Issuu on Google+

Inside

T H U R S D A Y



S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1



V O L .

1 ,

I S S U E

2 4

Charting a new course Charter High School offers education with an emphasis on the arts Page 23

STAFF PHOTO

Color your world: In the hour or so before turning in for the night, the sun often paints local skies pink

Elephant escapade?

 Questions surround proposed Fellsmere sanctuary Page 3

Council restores hours for beach lifeguards  Page 5

We still remember Weekend ceremonies mark the decade since the tragic events of 9-11 Page 8

FORUM SPORTS OBITUARIES

12 20 28

TO ADVERTISE CALL MARTINE FECTEAU 772.696.2004 MARK SCHUMANN 772.696.5233


Look as young as you feel!

What Should I Do Now?

Who says you can’t turn back time? With today’s technology and medicine, you can erase years off your skin. The true benefit is that all aesthetic treatments in our office are performed by Dr. Virginia Fegert, board certified physician concentrating in Aesthetic Medicine. Blending science and art without invasive surgery, you'll find the results better than you ever imagined.

Call today to schedule your individual consultation and find out how you can renew your skin to reflect your inner youth.

Guy L. Bassini, CFP, President

 !"" "  "!"! !  !" !!     !" "!  !! " !! ! "!

  ! "" ! Ted Zamerski, CFA, CPA/PFS

Treasure Coast Financial Planning

3770 7th Terrace, Suite 102 I Vero Beach

772.567.6602 www.VeinTherapies.com

Virginia E. Fegert, M.D.

If you are asking yourself that question, you probably don’t have a written ďŹ nancial plan prepared by a team of experienced and qualiďŹ ed professionals. Financial planning provides direction and meaning to your ďŹ nancial decisions. It allows you to understand how each ďŹ nancial decision you make affects other areas of your ďŹ nances. By viewing each ďŹ nancial decision as part of a whole, you can consider its short and long-term effects on your life goals. Our services are designed to help meet your individual needs. Find out if our team is right for you by taking advantage of a complimentary one hour consultation. 6 6 6

Comprehensive Financial Plans Fee-Based Asset Management Hourly Consulting

3418 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach (772)231-1422 ¡ theplanningco.com

6HFXULWLHVDQG$GYLVRU\6HUYLFHV2IIHUHG7KURXJK/3/)LQDQFLDO$5HJLVWHUHG,QYHVWPHQW$GYLVRU 0HPEHU),15$6,3&

Aesthetic Medicine

Brighten Your Smile. Boost Your Confidence.

Visit our new MediSpa for: s0ERMANENT%YELINER ,IPLINER s3OOTHING-ASSAGE s0ERMANENT(AIR2EMOVAL sh!GE3POTv2EMOVAL s%YELASH%XTENSIONS s%UROPEAN&ACIALS s3KIN2ESURFACING sjane iredale 4(%3+).#!2%-!+%50ÂŽ s$ESIGNER)NSPIRED*EWELRY s-ICRODERMABRASION

Let us show you what LUMINEERSŽ can do for you and how affordable they can be! ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡

Painless Instant Whitening Proven to Last 20 Years 0% Financing Available

You too can refresh, renew, rejuvenate.

,TLYZVU*LU[LY ,* for25$/+($/7+

(772)569-9700 3730 7th Terrace, Suite 301, Vero Beach

%HQ'(PHUVRQ''60'

www.emersonddsmd.com

$R7ILLIAM(&RAZIER TH3TREET 3UITE$ 6ERO"EACH &,

WWWVEROCOSMETICCOM

  


27

SCHOOLS

! S E P T E M B E R 1 5 , 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O B E A C H

in education. “We’re working diligently to get the funding our students are due,” says Aversa. The land on which the school is situated is leased from the college. David Sullivan, provost of the Mueller Campus, was another founding board member who had access to a 36-room building that in the past was used to house prison guards during area training sessions. That building, located on the east side of the school’s campus, was renovated with a state grant and leased to IRCHS in 1998. In 2002, with the school operating at a capacity of 250 students, and 400 more on a waitlist, the performing arts program was launched. One of the reasons that drove the decision to establish a performing arts program at IRCHS, says Waddell, was the lack of importance the other schools placed on the arts. According to Waddell, the faculty at VBHS voted in ’03 or ’04, to do away with seventh period, which was the time for elective classes. When Gary Miller, the award-win-

ning choral director at VBHS, announced he was leaving to work at IRCHS, the school realized what it had lost. A subsequent vote reversed the decision to cut the arts, and the next year the school district voted to build a $10 million performing arts center. “Competition, pure and simple, has helped elevate the arts programs,” says Waddell. In 2002, IRCHS leased another five acres from the college and applied for a mortgage with which to build the performing arts campus. The school uses a portion of the money from the state to pay the $30,000 per month mortgage. A clause on the lease says that if the current board defaults on the mortgage or wants to close the school, the college has the first right of refusal to continue the charter, says Waddell. Currently, there are about 350 students who declare a performing arts major, but other students can also participate in the fine arts programs. Performing arts majors are required to take classes in their elected discipline each semester, as well as regular

curriculum courses. Up to this point, there has been no proper stage at the school. Performances are held at one of the other auditoriums in town, including the Vero Beach Theatre Guild which has a reciprocal arrangement to expose students to all aspects of production in exchange for the use of its stage. There is some discussion about constructing a cover for the school’s courtyard, which would permit performances even when it’s raining. Recently, John Schumann expressed an interest in donating seed money to the school that would enable the construction of a permanent performance venue. Adams is researching various grants and other types of support to help with construction costs. Some of the IRCHS alumni who are performing on a larger stage include Alexa Bartol, a former drama student, who is scheduled to appear on “Desperate Housewives” this season. Previously, Bartol has appeared on episodes of “CSI: NY,” and several of the courtroom shows (in case you didn’t know, the people who appear

on those shows are, indeed, actors.) Another drama alumna, Hayley Bruce, has made appearances on episodes of “The Glades.” And, Isabelle Power, a former IRCHS Valedictorian and dance major, is slated to appear on the new television series, “Charlie’s Angels.” Gary Zanello, a music major, received a scholarship to attend Berklee College of Music in Boston, placing in the top 40 out of 6,000 guitarists who auditioned for admission. Former world champion tennis player, Ivan Lendl, enrolled his daughter, Daniela Lendl, in the golf school at IRCHS. Chosen as a preOlympics team member, she competed in South Africa last summer, and signed with the University of Alabama’s golf team. And, Jermaine Jackson, an early graduate of IRCHS, has achieved national acclaim as a music producer with a recording studio in Miami. For more information about the IRCHS and its efforts to build a theater, please call: (772) 567-6600, or visit them online: IRCHS.org.

N E W S W E E K L Y

Established in 1998, the Indian River Charter High School now has an enrollment of nearly 700 students grades 9 through 12


gCQTH dO8=

3

!

Questions remain how deal was struck for elephant sanctuary

Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt Realtors® Island Previews International Office OCEANFRONT ESTATE

Spectacular Vero Beach Home Magnificent River & Ocean Vistas cNNO?OP T; {(-"!B-BBB U ( ( z + z *

772-231-4880

[O?C rOTQL j=HTDP cNNKQO

INDIAN RIVER FARMS

GRAND HARBOR

OCEANFRONT CONDO

20 Acres

Exclusive St Andrews Island Custom Built House cNNO?OP T; {(-<!B-BBB U ( ( % " + +

Floor to Ceiling Windows w/River & Ocean Vistas

Main House & Guest House c?KMKDTHH6 {(-#BB-BBB !! U ( ( # + ( %

0|O!u!

FlColdwellBankerPREVIEWS.com

Luxurious Paragon 12th Fl Condo

cNNO?OP T; {""*-BBB U ( < B B " B

772-464-7007

'/-*! .)*&!20+/0 ,+1(0$ %"3&#

N E W S W E E K L Y

pOPKQT;OP ;C g:7:?6 _OTH o=;T;O

B E A C H

CONTINUES ON PAGE 4

V E R O

center’s presence in the area. They are particularly concerned after sanctuary officials walked away from a similar 326-acre elephant haven that had been approved by St. Lucie County in January, 2010. In that deal, conditions regarding oversight, land density and a prohibition on using a bull hook (a metal probe used to control the animals), were added by local officials to ensure humane treatment of the elephants. “We were very involved in the St. Lucie County proposal,” said Nick Atwood of the Animal Rights Foundation of Florida, an organization based in Ft. Lauderdale.

!

board and CEO of the Denver Zoo. Officials hope to break ground by the end of this year and open in mid to late 2012. “We are very enthusiastic about this project,” said Fellsmere City Manager Jason Nunemaker, who points out that the center will create four new jobs and the current agricultural zoning of the land will remain intact. “This use of land is consistent with our vision of Fellsmere.” And, in fact, though approval was granted with no public scrutiny, local officials apparently followed all rules and regulations required in authorizing the sanctuary. Local animal protection groups, however, are less enthusiastic about the

2 0 1 1

While  news last week of a 225-acre elephant sanctuary was championed by Fellsmere city officials, a closer look reveals a fast-track approval process that muted any chance for opponents to voice concern about the deal. The National Elephant Center, a collaboration of 73 zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, received approval by the city of Fellsmere on Sept. 9 to build an elephant sanctuary in a former citrus grove previously slated for residential development. However, just three weeks prior, project engineers were writing to the St. John’s Water Management District

asking them to hurry along its required approval before word leaked to local media. There was, in fact, no public input of any sort from any group for what will be a unique enterprise in north western Indian River County. Additionally, Fellsmere Community Development Director Mark Mathes, who approved the deal within 24 hours of receipt of the engineering plans, once worked for a firm hired by the land company that will make a profit leasing its unused acreage to the sanctuary. The sanctuary is designed to provide a place to breed Asian and African elephants for zoos to conserve the elephant population in the wild, said Craig Piper, vice chair of the center’s

1 5 ,

BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

S E P T E M B E R

Fellsmere soon to be up to its ears in elephants


LOCAL NEWS

ELEPHANTS FROM PAGE 3

With Atwood’s organization’s input, St. Lucie County commissioners approved plans for a ten-elephant-maximum facility. In Fellsmere, the center will open with two or three elephants and hold up to 30, said Piper. Although the sanctuary is 100 acres less than the proposed St. Lucie County facility, Fellsmere applied no conditions to the center’s site approval. “One thing we don’t get into is micro-managing agriculture,” said Nunemaker, who added there are enough agencies to regulate the center. “We don’t tell cattle ranchers how to raise cows. We’re not going to tell them how to manage elephants.” Nonetheless, there are valid concerns including the transportation of elephants over public roads, security issues relating to adequate containment of the animals and disaster plans

in the event of hurricanes and wildfires. There are also other issues that raise red flags about the way the deal was handled. In a letter dated Aug. 22 to the St. John’s Water Management District regarding permitting, David Tom of Construction Engineering Group, the project’s engineers, wrote, “Apparently, the press has found out about this project and we want to make sure this permit is in hand before there is a public announcement in the paper.” Tom declined to speak to Vero Beach Newsweekly about his intent as stated in the letter. Permit requests in the unincorporated area of St. Lucie County were applied for by The National Elephant Center, while permitting for the facility in Fellsmere has been done under the name of Sunshine State Wildlife Conservation, LLC. Despite working closely with St.

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

4

“Comprehensive Care, Uncompromising Service”

CALL NOW FOR OUR $97 NEW PATIENT SPECIAL! 0% INTEREST FINANCING AVAILABLE

Don’t let fear of the dentist keep you from achieving your dental goals. At Beachside Dental we are pleased to offer the latest in IV CONSCIOUS SEDATION during your dental treatment. Find comfort that goes beyond a “pill”.

Ask us about our services • IV SEDATION • Veneers • Cosmetic Dentistry • Dental Implants • In-office Whitening • Root Canals

• EMERGENCY CARE • Crowns and Bridges • Children’s Dentistry • Extractions • Denture Repair • TMD & Chronic Pain

Matthew J. Henry, DDS

772-234-5353 | www.beachsidedental.com | 5070 N A1A, Indian River Shores, In the Oak Point Building next to CVS

John’s Water Management District officials since July, Tom’s application never mentions the word “elephant,” nor was it ever mentioned by Tom in any of his correspondence with the agency. “Public notices were published, but since they were applied for under a different name, we were never given an opportunity to voice our concerns,” said Atwood, whose organization is now exploring other opportunities to ensure protection of the elephants destined for the facility. According to state records, Sunshine State Wildlife Conservation, LLC was registered in September, 2010 by Incorp Services, Inc. The same corporation also registered Hard to Treat Diseases. Both of these corporations were registered after the St. Lucie County commissioners placed limiting conditions on the center’s plan. The elephant center’s land is leased to Sunshine State Wildlife Conservation by Fellsmere Joint Venture, LLC, a partnership between citrus executives Gregory Nelson and Richard Carnell of Bernard Egan and Company, and Jeffrey Hurwitz. According to Nunemaker, the center will sub-let the tract for 40 years. Fellsmere Joint Venture owns about 18,540 acres of land that was annexed by Fellsmere in 2007. Development of the land, involving state and county planners, has been ongoing, with approval for 8,141 to 19, 750 residences in an area about three miles south of the elephant center Mathes said. In the area immediately surrounding the elephant center, a hamlet of approximately 250 residences will be built, he said. Mathes was hired by the city in February 2010, after working as the planning director for Stuart-based Lucido & Associates. That firm worked directly for Fellsmere Joint Ventures and created the development of housing clusters and business centers in Fellsmere. Mathes approved the elephant center’s site plan one day after it was submitted by project engineer Tom. According to Mathes, the state requires almost half the land slated for

development to be designated as open space. The agricultural zoning of the elephant center satisfies a portion of that requirement. “What’s wrong with the owners making money on that land?” asked Mathes. “You can only have so many lakes.” Open space is defined as “unpaved land,” said Peter Merrit, assistant director of the Treasure Coast Regional Planning Council, a state- mandated agency that mediates between various government agencies. His council did not know about the elephant center because “something would have had to trigger” a notification, he said, “such as a change in the land use.” Nor has anyone from the Brevard County manager’s office or planning department been notified about the elephant center, which is situated a mere 250 feet south of their county line. The Brevard Zoo is part of the consortium seeking the sanctuary and officials there said they may conduct programs connected with the facility. However, there are no plans to add elephants as part of the zoo’s regular exhibit of animals. There has also been some concern expressed about disposal of elephant waste. Piper explained the method of composting the center aims to employ is commonly used in agriculture. “With only 30 elephants, we’re taking the land to a less intensive use than its current use (of citrus),” said Piper. In explaining the range of activity planned at the elephant center, Piper said that research will be conducted on a type of herpes virus that is common in elephant populations in the wild and in zoos. Piper estimates there are 35,000 Asian elephants and 600,000 African elephants in the wild. “We are active in conservation efforts around the world,” said Piper. “We’re also firm believers that having a stable population in our care is just good policy. We should invest in both these baskets.” Piper also said the center would not be working to breed, train and provide elephants to circuses.


BY IAN LOVE FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

%/(/+,( S@7DF5 :FDH;R 9D7CDF5@:;R C47;@6ADER YUL'-#" UVR +<!!R!!! GD65 3@D26/ )NOK.$-!"Y$%

(6,3*+/,'2 26('

+426, )/312

!

*6.- /(.6,3 *.6,'6'/+, -Z65:70 *UL'*#" UV F50E 9::> A:=D# SD6@B;D7 C@;@6AD6 5A7:4BA:45# )NOK $$&"YY% +$R$!!R!!!

2 0 1 1 V E R O

QH65 :C V$V# YUL 2@5A :CC@FDR 9::>'69H# -!!- F:;57 S@7DF5 :FDH;C7:;5 >:5 @; D65HG>@6ADE F:==# O:2 +($XR!!! PMVR BH5DER DH65 :C V$V )NOK.$$<!Y&% +&XXR!!! G0 U7:2; E:B# )NOK.$-$X"Y%

+426,16'2

-6)5)/(6 T:4750H7E A:=D QH65 :C V$VR 65D96 5: GDHFAR +"*XR!!! F>4GA:46DR 9::># )NOK.$-$-*!%

(261)+%2 $2('

Q;E 4;@5 *5A C>7 =H1 :FDH; 3@D26R H971 $<&! 6CR +*-*R!!! -UL,B>H66 9:7FA# )NOK.$$"!"X%

OH65 >:5 @; KDHB7:3D ID65/ OH?DC7:;5R E:F? 6>@9R +YXXR!!! B4H7ER 5D;;@6# )NOK."-**X%

6,'/..2(

0/332, 06)5+&)

Q184@6@5D Y'Y 2@5A 49B7HED6# T>4GA:46DR 9::>R J;@84D YUL'YUV 5A7DD >D3D> 2' FH5ADE7H> FD@>@;B6 +Y-"R!!! +Y<XR!!! H;E DH5Z@; ?@5 )NOK.$$(((!% 5D;;@6R BH5DE# )NOK.$$X&"Y%

///BCA??E>;39HAD@JC<B:24 &&+$+*-$-+&. ) **&& A:8;3 G1608% =812 I8;:7% F52169; *+!"* ) ,..$"*#$#-##

N E W S W E E K L Y

*2./46, 4+%2 LD=:ED>DE TUKR 9::> :; EDD9 2H5D7 E:F?R #* HF7DR F>:6D 5: GDHFA# )NOK.$-$<&&% +"XXRX!!

B E A C H

CONTINUES ON PAGE 8

1 5 ,

Faced with the unpalatable choice of leaving some of Vero’s beaches unguarded one day a week for most of the year, the City Council restored $9,000 to the Recreation Department budget to cut the down time by more than half. Council members voted 5-0 last week to add the money back to the Recreation Department at its first public hearing on the 2011-2012 budget. At that meeting, the council granted tentative approval to a 4.6 percent tax rate increase. The City Council tentatively approved a tax rate of $2.03 per $1,000 valuation compared with $1.94 this year. Declining property tax values, however, will mean on average, taxpayers should not be paying more property taxes to the city. The final vote on the rate and budget will be Sept. 20. When that vote is taken it appears residents and tourists will be afforded more lifeguard protection than first envisioned by Recreation Director Rob Slezak when he was asked to cut 8 percent or $75,000 from his budget. Slezak pointed out this is the fourth year he has been told his budget would be slashed. The first two years department cuts had not hit the lifeguard corps. Last year, however, he had to reduce hours at one of the three lifeguard stations within the city limits. “We had tried to avoid cutting the lifeguards and we had been pretty successful, but it has come up on us now,” Slezak said. Slezak last year cut the lead lifeguard position and this year he said he will probably have to trim one or two part-time positions despite the extra funding from the council. In looking at his options for next

year’s budget, Slezak’s initial plan was to institute six-day per week coverage at the three city beaches with lifeguard towers -- Humiston, Jaycee and South Beach. City Manager John O’Connor, hired in the middle of the budget process, said he reviewed Slezak’s original proposal and was comfortable with the reasoning as necessitated by the reduced dollars in the budget. “After it was explained to me I had no problem with what we were doing,” O’Connor said. “I thought it was justified to have less manpower in the offseason. However, after further direction from the council we decided to further refine that.” The message from council was that millions of dollars were being spent on beach renourishment and promotion by the Chamber of Commerce of Vero Beach and Indian River County as a beach resort destination. Council did not want to mix that message of warm, friendly beaches with unmanned lifeguard towers. The new council-backed plan reduces the one-day-a-week unguarded towers from three to two and shortens that time from 38 weeks to 17 weeks. “Last year we had Humiston Beach guarded from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. for 38 weeks,” Slezak said. “Jaycee and South were open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. And for the other 14 weeks, which were basically the spring and summer breaks, they were all open 9 to 5 every day.” The revised plan has Humiston Beach open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Jaycee and South Beach towers will be closed one day a week (Wednesday or Thursday) for 17 weeks. Those

&)%/ 5'7,20 6.++.&( 83 !*4%- '""" $ '"#"1

S E P T E M B E R

Vero City Council puts money back in budget for lifeguards

5

!

KFH; 2@5A 0:47 K=H75 9A:;D/

LOCAL NEWS


LOCAL NEWS

Winger vows to not ‘give away’ city utilities BY BARBARA YORESH  vero beach newsweekly 

Barrier island resident Richard “Dick” Winger is a man for all seasons. The congenial vice chairman of the city’s Finance Commission – who was first to announce his candidacy

V E R O

for a City Council seat in the Nov. 8 election -- is a well-organized, successful business man; former U.S. Army Intelligence veteran posted at the Pentagon; president of his homeowners association; a leader of his church; a 2010 Census supervisor; a certified sailing instructor and he has

General Surgery for routine and complex surgical problems

Daniel Glotzer, M.D., FACS Board Certified General Surgeon Fellow of the American College of Surgeons

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

6

Board certified by the American Board of Surgery and a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Daniel Glotzer and his office provide modern, comprehensive care for your routine and complex surgical problems in collaboration with colleagues in other surgical and medical specialties at Indian River Medical Center. Daniel Glotzer, M.D.

Prior to joining IRMC in early 2011, Dr. Glotzer was a partner in a multispecialty group in Jamestown, NY, where he held the position of Chief of Surgery at WCA Hospital and Westfield Memorial Hospital. Dr. Glotzer also served as WCA Hospital’s Cancer Liaison Physician for the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. After completing his general surgery residency at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, Dr. Glotzer went on to complete a fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at Saint Vincent’s Hospital in Erie, Pa. Dr. Glotzer specializes in the following areas: • Breast surgery • Colonoscopy and polypectomy for colorectal disease • Gastrointestinal surgery (stomach, small bowel, colon and rectal surgery) • Melanoma, pancreas, endocrine, thyroid surgery • Minimally invasive hernia repair, gallbladder and colon surgery Now accepting new patients. Call 772.563.4741 to schedule an appointment.

General Surgery

1040 37th Place, Suite 201 | Vero Beach, FL | 772.563.4741

The Right Care Right Here

been known to give gifts of honey as testament to his beekeeping skills. Married and the father of four grown sons, Winger is also a gentleman who believes in and practices civility (and thinks others should, too) and wants to give back to his community a portion of the good fortune he has enjoyed. “I suppose I’m a do-gooder and I want to give back because I’ve had a long and blessed life,” he said. “Far too few do that in this country but in the final analysis, it’s better if we live in a village supported by neighbors and friends. It enriches everyone’s life.” Winger, 73, filed papers in July for the City Council race – beating the official Aug. 25 – Sept. 9 qualifying period for the Nov. 8 election. Winger will face incumbents Tracy Carroll and Brian Heady as well as a bid by former councilman Ken Daige. Selling the utilities Winger supports keeping taxes low and stabilizing city finances, preserving Vero Beach’s quality of life and insisting that a fair price be paid for the city’s power plant and water and sewer utility if they are to be sold. He pledges to provide “proven leadership to resolve complex problems.” “I would sell both utilities for a fair price. So what’s a fair price? One both parties can accept. In the case of the city, one that allows city government and services to continue without major adjustments and tax increases. I am dedicated to see that these are not put at risk because of poor financial decisions,” Winger said. The city’s consultant GAI Consultants of Orlando which evaluated both the electric and water and sewer plants valued both utilities considerably higher than any initially proposed purchase prices by Florida Power & Light and the county, respectively. FPL tentatively offered to buy the

city electric plant for up to $100 million which was valued in the GAI Consultants draft appraisal at $191.3 million or $184.9 million when all transactional costs are satisfied. The consultant’s draft appraisal of the city’s water and sewer utility was $100 million – far in excess of the county’s discussions to take over the city’s current $24 million debt on the system plus pay about $28 million to connect the city’s system to the county’s. “I believe the water utility is worth $100 million and we should get $100 million for it,” Winger said. “I’m for moving the sewer plant from the Indian River Lagoon to the airport and even for merging with the county but not for giving it away. It’s a wellmanaged facility. “And I do not believe you have city voters who would take an $80 million loss (on an electric plant sale to FPL at the offered price). But the way it was put out for bid, we encouraged only one bidder.” Avery real threat of financial difficulty exists for the city if poor decisions are made, Winger asserts, and

StAff PHOtO

winger wears his slogan on his back.


7

LOCAL NEWS

! 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O B E A C H

Winger speaks to the city council.

THE CALM IN THE STORM REST EASY WHEN PROTECTED WITH VERO INSURANCE IN THE VERY WORST WEATHER... our team endeavors to take care of you. With access to America’s top rated carriers, our firm offers the broadest coverage at the lowest possible rates, striving to find the best solution for all your insurance needs. Do you need a

Call today for an in-depth business coverage audit

way out of danger? Are you adaquetely covered in the event of a hurricane? Don’t think you are - know

Local 772.231.2022

you are protected with Vero Insurance. We never stop working for you.

Toll Free 877.231.2021

WWW.VEROINSURANCE.COM

N E W S W E E K L Y

Qualifications and Experience Winger’s professional career has been in senior business management. He has bought, sold and reorganized large U.S. and Fortune 500 companies. He obtained his Bachelor of Arts degree (cum laude) in economics and accounting from Ohio Wesleyan University and his Master degree in English from Cleveland State University. Currently serving as vice Chairman of the City of Vero Beach Finance Commission, Winger has since 1992 lived permanently in Vero Beach with his wife Bobbie. The couple first visited the area in 1971. Winger is active in the Saint Mark’s Anglican Church Vestry and as an Acolyte. He is a certified sailing instructor at the Youth Sailing Foundation and serves meals at The Source. He is president of the Castaway Cove IV and V Homeowners Association; is a former poll worker and served as a supervisor for the 2010 Census.

1 5 ,

Can’t we just all get along? Winger believes local government, like business, works best when conducted in an atmosphere of mutual respect and support. “I stand for civility and don’t believe in bickering because I don’t think it’s useful. We need to start with positive publicity. It’s time to put Vero Beach back on its course to greatness including the use of civil dialogue. “My vision for Vero is to keep Vero, Vero. That doesn’t mean it doesn’t change. The city has grown and ma-

tured. It’s better than it was and we need to keep the spirit of it while making it better,” Winger said. Instances in which some council members snipe from the dais at the public, city staff or each other are unacceptable and counter-productive, Winger said. “’Management is getting things done through others’ said (management consultant) Peter Drucker. My experience is I’ve been able to make a difference and right chaos in management. I’ve been doing that for 49 years and you can’t change things overnight but you can in several years,” Winger said. Winger’s experiences in business and his personal life taught him patience and problem-solving skills as well as the ability to recognize and utilize the abilities of others. He also knows how to diplomatically deliver bad news: while posted at The Pentagon in the late 1950s as a classified communications specialist, he beat news media press reports and sent a message to President Eisenhower informing him that the Russians had just beaten the U.S. into space. He noted that there is an almost unlimited resource of individuals with high-level business and educational backgrounds living in the city who should be invited to offer their expertise and insights toward solving city problems. “I’ve learned to be a good listener and do my homework. And within the City of Vero Beach, we figuratively have all the brains in the world; all the money in the world. The challenge is to inspire people to keep Vero as Vero. When all is said and done, it’s very complicated. What are at risk are city services and taxes and we need to find solutions to many problems. “If you have good leadership on the Vero Beach City Council, we can make good decisions and act like ladies and gentlemen. Leadership turns things around. If we can tone it down we’ll have a city council and government that behaves civilly and gets down to day-to-day business,” Winger said.

S E P T E M B E R

it is his decades of experience analyzing, managing and salvaging businesses, coupled with his love of the city that brought him into the race. “I’ve watched the city grow over the years and see it now at a crossroads. Frankly, if a fair price is not achieved, the City of Vero Beach may risk financial default. I believe the people of our city do not want this to happen and done properly, it will not happen. “This is what I bring to this campaign; my experience and leadership, my record of success analyzing complex situations, my skills to bring about a more harmonious working environment and my dedication to a secure future for our city,” Winger said. However, that passion isn’t widespread and Winger admitted many residents “just want to be left alone as long as things are working for them. I don’t think they’re engaged enough.” But last year’s election upheaval, which resulted in a change of four council seats, probably re-awakened interest in city affairs, he noted. “With all the falderal over everything, people are much more interested (in the upcoming Nov. 8 election) than two years ago. And I have a maybe naïve belief that all of us can and should make a difference. “If I’m elected, I would join the mayor as a vote for civility and indepth financial analysis to make sound decisions for the interest of the taxpayers,” Winger said.


8

STAFF PHOTO

Despite budget cuts for a fourth straight year, the council voted to keep more lifeguards on duty at city beaches.

BEACHES FROM PAGE 5

closures would run basically from post-Labor Day to December. “The impetus of this was from the Tourist Development Council and that the four months of January through April are when about 48 percent of our hotelier dollars in the city of Vero Beach are occurring,” said Council member Tracy Carroll. “We cannot have a situation occurring where on that Wednesday or Thursday we have no lifeguards when a big percentage of our tourists are using our beaches.” O’Connor said the additional lifeguard coverage would add about $9,000 back into the Recreation Department budget. He is anticipating some additional revenue to be generated by the police department, but if that does not materialize, O’Connor would charge each city department about $850 from their bottom line. Unlike last year with the Indian River County Commission, there was little public outcry about the possibility of reduced lifeguard coverage in Vero Beach. At the county

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

LOCAL NEWS

2090 6th Avenue Vero Beach, FL 32960

772-202-8588 Pamper yourself while Relaxing, Rejuvenating, and Reviving your mind, body and spirit with this 20% coupon. Apply to any service, one coupon per customer. TCN2606000

budget meetings last year it was decided to shutter the lifeguard tower at Treasure Shores Beach Park. That decision was made over the protests of scores of people who showed up in chambers to speak out against the closure and thousands of others who signed a petition drive. City Manager O’Connor noted the budget process was too far along for him to do much about lifeguard manpower in Vero Beach this year. However, he understands the direction the council expects him to take to protect Vero’s beaches. “You have to remember that the finance director (Cindy Lawson) and I have been dealing with this in the short term,” O’Connor said. “Next year’s budget I think will have more of how we expect to accomplish the goals of the council and will have a lot more detail from our perspective. “Based on input from council members, they have set the goal that we do not want to impede our tourism draw. One of our main attractions is our beaches. The council has made it clear that we project the image of safe beaches.”


LOCAL NEWS

9 ! 1 5 , 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O

Indian River County fire fighters and paramedics joined with law enforcement officials to host three 9/11 observance ceremonies in Vero Beach this past Sunday. The events marked the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks which took nearly 3,000 lives, including several hundred members of the New York City police and fire departments. At least 200 people gathered at Veterans Memorial Island early Sunday morning for the first of three local 9/11 observances, featuring the Navy Southeast Band, and guest speaker Navy Lt. Cmdr. Michael Welz. The Firefighters Association presented two additional concerts Sunday evening at the Riverside Theatre.

S E P T E M B E R

VeroBeachobserves9/11

B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y


10

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

LOCAL NEWS DIGEST Indian River Shores Council adopts‘break-even budget’ INDIAN RIVER SHORES — The Indian River Shores Town Council adopted a property tax rate of $1.47 per $1,000 of assessed value last week during the first public hearing on the proposed 2011-12 budget. For a $200,000 home with a $50,000 homestead exemption, the homeowner would pay about $220.50. This was less than the maximum property tax rate of $1.60 per $1,000 of assessed value the council approved in late July, but 2.14 percent higher than the current rollback rate of $1.44 per $1,000 of value. The tax rate funds a tentative general fund budget of $4.67 million, an increase over the 2010-2011 approved budget of $4.36 million. Included in the new budget are a road and offsite drainage fund of $74,443 and a planning, zoning and building fund of $232,134. Councilwoman Fran Atchison asked Town Manager Richard Jefferson if the $1.47 tax rate would give the town “any wiggle room” with expenses for 2011-12. “It’s a break-even budget and it pays the bills,” Jefferson said. “We’ve done all the facts and figures and we’re sure it’s going to cover it. It’s basically the same rate as we had from 2002 to 2007.” Councilman Richard Haverland said he is still concerned that the town’s pension fund for employees is underfunded.

Flash mob convenes at barrier island concert

STAFF PHOTO

About 50 dancers appeared at the Sunset Saturday Night concert as a “flash mob.” Organizers used social media to entice dancers to show up for the event. The final public hearing on the 2011-12 budget is set for Sept. 22 at the Fred R. Tuerk Municipal Center, 6001 North Highway A-1-A, Indian River Shores.

Field set for Vero City Council race VERO BEACH — Incumbents Tracy Carroll and Brian Heady will face two challengers for their Vero Beach City Council seats. The qualifying period for the city council race ended last Friday. The

LET ME RENT YOUR PROPERTIES! SUSAN BELMONT POWELL REALTOR® Rental Specialist

DAVID WALSH &ASSOC! REAL ESTATE 800 20th Place, Suite 5, Vero Beach, FL 32960 · Office (772)234-3450 · verorents.com

election will be held on Nov. 8. Finance Commission Vice Chairman Dick Winger will join former council member Ken Daige in pursuing one of the seats now held by Carroll and Heady. As with past elections, the possible sale of the city’s electric system to Florida Power & Light is expected to be the key issue. Carroll’s name will be at the top of the ballot as determined by a random drawing. Winger will be placed second, followed by Heady with Daige’s name appearing last. Also on the city ballot will be a referendum asking voters whether they approve of the lease of the power plant site for the purpose of selling the electric utility if the Council finds such a sale beneficial to city residents. The city will retain ownership of the land. Early voting begins Oct. 29 and runs through Nov. 5, including Saturdays and Sundays, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Early voting only will be held at the Supervisor of Elections office. Absentee voting is also available and a request for an absentee ballot can be made in person, by phone,

by mail or online at voteindianriver. com. Absentee ballots must be delivered to the elections office before 7 p.m. on Election Day. The last day to request an absentee ballot by mail is by 5 p.m. Nov. 2, although people can pick one up at the election office through Election Day.

Vero , FPL electric rates expected to rise next year VERO BEACH — As city officials work on the deal to sell the electric utility to Florida Power and Light, rates for both electric companies are expected to go up in 2012. The city’s current electric rate is $113.14 per 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity. Next month, the rate is expected to rise by about 1.2 percent to $114.43, not counting the local taxes or franchise fees. City Manager Jim O’Connor said that because of scheduled, as well as some unforeseen, increases from the city’s wholesale power supplier, Orlando Utilities Commission, the rate could go up another 6 to 7 percent in


!

12

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

Community Forum Why city should hold off talks to sell water and sewer GUEST COLUMN BY RICHARD WINGER

After studying the preliminary report by GAI Consulting on “Optimization and a Potential Sale of the City of Vero Beach Water and Sewer System,” both the Finance and Utility commissions recommended the Council cease all talks unless Indian River County makes a written offer at a fair price. The reason is the proposed $24 million is not a fair price. In a June 7th presentation to City Council, I estimated $74 million was what taxpayers owned. I said it was not credible to ask taxpayers to give up at least $50 million plus the $1 million annual transfer to the General Fund supporting City services. It turns out that I was low, for GAI appraised the assets for $100.9 million. Yet, I expect voices will continue to be raised asking City residents to contribute to Indian River County the roughly $75 million difference ($7,400 per resident).  Some proponents of the $24 million County offer add in the $28 million it would cost the County to interconnect sewer systems. How does that benefit us City taxpayers? The claim is the County will move the sewer plant off the lagoon. But on June 7th, I presented a plan for the City to move the

plant to the airport site utilizing the existing interconnect pipe to the deep injection well. This relocation can be done with on-going revenue and no rate increases. A new City plant would RICHARD WINGER cost $18 to $20 million which is considerably less than the $28 million County pipe. Rate comparisons between the County and City are apples and oranges because the City uses the older meter size billing while the County uses the ERC method. The City should adopt ERC billing and garner the additional $1.2 million with the change. By going to the County billing system, we remove the argument of who costs more.    GAI presented an Optimization Plan to take a very good City Utility and lower costs so that the City would need no rate increase for many years. This will take time to implement, so as not to unfairly harm our City employees, but the City W&S employees would go from 71 to 51 by making small capital investments leading to efficiencies. GAI said that as long as City Council does not give away the right to

service in South Beach, and the approximately $10 million worth of appraised assets the City Taxpayer’s own , the expiration of the franchising agreement is meaningless. The City continues to own, and provided service under the Service Agreement which has no expiration. Caring about our neighbors to the south, after conversion to ERC billing, Council should consider either charging rates no higher than the higher of County or inside the City rate; or make a bulk sales agreement and let South Beach have their retail bill provided by whomever they wish. The City is negotiating with St. Lucie County, and has the excess capacity to serve North Hutchinson Island with a profitable bulk water sales agreement. Therefore the City is likely to continue to have water mains through South Beach. The City is interconnected to a web of municipal water providers (excluding the County with a different method of sanitation). Having interconnection provides reliability, regardless of our county. How did this “merge with the County dialogue” begin? The County could not plan for a housing bust which followed the large expansion in the County system to serve the building boom. So the County has end up with

Mark Schumann, Publisher 978-2246 Mark.Schumann@scripps.com

“Doing good by doing right.” Vero Beach Newsweekly is distributed throughout Vero Beach and the barrier island. Visit us on the web at www.VeroBeachNewsweekly.com Mail may be sent to Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. Hwy. 1, Vero Beach, FL, 32960

Ian Love, Managing Editor 978-2251 ian.love@scripps.com Mike Bielecki, Sports Editor 321-6105 mbwordsmith@gmail.com Christina Tascon, Writer/Photographer 978-2238 verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

Lisa Rymer Contributor Milt Thomas Contributor Scott Alexander Contributor Michael Birnholz Contributor

Nick Thomas Contributor Barbara Yoresh Contributor Carrie Scent Graphic Designer Marsha Damerow Graphic Designer

To contact one of our contributing writers please call 772-978-2251 or send an email to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

To advertise call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 (martine.vbnewsweekly@gmail.com) or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233 (Mark.Schumann@scripps.com)

excess capacity and has lost roughly $28 million in total, beginning with 2007. Remember, we Vero Beach residents are also County taxpayers, and helping lower County costs and taxes is good. However, it is not good giving away many tens of millions of City taxpayer dollars for no appreciable improvement in rates or service. It has been suggested that the proper way to amalgamate water and sewer is a Regional Authority. This would be with the County, City and our four sister cities, having proportional representation.   The County may not want to offer a fair price to buy out the City, but if we all pooled our assets, we could pool our employees, continue with our respective revenue streams, and have one universal billing system at lower total cost. This is the most economical and equitable solution. Plus an Authority, in all probability, moves the Sewer Plant off the lagoon faster than either the City or County. (Endnotes) 1. Note the County has not yet made a formal written offer. 2. Based upon the 2010 Census of City Residents. Richard Winger is vice chairman of the city’s Finance Commission and is running for a seat on the city council.

LETTERS WELCOME Vero Beach Newsweekly invites you to send Letters to the Editor on topics of interest pertaining to Indian River County. Letters should be 250-300 words and may be edited for length. We encourage an open dialogue, but reserve the right to refuse publication of letters that do not meet our editorial standards. E-mails may be sent to verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com or by regular mail to Letter to the Editor, Vero Beach Newsweekly, 1801 U.S. 1, Vero Beach, FL 32960.


13 !

COMMUNITY FORUM

BY MILT THOMAS

“I have traveled a good deal in Concord,” wrote Henry David Thoreau in 1845 of his time seeking simplicity and wholeness in the environs around Walden Pond. “I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond…I have my horizon bounded by woods all to myself; a distant view of the railroad where it touches the pond on the one hand, and of the fence which skirts the woodland on the other…As I walked in the woods to see the birds and squirrels, so I walked in the village to see the men and boys…It is as much Asia and Africa as new England. I have, as it were, my own sun and moon and stars, and a little world all to myself.”

Thoreau’s spiritual point is that whether we frequently travel worldwide, or routinely stay close to home, amazing worlds of intricacy and joy are open to us – as long as REVEREND we truly pay atten- SCOTT ALEXANDER tion to the world right where it touches us. The whole world’s richness is always at hand. I am an avid cyclist who, like Thoreau at Concord, “Have traveled a good deal on the Treasure Coast.” I am very familiar with my local surroundings, passing the same places and scenery again and again, all without venturing terribly far from home. I am especially

familiar with the Indian River Lagoon, which I bike up and down every day. One might think I would tire of the routine and repetition of looking at the lagoon and its environs again and again and again. But Thoreau was right about familiar old haunts. If you are paying attention (even for the hundredth, or thousandth time) they are rich with infinite variety and intricate beauty. The truth is the lagoon is never the same two days in a row. Each day it comes alive in variety, intricacy, subtlety and charm. But for you to see the remarkable in the familiar, you must regularly cultivate all your senses in a keen attentiveness. To be blessed, you must pay keen attention, even in places you think you know perfectly well. In every moment you must tell your

eyes to see as though they have never seen this before. Yes, some are lucky enough to regularly travel the world far and wide, being charmed by the world’s countless, exotic surprises. But those who are nearer to home can also be charmed and blessed. Whatever your familiar haunts, be open and alert to the everchanging tapestry of life that is spread out before you. Wake up to what is at hand wherever you are…for there are untold worlds of richness right here, close to home. Rev. Scott W. Alexander is the minister of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Vero Beach, and has been a minister, author, and educator for almost 40 years. He is an avid cyclist and outdoor enthusiast who loves living in Vero Beach.

N E W S W E E K L Y

BY REVEREND SCOTT ALEXANDER

B E A C H

Learning to see the remarkable in the familiar

V E R O

President Obama has done. In fact, they didn’t agree with him even before he did anything, except for Romney and his Massachusetts healthcare program. Although it was successful and a model for Obama’s healthcare program, it is his greatest liability because it was a model for Obama’s healthcare program. Other issues that will decide the future of our great nation, like jobs, national security, our mammoth debt, Planned Parenthood and gay marriage, will serve as campaign talking points, but by the time November 2012 rolls around, all candidates will sound the same and we will be left with making our decision on who looks the most presidential in the ads tearing down all the other candidates. Milt Thomas is a Vero Beach resident and an experienced freelance writer/ author with a 20-year background in the music industry. He currently writes biographies, blogs, lectures, travels extensively and is an active member of the National Press Club.

!

Among the male candidates, we can scratch off the “niche” candidates, niche meaning they are undistinguishable from Fred the local Honda salesman. So that leaves the front runners, Rick Perry and Mitt Romney. Both are handsome men, so they meet that standard. They are also not prone to gaffes. Rick Perry tossed out one live grenade, telling Florida voters that Social Security is a Ponzi scheme when most of them depend on Social Security to live. (Actually, there can be a comparison made here. A Ponzi scheme benefits the first investors and insures there will be no money left for future investors, just like social security. ) So, if Perry and Romney pass the most important tests, their looks and their ability to speak intelligently, we are left with sorting through all the secondary qualifications and their views on what they would do if elected. They share the most important of these secondary qualification – neither of them agree with anything

2 0 1 1

lecting a Republican candidate because the Democratic choice is a foregone conclusion. So let’s look at the most important qualities in selecting a Republican candidate to run against Presi- MILT THOMAS dent Obama. First of all, looks are at the top of the list. The candidate must be telegenic because we are going to have to watch him or her on television and other media for at least the next five years. No one wants to look at an ugly president. Among the female candidates, of which there is one so far, Michele Bachman is certainly attractive. However, Bachman can’t seem to open her mouth without inserting one or both feet. Now, if she wasn’t attractive but still prone to gaffes, one wonders if she would have ever been considered a top tier candidate if even for a short while.

1 5 ,

An uninformed visitor to our country would think the next presidential election is six weeks away given the amount air time and print already given to candidates competing for that office. I say six weeks because that is more typical of election campaigns in advanced societies, unlike the two year media onslaught now common here. You can blame it all on Christmas. Christmas shopping season used to start after Thanksgiving. Now it begins after Independence Day. Politicians know a good thing when they see it. All this media hype about the candidates places a great deal of pressure on average voters like myself. How are we supposed to decide which candidate is best for the country and the entire free world when we vote in November of next year, assuming the Mayan end-of-world prediction does not come true? Actually, it is relatively easy. First of all, we only have to worry about se-

S E P T E M B E R

Blame the extended political season on Christmas


1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

14

^CQKTH u gKNO=;6HO Pink bras, bling help promote breast cancer awareness Dr. Rob Callery will tell you that it was the right thing to do to sponsor a team to participate in the upcoming American Cancer Society’s Making Strides against Breast Cancer 5k walk Dr. Callery’s wife, Cathie, loved the idea of this year’s theme of walking for Breast Cancer awareness while sporting pink bras. Cathie Callery

was attracted by the glitter and glitz so her team got out their glue guns to work on their wardrobe for the Oct. 15 walk. The office workroom at Ocean Oaks Dental Group was filled with pink bras and lots of bangles, baubles and feathers as the team stepped it up to bring on the bling for their team. When Cathie and Rob Callery began working with the American Cancer Society 14 years ago, they

never thought that “supporting the cause” would be by “sporting a bra.” But once they decided their wardrobe, Cathie found the volunteers to walk in the event. Ocean Oaks Dental’s team includes Cathie Callery, Arielle Noble, Kathy Hart, Tamara Welcome, Robin Selzer, Kristi White, Jean Leifhelm, Roxanne Martin, Valerie Mae Miller and Heather Anderson. Where there are women decorating pink bras with sequins, lace trim

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Dr. Rob Callery, DDS, pours out the Chocolate Martinis to support the Team efforts

and feathers, there are always a few male supporters who are good hearted enough to supply pizza and cocktails. Dr. Callery and another of the team, Randy Wytrval, were there to cheer the team on and mix and serve chocolate martinis and buy the hardworking women some pizza to keep up their strength. Just what a festive decorating party requires. Wytrval, who owns Synergy Architectural Design never thought he would see the offices being used as a lingerie shop when he designed the luxurious Ocean Oaks Dental Group’s offices, but he did not seem to think it was a bad thing at all. He will be at the 5k and although he will not be wearing one of the sparkly bras, he did dye his moustache pink to support the team. The decorating party was filled with laughter but when Dr. Callery was asked how he came to be involved he became serious. He recently became the new Chairman for the local Cancer Society after his dental assistant, Robin, who had been with Ocean Oaks for 14 years, had two rough bouts with breast cancer. Callery said, “One out of eight women will experience breast cancer and having someone who worked so closely with me and my partners made it more personal.” The Callery’s are huge supporters of numerous charities, but this one is especially close to both their hearts. The walkers will begin at 9 a.m. on Oct. 15 from the Sebastian River Medical Center. Team Ocean Oaks will be there strutting their bras (over t-shirts of course). All proceeds will benefit Making Strides Against Breast Cancer’s programs to educate, support and facilitate the medical treatments of the women and men who have been diagnosed with the disease.


SOCIAL | LIFESTYLE

15 ! S E P T E M B E R 1 5 , 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O B E A C H

Arielle Noble gets creative

Tamara Welcome takes it up a notch with boa feathers and gems

N E W S W E E K L Y

Arielle Noble,Tamara Welcome, Randy Wytrval, Kathy Hart, Kristi White, Jean Leifhelm, Cathie Callery and Robin Selzer make up Team Ocean Oaks


16

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

Milestones ENGAGEMENTS

Leon High School, Ponce de Leon, in 1997; the University of West Florida, Burgess-Bartolucci Pensacola, in 2006 with a degree in ST. PETERSBURG — Ashley Bur- exceptional student education; and gess of St. Florida Atlantic University in 2009 Petersburg , with a masters degree in educational daughter of leadership. She is employed by St. LuTom and Cacie County School District as a proron Burgess of gram specialist. St. Petersburg, Hays graduated from John Carroll is engaged to High School, Fort Pierce, in 1997, and Eric Bartolucci the University of Florida, Gainesville, of Jacksonville. in 2001 with a degree in food and reBartolucci is source economics. He is vice presithe son of Greg dent of Hays Harvesting Inc. and Amy Bartolucci of Vero Beach and The couple plan to marry Oct. 8. Sandy and Don Wright of Vero Beach. Burgess graduated from St. PetersWEDDINGS burg High School in 2004, from the Farmer-Manny University of Florida Gainsville in MIDDLESBORO, Ky. — Roseanne 2008 with a Bachelor of Science in Finance and from Stetson University Frances Manny of Vero Beach, daughCollege of Law in St. Petersburg in ter of David Manny Sr. of Kenansville 2011 with a Juris Doctor and a Master and Cheryl Manny of Vero Beach, was married to Richard Damon Farmer of Business Administration.. She is employed by the State Attor- of Middlesboro, Ky., on June 18, at ney’s Office in St. Petersburg as As- Covenant United Methodist Church in Middlesboro with the Rev. Samuel sistant State Attorney. Bartolucci graduated from Vero Johnson officiating. Farmer is the son of Richard and Beach High School in 2004 and from the University of Florida Gainsville Crystal Farmer of Tazewell, Tenn. Melissa Davenport of Vero Beach in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science in was maid of honor, with Jennifer Sport Management. He is employed by Jacksonville Muncey, Amanda Cooper, Megan Jaguars NFL Team in Jacksonville as House and Brooke Tabor as bridesmaids. Brylea Tabor and Mia DavenSenior Sales Executive. The couple plan to marry April 21, port were flower girls. Brandon Banks of Pineville, Ky., was 2012. best man, with Randy Lambert and Prescott-Hays John Davenport III as ushers. Landon VERO BEACH — Jody Prescott of Davenport was ring bearer. Vero Beach, daughter of Christine A reception at Middlesboro CounPrescott of try Club followed the ceremony. Westville and The bride graduated from Vero the late Jerry Beach High in 2003 and from Lincoln Prescott, is enMemorial University in Harrogate, gaged to Pete Tenn., in 2009 with a degree in veteriHays Jr. of Vero nary science. Beach. She is employed by Powell Animal Hays is the Hospital in Powell, Tenn., as a lison of Pete and censed veterinary medical technician. Linda Hays of The groom graduated from Bell Fort Pierce. County High School in Pineville, Ky., Prescott graduated from Ponce de in 1999 and from Lincoln Memorial

University in 2005 with a degree in communications. He is employed by TEKsystems Inc. in Knoxville, Tenn. as a contract manager. After a wedding trip to Key West, the couple reside in Maynardville, Tenn.

ANNIVERSARIES 50th Anniversary

Walter and Connie Allen of Vero Beach celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on July 16 on an eightday cruise to Bermuda on the Holland American Veendam out of New York. The couple was married in MorichHenderson-Collier es, N.Y., at her parents home. Tara Collier of Vero Beach, daughThey have been residents of Florida ter of Brian and Tyna Collier of Vero for 10 years. Beach, was married to Chris HendChildren include Robin Goldsmith erson of Vero of Lakewood Park and Cindy Dubicki Beach on May of Remsenburg, N.Y. 28 at MeadThey have two grandchildren and owood Golf & two great-grandchildren. Tennis Club, 50th Anniversary Fort Pierce, Rev. William with Michael T. and Elgene Carter officiStone of Vero ating. Beach celHenderson ebrated their is the son of Hiram and Judy Henderson of Vero 50th wedding anniversary Beach. Megan Collier of Vero Beach was on July 29 maid of honor with Holly Wood, on an eightAudra Espich, Kristi Odon, Jessie day Alaskan Porter, Mandy George, Nicole Del cruise on the Tufo and Ashley Darnell as brides- Norweigian Pearl Cruise ship. The couple was married at Bethel maids. Kirra Henderson and GabriTemple United Pentecostal Church in elle Espich were flower girls. Jon Poole of Vero Beach was best Decatur, Ill. They have been residents of Florida man with Adam Sherako, Kelly Golden, Kenny Darnell, Hiram Hender- for 33 years. Children include the late Will Stone. son, Victor Harrell and Jason Pomar They have two grandchildren. as ushers. Ethan and Bryson Darnell was ring bearers. A reception followed the ceremony BIRTHS at the Club. LAWNWOOD REGIONAL The bride graduated from Vero Harper Monroe Cheston, a daughBeach High in 2001 and from Florida State University in 2005 with a bach- ter, was born to Daniel and Megan elor’s degree in criminology and a Cheston of Vero Beach on July 25. minor in psychology. She is a paraleINDIAN RIVER MEDICAL gal with Hoskins, Turco, Lloyd and CENTER Lloyd, Fort Pierce. Adam Thomas Pfahler, a son, was The groom graduated from Vero Beach High in 1990. He is an ocean born to Eric and Laurel Pfahler of Serescue EMT for Indian River Coun- bastian on July 4. Kaley Michelle and Ryley Jules Neal, ty. Following a wedding trip to Jamaica, twin daughters, were born to Adam and the couple will reside in Vero Beach. Michelle Neal of Vero Beach on July 15.


s?;= u oD;O?;TKDGOD;

17 ! S E P T E M B E R

Ivo David: bringing ‘Fusionism’ from Italy to Vero Beach

1 5 , 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA TASCON

Ivo David goes through the process of how he works on his paintings which start out as charcoal sketches


18 2 0 1 1

!

ARTS | ENTERTAINMENT BY CHRISTINA TASCON VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

I

vo David carries more than just his sketchbook with him when he travels. David takes the history of art along every time he picks up his pen or charcoal pencil to rough out a sketch of a beautiful scene before his eyes. Rarely will he go anywhere without a tablet or something to draw in as he enjoys a cup of coffee at the Vero Beach and Fort Pierce cafés where he is well known by the staff and regular patrons. Sometimes he is working on a piece that is still in his head, but mostly he draws what he sees around him -- faces, figures and familiar local landmarks. Ivo David (pronounced eye-vō) is a classically trained artist from Florence, Italy.  Following in the footsteps of his father, Arduino David, he studied art at University as a master painter and teacher. Many pieces of his work

Ivo David with his painting depicting a scene at South Beach are in the permanent collection of the Biennale Internazionale delle’Arte Comtemporanea in Florence. David has recently returned from Italy where he was invited by the Museum of Fine Art of Casa Di Dante in Bellonzi, Pescara, Italy to exhibit a se-

ries of work based on Dante’s Divine Comedy called the “Illustrations of the Divine Comedy-Inferno, Purgatorio y Paradiso.” His work has appeared in celebrated shows from New York and Washington D.C. He has also been chosen for many of the permanent collections at museums in his homeland of Italy as well as Paris, and other international galleries. He is registered in the Library of Congress; has a book written about him called The Fusionism of Ivo David: A Search for Freedom; is in the Who’s Who in American Art, Encyclopedia of Living Artists, and Who’s Who among the Italian Americans. In fact, his work appears in many artistic publications and encyclopedias as the founder of a style called ‘Fusionism’, which he began in 1956. David describes Fusionism as the process of “fusing the classical with an artistic dream to balance between abstraction and reality.” It is the intuitive blending and layering of color, form, scale, space and time, forming fantastic, fabulous abstractions. Although David has traveled the world as a renowned  painter and poet, this internationally recognized artist chose Vero Beach as his American port. David says moving here was for a simple reason, “It is a beautiful, quiet city with lots of amenities and close to art, like a cultural island. The picturesque corners of the city are

interesting and drew me paint and sketch them.” His love of the area not only made him buy a home here and set up a studio, but also get involved with local activities and events. His 2010 entry into the Hibiscus Festival not only won first place in the Poster contest to represent the show, but also won first place in their Downtown Banner contest and may be seen on the banners that appear along 14th Avenue. David believes that people buy his art “because there is a message in them.” He said that people tell him that his work is soothing to the soul and brings them peace while the vibrancy and colors in his work gives them hopefulness and uplifts their spirit. Last year, David participated in the Vero Beach Art Club’s Art Trail and broke all previous sales records for the event. He says 2010 to 2011 has been a banner year and feels the economy must be getting better. David has shown his local art at the A.E.Backus Gallery at a featured exhibit and at the Art by the Sea Show held at the Vero Beach Museum of Art for the last two years. He is currently working with Alessandro Vannini, a painter and coordinator at the Biennale Internazionale delle’Arte Comtemporanea for a large exhibition in 2013. His paintings of local landmarks such as South Beach, Riverside Park, Jaycee Beach and Conchy Joe’s are snatched up as fast as they are exhibited. Many are proudly featured on the walls in homes from Stuart to Brevard and also bought by winter residents to take back a piece of the Treasure Coast to their Northern residences. So if you catch a glimpse of an artist at the next table or park bench who is sketching furiously, smiling and chatting, with a big Italian accent and friendly manner, it may well be Ivo David. Who knows, you might just find a sketch of your profile or a neighbor or two as they strolled the beaches or parks of Vero Beach that David so loves to paint.


19

MONDAY, SEPT. 19

TUESDAY, SEPT. 20

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21

87O 73O

86O 74O

86O 74O

84O 73O

85O 74O

85O 74O

85O 73O

Winds NNE 8 mph Chance of Rain 0%

Winds: NE 11 mph Chance of Rain 30%

Winds: NE 12 mph Chance of Rain 20%

Winds: NE 13 mph Chance of Rain 40%

Winds: ENE 10 mph Chance of Rain 40%

Winds: NE 9 mph Chance of Rain 60%

Winds: ENE 9 mph Chance of Rain 60%

N E W S W E E K L Y

SUNDAY, SEPT. 18

B E A C H

SATURDAY, SEPT. 17

To submit your calendar listing please email: verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com

V E R O

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16

food booths. Dr. Hook, Molly Hatchet, Blackfoot, Pat Travers and more. Tickets $15 in advance and $20 at gate. 954-205-7813. Sept 24-30: Registration for “Scarecrows in the Garden at McKee Botanical Gardens,” 10 am-4 pm, Monday - Friday. Free entry cost for non-profit or a family. $25 for business organizations. 772-794-0601. For registration forms and rules go to www.mckeegarden.org. Sept 28: Florida’s Research Entrepreneur’s Summit with Congressman Bill Posey at Indian River State College, 6155 College Ln., 8 am. Register at irscbiz.com. Sept 29: “Warm Nights Cool Music in the Park” - Vero Beach Museum of Art, Alice & Jim Beckwith Sculpture Park, 5-7 pm. Jazz guitar, Latin and flamenco music by the Don Soledad Group. $10 ticket, free hors d’oeuvres

!

take a fascinating tour of the “back and front of the house.” See what it takes to put on live theatre performances and the practical aspects to put on a show. 772-231-6990. Sept 22: Vero Beach Book Center presents Stuart Woods with his book “Son of Stone” from his series of Stone Barrington books at 7 pm, autograph and Q & A. You must purchase the book at the event or online for autograph. 772-569-2050, VeroBeachBookCenter.com Sept 23: Treasure Coast Human Resources Association, “Creating a Culture of Safety to Prevent Bullying, Harassment and Bias.” IRSC Mueller Center lecture from 7:30 am-1 pm. $50, contact Cynthia.Stalheber@willis.com. Sept 23-25: Treasure Coast Music Festival at the IRC Fairgrounds, 3 stages of music, 100 vendors and

2 0 1 1

If you’d like to see one of your photographs published in Vero Beach Newsweekly, please send them to us at verobeachnewsweekly@gmail.com. Photos need to be at least 200 dpi and in jpeg format.

1 5 ,

THURSDAY, SEPT. 15

STAFF PHOTO

and cash bar for wine and mixed drinks. 772-231-0707, verobeachmuseum.org. Sept 30: Llama, Llama, Red Pajama Sleepy time Story Hour with Miss Julie. Kids get to dress in fun PJ’s as they listen to the story, enjoy refreshments and meet the story character, Llama. 6:30 pm, Vero Beach Book Center’s Children’s Store, 2145 Indian River Blvd., 772-569-6650. Oct 1: Special Olympics State Aquatic Championship, North Aquatic Center, 9450 95th St., Sebastian. Saturday, 9 am-4:30 pm; Sunday, 8:30 am-1 pm. Food vendor on-site, no alcohol allowed. IRC Recreation Department is now recruiting volunteers. 772-226-1732. Oct 2: Jeane Graves Charity Cupcake Challenge to benefit the Michael J. Fox Foundation. Incredible baking contest and sale. Buy, taste and vote for the best cupcake on the Treasure Coast at this charity event. $10 entry. Heritage Center, 14th Ave., 3-6 pm. 772-473-3410 or email JanieTV@yahoo.com. Oct 6: Poetry reading by artist and Vero Beach pioneer Sean Sexton at the Tiger Lily Art Studios & Gallery at 7 pm, 1903 14th Ave., no admittance fee. Light refreshments. 772778-3443. Oct 8: Family Jamboree at the Indian River County Fairgrounds with games, shows, music, contests, food, crafts and so much more. Vendors may call 772-563-0430. Oct 10: Senior Activities Fair, 2-4 pm at the Schumann Hall Senior Center, 686 14th St., 30+ vendor tables and instructors. Call 772-4692062, kdelong@sramail.org.

S E P T E M B E R

Every Saturday: Oceanside Business Association’s Farmer’s Market, 8 am-noon. Located in the parking lot just south of Humiston Park on Ocean Drive. www.VeroBeachOBA. com, 772-532-2455. Every Sunday: Farmer’s Market from 9 am-2 pm in downtown Vero at the corner of 14th Ave. & 21st St. Contact Eric Hessler by email: eric@ mainstreetverobeach.org or call the Main Street office, 772-480-8353. Sept 15: “Cha-Cha and Pizza” to kick off National Ballroom Week. USA Dance, Heritage Center, 2145 14th Ave., 7 pm, $8-$10, 772-7709684, verodance.org. Sept 15-25: “All My Sons” at the Vero Beach Theatre Guild, 2020 San Juan Ave. Visit their web site at www. VeroBeachTheatreGuild.com for varied show times and cost or call 772562-8300. Sept 16: Lifestyle & Media Auction: Springhill Suites Marriott, 5115 Indian River Blvd., Opportunity to bid for advertising & publicity at auction. Proceeds go to the Sebastian River Chamber of Commerce. $10 members - $20 non-members includes hors d’oeuvres. 772-589-5969. Sept 16-17: Comedy Zone, Riverside Theatre, comedians Ken Evans and Lucas Bohn, Riverside Theatre, 6250 Riverside Park Dr. Tickets $15, go to riversidetheatre.com or call 772-231-6990. Sept 17: “No Flea Market” at the Humane Society’s Education Room from 8 am-2 pm, 6230 77th St. The best donated items from their thrift shop are available for sale for this once a year fundraiser. 772-567-2044. Sept 18 & 25: Riverside Theatre Open House, 6250 Riverside Park Dr., free event and refreshments as you

!

Community Calendar


^AC?;=

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

20

Vero Beach High School boys’ golf is young and talented

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

BY MIKE BIELECKI FOR VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

The Vero Beach High School boys’ golf team is in the very early stages of making a name for themselves along the Treasure Coast. Okay, they aren’t ready for their own shaving cream commercials (heck, most of them don’t need to shave as of yet anyway), but this is possibly the most talented team of prep golfers to come through the Treasure Coast— ever. Led by co-captains, junior Fredrik Gutafsson and freshman Jake Leffew, Vero Beach won Monday’s Okeechobee Invitational over Martin County, John Carroll, Treasure Coast, Sebastian River, and Fort Pierce Central High Schools. Gustafsson’s 73 and Leffew’s 77 were paired with freshman Nick Cammarene’s 74 and sophomore Jordan Payton’s 78 to earn the team victory. Junior Sean Keeby carded an 82 and sophomore Brad Wonka shot an 84, but only the top four scores for each team were taken. “Last year, the team made it to regionals and we missed states by three shots—I shot an 80,” Gustafsson said. “My goal for the team this year is to contend for the state title at the state tournament. For me, I would like to make the All-Treasure coast team and contend for the individual title.” Like most every young, talented ball-striker in Florida, Gustafsson

would like to play Division-I golf for a South Eastern Conference or Atlantic Coast Conference school and eventually play on the PGA Tour. “We have an extremely talented team, and a lot of that talent is young,” Gustafsson said. “Jake Leffew is special for his age, to say the least. He has a great head on his shoulders and is a born leader, and I believe that is why he is a co-captain with me.” While Gustafsson and Leffew are the unquestioned leaders of the team, it is a topic of debate who is actually the most talented golfer on the team. College football prospect and fellow junior Connor Moore shared his opinion. “Fred is the man,” Moore said. “He expects to shoot a 72 or 73 every time out and only gets visibly excited when he breaks 70,” he said of his friend. “But Jake plays beyond his years. And beside, he’s a Leffew—they’re good at everything.” Moore was talking about the freshman’s older sister, Harvard lacrosse star Jenn Leffew, who was a talented student and high school All-American during her time at Vero Beach High School. Point West head PGA golf professional Mark Cammarene, whose son Nick is the team’s other fabulous frosh, offered his professional opinion. “Payton had a real good year last year as a freshman, but Brad might

Superior Auto Service Family Owned and Operated “Old Fashioned Service” Superior Auto Service employs ASE Master Mechanics to provide diagnostic and repair services on all American, European & Asian vehicles. We install premium and original equipment parts only!

have the most talent of anyone out here,” the elder Cammarene said. “He doesn’t have the head and maturity of Jake Leffew, as he’s only been playing competitively for about three years. He was a baseball player who only played a little bit of golf as a child. He’s just starting to learn how to think out there and hit shots, and I only see him getting better and better.” Wonka finished fifth in a Florida Junior Tour event over the summer and placed second in the Sam Parks Invitational in Tampa two weeks ago, where he missed first-place by just a stroke. “He’s almost got a long and lazy swing, kind of like (1992 Masters Champion) Freddie Couples,” Cammarene said. “He’s strong, he hits it 320 off the tee—the ball just jumps right off his club face.” As for Cammarene’s son, Nick, his 74 at Monday’s tournament puts him in the conversation as the team’s most talented golfer (even if the elder Cammarene refuses to play the part of the proud papa).

What is certain, however, is the that Fighting Indians golf will be a team to watch for the next several years—with or without their own commercials.

Freshman Nick Cammarene

Valvoline Expresscare of Vero Beach Quick Lube Owned and Operated by Superior Auto Service

(772) 778-6645 Under New Management

Owner Bill Marion, a certified ASE Master Mechanic, has been repairing vehicle in Vero Beach since 1987 at the same location.

(772) 569-1410 1212 23rd St., Vero Beach, FL 32960 · www.verobeach.com

STAFF PHOTOS

Sophomore Payton Taylor

Co-Captain, Junior Fredrik Gustafsson


SPORTS

21

$8:)2 ?84#&2 (*812 514 $+>;. <+66&:>:#3 (3 -&;;

78:'+.= BKP*X+*+ @/UUG @WOS CS$X#R OXP$" =I9VU! /1&3'+.= @/"( W(( .WPP"*R W( M$X* -&':&3'+.= 2$X* +WMX M$P% /"" %WOR* M$X* UWOSR (WS T: /"" +/G /!143'+.= @/UUG @WOS /P @*/PWX0R 7**( (SW! LU!H,"WR*

?4>'+.= >S< >WPWMX $X P%* FW./"P ?WOX&*3 FOSP$R @$"" /P =U! 0+214'+.= ?$N* !OR$, /P @*/PWX0R 7**( (SW! 1U!H'U! 01:'+.= J"WW+G >/SG J/S (SW! 1V/!HEU!

9:VV ;,*/X CS$N* 4*SW J*/,%3 A? 9E)L9 ==E<'L)<1VLV

N E W S W E E K L Y

"!0' $0*. -525 '6+! ) 4#.0 3#)&! )%%.#,, )1% .#&#6(#/

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

B E A C H

95,(9 /5 /<" 95%(90

V E R O

adding varsity baseball, volleyball, golf, tennis, and soccer, Master’s Academy had an eye on the most competitive of Florida high school sports. “There was this hint, late in the winter, about football,” Powell said. “That was very controversial, as there were a lot of people thinking we were

!

business. Whatever they choose to do in the future, I would like to think that Master’s Academy pushed them to that success.” After an eight-year professional baseball career, Brown coached at his alma mater for another eight years, sending off several Golden Rams off to play college and professional baseball over that period of time. When given a shot at starting a baseball program at Master’s Academy, Brown jumped at the opportunity. “I knew I wanted continue my coaching career in the right place and with the right kids, and be a part of starting a (baseball) program,” Brown said. “When I walked through the door, before meeting anybody, I knew this was the place I wanted to be because it felt like home.” The school was already competitive in varsity softball, having won a district title in 2010 and repeating in 2011. Then, with momentum built up within the athletic department after

2 0 1 1

STAFF PHOTO

Master’s Academy Head Coach Dan Smith walks his team through plays as they prepare for their second game of the season against Vero Beach’s Junior Varsity.

1 5 ,

Tim Tebow’s visit to Master’s Academy this past May left an enduring impression on the 800 people who attended his fundraiser for the school’s burgeoning athletic program. He spoke not only of his fabled football college career at the sold-out event, but also of his love of God and belief in the importance in strength of character. Master’s Academy’s request for a Tebow visit in 2012 was fast-tracked once the former Gators star heard of the nature Master’s Academy’s request and gathered an opinion of its faculty. “You can see that they’re top-notch people,” Tebow said at the time. To say Tebow left an impression on headmaster Dr. Grant Powell and the rest of the faculty at Master’s Academy would be an understatement. “It was exciting to hear an individual of Tim Tebow’s stature talk about the importance of character,” Powell said. “There are a lot of athletes today saying, ‘I’m not a role model.’ And he said, ‘Well, those athletes are, they’re just not very good ones.’ “We want to see young men and women being groomed and cultivated to the place where what we see on the field or on the court isn’t just sportsmanship, but it emanates from an internal character.” First-year athletic director Charles Brown shares Powell’s vision for the athletic program at Master’s Academy. The former John Carroll standout and AA Yankees pitching prospect sets the highest standards for his programs and student-athletes. “What we expect from our student athletes isn’t just winning on the field, it is winning on the field in a Christlike manner,” Brown said. “We’re obviously not a big 6A school, but I feel we are very competitive in our sports. I want our kids to be successful down the road, whether as an athlete, a congressmen, or a CEO in

too small to have a football program. I never thought I would be so jazzed about a football program, myself.” Master’s Academy was defeated, 35-0, it its inaugural game against Merritt Island Christian. The Patriots ran just 14 or their 26 plays for positive yardage, showing their inexperience against a competitive opponent. “We gave Merritt Island Christian School a fairly good competition, I think, for our very first game,” Powell said. “(Our players) were very, very green, but we gave them a respectable competition. We play to win, but even if we lose, we want to behave like a winner.” The score was all but insignificant to Powell, though, as he saw his student-athletes conducting themselves with a great amount of character. “What threw me most, was the announcer from Merritt Island Christian saying our guys by name, and how he appreciated their sportsmanlike conduct,” Powell said. “We would knock ‘em down, but then help them back up. That’s who we are. “We want people to see Godly character in all we do, and that is what we are all about – training young men and women to think and reason from truth and to manifest that kind of Godly character in everything they do.”

S E P T E M B E R

BY MIKE BIELECKI VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLLY

!

Character trumps wins and losses at Master’s Academy


22

This week at Vero Beach High School

This week at St. Edward’s

Who: Vero Beach High School vs. Fort Pierce Westwood Where: Billy Livings Field at the Citrus Bowl Time: 7:30 p.m. What they did last week: Vero Beach High School defeated Martin County at home, 42-14. Fort Pierce Westwood lost at Treasure Coast, 41-18. What you should know: Ft. Pierce Westwood lost former All-State quarterback Traveres Copeland to Treasure Coast High School when he transferred after last football season. Current Westwood starting quarterback Karnal Davidson transferred to Vero Beach briefly in 2010 before transferring back. Westwood has lost its first two games by a total of 102-18. Current Vero Beach quarterback Nick Madden transferred from John Carroll in the spring and has thrown for 563 yards and 4 touchdowns through two games. Vero Beach High School threw for a total of 666 yards and 6 touchdowns in 11 2010 contests.

Who: St. Edwards vs. Upperroom Christian Academy Where: Pirate Stadium Time: 7:00 p.m. What they did last week: St. Edward’s lost at Trinity Christian, 14-13. Upperroom lost at Miami Day 2-0. What you should know: The Pirates are coming off their second straight loss, but showed improvement in Week 2. Cortez Brown ran for 98 yards and 2 touchdowns in defeat, and should have a big game against an overmatched Upperroom team. The offense will be without starting QB Anderson Proctor, but should be fine if Brown breaks off a couple of long runs. Upperroom plays a class below St. Edwards, against 1B competition. The school had just 22 high school students at the start of the 2010-2011 school year, so the Pirates will have a rare advantage in personnel numbers.

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

SPORTS

PHOTO BY SAM WOLFE

Vero Beach High School quarterback Nick Madden follows the block of running back Dentist Hall past a Martin County defender last week.


^QLCCH=

23 ! S E P T E M B E R

Indian River Charter High School: A model of success

1 5 , 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O B E A C H

BY LISA RYMER VERO BEACH NEWSWEEKLY

Zachary Hilberer and Patrick Haas work together on a musical composition

The Treasure Coast may not be known as a bastion of academic achievement, nonetheless Indian River Charter High School is starting to make a name for itself turning out well-rounded students with a talent for the arts. With another “A” grade pending from the state, a low administration to student ratio, and graduates who are consistently achieving national fame, the school continues to make waves and chart the course for other institutions in its wake. As a respite for students who buck the norm – be it their appearance, a passion for the arts or an outlying academic acumen – IRCHS offers an alternative to the traditional education curriculum. A college-styled campus, small class sizes, flexible schedules, and a formal visual and performing arts program create an ideal environ-

ment for students to realize their potential in a variety of disciplines. This year, there are 675 students enrolled at IRCHS and for the first time since opening in 1998, the school had to hold a lottery to fill a limited number of available spots. A second lottery is scheduled in January for admission in the winter semester. “We capped enrollment at 650 to 700 students,” says Gene Waddell, a current board member of IRCHS and a founding father of the school. “Otherwise we could lose what got us here.” IRCHS was formed by a grass roots effort of a handful of educators, business people and parents concerned that the two public high schools were not serving the needs of the entire community. In ‘99, as far back as the records are accessible, Vero Beach High School was given a “D” grade by the state; Sebastian River High CONTINUES ON PAGE 24

N E W S W E E K L Y

STAFF PHOTOS

Michael Naffziger’s Musical Theatre Class prepares for a production of Roger and Hammerstein’s Cinderella


SCHOOLS

!

24

2 0 1 1

IRCHS

Yaritza Arquieta, Christine Aguirre, Kadija Holder, Amineh Bell working in the reading lab

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

FROM PAGE 23

David Mundy’s percussion class

School received a “C.” Waddell and his board members rightfully believed that a good dose of competition would raise the bar for everyone. A local insurance broker, Waddell was a school board member for the district in the late ‘80s. Later, he helped establish a performancebased high school diploma program and he served on the board of the county’s adult education program. Then, in ’97, the state approved legislation pertaining to charter schools. A charter school is based on a contract with the school district, which oversees the goals, standards, and mission statement of the institution. Although IRCHS is a public school, it differs from other public schools in the area in that there is no teacher’s union, no tenured positions and it has an employment-at-will policy. “Charter takes between $10 and $12 million from the district’s budget,” says Waddell. Charter schools receive from the

state the same amount per student of the full time equivalency as other public schools. However, because charter schools are not eligible to apply for other kinds of funding available to traditional public schools, they receive on average 11.4 percent less per student. In traditional public high schools, the state’s class size amendment prohibits more than 25 students per class. Charter schools are bound by a class size average of 25 students. Moreover, charter schools only receive one-fifteenth of the cost per student from capital outlay funds from the state. That means the money available to charter schools to meet the growing demand for enrollment is significantly less than traditional public schools. Although funding for IRCHS is not the same as for public schools, “the laws are requiring charter schools to become more and more like traditional schools,” says IRCHS principal, Cynthia Aversa. “They have to take all the same tests and meet all the same requirements as public schools.” Nonetheless, the school has achieved an “A” grade from the state for three years in a row, based on its advance placement program and dual-enrollment at adjacent Indian River State College, combined with test scores and graduation rates. On average, says Aversa, who has worked for the school since 2002, and before that for the school district for 15 years, IRCHS consistently scores the highest in the county on the FCAT, as well as on the ACT test for college admissions. In fact, IRCHS scores higher than the national average on the ACT, which she explains “lends itself to the school’s integrative curriculum.” The integrative curriculum is a teaching technique that connects all subject matters to reinforce learning. Every semester, Charter introduces a new time period -- ancient world, Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Post Modernism and Modernism -- with all course work focusing on the subject’s


1 5 , 2 0 1 1

! V E R O

Indian River Charter High School Principal Cynthia Aversa and Assistant Principal Dr. Ray Adams

B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

CONTINUES ON PAGE 26

S E P T E M B E R

relevance to that time in history. On the other hand, IRCHS scores are lower than the county average on the SAT, which, Aversa says, aligns itself more with a conventional teaching approach. Universities accept both the ACT and SAT for admissions. Most educators will recommend which test to take according to the strengths of an individual student. Three years ago, the district stopped administering the PSAT as a practice exam, says Aversa. Now, “The Plan,” a pre-cursor to the ACT is administered to every tenth grader in the district. Last year, says Waddell, 48 percent of IRCHS graduates received Bright Futures Scholarships, earning a B grade point average or better. Every year, between five and seven students earn their AA degree from the college at the same time they receive their high school diploma. Other requirements for graduation include attendance of cultural events, government meetings and a minimum of ten hours volunteer work every semester. Also, twice a year students are offered the opportunity to travel to other countries to broaden their understanding of the world. In addition to Spanish, French and the language courses available at the college, IRCHS now has a Chinese language program with a full-time teacher funded through a Fulbright grant. The teacher of Chinese is also involved in community outreach, teaching at the public library and at Imagine School, an elementary charter school in south county. Moreover, there are currently 15 international students attending IRCHS through a program Aversa coordinated that both elevate the cultural aspects of the school and provide an innovative avenue of additional funding. International students can apply for an I-20 form from Homeland Security and receive a one year student visa to attend IRCHS. The students must provide an acceptance letter from the school to the American embassy in their own country, and have funding

25

!

SCHOOLS

Front Row: Michael Perrault, Madison Ware, Selina Flores, Kayleen Ridout, Back Row: Karen Suaez, Tatiana Cooley, Shelby Ross


26 !

SCHOOLS

2 0 1 1

IRCHS

Erik Martin, Victoria Zuckert, Blake Burrell, Aurora Rollins relax in “Home Base”

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

FROM PAGE 25

Art class

equal to the amount the state would pay the school for attendance of an American student. Now, Aversa has launched yet another new project that generates funding for the school with Educatius International, which brings 1520 students from across the globe to IRCHS for an English and Golf Learning Experience (EAGLE). Working in conjunction with Pointe West, whose golf pro, Mark Cammarene, runs the IRCHS golf school, international students spend a few hours each day learning English, and the remainder of the day learning golf. The students “cannot be a burden on the system,” says Aversa, citing the law. IRCHS has a limited administrative department, consisting of Aversa, assistant principal, Ray Adams, who from the start has been an integral part of the school’s arts program, and a business manager who handles accounting and personnel functions. In addition to these three administrators, there are six support positions at the school and 40 instructors, for a total student to employee ratio of 675:49, or 17 students for every one staff. Even the task of cleaning the school is handled by students and staff. In contrast, the school district of Indian River County counts 15,645 non-charter school students, with a total of 2,012 employees, which equates to eight students for every one staff. Not all charter schools are like the locally run and locally managed IRCHS. Imagine School, one of five charter schools in the county, is managed by an organization based out of Arlington, Virginia, providing administrative and financial support that supplements the shortfall from state funding. In the meantime, Aversa sits on several state boards and committees, such as the Florida Consortium of Public Charter Schools, to keep apprised of the laws and trends


27

SCHOOLS

! S E P T E M B E R 1 5 , 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O B E A C H

in education. “We’re working diligently to get the funding our students are due,” says Aversa. The land on which the school is situated is leased from the college. David Sullivan, provost of the Mueller Campus, was another founding board member who had access to a 36-room building that in the past was used to house prison guards during area training sessions. That building, located on the east side of the school’s campus, was renovated with a state grant and leased to IRCHS in 1998. In 2002, with the school operating at a capacity of 250 students, and 400 more on a waitlist, the performing arts program was launched. One of the reasons that drove the decision to establish a performing arts program at IRCHS, says Waddell, was the lack of importance the other schools placed on the arts. According to Waddell, the faculty at VBHS voted in ’03 or ’04, to do away with seventh period, which was the time for elective classes. When Gary Miller, the award-win-

ning choral director at VBHS, announced he was leaving to work at IRCHS, the school realized what it had lost. A subsequent vote reversed the decision to cut the arts, and the next year the school district voted to build a $10 million performing arts center. “Competition, pure and simple, has helped elevate the arts programs,” says Waddell. In 2002, IRCHS leased another five acres from the college and applied for a mortgage with which to build the performing arts campus. The school uses a portion of the money from the state to pay the $30,000 per month mortgage. A clause on the lease says that if the current board defaults on the mortgage or wants to close the school, the college has the first right of refusal to continue the charter, says Waddell. Currently, there are about 350 students who declare a performing arts major, but other students can also participate in the fine arts programs. Performing arts majors are required to take classes in their elected discipline each semester, as well as regular

curriculum courses. Up to this point, there has been no proper stage at the school. Performances are held at one of the other auditoriums in town, including the Vero Beach Theatre Guild which has a reciprocal arrangement to expose students to all aspects of production in exchange for the use of its stage. There is some discussion about constructing a cover for the school’s courtyard, which would permit performances even when it’s raining. Recently, John Schumann expressed an interest in donating seed money to the school that would enable the construction of a permanent performance venue. Adams is researching various grants and other types of support to help with construction costs. Some of the IRCHS alumni who are performing on a larger stage include Alexa Bartol, a former drama student, who is scheduled to appear on “Desperate Housewives” this season. Previously, Bartol has appeared on episodes of “CSI: NY,” and several of the courtroom shows (in case you didn’t know, the people who appear

on those shows are, indeed, actors.) Another drama alumna, Hayley Bruce, has made appearances on episodes of “The Glades.” And, Isabelle Power, a former IRCHS Valedictorian and dance major, is slated to appear on the new television series, “Charlie’s Angels.” Gary Zanello, a music major, received a scholarship to attend Berklee College of Music in Boston, placing in the top 40 out of 6,000 guitarists who auditioned for admission. Former world champion tennis player, Ivan Lendl, enrolled his daughter, Daniela Lendl, in the golf school at IRCHS. Chosen as a preOlympics team member, she competed in South Africa last summer, and signed with the University of Alabama’s golf team. And, Jermaine Jackson, an early graduate of IRCHS, has achieved national acclaim as a music producer with a recording studio in Miami. For more information about the IRCHS and its efforts to build a theater, please call: (772) 567-6600, or visit them online: IRCHS.org.

N E W S W E E K L Y

Established in 1998, the Indian River Charter High School now has an enrollment of nearly 700 students grades 9 through 12


28

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

2 0 1 1

!

Obituaries Ann McDonagh Ann M. McDonagh, 77, died Aug. 29, 2011, at Sebastian River Medical Center. She was born in Dublin and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming from New York City. She was an artist. Survivors include her sons, Gerry McDonagh and Donogh McDonagh, both of Vero Beach; daughters, Siobhan Danks of Vero Beach and Sheelagh Maiolo of Pittsburgh; sisters, Eve Kavanagh of New York City, Mona Lawless of Ireland and Marie Gulick of Arizona; brothers, Frank Kavanagh of Ireland and Tony Kavanagh of Oregon; seven grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice House, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A online guest book is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com. Mark McShurley Mark M. McShurley, 94, died Aug. 28, 2011. He was born in New Castle, Ind., and lived in Vero Beach for five years, coming from Stuart. He was an FBI agent and also worked as a financial supervisor. He was a member of St. John of the Cross Catholic Church, Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife, Esther McShurley of Vero Beach; daughter, Suzanne Landre of St. Louis; sons, Mark C. McShurley and Mike D. McShurley, both from Virginia; 12 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com. John L. “Whitey” Nemeth John L. “Whitey” Nemeth, 69, died Aug. 25, 2011, at his home. He was born in Easton, Pa, and lived in Vero Beach for 10 years. Before retirement, he was a senior manager with 37 years of service at Air Products and Chemicals Inc. MIS-International. He was a member of St. Thomas More Church in Allentown, Pa., and St. Helen Catholic Church in Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife, Marlene; sons, Carey and Michael; sisters, Shirley Bussenger and Donna Curcio; brother, Barry; and five grandchildren. Me-

morial contributions may be made to St. Helen Catholic Church, 2025 20th Ave., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook may be signed at www.weberfuneralhomes.com.

tions may be made to VNA Hospice of Indian River County, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960; www.vnatc. com. A guest book is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Pamela J. Rochowiak Pamela J. Rochowiak, 63, died Aug. 18, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. She was born in Chicago and moved to Vero Beach in 1970 to begin her career in education. Before retirement in 2000, she was an English, speech, drama and debate teacher for the Indian River County School District, including the Vero Beach junior and high schools and Sebastian River High School. She directed and performed in plays and musicals throughout South Florida, and was a member of the Theatre Guild, Pineapple Playhouse, Theater-GoRound; Encore Alley, Treasure Coast Opera Society and Riverside Theatre. She was a member of the St. Helen’s Parish and Choir. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society of Vero Beach and Indian River County, P.O. Box 644, Vero Beach, FL 32961. A guest book may be signed at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Pamela Waddell Pamela J. Waddell, 64, died Aug. 30, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Byesville, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 50 years, coming from her birthplace. Survivors include her husband of 44 years, Donald A. Waddell of Vero Beach; daughters, Karie A. Stefanacci, Donna J. Waddell and Mia R. Rayburn, all of Vero Beach; mother, Ruth Ann Couch of Vero Beach; sister; three brothers; six grandchildren; and one great-grandson. Memorial contributions may be made to Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. Services: A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com.

Bruni Luchessi Troxell Bruni Luchessi Troxell died Aug. 27, 2011, at VNA Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Salinas, Puerto Rico, and lived in Vero Beach for 11 years, coming from Cincinnati. Before retiring, she worked as an elementary school teacher for two years and for Eastern Airlines as a flight attendant for six years. She attended St. Sebastian Catholic Church, Sebastian, and was a member of Orchid Island Golf and Beach Club and Community Bible Study. Survivors include her husband of 40 years, William Troxell of Vero Beach; daughter, Kimberley Hollingsworth of Fayetteville, N.C.; son, Michael Troxell of Phoenix; sister, Myrna Calcagni of Yardley, Pa.; brother, Luis Luchessi of Ponce, Puerto Rico; and three grandchildren. Memorial contribu-

Gordon Greer Gordon Greer, 90, died Aug. 30, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Buffalo, N.Y., and after living in various eastern U.S. cities, he lived in Vero Beach for 10 years, coming from St. Bart’s. Before retiring, he worked for the Spencer-Kellogg Co. where he became East Coast Division vice president. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, F. Ernestine Holland Greer of Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.strunkfuneralhome.com. Sandra Novik Sandra Novik, mother of Eric Platt and the late Diana Platt Frenkel, passed away on Aug. 22. She was raised in New York City, lived in Bethesda, MD, Glen Clove, NY and most recently Vero Beach, FL. She is survived by her son, sister Marilyn Pollans, daughter-in-law Linda Roth Platt and grandchildren Samantha and David. Donations can be made to the Diana Platt Frenkel Genetic Counseling Research Fund, PO Box 9110, Waltham, MA 02454.

Arthur L. Williams Arthur L. Williams, 82, died Aug. 27, 2011. He was born in Dawsonville, Ga., and lived in Vero Beach since 1996, coming from Brooklyn, N.Y. Survivors include his daughters, Margrette Smith of Howell, N.J., and Lily Rollins of Almara, N.Y.; stepsons, James Earl of Eastman, Ohio, and John Green of Plainfield, N.J.; brothers, David Williams and Joseph Williams, both of Dawsonville; and sister, Armelia Williams. Walter Bernhold Walter Bernhold, 90, died Aug. 31, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Java, Dutch East Indies, and lived in Vero Beach for 17 years, coming from Long Island, N.Y. Survivors include his wife, Freddie Dudding-Bernhold of Vero Beach; daughter, Catherine Procaccini of Long Island; stepdaughters, Danni Kegaries of Hollywood Hills, Calif., and Lynn Dudding-Back of Orlando; sister, Hannah Brenkman-Bernhold of Arnhem, Netherlands; half sisters, Maarta and Leis, both of the Netherlands; and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice Foundation, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com. Elizabeth Flowers Elizabeth Flowers, 96, died Aug. 30, 2011, at the VNA/Hospice House in Vero Beach. She was born in Van Wert, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 31 years, coming from Mishawaka, Ind. Survivors include her sons, Wayne Flowers of O’Brien, David Flowers of Orlando and Joel Flowers of Vero Beach; brother, Bill Billman of Panama; sister, Ann Louise Konkel of Tucson, Ariz.; seven grandchildren; and six great-great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA/Hospice House, 3901 37th St., Vero Beach, FL. 32960.


29

OBITUARIES

! B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y

Willis Alexander Newbold Willis Alexander Newbold, 61, died Sept. 4, 2011, at the VNA Hospice

Jeannette M. Schoen Jeannette M. Schoen, 80, died Sept. 4, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Dayton, Ohio, and lived in Vero Beach for 25 years, coming from Morristown, N.J. She was a volunteer for the Vero Beach Humane Society Thrift Shop. Survivors include her sons, Steven Schoen of Honolulu, Michael Schoen of Bryn Mawr, Pa., and Eric Schoen of Vero Beach; daughter, Nancye Falzon of Morristown; brother, William Baldiga of Falls Church, Va.; sisters, Florence Manning of Falls Church and Juanita Smith of Vero Beach; and seven grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

Merle Everett Jackson Merle Everett Jackson passed away on Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011 in Vero Beach, at the age of 100. He led a varied and successful business career which included work for Packard Motor Car Co. and F.W. Woolworth Co. During World War II he became a CEO of J.T.Wood Co., a parachute and gun brush manufacturer followed by work in industrial engineering as V.P. of Krippendorf Calculator Co. In 1970 Merle retired and moved from Marblehead, MA to the Treasure Coast of Florida residing first in Ft. Pierce and then Vero Beach. One of his many retirement activities was as a member of the Florida Shuffleboard Association. He leaves his daughter Linda Jackson and his close friend Rosemary Callahan of Vero Beach, who cared for him with love and humor in their home. Memorial contributions in his name may be made by check to Schepens Eye Research Institute Massachusetts A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome .com.

V E R O

Nancy Jane Johnson Nancy Jane Johnson, 77, died Sept. 6, 2011, at VNA Hospice. She was born in Johnstown, Pa., raised her family in Pound Ridge, N.Y., and lived 10 years in Cleveland before moving to Vero Beach in 1998, living in Grand Harbor. She worked for Sigrid’s of Vero for many years, as well as other area boutiques. She was a member of the Community Church of Vero Beach. Survivors include her husband of 55 years, Edward Johnson; daughters, Jeanette Johnson of Dallas and Linda Scheuer of Mason, Ohio; son, Keith Johnson of San Antonio; sister, Janet DaGrosa of Mount Laurel, N.J.; and two grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to VNA Hospice, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL. A guestbook is available at www. coxgiffordseawinds.com.

Nuna Gean Stuckey Nuna Gean Stuckey, 70, died Sept. 3, 2011. She was born in Ozark, Ala., and lived in Vero Beach. Survivors include her sons, James Stuckey, Jack Stuckey, Mackerl Stuckey and Jerry Stuckey, all of Vero Beach; daughter, Annie Jean Stuckey-Shelly of Vero Beach; sisters, Eddie Mae Comer and Recia Taylor, both of Panama City; 31 grandchildren; 70 great-grandchildren; and one greatgreat-grandchild.

!

Aaron Michael Hoyt Aaron Michael Hoyt, 47, died Aug. 31, 2011, at the VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. He was born in Muncie, Ind., and moved to Vero Beach 18 years ago from his birthplace. He worked at Piper for seven years as an experimental aircraft assembler. Survivors include Zora Bechdolt of Vero Beach. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

John Michael “Mike” Ohler Sr. John Michael “Mike” Ohler Sr., 62, died Sept. 5, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. He was born in Leavenworth, Kan., and lived in Vero Beach for 37 years, coming from Kansas City, Kan. He was a master builder. He received numerous awards for his carpentry including the Most Promising Carpenter Award in 1971. He was a member of Tabernacle Ministries, Vero Beach. Survivors include his wife of 41 years, Phyllis Elaine Ohler of Vero Beach; sons, John Michael Ohler Jr., Matthew Ohler and Michael Wayne Ohler, all of Vero Beach; daughters, Michele Brillhart of Vero Beach and Cheri Estevez of Royal Palm Beach;and 16 grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Tabernacle Christian School Scholarship Fund, 51 S. Dixie Highway, Vero Beach, FL 32962. A guestbook is available at www. strunkfuneralhome.com.

Janet Marie Snell Janet Marie Snell, 62, died Sept. 5, 2011, at VNA Hospice House, Vero Beach. She was born in Richmond, Calif., and lived in Vero Beach for 22 years, coming from Hollywood. Survivors include her daughter, Angie Regan of Sebastian; mother, Alberta Ball of Vallejo, Calif.; sisters, Nancy of Vallejo and Debbie of Reading, Calif; and three grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www. seawindsfh.com/obituaries.php.

2 0 1 1

June Faulkinham Frank June Faulkinham Frank died Sept. 2, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. She was born in Augusta, Maine, and lived in Vero Beach since 1971. She was a former reference librarian at the Indian River County Library. Survivors include her husband of 10 years, Edward Frank of Vero Beach; sister, Gloria Snow; daughter, Cindy Krupp; son, David Roberts; four grandchildren; and seven greatgrandchildren. Memorial contributions may be

Joanne Gabriele Joanne Gabriele, 69, died Sept. 5, 2011, at Sebastian River Medical Center. She was born in Philadelphia and moved to Vero Beach six years ago from Margate. Survivors include her daughters, Sheri Forman and Michele Cain, both of Vero Beach, and Dana Sussman of Sebastian; son, Albert Gabriele of Melbourne; sisters, Dorothy Lavell of Coconut Creek and Judith Diliberto of North Wales, Pa; and eight grandchildren. A guestbook is available at www. seawindsfh.com/obituaries.php.

House, Vero Beach. He was born in Nassau, Bahamas, and moved to Vero Beach 30 years ago, coming from his birthplace. He had worked in construction as a marble finisher. Survivors include his wife of 10 years, Mary; daughter, Vonna Newbold of Nassau; and sister, Eddie Newbold of Nassau. A guestbook is available at www.coxgiffordseawinds.com.

1 5 ,

Jeanne A. Eberly Jeanne A. Eberly, 90, died Sept. 2, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center. She was born in Chicago and moved to Vero Beach 20 years ago from Aurora, Ohio. She was a graduate of Millikin University, Decatur, Ill. She retired as a teacher of mathematics and science in Warrensville Heights, Ohio. She was an elder of the First Presbyterian Church of Vero Beach and was past president of PEO, Chapter HB. Survivors include her husband, John; daughter, Carol Theis of Aurora, Ohio; sons, John A. Eberly of Auburn Township, Ohio and Mark Eberly of Carmel, Ind.; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the First Presbyterian Church, 520 Royal Palm Blvd., Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www. lowtherfuneralhome.com.

made to VNA Hospice of Indian River County, 1110 35th Lane, Vero Beach, FL 32960. A guestbook is available at www.lowtherfuneralhome.com.

S E P T E M B E R

Steven M. Hrabovsky Steven M. Hrabovsky, 49, died Sept. 2, 2011, at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach. He was born in Danville, Pa., and lived in Vero Beach for 28 years, coming from Numidia, Pa. He was cafeteria supervisor at Indian River Medical Center and had worked at Disney’s Vero Beach Resort. Survivors include his companion of 26 years, Buster Owsley of Vero Beach; sister, Chris Billig of Sebastian; and brother, Joseph Hrabovsky of Fayetteville, N.C. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association, 237 E. Marks St., Orlando, FL 32803. A guestbook is available at www.seawindsfh.com/obituaries.php.


30 2 0 1 1

!

Real Estate Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker: Address 902 Sandpiper Lane

Subdivision Ocean Corp

Address: Subdivision: List Date: List Price: Sell Date: Sell Price: Listing Broker: Selling Broker:

653 Lake Drive Riomar Bay 2/3/2011 $1,300,000 9/6/2011 $1,200,000 Dale Sorensen Real Estate Inc. Coldwell Banker Ed Schlitt

List Date 4/21/2006

List Price $205,000

Sell Date 9/7/2011

Sell Price $175,000

Listing Broker Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

9315 Maiden Court West Old Orchid 5/2/2011 $315,000 9/2/2011 $285,000 Alex MacWilliam, Inc. The Land Corporation of Fl

Selling Broker Alex MacWilliam, Inc.

Mainland Real Estate Sales – September 1-September 7 Address 13135 79th Street

Subdivision Fellsmere Farms

List Date 4/21/2011

List Price 299,500

Sell Date 9/6/2011

Sell Price 260,000

Listing Broker Sebastian Realty, Inc

Selling Broker Billero & Billero Properties

Reach More Than A Zip Code

V E R O

B E A C H

N E W S W E E K L Y

!

S E P T E M B E R

1 5 ,

Barrier Island Real Estate Sales – September 1-September 7

Inside

S D A Y T H U R

!

J U L Y

1 4 ,

2 0 1 1

!

V O L .

1 ,

I S S U E

1 5

eless in July Christmas summertime visit for Hom Santa makes !Page 16 Family Center

Advertise your business in Vero Beach Newsweekly to reach every home on the barrier island, plus communities such as Vero Isles, River Wind, Oak Harbor, Grand Harbor, Vero Beach Country Club, Indian River Club, Pointe West and Bent Pine.

g fun ts weekToe-tappin iness Association hos Oceanside Bus!Page 10 end concert

J. PHOTO BY

LY SCOTT KEL

munity. k to the com h giving bac raphy wit of photog es his love y combin J. Scott Kell

donate to !Gallery to ts!Page 18 non-profi

use for art Finding a ca Director hiring! Page 3

ping y trust In land the Land Trust sets about keee 7 Indian River r Lagoon green !Pag the Indian Rive

12 M 20 ! FORU AR ! CALEND IES 24 ! OBITUAR

ISE CALL 4 TO ADVERT 772.696.200 FECTEAU 3 MARTINE 772.696.523 UMANN MARK SCH

nds Finance !City defe

The Vero Beach Newsweekly gives you the barrier island and more. verobeachnewsweekly.com

To learn more, call Martine Fecteau at 772-696-2004 or Mark Schumann at 772-696-5233.


LOCAL NEWS AT ITS BEST. Congratulations to our Florida Society of News Editors Award winners! 2011 FIRST PLACE AWARDS ■ Breaking Business News: “Federal regulators seize Riverside National Bank” by Tyler Treadway, Keona Gardner and Eric Pfahler ■ Consumer Reporting: “Real estate experts say program failing to solve foreclosure crisis” by Nadia Vanderhoof ■ Crime Reporting: “When murder hits home” by Tyler Treadway and Russ Lemmon

2011 SECOND PLACE AWARDS ■ Enterprise Business Reporting and Real Estate Reporting: “Condo conversions go from flip to flop” by Melissa Holsman and Nadia Vanderhoof ■ Enterprise Photography Series: “The whole island was crying” by Alex Boerner

2011 THIRD PLACE AWARDS ■ Crime Reporting: “Hatch accepts plea deal on racketeering charge” by Melissa Holsman

Don’t miss a moment of our award-winning news coverage. Subscribe at 866-707-6397 or TCPalm.com/subscribe


Vero Beach NEWSWEEKLY 1801 U.S. 1 Vero Beach, FL 32960

*ETSONISPROUDTOCARRYAmerican-Made APPLIANCESFROM7HIRLPOOL#ORPORATION

25CF Side-By-Side Refrigerator w/ Ice & Water Dispsensor %$&6'873sMSRP $1299.99

U.S. POSTAGE PAID FORT PIERCE, FL PERMIT NO. 173

PRSRT STD

Full Console Dishwasher w/ CertiďŹ ed SaniRinseâ&#x201E;˘ $58483sMSRP $499.99

Freestanding Electric Range w/ 4.8CF Capactiy Oven 7&%,63sMSRP $659.99

1.6CF OTR Microwave w/ 2-Speed 220 CFM Venting 7-(863sMSRP $269.99

T H U R S D A Y  S E P T E M B E R

PKG MSRP $2729.96Ă&#x160;U $830 TOTAL SAVINGS

1 5 , 2 0 1 1

/NE0ER(OUSEHOLDs.O(OLDS



WWW*ETSON0OWER"UYCOMsTH3TREET 6ERO"EACHs  

F R E E

Expert Advise + The Best Price


LOCAL NEWS

9 ! 1 5 , 2 0 1 1 ! V E R O

Indian River County fire fighters and paramedics joined with law enforcement officials to host three 9/11 observance ceremonies in Vero Beach this past Sunday. The events marked the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks which took nearly 3,000 lives, including several hundred members of the New York City police and fire departments. At least 200 people gathered at Veterans Memorial Island early Sunday morning for the first of three local 9/11 observances, featuring the Navy Southeast Band, and guest speaker Navy Lt. Cmdr. Michael Welz. The Firefighters Association presented two additional concerts Sunday evening at the Riverside Theatre.

S E P T E M B E R

VeroBeachobserves9/11

B E A C H N E W S W E E K L Y


Vero Beach News Weekly