071 1468 3289 1374 1790 1869 1632 1970 1560 672 1338 1610

1985 1985 1986 1987 2000 1971 1994 1984 1977 1963 1976 1953 1955 1967

07-27-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-27-11

260,000 255,250

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1278 1680 1582 1008 1045 886 788 950 1461 1288 1418 1532 2336 1084 918 1589 1180 1651

1947 1976 1944 1943 1930 1925 1940 1948 1977 1947 1947 1948 1953 1973 1987 1952 1965 1999

07-27-11 07-27-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-28-11 07-28-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11

Sudoku Solutions

4 6 9 7 3 1 8 2 5

5 3 1 8 2 9 7 6 4

8 2 7 4 5 6 1 3 9

9 5 2 1 8 7 3 4 6

3 7 4 9 6 2 5 1 8

6 1 8 3 4 5 2 9 7

7 4 6 5 1 3 9 8 2

1 8 5 2 9 4 6 7 3

2 9 3 6 7 8 4 5 1

8 2 F 9 0 1 B 6 4 5 A E 7 D C 3

E B 0 D F A 4 2 C 7 3 1 8 5 6 9

7 1 6 3 C 9 5 E 0 D 2 8 F 4 B A

C A 4 5 D 7 3 8 9 F B 6 0 1 2 E

6 C 2 8 9 3 0 A F E 1 5 B 7 4 D

0 4 3 1 6 B E F D 9 C 7 2 A 5 8

A E D B 5 8 1 7 3 2 0 4 9 6 F C

9 7 5 F 2 4 C D A 8 6 B E 3 0 1

B 5 C 7 A 6 F 3 E 0 8 2 D 9 1 4

3 D 8 2 4 E 9 B 7 1 F C 6 0 A 5

4 F 9 E 8 0 D 1 6 A 5 3 C 2 7 B

SAN LORENZO | TOTAL SALES: 08 Highest $: 325,000 Median $: 245,000 Lowest $: 225,000 Average $: 264,250 ADDRESS

390,000 393,179

SAN LEANDRO | TOTAL SALES: 18 Highest $: 366,000 Median $: Lowest $: 148,500 Average $: ADDRESS

1986 08-05-11 1998 08-05-11

1 0 A 6 7 C 2 5 B 4 D 9 3 E 8 F

F 8 7 0 B 2 A 9 1 3 4 D 5 C E 6

2 3 E A 1 5 7 C 8 6 9 F 4 B D 0

D 9 B 4 E F 6 0 5 C 7 A 1 8 3 2

5 6 1 C 3 D 8 4 2 B E 0 A F 9 7

ZIP

264 Ano Avenue 562 Empire Street 16121 Via Alamitos 17226 Via Chiquita 15933 Via Granada 1169 Via Los Trancos 16131 Via Owen 1396 Via Vista

94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580 94580

SOLD FOR BDS

245,000 235,000 225,000 285,000 299,000 235,000 265,000 325,000

3 3 2 3 4 3 3 3

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1566 1164 1102 1031 1480 1043 1196 1551

1948 1950 1947 1951 1946 1950 1955 1951

07-27-11 07-29-11 07-28-11 07-28-11 07-28-11 07-28-11 07-29-11 07-28-11

UNION CITY | TOTAL SALES: 11 Highest $: 670,000 Median $: Lowest $: 250,000 Average $: ADDRESS

35173 11th Street #271 4134 Asimuth Circle 4330 Cambridge Way 35142 Garcia Street 34880 Herringbone Way 2581 Lambert Court 4586 Ojai Loop 2444 Regal Drive 3021 San Andreas Drive 31361 San Andreas Drive 32481 Seaside Drive

ZIP

94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587 94587

SOLD FOR BDS

385,000 250,000 575,000 360,000 455,000 415,000 548,000 425,500 369,000 362,000 670,000

3 4 5 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 3

415,000 437,682

SQFT

BUILT

CLOSED

1675 1584 2300 1298 1988 1813 2275 1566 1396 1675 2846

2007 1974 1997 1965 1997 1970 1983 1970 1970 1969 1991

07-29-11 07-29-11 07-27-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-29-11 07-28-11

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Tri-City Voice welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include an address and daytime telephone number. Only the writer’s name will be published. Letters that are 350 words or fewer will be given preference. Letters are subject to editing for length, grammar and style.


Page 16

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY FLOYD BUSBY

S

even stages of continuous entertainment is high on the list of many who will attend at the 146th Scottish Highland Gathering & Games, set for September 3 and 4 at the Alameda County Fairgrounds in Pleasanton. The entertainment includes a wide variety of styles with something for everyone. High on the list of favorites is Celtic Rock. Many prefer the traditional folk style entertainers, and others hold the Celtic Heritage stages with the Scottish Fiddlers Rally and Celtic Harpers in their favorite check off list. Add Scottish Country Dancing exhibitions and Scottish and Irish songs in ancient Gaelic by Kirsty Fitch, and you have a well rounded musical experience. Four of the Celtic Rock groups vie for top billing, each bringing a solid fan base to the Games. Perhaps the most visible of the groups is Tempest. Tempest has performed at all but one of the 17 Games held at the fairgrounds in Pleasanton. They are also different from the other rock groups in that they do not include a bagpipe in the fiveman ens amble. Norwegianborn Lief Sorbye is the lead singer and electric mandolinist. Fiddler Michael Mullen blows the crowd away with his "hot fiddle" renditions. From Australia, Brother has grown with a world-wide following. The group includes the use of the Aboriginal didgeridoo.

September 2, 2011

The "Tribal" element of Celtic Rock is provided by Albannach (an ancient word for

by another set at 11 a.m. Entertainment returns at 1 p.m. and continues at 2, 3 and 4 p.m.

Scotland), direct from Scotland. Consisting of all percussion and one bag pipe, the ensemble's pounding beat has attracted many new American supporters. Molly's Revenge brings a standout trio of musicians to the pulse-driving Celtic Rock genre. Outstanding vocals in the more traditional venues include Scotland's TV personality Isla St Clare, The Brown Sisters with George Cavanaugh, Golden Bough and soloists Ed Miller, Neil O'Neill and Peter Daldry. The Browne Sisters produce a lively program of beautifully arranged vocal harmony, with cousin George on guitar. Five of the stages have continuous 45-minute sets with two groups rotating on each stage. The entertainment begins both days at 10 a.m., followed

The two Celtic Heritage stages run a similar schedule with fiddlers, harpers, Scottish country dancing and vocal soloists. Dancing is also of high priority with the Western U.S. Championship Highland Dancing competition and the Irish Pavilion with exhibitions of the rapid-fire step dancing. Additional information is available on the Games website: www.TheScottishGames.com. The Games are hosted by the Caledonian Club of San Francisco. Scottish Games Saturday, Sept 3 & Sunday, Sept 4 8 a.m. Alameda County Fairgrounds, Pleasanton www.thescottishgames.com


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

New ownership of Realty World Neighbors BY SIMON WONG PHOTO BY SIMON WONG Hayward and San Leandro Chambers of Commerce held ribbon-cutting ceremonies to mark the new ownership of boutique real estate brokerage

bers of Commerce. She understands the inter-relation of business, community and government. Owner/REALTOR Greg Jones, who served as City Manager of Hayward and of Chico, specializes in commer-

Lyman Menger who remains as a Broker-Associate with the company. May and Jones are passionate about keeping Hayward vibrant and alive, which led to their decision to continue with the office in its present Downtown Hayward location.

Owner/broker Anna May and Owner/REALTOR Greg Jones (wielding scissors) celebrate their new ownership of Realty World Neighbors, Hayward, with a ribbon cutting ceremony on August 25, 2011.

Realty World Neighbors, located at 22470 Foothill Boulevard, Suite C, Hayward. More than 100 people attended the reception hosted by new owners Anna May and Greg Jones on Thursday, August 25, 2011. Owner/broker Anna May is a former Hayward City Council member and the 2011 Presidentelect of the Women's Council of REALTORS Tri-Cities Chapter. She specializes in residential real estate and, with her background in retail leasing and franchise sales as a former owner of several restaurants in the Rickshaw Express chain, works with Jones on retail leasing transactions. During her tenure as an Alameda County Housing Authority Commissioner until 2010, she introduced the first landlord commissioner to the Housing Authority in many years. She is a long-time Rotarian, having served as the 2003-05 President of Hayward South Rotary Club, and is an Ambassador for Hayward and San Leandro Cham-

cial/retail real estate and is a land use/entitlements consultant. He and May advise clients on residential investment transactions. While Hayward City Manager, he was instrumental in initiating the Mission Corridor Specific Plan which will decide the future of commercial, retail and residential land use along Mission Boulevard in Hayward. Additionally, Jones initiated the Retail Attraction Study which aids retailers' and brokers' efforts to locate in Hayward. He is a founding member of the Asian Business Alliance and Board member of both the Hayward Chamber of Commerce and the Hayward Rotary Club. A former US Air Force navigator, Jones has a Master's Degree in Public Administration from CalState University, Hayward. May and Jones purchased the real estate brokerage on July 1, 2011, from long-time Realty World Neighbors broker

“Owning our own brokerage means independence,” stated May. “Our office has an excellent team which always puts the client first and tailors services according to his/her needs. Thank you to past and present clients. We look forward to everyone’s continued interest and support.” “After many years of owning Realty World Neighbors in Hayward, I decided to concentrate on my passion for assisting clients to buy and sell real estate. To accomplish this, I have handed over the operations to Anna and Greg who have been agents with the company. I wish them every success and am pleased to be part of their team as Realty World Neighbors continues as the premier real estate brokerage in Hayward and in the East Bay,” stated Menger. For more information, contact Anna May at (510) 8862662, Greg Jones at (510) 886-4734 and Lyman Menger at (510) 881-1234.

Page 17


Page 18

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Information found in ‘Protective Services’ is provided to public “as available” by public service agencies police, fire, etc. Accuracy and authenticity of press releases are the responsi-

September 2, 2011

bility of the agency providing such information. Tri-City Voice does not make or imply any guarantee regarding the content of information received from authoritative sources.

Suspects arrested for possession of stolen property

Dixon Landing road. Officers stopped the car and determined that the driver, Darrell Sean Bewley, was a

parolee from Newcastle and the female passenger, Katherine Celeste Marrell, had an outstanding felony warrant from Placer

County. When officers searched the vehicle they discovered items stolen from a recent auto burglary in Dublin. Bewley was arrested for being a felon in possession of Mace and stolen property. Marrell was arrested for the warrant. Both people were booked into Santa Clara County Main Jail. These individuals probably would not have been caught were it not for the alertness of a resident. We encourage all residents to contact the Police Department if they see suspicious activity. If residents are in doubt whether activity is suspicious, we encourage a

SUBMITTED BY CMDR BOB DOUGLAS, NEWARK PD

the intersection of Thornton Avenue and Cherry Street and broadsided a vehicle, causing minor injuries to the driver of the other vehicle. The suspect then attempted to flee on foot with a group of junior high

school-aged girls and their mothers who had been hosting a car wash at the intersection chasing after him. Responding units located the suspect a few blocks away where he was arrested. At 8:32 p.m., NPD units

SUBMITTED BY LT STEVEN PETRAKOVITZ, MILPITAS PD On Monday, August 29, 2011, at approximately 8:05 a.m., a resident of Summerwind Drive noticed a suspicious vehicle driving through the neighborhood and phoned 9-11 to report the information to the Milpitas Police. The witness said she saw the vehicle in the area on another occasion and did not recognize the occupants as living in the area. The area was checked but the car was gone when officers arrived. Approximately 10 minutes later, officers located the car traveling on N. Milpitas Blvd near

Newark Police Log

Darrell Bewley

August 27 At 10:12 a.m., Sitteruiet Taylor of Newark ran the red light at

Katherine Marrell

phone call to the Milpitas Police Department so we may evaluate the circumstances. Anyone with any information regarding this investigation or other similar incidents is encouraged to call the Milpitas Police Department at (408) 586-2400. Information can be given anonymously by calling the Milpitas Police Department Crime Tip Hotline at (408) 586-2500, or via the Milpitas Police Department website at: http://w ww.ci .milpi tas.ca.gov/govemment/police/cri me tip.asp

were detailed to the area of Olive/Graham on what was first reported as a shooting; ultimately it was learned that a stabbing had occurred. Officers stopped a vehicle fleeing the continued on page 19


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 19

Fremont Police Log SUBMITTED BY DET. BILL VETERAN August 30 A female employee at the Posh Bagel called to report that a homeless male came into the store, asking for money. When she refused, he slapped her in the face. A 47-year-old male was later arrested for battery. FPD received a call that a robbery had just occurred at the Osgood Walmart. Initial reports indicated that a Walmart door greeter was battered by two suspects when the greeter tried to stop them from shoplifting. Officer Miller investigated and determined that actually a single suspect set off the door alarms when he walked out the door. When the greeter asked him to return to the store, the suspect bumped the greeter two times and verbally threatened him. A mother called to report that her 12 year-old daughter was raped by an 18 year-old male. She further reported that she was on the way with the daughter to confront the suspect. By the time officers arrived, there were 10 people involved in a major shouting

Newark Police Log, continued from page 18

scene and arrested James Shultz. As of this writing, the victim is recovering after surgery. August 28 At 10:05 p.m., a female victim was walking from the parking lot to her residence in the 6100 block of Thornton Avenue (Foxwood) when a suspect rode by on a bicycle and grabbed her inappropriately. The suspect was described as a Hispanic male adult, 21-22 years of age, skinny

match. When the dust cleared, Officer Snyder determined that the mother had read the daughter’s diary, and learned that the daughter had engaged in sexual activity with her 14 year-old boyfriend, but in order to protect him, lied about another uninvolved male. Officer Gourley responded to a report of an assault with a deadly weapon at the Southlake Mobile Home Park. The suspect became upset about his ex-wife getting a new male roommate. The suspect beat the new roommate with a baseball bat. The victim was uncooperative and did not want prosecution. Units checked the area the suspect with negative results. A Residential burglary occurred in the 2700 block of Olive Avenue. A residential burglary occurred in the 41000 block of Chadbourne Drive. August 31 Officers were dispatched to Kaiser Hospital for a reported felony domestic battery. After meeting with the female victim, officers visited the male suspect at home with a two year-old child. The male, with serious vis-

ible injuries, said the female was the aggressor and he just “covered up” to protect himself. Physical evidence and statements indicated that he was truthful; the female was arrested and transported by Officer S. Hunt to Santa Rita Jail. Recurrent family dysfunction at the 4100 block Bacinada between a 71 year-old dad and 49 year-old son who were drinking together all day before things got ugly. Predictably, they began to argue; dad pulled out a gun and punched his son in the head. Dad went out to the front porch and sat down with the gun in his hand. Family members called the police and fortunately dad was cooperative. The gun was found to be a cap gun. Son would not press charges for battery, but dad was sent to the hospital for psychological evaluation. Son was arrested for violation of a restraining order, since he is prohibited from being around dad. A citizen called to report two males inside a Honda in the Target lot acting suspiciously and looking under the steering wheel. Officer Romley spotted the subjects walking nearby. A

build, about 5’7”, short black colored hair, dark colored eyes, dark complexion and wearing a white colored tight fitted t-shirt. August 29 A local hospital called NPD at 10:07 p.m. to report that a 33-year-old female was admitted for severe burns. Kaiser asked that NPD check the area of the EZ-8 Motel for the subject’s vehicle, because they thought she may have been involved in an auto accident. It was later learned that the subject’s burns were actually caused by stripping copper wire. The subject was

transferred to a local burn unit. At the time of this writing the location of this incident had not been established. Investigation is on-going. Tuesday August 30, 2011 Officers responded to Newpark Mall at 6:10 p.m. on a report of an 11-year-old girl that had not been seen since departing from her family with a teenage male acquaintance whom they saw at the mall at approximately 4:30 p.m. Officers subsequently learned the girl and her 13-year-old friend where safe at a location in Fremont.

continued on page 21

www.whotels.com/siliconvalley


Page 20

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 2, 2011

PUBLIC NOTICES CIVIL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. FG11589544 Superior Court of California, County of Alameda Petition of: Jack Chuan S. Chin for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Chuan S. Chin filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Chuan S. Chin to Jack Chuan S. Chin Chuan Shen Chin to Jack Chuan S. Chin The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 11/10/2011, Time: 2:30 PM, Dept.: 608 The address of the court is 39439 Paseo Padre Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: What’s Happenings Tri City Voice Date: Aug. 9, 2011 RICHARD O. KELLER Judge of the Superior Court 8/12, 8/19, 8/26, 9/2/11 CNS-2155011#

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAMES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454742 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ocean Vista Education Group, 212 St Henry Dr., Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda. 36610 Cherry St., Newark, CA 94560. Jun Lu, 212 St Henry Dr., Fremont, CA 94539. Kam Hong Lui, 212 St Henry Dr., Fremont, CA 94539. This business is conducted by a Joint venture The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jun Lu Kam Hong Lui This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 4, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2166025# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455364

The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Key Estates & Capital, (2) Key Funding, 33031 Garfinkle St., Union City, CA 94587, County of Alameda. Gurpreet Randhawa, 33031 Garfinkle St., Union City, CA 94587. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gurpreet Randhawa This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 19, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2166023# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455113 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: D.P.’s Final Touch Maintenance, 4138 Bullard St., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Davin Payne, 4138 Bullard St., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on August 10, 2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Davin Payne This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 12, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2165377# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454924 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: PrinSilk Productions, 39326 Mariposa Way, Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda; P.O. Box 7628, Fremont, CA 94537 Steven Ree Worley, 39326 Mariposa Way, Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Steven Ree Worley This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 9, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the

facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2165363# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 455173 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: BJ’s Best In The West Gourmet Caramel Corn, 4940 Everglades Park Dr., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Ruth J. Tanner, 4940 Everglades Park Dr., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Ruth J. Tanner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 16, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 9/2, 9/9, 9/16, 9/23/11 CNS-2165289# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454780 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Great Massage Finder, 38750 Paseo Padre Parkway, #C7, Fremont, CA 94536, County of Alameda. JDR Financial Group, Inc., CA, 38750 Paseo Padre Parkway, #C7, Fremont, CA 94536. This business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jun Hao Qiu, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 4, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/26, 9/2, 9/9, 9/16/11 CNS-2163081# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454967 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Cajun Boiling Seafood & Sushi Bar, 4812 A Thornton Ave., Fremont, CA 94536 Rolando H. Aranzamendez, 31770 Alvarado Blvd. #134, Union City, CA 94587

This business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Rolando H. Aranzamendez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 9, 2011. NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/26, 9/2, 9/9, 9/16/11 CNS-2160962# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454670 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Formosa Trading Company, 44129 Glendora Drive, Fremont, CA 94539, County of Alameda Chien Sheng Wang, 44129 Glendora Drive, Fremont, CA 94539 This business is conducted by an Individual The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Chien Sheng Wang This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on August 3, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/19, 8/26, 9/2, 9/9/11 CNS-2159020# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454145 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Bengali Sweets and Cafe, 5029 Mowry Ave., Fremont, CA 94538, County of Alameda Bombay Express Inc., Calif., 5029 Mowry Ave., Fremont, CA 94538 This business is conducted by a Corporation The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Gurdeep S. Bidwal, (Secretary) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 19, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under

Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/19, 8/26, 9/2, 9/9/11 CNS-2158647# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454677 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: ESA COMPANY, 40824 TOWNSEND TERRACE, FREMONT, CA 94538, County of ALAMEDA HUIYING HU WONG, 40824 TOWNSEND TERRACE, FREMONT, CA 94538 This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ HUIYING HU WONG This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on AUGUST 3, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/19, 8/26, 9/2, 9/9/11 CNS-2158337# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454095 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Ivyboost Education, 4988 Paseo Padre Pkwy. #203-4, Fremont, CA 94555, County of Alameda Rim Vision LLC, California 34185 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94555 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 07/01/2011 I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Tony Tang, Managing Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 18, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/19, 8/26, 9/2, 9/9/11 CNS-2156941# FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No. 454245 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Sprog Group, 4026 Midvale Avene, Oakland, CA 94602, County of Alameda; 37 E. Lewelling Blvd., San Lorenzo, CA 94580 Jeremy Bordi, 4026 Midvale Avene, Oakland, CA 94602 Hazel Luciano, 4026 Midvale Avene, Oakland, CA 94602 This business is conducted by a general partnership The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A I declare that all information in this statement is


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Page 21

PUBLIC NOTICES true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) /s/ Jeremy Bordi, General Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Alameda County on July 21, 2011 NOTICE-In accordance with Section 17920(a), a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires five years from the date it was filed with the County Clerk, except as provided in Section 17920(b), where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). 8/12, 8/19, 8/26, 9/2/11 CNS-2155014#

GOVERNMENT Notice is hereby given that sealed competitive bids will be accepted in the office of the GSAPurchasing Department, County of Alameda, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Suite 907, Oakland, CA 94612 NETWORKING/NORTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFQ #900791 for Inmate Transport Trucks, Monday, September 19, 2011, 10:00 a.m. – General Services Agency, 1401 Lakeside Drive, Room 228, 2nd Floor, Oakland, CA NETWORKING/SOUTH COUNTY BIDDERS CONFERENCE RFQ #900791 for Inmate Transport Trucks, Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 2:00 p.m. – Castro Valley Library, 3600 Norbridge Avenue, Chabot Room, Castro Valley, CA Responses Due by 2:00 p.m. on October 26, 2011 County Contact: Evelyn Benzon (510) 2089622 or via email: evelyn.benzon@acgov.org Attendance at Networking Conference is Nonmandatory. Information regarding the above may be obtained at the Alameda County Current Contracting Opportunities Internet website at www.acgov.org. 9/2/11 CNS-2167050# ORDINANCE NO. 761-11 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UNION CITY AMENDING CHAPTER 9.34 “REGULATIONS FOR MASSAGE ESTABLISHMENTS AND MASSAGE

Fremont Police log, continued from page 9

few minutes into the contact, both subjects ran away. K9 Timo laser- locked on the taller suspect, chasing him a few hundred yards into the Smart ‘n Final lot. That suspect jumped on to the roof of a car to escape, but apparently Timo knows how to climb. Timo used the hood of the car as a launch pad, knocking the suspect to the ground. Meanwhile, the second suspect

TECHNICIANS” OF THE UNION CITY MUNICIPAL CODE, ALONG WITH PERMITTED USES IN CHAPTER 18.36 “COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS,” CHAPTER 18.38 “STATION MIXED USE COMMERCIAL (CSMU) DISTRICT,” AND CHAPTER 18.39 “UNION LANDING COMMERCIAL (CUL) DISTRICT” The above entitled ordinance was adopted by the Union City City Council on August 23, 2011. Due to the length of the ordinance, this abbreviated notice is published in lieu of the full text of the ordinance. A copy of the ordinance, as presented to the City Council on July 26 and August 23, 2011, is available on the City’s website at: h t t p : / / w w w. c i . u n i o n - c i t y. c a . u s / a g e n d a s / C i t y C o u n c i l / 2 0 11 c c a g e n d a s / ccpacket08232011.pdf

wireless telecommunications facility. The site is located 33709 Mission Boulevard (Assessor’s Parcel Number 486-0006-081-04) in the CC (Community Commercial) Zoning District.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JAY MCNEIL CASE NO. RP11591964 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Jay McNeil A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Kenneth P. Roberts in the Superior Court of California, County of Alameda. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Kenneth P. Roberts be appointed as personal

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY FOR ORDER DECLARING STATUS OF THE TRI-CITY VOICE NEWSPAPER AS ONE OF GENERAL CIRCULATION [Gov. C. Sec. 6000] Case No. HG11590723 Superior court of the State of California For the County of Alameda In the Matter of the Petition of William Marshak to Have the Standing of :What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE” as a Newspaper of General Circulation Ascertained and Established NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on September 16, 2011, at 9:00 a.m., or soon thereafter as the matter may be heard in Department #1 of this court, located at 1225 Fallon St., Oakland, CA 94612 petitioner intends to apply for an order declaring the newspaper known as “What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE” to be a newspaper of general circulation for the City Fremont. Dated: 8/16/11 /s/ Stephen F. Von Till Attorney for Petitioner PETITION TO ASCERTAIN AND ESTABLISH STANDING OF THE TRI-CITY VOICE

NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL CIRCULATION IN THE CITY OF FREMONT [Gov.C. Sec. 6000] Superior Court of the State of California For the County of Alameda In the Matter of the Petition of William Marshak to Have the Standing of “What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE” as a Newspaper of General Circulation Ascertained and Established Petitioner, William Marshak, declares: 1. Petitioner is the publisher and editor-in-chief of the newspaper “What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE,” referenced herein as “the newspaper.” 2. Petitioner seeks adjudication of the newspaper under Government Code Sections 6000, as “a newspaper of general circulation” in the City of Fremont. 3. The newspaper is a newspaper of general circulation published and distributed for the dissemination of local news and intelligence of a general character in the city of Fremont for which it seeks adjudication. 4. The newspaper is printed and published in the City of Fremont, Alameda County, State of California, and has a bona fide list of paying subscribers in said city. 5. The newspaper has been established, printed and published semi-weekly (twice per week) in the City of Fremont for at least one year preceding the date of this petition, said one year period of printing entirely in the City of Fremont commenced on August 10, 2010.. 6. The newspaper has only one principal office of publication and that is at 39737 Paseo Padre Parkway in the City of Fremont, County of Alameda, State of California. WHEREFORE, petitioner prays for judgment ascertaining and establishing “What’s Happening’s TRI-CITY VOICE” as s “newspaper of general circulation” under sections 6000 of the Government Code for theCity of Fremont. Dated: August 16, 2011 /s/ William Marshak, Petitioner /s/ Stephen F. Von Till Attorney for Petitioner Stephen F. Von Till, Bar No. 47217 VON TILL & ASSOCIATES 152 Anza Street, Suite 200 Fremont, California 94539 Phone: (510) 490-1100 Fax: (510) 490-1102 VERIFICATION I, William Marshak, am the petitioner in the aboveentitled proceeding. I have read the foregoing petition and know the contents thereof. The same is true of my own knowledge, except as to those matters which are therein alleged on information and belief, and as to those matters, I believe it to be true. I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing is true and correct. Executed in the City of Fremont, State of California on August 16, 2011. /s/ William Marshak 9/2, 9/6, 9/9, 9/13/11 CNS-2167657#

September 1 Officers responded to 33197 Lake Superior in regard to a robbery of a pizza delivery driver. Upon arrival at the vacant residence, the victim was confronted by a black male adult. The suspect produced a small caliber handgun and demanded the victim’s wallet and pizza. A probation search was conducted around the corner from the vacant residence on a subject matching the description. Although the probation search was successful, the victim was unable to identify any subjects associated with the probation house.

Loss is a wallet and the pizza. Officer Gonzalez was the investigating officer. Officer Gourley responded to the Sharks Ice rink on a report of a battery. The referee of a hockey game attempted to break up a fight on the ice and was punched in the face by a hockey player. The referee placed a 25 year-old male under citizen's arrest for battery. The player was cited and released at the scene. Officer Sanchez and Officer Farmer made contact at a residence on the 37000 block of Alexander Street in response to neighborhood complaints of

drugs, noise, etc. They contacted several people within the residence including a parolee who lied about his name. They ultimately discovered his true identity and initiated a search pursuant to his parole. They recovered a loaded SKS assault rifle with an extended magazine from the trunk of his vehicle. He was arrested for a variety of felony charges including possession of an assault weapon, felon in possession of a firearm, and a parole violation. They also arrested two other people within the residence for possession of ecstasy and felon in possession of ammunition.

The Planning Commission reviewed this item at their August 18, 2011 meeting and recommended approval to the City Council on a 5-0 vote. Notice is also given that this project is exempt under Section 15301, Class 1, Existing Facilities, of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). For further information on the above application, contact Avalon Schultz, Associate Planner, at (510) 675-5321. CITY COUNCIL MEETING Tuesday, September 13, 2011

A copy of the ordinance is also available at the Office of the City Clerk, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City, California, during normal business hours.

Said hearing will be held at 7:00 p.m. In the Council Chambers of City Hall, 34009 Alvarado-Niles Road, Union City.

PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the City Council of the City of Union City at a regular meeting held on August 23, 2011, by the following vote:

Written comments regarding these projects should be received by the Planning Division prior to Tuesday, September 13, 2011.

AYES: Councilmembers Duncan, Ellis, and Gacoscos, Vice Mayor Navarro, Mayor Green NOES: None ABSENT: None ABSTAIN: None

City Hall is accessible by Union City Transit lines 1A, 1B, 3, 4 and AC Transit line 97. BART riders can transfer to these bus routes at the UC BART station. For information, please contact: Union City Transit at (510) 471-1411, AC Transit at (510) 891-4777, or BART at (510) 465-2278.

APPROVED: /s/ Mark Green MARK GREEN, Mayor

JOAN MALLOY Economic & Director 9/2/11

Community

ATTEST: /s/ Renee Elliott RENEE ELLIOTT, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: /s/ Benjamin T. Reyes II BENJAMIN T. REYES II, City Attorney 9/2/11 CNS-2166569# CITY OF UNION CITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the City of Union City for the purpose of considering the following project application: Site Development Review (SD-11-002) The applicant, AT&T Mobility, is seeking Site Development Review (SD-11-002) approval tomodify an existing building, including raising an existing parapet wall, to conceal an expanded

was cornered by officers on the 2nd floor of Murco Plaza. Having seen a similar move on TV, the suspect jumped over the edge, landing on the hood of a parked car. It didn’t work like it does in Hollywood. Both suspects were arrested for resisting arrest, attempted auto theft and vandalism. A male brandished a 4-way tire iron at a family in the Warm Springs Safeway parking lot then got into his older red Toyota Camry and fled out of the lot. The suspect and vehicle were not located.

representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A HEARING on the petition will be held on 9/28/11 at 9:30AM in Dept. 201 located at 2120 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Berkeley, CA 94704. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Elise M. Balgley (#114633), 3900 NewPark Mall Road, Third Floor, Newark, CA 94560, Telephone: (510) 791-1883 9/2, 9/6, 9/13/11 CNS-2165393#

LEGAL NOTICES

Development

CNS-2166157#

PROBATE


Page 22

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Solar company that got federal loan shuts down BY KEVIN FREKING AND JASON DEAREN ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON (AP), Aug 31 - A California solar-panel manufacturer once touted by President Barack Obama as a beneficiary of his administration's economic policies - as well as a half-billion-dollar federal loan - is laying off 1,100 workers and filing for bankruptcy. Solyndra LLC of Fremont, Calif., had become the poster child for government investment in green technology. The president visited the company in May 2010 and noted that Solyndra expected to hire 1,000 workers to manufacture solar panels. Other state and federal officials such as former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Energy Secretary Steven Chu also visited the company's facilities. But hard times have hit the nation's solar industry. Solyndra is the third solar company to seek bankruptcy protection this month. Officials said Wednesday that the global economy as well as unfavorable conditions in the solar industry combined to force the company to suspend its manufacturing operations.

The price for solar panels has tanked largely because of heavy competition from Chinese companies, dropping by about 42 percent this year. Republicans have been looking into the Solyndra loan for months. The House Energy and Commerce Committee subpoenaed documents relating to the loan from the White House Office of Management and Budget. GOP Reps. Fred Upton of Michigan and Cliff Stearns of Florida issued a joint statement on Wednesday saying it was clear that Solyndra was a dubious investment. “We smelled a rat from the onset,” the two lawmakers said. It was clear shortly after the company's announcement that its bankruptcy would serve as further ammunition to criticize an economic stimulus bill that provided seed money for solar startups. Upton and Stearns said they would continue to seek documents that would provide more details about the Solyndra loan. “Unfortunately, Solyndra is just the latest casualty of the Obama administration's failed continued on page 22

September 2, 2011

Solyndra bankruptcy a blow to Bay Area’s economy SUBMITTED BY ANDREW LAMAR Legislature must do more to nurture business; giving California solar companies a bid preference on state contracts would be a good start. Senate Majority Leader Ellen M. Corbett (D-San Leandro) issued the following statement on August 31, 2011, in response to the announcement by Fremont-based, solar panel manufacturer Solyndra that it is filing for bankruptcy and laying off 1,100 employees: “This is devastating news. It’s time for all state lawmakers to understand we must act urgently to protect jobs and help nurture a return of California’s economy to good health. When we don’t, our families and communities suffer. The loss of 1,100 jobs in one fell swoop in my district is a terrible blow that will have a domino effect throughout the Bay Area. “Unfortunately, it is too late to help Solyndra but many other

struggling companies could benefit from legislation I have authored that would give California-based solar companies a bid preference on state contracts. “If California is going to install solar panels on state property, shouldn’t we try to use panels made in California? Isn’t it common sense to use taxpayer dollars to support California jobs? This is a simple measure that can help protect California jobs.” Senate Bill 175, which provides a five-percent bid preference to companies that certify they are using California assembled or manufactured solar panels, was approved by the Senate but failed to pass the Assembly Business and Professions Committee in July 2011. Corbett has subsequently revived the measure by amending Senate Bill 134. That bill is in the Assembly awaiting a hearing. For more information, visit www.sen.ca.gov/corbett


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Solar company that got federal loan shuts down, continued from page 22

stimulus, emblematic of an economic policy that has not worked and will not work. We hope this informs the president ahead of his address to Congress next week,'' the GOP lawmakers said. When Obama, who is seeking to address Congress to unveil a new jobs plan, toured the company's facilities, he said the investment was important because more clean energy would benefit the environment, the economy and national security. ``The future is here,'' Obama said during his visit. ``We're poised to transform the ways we power our homes and our cars and our businesses. ... And we are poised to gener-

ate countless new jobs, good-paying, middle-class jobs, right here in the United States of America.'' In a blog posting, Energy Department spokesman Dan Leistikow said Solyndra was a once promising company that had increased sales revenue by 2,000 percent in the past three years. The $535 million loan guarantee was sought by both the Bush and Obama administrations, he said, and private investors put more than $1 billion into Solyndra. ``We have always recognized that not every one of the innovative companies supported by our loans and loan guarantees would succeed, but we can't stop investing in gamechanging technologies that are key to

After Apple's fall, is it time to buy or sell? BY BERNARD CONDON AP BUSINESS WRITER NEW YORK (AP), Aug 26 - Should you buy or sell Apple? Investors largely shrugged off news this week that Steve Jobs is stepping down as CEO, barely selling its shares. But that hasn't satisfied Wall Street analysts who follow the tech giant. They say the shares are a bargain and likely to rise by a third over the next year. Their recommendation: Buy Apple by the bucketful. So who is right? The pros or the investors? The short answer may be the pros, though the stock is probably not the steal that many of them assume. One popular way to value a company's stock is to look at how high it is trading relative to its earnings per share. It's a rough measure, but it does show that Apple is not much more expensive than the average company. At Thursday's closing price of $374 per share, Apple is trading at 12 times its expected earnings over the next 12 months compared with 11 times for the Standard & Poor's 500 index. Translation: For every dollar you spend on Apple, you should expect roughly the same earnings as you would get on the average company. The difference, of course, is that Apple has a tendency to beat expectations and send its stock soaring. It's up 16 percent since Jan. 1, and it briefly topped Exxon Mobil this month as the most valued U.S. company. One reason the stock trades at a discount to its stellar reputation is a bit counterintuitive: The company has been so successful at producing hot products, starting with the iPod in 2001, then the iPhone in 2007 and last year's big hit, the iPad. The problem is, no continued on page 26

America's leadership in the global economy,'' Leistikow said. Brian Harrison, Solynda's president and CEO, said that raising capital became impossible. ``This was an unexpected outcome and is most unfortunate,'' Harrison said in a statement. Another solar company, Spectrawatt Inc. of Hopewell Junction, N.Y., filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Aug. 19. Its CEO said in the filing that it could not compete with solar manufacturers in China, which receive ``considerable government and financial support.'' Spectrawatt's filing came four days after Evergreen Solar Inc. of Marlboro, Mass., filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Bill lets illegal students apply for public aid BY JULIET WILLIAMS ASSOCIATED PRESS SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP), Aug 31 - The state Legislature has approved the second half of the so-called California Dream Act, which would allow students who are illegal immigrants to apply for state-funded scholarships and financial aid. The Senate approved AB131 on a 2211 vote Wednesday, sending it Gov. Jerry Brown. The legislative package by Democratic state Assemblyman Gil Cedillo of Los Angeles differs from the federal Dream Act, a proposal that would create a path to citizenship for those who are bought to the country illegally as children. Earlier this year, Brown signed a bill approving private scholarships and loans for illegal immigrant students. AB131 adds state-funded financial aid. Illegal immigrant students would have to meet the same requirements as others but only would qualify for financial aid that remains after legal residents apply.

Page 23


Page 24

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SUBMITTED BY JUNE HEATON Fremont’s premier soccer team, MVU-93-GIRLSBLACK, wining all of their matches in regulation time, brought home the North Huntington Beach (NHB) Cup Championship trophy. The tournament was held at the UC Irvine Athletic Fields in Southern California, August 27 – 28. After winning their bracket and taking second place overall in the Stanford Summer Classic just the weekend before, MVU was ready to fight for a championship trophy again. Their first duel was with home team, NHB Black. NHB took an early 1 – 0 lead. But steadfast pressure from MVU’s Midfielders, Katie Lovejoy, Melissa Urena, Leslie Correa and Aliss Vasquez, paid off when Vasquez launched a shot over NHB defense and a shocked goalie to tie the game. With a beautiful through ball from Forward, Megan Racine, Forward, Melissa Heaton scored the last goal of the game for a 2 – 1 win. On the field next with MVU was MATRIX SC. MVU stood firm as they were met with the hard hitting MATRIX. Defenders, Kelly Castongia, Shayla Funk, and Ellie Wong fought off their approaching opponent and forced numerous goal kicks from MVU

Goalie, Jessica Espinosa. In the end, it was a pass from Heaton to Forward, Megan Ravenscroft that finalized the game with a score of 1 – 0.

Midfielders Sarah Hardin, Nadia Mounzih, and Megan Massone pressed the line and passed off the ball to Heaton and Ravenscroft who would net one goal

In the Championship, MVU played RIVERSIDE MGFM STARZ. With emotions flying as high as a goalie’s punt, the encounter between the oppos-

September 2, 2011

Ravenscroft managed to break free and score. STARZ tried hard to tie the game but excellent defense and a ball hugging save by MVU’s Espinosa kept

MVU-93-GIRLS-BLACK - Back Row (LtoR) Assistant Coaches Tony Espinosa and Kyle Brown. Middle Row (LtoR): Sarah Hardin, Shayla Funk, Coach Joe Peixoto, Megan Ravenscroft, Aliss Vasquez, Megan Massone, Jessica Espinosa. Front Row: Lesly Correa, Pricilla Rodriguez, Megan Racine, Kelly Castongia, Mia Moya, Shaina Charles, Melissa Urena, Melissa Heaton, Katie Lovejoy, Nadia Mounzih. Not pictured: Ellie Wong

Back out on UC Irvine’s athletic fields for game three, Fremont’s MVU faced FC LONG BEACH. Continuing their push for the trophy, MVU

Scoring notice SUBMITTED BY JEREMY PEÑAFLOR

each. Defenders, Shaina Charles, Mia Moya and Pricialla Rodriguez, diverted countless shots away from their goal box for another shutout win.

ing forces kept both sidelines in anxious suspense. Both teams had several attempts on goal with no avail. Then, late in the second half, a double teamed

the score 1 – 0, and MVU undefeated to become the tournament champions.

Head Women's Volleyball Coach, Ohlone College Ohlone College Renegades defeated Contra Costa College, 3-0 (25-11, 25-9, 25-18) on August 31 at Ohlone College.


September 2, 2011

EARTHTALK® Dear EarthTalk: I remember that medical waste, washing up in New Jersey, I believe, was a big issue in the late 1980s. Is it still today? -- WALTER MALISZEWSKI, CAMDEN, NJ

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

E - THE ENVIRONMENTAL MAGAZINE grave so that it didn’t end up fouling beaches or any other environments. While the program was not renewed when it expired in 1991, it served as a model for how states and municipalities could better track potentially dangerous medical

M

edical waste washing up on New Jersey beaches was a big problem in the late 1980s, closing beaches along a 50-mile stretch of the New Jersey shore. Officials scrambled for months to figure out where the waste was coming from, and eventually zeroed in on New York City’s Fresh Kills Landfill on Staten Island. Sub-optimal systems there were not successfully containing medical waste and other garbage on site, and New Jersey beaches—and vacationers and business owners—were paying the price. Although no one was injured or exposed to disease by the washed up waste, the public was especially alarmed given the HIV/AIDS crisis gripping the nation at that time. New York City was required to pay $1 million for past pollution damages and had to shoulder the cost of clean-up at Jersey Shore beaches as well. The resulting loss of tourism cost business owners throughout the affected region as much as 40 percent of their revenue, with total losses estimated at well over $1 billion. Some New Jersey business owners remain upset that New York wasn’t forced to pay them reparations for lost revenue as well. In the wake of the scare, Congress enacted the Medical Waste Tracking Act in 1988, requiring the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to create a program to better track medical waste from cradle-to-

Medical waste washing up on New Jersey beaches was a big problem in the late 1980s. Bacterial contamination from sewage treatment outflows, contaminated storm water and other sources caused more than 24,000 beach closures or advisories across the U.S. last year. Pictured: a washed-up syringe.

waste while also helping medical facilities institute systems and processes for making sure they knew where their waste was going and that it would be disposed of responsibly. Meanwhile, New York and New Jersey have coordinated on setting up and maintaining their own systems to stem the so-called “syringe tides.” The cornerstone is a multi-agency program designed to intercept debris within New Jersey Harbor before it can get to touristcrowded Jersey Shore beaches. Thanks to the plan—which relies on surveillance by environmental groups as well as routine and special clean-up sweeps by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the implementation

of a communications network to facilitate the reporting of incidents and quick responses— beach closures declined from more than 70 miles in 1988 to less than four miles in 1989, with closures remaining at similarly low levels ever since. Of course, medical waste is hardly the only problem facing America's beaches and coastal waters. According to the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), bacterial contamination from sewage treatment outflows, contaminated storm water and other sources caused more than 24,000 beach closures or advisories across the country in 2010 alone. NRDC reports on water quality at U.S. beaches every year in its series of “Testing the Waters” reports. Pressure from the group has helped spur the EPA to agree to overhaul Clean Water Act regulations pertaining to urban and suburban storm water runoff and update decades-old beach water quality standards by 2012. These improvements should help to keep beaches from the Jersey Shore to the Great Lakes to California, and points in between, clear of debris and safe for swimmers and sunbathers of every stripe. CONTACTS: NRDC Testing the Waters, www.nrdc.org/water/oceans/ttw; Medical Waste Tracking Act of 1988, www.epa.gov/osw/nonhaz/industrial/m edical/tracking.htm.

EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E - The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.

Page 25


Page 26

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

September 2, 2011

After Apple's fall, is it time to buy or sell? continued from page 23

one knows if the company can keep this up, especially now that its visionary CEO is resigning (though he will stay as chairman). If Apple doesn't produce more big sellers, estimates of future earnings may prove too high. But Shaw Wu, an analyst at Sterne, Agee & Leach, says investors are confusing the image of Apple as an innovative, rebel company with the less colorful, but reliable profit maker that it is. ``It's not just a company producing hit products,'' Wu says. ``The earnings have become more predictable.'' Despite the popularity of its iPhone, Wu estimates that it still only accounts for 5 percent of cellphones in the world. He believes the iPhone's market share could triple to 15 percent, especially given the opportunity in China, where the company has started selling. He notes that Nokia at its peak had 40 percent of the cellphone market. Similarly, Wu is bullish on Apple's Macs and iPads. He says they now account for more than 10 percent of the world's computers. He expects that to double. He says that Hewlett-Packard, at its peak, captured 25 percent of the PC market. Both Nokia and HP are now hurting in part because of Apple's successes with the iPhone and the iPad. ``China is the next big frontier,'' says Wu, who's been recommending the stock since it was $40. ``It's where the next $100 (jump) could come in the stock.'' There are plenty of reasons for doubt, however. Even if Jobs had stayed on as CEO, the company faced numerous challenges. Rival phone makers such as Motorola, Samsung and LG Corp. are making inroads using Google's Android operating system for smartphones, which are just about as easy to use as Apple's iPhone. And the success of the iPhone and rival smartphones, which can play music and video, means fewer people need iPods from Apple. Then there's the challenge of mathematics. As a company gets bigger, it's harder to get the same percentage increase in earnings that investors have come to expect. Apple earnings have been growing an average of 60 percent annually over the past five years. But can investors really expect that to continue with annual earnings estimated to hit $26 billion the fiscal year that ends in September? Even Apple fans such as Timothy Ghriskey, co-founder of Solaris Asset Management, which owns Apple stock, notes that selling iPads and iPhones to the Chinese and coming out with new versions of old products will only go so far. ``There is predictability to the earnings two or three years out. But beyond that? Who knows what the next handheld communications device is going to be?'' he says. ``Apple has to keep coming up with the (next) new thing.'' To bulls, though, the benefit of buying stock now is that investors have already priced a bit of this danger into the stock. ``There's always the risk they'll lose their mojo, their magic,'' says Wu. ``But that's why it trades at 12 times.''

BY PATRICIA RYAN Can you believe summer has passed already? Over 8,000 prizes were awarded in Alameda County Library’s 2010 Summer Reading Game for children, One World, Many Stories. And many children and families enjoyed fantastic programs and entertainers, in addition to all that reading. KidPower volunteers put in almost 4,500 hours helping out with the Summer Reading Game and other programs during the summer! But that’s not all! Alameda County teens earned almost 1,200 prizes by logging their reading in the Teen Summer Reading Program, You Are Here. Adult Librarians had their work cut out for them refilling the display shelves for the History: Fact & Fiction reading program. Summer programs and prizes were sponsored by Alameda County Library, Alameda County Library Foundation, Chabot Space and Science Center, Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center, Lawrence Hall of Science, MOCHA – Museum of Children’s Art, San Francisco Giants/Oracle, Target and U.S. Bancorp Foundation. September will see the return of regular programming at the Union City Library, including Toddler Time, Preschool Story Time, and the Homework Center. Beginning Monday, September 12, the Union City Homework Center will be open 3:30-5:30 Monday through Thursday. No registration is required, and the program is free. Supervised by adult coordinators, Teen volunteers help elementary students understand and complete assignments. One-on-one helps is available in all subjects. Paper, pencils, calculators, some textbooks are available for student use, and help is available in both English and Spanish. Parents and caregivers are requested to stay in the Library building while students in grades K-5 are in the Homework Center. All teens are invited to a FREE workshop on how to write a winning college admission essay. SAT Essay Writing Workshops are

scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 3 – 4 p.m. at the Union City Library (contact Mira Geroy (510) 745-1464 Ext. 11 or email mgeroy@aclibrary.org) and Saturday, September 24, 2-3:30 p.m. at the Newark Library (contact Kathleen Hannon (510) 795-2627 x 18 or email khannon@aclibrary.org for more information). Lots of volunteer training opportunities are coming up at the Newark Library including shelving orientation on Saturday, September 3 at 3:30 p.m. and teen tutor orientation for Homework Express on Tuesday, September 6 from 6:30–8:30 p.m. and Wednesday from 3:30–5 p.m. Homework Express @ the Newark Library opens September 13, and runs Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays 3:30-5:30 p.m. In addition to Toddler and preschool story programs, the Newark Library has a lot scheduled for all ages. Centerville is presenting preschool storytime and Mandarin/English bilingual storytime, as well as Read With Me, a one-on-one reading assistance program for children in grades 1-6, provided bytrained teen volunteers. In addition to preschool storytime, Irvington has scheduled a story writing workshop Wednesday, September 7, 2:304:30 p.m. Along with preschool storytime, Niles branch invites 3rd and 4th graders to participate in Bookworms Club, a book discussion group that meets once a month. The Fremont Main Library has programs for babies through seniors, with something for everybody and they are all free. Check the Alameda County website, http://www.aclibrary.org/, for information about all of our programs, and be sure to check the catalog to find books, DVDs, books and music on CD, as well as access to ebooks and databases. Teachers, don’t forget to contact your local branch to arrange for visits to the Library, or for a Librarian or Booklegger to visit your classroom! Patricia Ryan is a Children’s Services Librarian at Union City Library.


September 2, 2011

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Mall hosts blood drive

Immigration workshop

SUBMITTED BY SHERYL CRAIG In a joint effort with the American Red Cross, NewPark Mall is inviting the community to schedule an appointment and donate blood. To register, please log on to www.redcrossblood.org, and enter the Sponsor Code: NEWPARK or call 1-800-RED CROSS (800-733-2767). Participants must show identification at donation site. All presenting donors will receive a coupon from Mimi's Café for a free starter or small plate with purchase of a lunch or dinner entrée (non-transferable and not redeemable for cash). Blood Drive Saturday, September 3 12Noon - 5:00 pm NewPark Mall, Newark (upper level between JCPenney and Burlington Coat Factory) (866) 236-3276

SUBMITTED BY JANET CRONBACH "A falling climber's rope snaps thousands of feet above the ground. Two backcountry skiers find themselves buried by an avalanche; Wild winds hurl a paraglider out of control. A daring kayak venture helps and aging legend discover greater health and happiness. These stories and more come to life in this collection of first-person narratives." Join local author Matt Johanson and artist

SUBMITTED BY EVERCARE FOUNDATION SUBMITTED BY KAREN PACHECO FREMONT MAIN LIBRARY This free, interactive program of storytelling and activities is presented by Fatima Colanders of the National Park Service and is intended for everyone. It will focus on the role of children in the Anza expedition, which established San Francisco and doubled the Spanish population of Alta California in 1776. Children of the Anza Expedition Tuesday Sept. 6 4 p.m. – 5 p.m. Fremont Main Library 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont (510) 745-1421

Christopher Hampson as they relay amazing tales of outdoor adventure from their new book Yosemite Epics: Tales of Adventure from America’s Greatest Playground. Books will be available at the discounted price of $15.00. Matt Johanson writes about sports, the outdoors, education and politics for California newspapers and magazines. Yosemite Epics is his third book. Matt also teaches social studies and advises an awardwinning student newspaper at Castro Valley High School. His writing can be found at www.mattjohanson.com Christopher Hampson is an artist studying illustration and animation at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. In his free time, he en-

EverCare Foundation, a California non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation, invites all of those interested to a FREE Immigration Workshop on September 3, Saturday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at 15963 Marcella St., San Leandro. Filipino Advocates for Justice, one of six agencies in the East Bay certified by the Board of Immigration Appeals, will conduct the workshop that will focus on two main topics: Family Petitioning and Naturalization. Learn about the steps in petitioning family members and the requirements for US citizenship application. Everyone is welcome. Coffee and snacks will be served. For more information, call Milet at (415) 810-3833.

joys mountain biking, snowboarding and backpacking through Yosemite. Christopher especially enjoys his new role as a father. The Library is wheelchair accessible. No reservation is required. For an ASL interpreter, call the library at least seven working days before the event. For more information, contact the Fremont Main Library at 510745-1401 or Janet Cronbach at 510-745-1429. Yosemite Epics Saturday, September 3 11 a.m. Fremont Main Library, Fukaya Room 2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont jcronbach@aclibrary.org (510) 745-1429 TTY: (888) 663-0660

Page 27


Page 28

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

FREE Places of Worship Listing - Call 510-494-1999

ASSEMBLY OF GOD Christian Life Center 33527 Western Ave., Union City 510-489-7045 Convergence House of Prayer 40645 Fremont Blvd., Ste 16, Fremont 510-656-2335 www.ichop.org Harbor Light Church 4760 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-744-2233 www.harborlight.com Light of the World Christian Center Assembly of God 43297 Osgood Rd., Fremont 510-651-5922 Templo De La Cruz All services in English 24362 Thomas Ave., Hayward 510-886-1644 www.tdlc.org

BAHA’I FAITH Alameda County West Center 21265 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-377-3392

BAPTIST Alder Avenue Baptist Church 4111 Alder Ave., Fremont 510-797-3305 www.alderavebc.com Bay Area Baptist Church 38517 Birch St., Newark 510-797-8882 www.bayareabaptist.org Berean Baptist Church 2929 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-792-3928 Calvary Baptist Church 28924 Ruus Rd., Hayward 510-887-2187 Chinese Independent Baptist Church 37365 Centralmont Pl., Fremont 510-796-0114 www.cibcfremont.org

Christ Centered Missionary Baptist Church In the Broadmoor Community Church Bldg., 301 Dowling St., San Leandro Community Church of Hayward 26555 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-8593 Fairway Park Baptist Church 425 Gresel St., Hayward 510-471-0200 www.FPBC.org First Baptist Church of Newark 6320 Dairy Ave., Newark 510-793-4810 Heritage Baptist Church 2960 Merced St., San Leandro 510-357-7023 www.hbc.org Landmary Missionary Baptist Church 573 Bartlett Ave., Hayward 510-918-0663 www.LMBCHAYWARD.org Memorial Baptist Church 4467 Stevenson Blvd, Fremont 510/657-5522 www.bmaca.org/fremont2.html Mission Peak Baptist Church 41354 Roberts Ave., Fremont 510-656-5311 www.missionpeakbaptist.org New Hope Baptist Church 925 F St., Union City 510-487-7472 Palma Ceia Baptist Church 28605 Ruus Road, Hayward 510-786-2866 www.palmaceiachurch.org Park Victoria Baptist Church 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-263-9000 www.parkvictoria.com

September 2, 2011

PLACES OF WORSHIP Pathway Community Church 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-797-7910 www.pathwaycommunity.info

St. Elizabeth Catholic Church 750 Sequoia Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8100

Resurrection Baptist Church 1221 Pacific Ave., San Leandro 510.363.3085 www.the-resurrectionbc.org

St. James the Apostle 34700 Fremont Blvd. (w. of Decoto Rd), Fremont 510-792-1962 www.sjapostle.net

Shiloh Baptist Church 22582 South Garden Ave., Hayward 510-783-4066 shilohbc @sbcglobal.net

St. John the Baptist Catholic Parish 279 S. Main St., Milpitas 408-262-2546 www.sjbparish.org

Warm Springs Church 111 E. Warren Ave., Fremont 510-657-4082 www.warmspringschurch.org

BUDDHIST Buddhanusorn Thai Temple 36054 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2294 Purple Lotus Temple 30139 Industrial Pkwy SW, Unit J&K, Hayward 510-489-8868 www.plbs.org/www.purplelotus.org So. Alameda County Buddhist Church 32975 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 415-471-2581 www.sacbc.org

CATHOLIC Corpus Christi Church 37891 Second St., Fremont 510-790-3207 www.corpuschristifremont.org Holy Spirit Catholic Church 37588 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-1660 www.holyspiritfremont.org Old Mission San Jose Church 43266 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-1797 Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish 41933 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-657-4043 www.guadalupe-parish.org

CHINESE CHRISTIAN Home of Christ Church 35479 Dumbarton Ct., Newark 510-742-6848 www.hoc6.org Silicon Valley Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-668-1989 www.svacnewark.org

CHRISTIAN Calvary Bible Church of Milpitas 1757 Houret Ct, Milpitas 408-262-4900 www.calvarybiblechurch.us Calvary Chapel Hayward 21406 Foothill Blvd., Hayward 510-396-0318 www.calvaryhayward.com Cedar Blvd. Neighborhood Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-791-8555 www.cbnc.net Christ Community Church of Milpitas 1000 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-262-8000 www.cccmilpitas.org Calvary Chapel San Leandro Marina Community Center 15301 Wicks Blvd San Leandro 510-421-3207 www.calvarysanleandro.com

Christian Worship Center 241 So. Main St., Milpitas 408-263-0406 http://www.cwcsj.org Church of Christ 977 Grant Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-4693 www.church-of-christ.org/slzca Church of Christ of Fremont 4300 Hanson Ave., Fremont 510--797-3695 www.fremontchurchofchrist.org Church of Christ – Hayward 22307 Montgomery St., Hayward 510-582-9830 www.haywardchurchofchrist.org


September 2, 2011 Church of Christ South Hayward 320 Industrial Pkwy.,Hayward 510-581-3351 www.churchofchristhayward.com Discovery Fremont 38891 Mission Blvd. (@ Walnut), Fremont 510-797-7689 East Bay Christian Fellowship 1111 H Street, Union City 510-487-0605 www.ebcf.net Emmanuel Mission Church 5885 Smith Ave., Newark (510) 793-6332 www.cmalliance.org Family Bible Fellowship 37620 Filbert St., Newark 510-505-1735 www.fbfministries.org First Church of Christ Scientist 1351 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-656-8161 Fremont Asian Christian Church Meets Centerville Community Center 3355 Country Drive, Fremont 510-795-2828 www.fremontasianchristianchurch.org Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont 510-657-0123 www.gofcc.org Fremont Journey of Faith Church 39009 Cindy St. Fremont 510.793.2100 www.jof-fremont.com Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry MultiCultural Worship @10 AM 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-552-4476 gssam@sbcglobal.net. Grace Church Fremont 36060 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-797-7729

Page 29

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE Great Exchange Covenant Church Fremont (GRX) Sunday Services at Cabello Elementary School 4500 Cabello St., Union City www.grxfremont.org

Resonate Church Forest Park Elementary School 34400 Maybird Circle, Fremont 510-713-8703 www.resonatemovement.org

Hayward First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-732-0777

San Lorenzo Japanese Christian Church 615 Lewelling Blvd., San Leandro 510-483-9455 www.slzjcc.org

Hope Lighthouse Foursquare church 36883 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-796-0730 InRoads Christian Church 3111 Washington Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0251 www.inroadschurch.com Jesus Christ For All Nations 4400 Rosewood Dr., Pleasanton 510.659.1848 www.jcfans.org Jyoti Fellowship church Located in First Church of the Nazarene 26221 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-427-0491 Liberty Church International Veteran’s Bldg., 37154 Second St. (Fremont Niles) 510-324-1400 www.libertyvision.org Mount Olive Ministries 1989 E. Calaveras Blvd., Milpitas 408-262-0506 www.mt-olive.org New Covenant Evangelistic Christian Center 3801 Smith St., Union City 510-487-0886 New Life Church 4130 Technology Pl., Fremont 510-657-9191 Newlifechurchofsf.org Our Father’s House 42776 Albrae St., Fremont 510-796-1117 www.ourfathershousefremont.org

Solid Rock Church of God In Christ 5970 Thornton Ave., Newark 510-791-7625 www.solidrockcogic.org

Mision Hispana Esperanza Viva 4673 Thornton Ave. Suite P Fremont 510-754-5618 www.esperanzaviva.org

CHRISTIAN FILIPINO Christian Fellowship International Church (Meets in the Park Victoria Baptist Church bldg.) 875 S. Park Victoria Dr., Milpitas 408-386-2215 http://cficmilpitas.multiply.com/

Tree of Life. Lord's Harvest Christian Church 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-6133 www.living-tree.org

Christ's Chosen Vessel Ministries International (Meets at Spring Valley Bible Church Building) 220 S. Main St. Milpitas 650-834-3776

Upper Room Church 500 Harris Rd., Hayward 510-276-1894

Light By The Mountain Church 606 H St., Union City 510-378-0159

WORD OF LIFE - A Foursquare Church 1675 Graham Ave., Newark 510-754-9438

CHRISTIAN (ESPANOL) Arbol de Vida 4140 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-790-2140 Iglesia Apostolica de Union City 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd, Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org Iglesia Biblica El Faro 280 Mowry Ave., Fremont Estudio Bíblico 510-585-1701 lbfchurch.org Ministerios Cosecha "Fuente de Vida" 4360 Central Ave., Fremont (510) 573-1800 mcofremont@yahoo.com

Word International Ministries 35501 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-366-5995 www.wordinternational.com

CHRISTIAN INDONESIAN Graceful Christian Community Church At Immanuel Presbyterian Church - 5 PM 4333 Hansen Ave, Fremont 510-792-1831 www.gracefulcommunity.org Adonai Indonesian Christian Fellowship 2603 Quail Ct, Union City 510-475-5377

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont 510-793-5439

CHRISTIAN REFORMED Christ’s Community Church 25927 Kay Ave., Hayward 510-782-6010 ccchayward@sbcglobal.net

EPISCOPAL St. James Episcopal Church 37051 Cabrillo Terr., Fremont 510-797-1492 www.saintj.com

EVANGELICAL COVENANT South Bay Community Church 47385 Warm Springs Blvd, Fremont 510-490-9500 www.sobcc.org

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH OF AMERICA Newark Community Church 37590 Sycamore St., Newark 510-796-7729 www.newarkcommunitychurch.org Asian Indian Church Ministries Meet at Newark Community Church 510-795-7770 www.asianindianchurchministries.org Bridges Community Church 505 Driscoll Road, Fremont 510-651-2030 www.bridgescc.org

HINDU TEMPLE Paramahamsa Nithyananda Meditation - Sundays at 3:30 p.m. 451 Los Coches St., Milpitas 510-813 6474 www.LifeBliss.org Shreemaya Krishnadham 25 Corning Ave., Milpitas 408-586-0006 www.bayvp.org


Page 30

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

Vedic Dharma Samaj Hindu Temple and Cultural Center 3676 Delaware Dr., Fremont 510-659-0655 www.fremonttemple.org

JEWISH

LUTHERAN Calvary Lutheran Church & School 17200 Via Magdalena, San Lorenzo 510-278-2555 www.calvarysanlorenzo.com

Congregation Shir Ami 4529 Malabar Ave., Castro Valley 510-537-1787 www.congshirami.org

Christ the King Lutheran Church 1301 Mowry Ave., Fremont 510-797-3724 www.Ctkfremont.org

Temple Beth Torah 42000 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-656-7141 www.bethtorah-fremont.org

Epiphany Lutheran Church ELCA 16248 Carolyn St., San Leandro 510-278-5133 www.eastbayepiphany.org

KOREAN NC HAN MA EUM KOREAN CHURCH 4500 Thornton Ave., Fremont 510-661-9079 www.j-church.org

LDS (MORMON) Bayside Ward 36400 Haley St., Newark 510-796-0914 Centerville Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-797-1200 Central Park Ward 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont 510-795-6658 Fremont (Deaf) Branch 820 Walnut Ave., Fremont Glenmoor Ward 38134 Temple Way, Fremont 510-793-8060 Irvington Ward 510-656-8754 510-656-7522 (Foyers) Mission Peak Ward (English and Chinese) 48851 Green Valley Rd., Fremont 510-657-2156 510-623-7496 (Foyer) Newark (Spanish) Branch 36400 Haley St., Newark

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church 166 W. Harder Rd., Hayward Iglesia Luterana "El Buen Pastor" 510-782-0872 www.gslchayward.org Good Shepherd South Asian Ministry 4211 Carol Ave., Fremont 510-656-0900 www.gssam.org Grace Lutheran Church LCMS 1836 B St., Hayward 510-581-6620 Holy Redeemer Lutheran Church 35660 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-793-1911 office@hrlc-newark.org Holy Trinity Lutheran Church 38801 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-793-6285 www.holytrinityfremont.org Hope Lutheran Church 3800 Beard Rd., Fremont 510-793-8691 http://hopelutheranfremont.org/ Memorial Lutheran Chapel for the Deaf 874 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-276-3860

Messiah Lutheran Church 25400 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward 510-782-6727 Oromo Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church 100 Hacienda Ave., San Lorenzo 510-276-7980 ollibuse@yahoo.com Our Savior Church & Preschool 858 Washington Blvd., Fremont 510-657-3191 www.oslfremont.com

September 2, 2011

Victory Center AME Zion Church 33527 Western Ave., Union City (510) 487-0233

MUSLIM Islamic Society of East Bay 33330 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-4732 www.iseb.org

NON DENOMINATIONAL

Prince of Peace Lutheran Church/School 38451 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-793-3366 www.popfremont.org

Central Church of Christ 38069 Martha Avenue, #100 Fremont 510-792-2858

St. Steven Lutheran Church 1046 Grove Way, Hayward 510-581-6637 www.ststephenclc.org

Crossroads Church 41386 Fremont Blvd., Fremont 510-651-0301 www.crossroadsfremont.org

METHODIST

Fremont Community Church 39700 Mission Blvd., Fremont (510) 657-0123 www.gofcc.org

African Methodist Episcopal Church 201 E St., Union City 510-489-7067 www.tricityame.org First United Methodist Church 1183 B St., Hayward www.gbgm-umc.org/haywardfirstumc First United Methodist Church 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-490-0200 www.fremont-methodist.org South Hayward UMC 628 Schafer Rd., Hayward (510) 780-9599 www.SoHayUMC.org St. Paul United Methodist 33350 Peace Terr., Fremont 510-429-3990 www.stpaulumcfremont.org

Mission Springs Community Church 48989 Milmont Dr., Fremont 510-490-0446 www.msccfremont.org Morning Star Church 36120 Ruschin Dr., Newark 510-676-1453 www.msconline.org

Victory Outreach Fremont 40086 Paseo Padre Pkwy., Fremont 510-683-4660 info@vofremont.org

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN St. Christina Orthodox Church 3612 Peralta Ave., Fremont 510-739-0908 www.stchristinaorthodox.org

PENTECOSTAL

Glad Tidings Church of God in Christ 27689 Tyrrell Ave., Hayward 510-783-9377 www.gladtidingscogic.com Newark Christian Center 37371 Filbert St., Newark 510-793-6630 The Pentecostals of Hayward 25715 Mission Blvd., Hayward 510-733-0443 Union City Apostolic Church 33700 Alvarado Niles Rd., Union City 510-489-0687 www.ucapostolic.org

PRESBYTERIAN Centerville Presbyterian Church 4360 Central Ave., Fremont 510-793-3575 www.cpcfremont.org

New Birth Christian Ministry Center 3565 Arden Rd., Hayward 510-782-1937

First Presbyterian Church of Hayward 2490 Grove Way, Castro Valley (510) 581-6203 http://firstpreshayward.com

Revelation Christian Fellowship 1670 Orchard Ave., San Leandro 510-352-4707 www.revelationcf.org

First Presbyterian Church of Newark 35450 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-797-8811 www.newarkpres.org

True Jesus Church 1190 Davis St., San Leandro 510-522-2125 www.tjc.org

First Presbyterian Church San Leandro 180 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro 510-483-2772 FPCSanLeandro.org


September 2, 2011 Immanuel Presbyterian Church of Fremont 4333 Hansen Ave., Fremont 510-494-8020 www.ipcf.net Irvington Presbyterian Church 4181 Irvington Ave. (corner Chapel & Irvington), Fremont 510-657-3133 Mt. Eden Presbyterian Church 26236 Adrian Ave., Hayward 510-786-9333 Westminister Hills Presbyterian Church 27287 Patrick Ave., Hayward (510) 782-5795 www.whpchurch.org

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA New Hope Community Church 2190 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-739-0430 www.newhopefremont.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center For Spiritual LivingFremont 40155 Blacow Rd., Fremont 510-656-9955 www.CSL-Fremont.org

SALVATION ARMY Hayward Citadel Corps 430 A St., Hayward 510- 581 - 6444 The Tri-Cities Corps 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510-793-6319 Korean Congregation Army 36700 Newark Blvd., Newark 510 - 793 - 6319

Page 31

WHAT’S HAPPENING’S TRI-CITY VOICE

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Community Seventh-Day Church 606 H St., Union City 510-429-8446 www.unioncity22.adventistchurchconnect.org/ East Bay Fil-Am Seventh Day Adventist Church 32441 Pulaski Dr., Hayward 510-324-1597 Fremont Chinese SeventhDay Adventist Church 1301 Mowry, Fremont 415-585-4440 or 408-616-9535 Fremont Seventh-Day Adventist Church 225 Driscoll Rd., Fremont 510-384-0304 http://fremont.netadvantist.org Hayward Seventh-Day Adventist Church 26400 Gading Rd., Hayward 510-782-3422 Hayward.AdventistFaith.org Milpitas Adventist Center 1991 Landess Ave., Milpitas 408 726-5331 www.milpitas.netadventist.org

SCIENTOLOGY Chuch of Scientology 1865 Lundy Ave, San Jose 408-383-9400 www.scientology-sanjose.org

SIKHISM Fremont Gurdwara 300 Gurdwara Rd., Fremont 510-790-0177 www.fremontgurdwara.org

UNITARIAN Mission Peak UU Congregation (meets at FUMC's Cole Hall) 2950 Washington Blvd, Fremont 510-252-1477 www.mpuuc.org

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Eden United Church of Christ 21455 Birch St. @ Grove Way, Hayward 510-582-9533 www.edenucc.com Filipino American United Church of Christ 4587 Peralta Blvd., Fremont 510-797-8408 filamucc@sbcglobal.net Fremont Congregational Church 38255 Blacow Rd, Fremont 510-793-3970 www.fremontucc.net Niles Congregational Church 255 H St., Fremont 510-797-0895 www.nccucc.org San Lorenzo Community Church 945 Paseo Grande, San Lorenzo 510-276-4808 The Little Brown Church 141 Kilkare Rd., Sunol 925-862-2004 www.littlebrownchurchofsunol.org

UNITY CHURCH Unity of Fremont 36600 Niles Blvd, Fremont at the First Christian Church 510-797-5234 www.unityoffremont.org

FREE Places of Worship Listing Call 510-494-1999 or send email tricityvoice@aol.com

VIETNAMESE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Vietnamese Christian & Missionary Alliance Church 38325 Cedar Blvd., Newark 510-623-9063 www.htnewark.org



TCV 2011-09-02