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2018

VOTERS GUIDE CALDWELL

Making their stands Kansas governor candidates agree to ramp up highway budget, disagree on cuts

KELLY

By Tim Carpenter timothy.carpenter@cjonline.com

T KLOOS

KOBACH

ORMAN

he Republican, Democratic and Libertarian party nominees and two independent candidates for Kansas governor are enthusiastic about reviving investment in highway infrastructure but are all over the map in terms of cuts to state spending. In addition to restoring financing to the Kansas Department of Transportation, which Govs. Jeff Colyer and Sam Brownback drained of $2 billion when state tax revenue tumbled, a majority of 2018 gubernatorial candidates emphasized the need to reasonably fund K-12 public education. Republican nominee Kris Kobach vowed to seek completion of projects included in the T-Works transportation program and compel the Legislature to "stop robbing the highway fund," while Democrat Laura Kelly said she would reshape the budget to emphasize health care, roads and schools. "As a result of the Brownback experiment, we’ve seen bigger class sizes and teachers fleeing the state. That is unacceptable," said Kelly, a state senator from Topeka. "And as governor, I will fully fund our K-12 schools and invest in early childhood education so our students are ready for the jobs of the future." Independent Greg Orman would dedicate more state funding to career or technical education offerings statewide. Independent Rick Kloos singled out the need to upgrade the state's response to damaging wildfires. Libertarian Jeff Caldwell said expansion of community mental health services had to be a priority. "Three areas of state government requiring immediate investment are mental health, the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System and KDOT," Caldwell said. The gubernatorial aspirants on the Nov. 6 ballot offered an array of ideas for limiting or altering expenditures in response to questions submitted to candidates by The Topeka Capital-Journal. Kobach, a Lecompton resident and the Kansas secretary of state, said the state budget could be trimmed through employee attrition. About 11,000 baby boomers retire each day in the United States, he said, and when retirements occur in state government some of those workers shouldn't be replaced. Kobach said illegal immigrants ought to be prevented from receiving state government benefits. The Kansas law allowing some children of undocumented migrants to pay in-state tuition rates at public colleges must be repealed, he said. Kansas will be justified in pulling the plug on "nobid" state contracts, Kelly said. The Brownback and Colyer administrations entered into a large number of contracts without transparent public bidding. "This is an inefficient, not to mention corrupt, way to manage state business," Kelly said. "We must use a competitive bidding process, unless it is an emergency, to help save tax dollars." In a dig against Kobach, the Democratic senator said taxpayers should no longer pay penalties when a state official was guilty of abusing his or

Know the candidates before casting an early ballot beginning Oct. 16 or heading to the polls Nov. 6. Of the 37 statewide and area candidates asked by The Capital-Journal to address a variety of subjects of interest to voters, only Kansas House incumbent Vic Miller, 58th District, declined. U.S. Rep. Roger Marshall's answers were given to the Hutchinson News, our sister newspaper.

INSIDE: • U.S. House, 1st District: page C2 • U.S. House, 2nd District: page C3 • Governor: pages C4, C5 • Secretary of state: page C6 • Attorney general: page C7 • Treasurer: page C8 • Insurance commissioner: page C9 • Kansas House, 47th District: page C10 • Kansas House, 50th District: page C11 • Kansas House, 51st District: page C12 • Kansas House, 52nd District: page C13 • Kansas House, 53rd District: page C16 • Kansas House, 54th District: page C14 • Kansas House, 55th District: page C16 • Kansas House, 56th District: page C15 • Kansas House, 57th District: page C16 • Shawnee County Commission, District 1: page C17

her position. Kobach was found in contempt by a federal judge and used a state credit card to pay the fine. Orman, a Johnson County businessman, said Kansas needed to halt an expensive battle with Missouri for job bragging rights. Both states run tax-break programs exploited by businesses that qualify by moving offices a few blocks east or west. "We should end the border war with Missouri. We should institute a 'no-fly zone' that extends 40 miles around downtown Kansas City," Orman said. "Under this agreement, we would not to recruit companies to move from the Missouri no-fly zone to the Kansas no-fly zone, assuming Missouri agrees to do the same." He said Kansas should make recreational use of marijuana an offense equal to a traffic violation. In addition, the state's $3 billion Medicaid system should aggressively negotiate prescription drug prices for the system's 400,000 participants. "We shouldn’t pay $10 a pill when Canada is paying $2 a pill for a drug," Orman said. Caldwell, the Libertarian nominee, said he would cut operational expenditures at the Department of Corrections by pardoning people convicted of nonviolent marijuana offenses. He said it could save $20 million annually. He proposed selling the Cedar Crest governor's mansion. The state barbering and cosmetology boards can be eliminated, he said, because people working in those fields don't need licenses. Kloos, an independent candidate from Berryton, said he was generally satisfied with the state's approach to budgeting but would authorize more audits of spending by independent reviewers.


C2  Sunday, October 14, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

U.S. HOUSE, 2ND DISTRICT: PAUL DAVIS Please outline reasons you are the best candidate in the field to serve in the U.S. House?

The dysfunction of Washington has spiraled out of control, and I can’t sit back and do nothing. When bipartisanship becomes something that’s threatened by leaders as a last resort — rather than relied upon as the foundation for sound policymaking — the system has lost touch with America and no longer serves the public good. One person cannot change Congress alone, but every seat matters. I have a long history of building relationships across the aisle, finding compromise and getting things done as an elected official here in Kansas. We need more with that mindset in the United States House of Representatives.

President Donald Trump has been active on international trade. How has the president's actions helped or hurt the Kansas economy, especially agriculture, and how would you adjust the government's approach to trade?

I convened an agricultural advisory group early

in my campaign, and I’ve hosted roundtable discussions with Kansas producers and suppliers throughout the district. Without question, they are more worried about the President’s trade war than anything else. I am very supportive of renegotiating NAFTA to protect Kansas jobs, with the caveat that it does not cost Kansas market access. Our state ranks seventh in the nation for agricultural exports, and we cannot grow if trade tensions continue to escalate. It is critical that trade policy protect Kansas producers, retain existing foreign markets, and develop new and emerging markets. In what ways would you reform federal law on funding of Planned Parenthood as well as the availability of legal abortion?

I have never politicized women’s health and I never will. Planned Parenthood is one of our nation’s largest health care providers for women. They provide affordable birth control, vaccinations, lifesaving cancer screenings, testing

and treatment for STDS, HIV screenings, miscarriage management, and other essential care to 2.5 million women each year. What should be the top priorities as Congress works to reform tax law? Explain benefits of your ideas.

I support tax reform that helps middle class Kansans who have been left behind as corporations raked in record profits. As a legislator I voted to cut taxes over 150 times for Kansas families, seniors, and businesses. Unfortunately, the Republican tax law that Congress passed was a Brownback-style giveaway for special interests and campaign donors. It is exploding the national debt, stripping healthcare from 30,000 Kansans in this district, and ultimately raises taxes on Kansans earning less than $75,000 — all to pay for permanent corporate tax cuts. I say that instead of raising taxes on hardworking Kansas families, let’s cut them. Our tax code is riddled with loopholes. Most of these loopholes

benefit big multinational corporations and the wealthiest Americans. They don’t help middle class Americans, they only help widen the gap between the very rich and the rest of us. If these loopholes and others are closed, we can recoup $900 billion in the next 10 years. Last December, I supported a plan to close those $900 billion worth of corporate loopholes and to use it to cut tax cuts for middle and lower income Americans. We need real tax reform for real people Gun violence in the nation's cities, often brought into focus as a consequence of mass shootings, is a public health challenge. What are your recommendations for improving public safety while balancing constitutional right to bear arms? How should government better protect school buildings from shooters?

I support the 2nd amendment and the individual right to bear arms. I’m also a dad, with a second grader who must practice “active shooter drills” with her classmates. Elected leaders have a

PAUL DAVIS

Town of residence: Lawrence Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 45 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: Kansas House

responsibility to do more to keep our children safe, but they keep letting partisan politics get in the way. There are many commonsense, bipartisan ideas worthy of consideration to enhance gun safety without hampering constitutional rights. Some include strengthening the background check system so fewer violent criminals and domestic abusers get access to weapons, or laws to prevent individuals on terrorist watch lists from buying a gun.

REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE, 2ND DISTRICT: STEVE WATKINS Please outline reasons you are the best candidate in the field to serve in the U.S. House?

I have led soldiers in war, fought wasteful spending and created cohesive teams across the world. While my opponent is a lifelong politician and lobbyist, I’m an outsider dedicated to making government more efficient, more effective, and more accountable. Today, Congress is filled with far too many career politicians and former lobbyists, like Paul Davis, who constantly put their personal agenda before that of their constituents. As a conservative who has never run for office before, I offer a breath of fresh air to those seeking a new perspective and fresh ideas from their leaders in Washington.

President Donald Trump has been active on international trade. How has the president's actions helped or hurt the Kansas economy, especially agriculture, and how would you adjust the government's approach to trade?

I call balls and strikes when it comes to President Trump

– when I don’t agree with something I will stand up and voice my opinion. I am incredibly impressed with the benefits Kansans are already reaping from the historic tax reform legislation signed into law by President Trump last year. In addition to helping working families keep more of their hard-earned money, the Trump Administration has cut burdensome regulations and empowered our small business owners to do what they do best – create jobs, pay higher wages, and grow our economy. As a veteran who has spent a majority of my adult life in war zones overseas, I am also impressed with how President Trump was able to restore America’s strong presence on the international stage. However, I disagree with the President’s approach to trade. Kansans manufacture and produce far more than we consume, and we need to keep government out of the way and ensure we can compete for and access markets across the globe. In what ways would you reform

federal law on funding of Planned Parenthood as well as the availability of legal abortion?

Under the current provisions set aside in the Hyde Amendment, no U.S. taxpayer money can go toward funding abortion and that must continue. In addition, I would like to end federal funding for Planned Parenthood and direct the money currently being sent to their clinics towards other local public health departments and rural hospitals that do not provide abortions.

What should be the top priorities as Congress works to reform tax law? Explain benefits of your ideas.

A top priority of mine will be making the middle-class provisions in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act permanent. If we fail to act, there are a number of tax cuts and deductions critical to the viability of Kansas families and small businesses that will expire. Since the tax cuts were signed into law, tens of thousands of jobs have returned to

the United States and we’ve seen tax dollars making their way back into the pockets of Kansas workers. I believe that if we push forward on an agenda of making these changes permanent and continuing to reduce wasteful government spending and burdensome regulation the economies of Kansas and the U.S. as a whole will vastly improve. Gun violence in the nation's cities, often brought into focus as a consequence of mass shootings, is a public health challenge. What are your recommendations for improving public safety while balancing constitutional right to bear arms? How should government better protect school buildings from shooters?

The Second Amendment is a critical component of the Constitution, which exists to protect us. Taking away guns from law-abiding citizens and placing undue burdens on ownership does not protect us, it only serves to empower criminals who do not mind breaking the law. We should

STEVE WATKINS

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 41 Job: Engineer Prior elected offices: None

debate the issue of how best to keep weapons out of the hands of those who wish to do us harm, but a cornerstone of those debates must be mental health reform. Too often these crimes are carried out by individuals who have a history of mental health problems. We also need to look seriously at the security of our schools and provide them the resources needed to ensure our schools can be a safe and secure for our children.

L I B E R TA R I A N

U.S. HOUSE, 2ND DISTRICT: KELLY STANDLEY Please outline reasons you are the best candidate in the field to serve in the U.S. House?

Kelly D. Standley born in Kansas, raised here, went to school here and I am running for the U. S. House of Representative 2nd Congressional District of Kansas. Because I know what it is like to be raised as a child with parents living from one check to another check. Both parents working, being raised by babysitters and then older siblings. As I have gotten older my life has filled me with challenges that I hope nobody ever has to face being homeless, starving, no job, no warm bed, and no friends to turn to for help. In our country, we are supposed to be WE THE PEOPLE but in time it has changed to a country of corporate political influence. I have not taken any money for my campaign and it would be my honor to be elected to the 2nd U.S. Congressional Seat in Kansas to represent the people in Kansas and not the Corporations of this country. By 2030 it would be an honor to have worked to get all Americans health insurance that is affordable, secure the benefits of Social Security, Medicare without supplemental insurance being needed. We have large problems in this country and maybe one man or woman can’t

fix all the issues but as we have learned over time anything can be accomplished if a person is to set their mind to it. We need to work on fixing the Judicial, Criminal Justice, Legislative term limits, Limit Executive Powers so the power goes back to the people where it belongs. While in office, not only will I make myself available to 2nd District of Kansas but to those who will listen to what it will take to make real change happen. Getting new blood in the House and Senate not only at the Federal level but at the State level as well. I will need to work hard as I have always done since I was 14 years old to get my fellow Kansans and the nation on board. I’m a believer that if you work hard for something great things can happen! We have serious issues going on, prices of food are rising and when we get people up to a living wage the corporations will just raise prices again and again. It is a battle that must be won and if the people of Kansas want someone who will make change happen then they can vote Standley for Congress on Nov. 6. President Donald Trump has been active in international trade. How have the president's actions helped or hurt the Kansas economy, especially agriculture, and how would you adjust the government's

approach to trade?

Farmers in Kansas have reported to Farm Aid is that they are not making it this year, they don’t even make enough money to support their own families let alone feed other families. We will lose small farmers who were growing before but now are going bankrupt. We have to make changes in this country to help the smaller businesses. In what ways would you reform federal law on funding of Planned Parenthood as well as the availability of legal abortion?

I’m a strong believer that women deserve to have their choices in life, but just as strong I believe a child has the right to life. There are other options out there and I would like to see those alternative choices being used instead of abortion. If given the opportunity to reform federal law I would take abortion away as an option through planned parenthood.

What should be the top priorities as Congress works to reform tax law? Explain the benefits of your ideas.

My response on this will not be favorable but we need to make sure that the Large Corporations are paying their fair part in taxes if they are not they need to be paying employees higher

wages. My proposal is to pass a bill that requires corporation who pay their Executive officers millions in bonuses to also pay their employees in bonuses as well. People always say that it is the Owner or the President of the company who made the business what it is today, but where is the praise for the hardworking people in the company. Companies like Wal-Mart who is raising employee pay to $15.00 an hour but then around the country they are laying off thousands of people and going to automated systems to cut the cost of this pay raise. We need to cut taxes on those who make 60,000 a year or less and raise taxes on the upper class. Giving corporations tax breaks on new hires that stay with the company for a year and when they pay to have an employee trained to do a job they get a tax break as well. Hiring a new graduate from college will bring large corporations tax breaks, so as you read this I want you to be completely able to understand that with certain benefits corporations can have large tax breaks if they follow my plan. My completed list of tax raises and breaks for individuals and corporations is being finalized. Gun violence in the nation's cities, often brought into focus as a

KELLY STANDLEY

Town of residence: St. Paul Party affiliation: Libertarian Age: 49 Job: Business owner Prior elected offices: None consequence of mass shootings, is a public health challenge. What are your recommendations for improving public safety while balancing constitutional right to bear arms? How should the government better protect school buildings from shooters?

Training and education to the teachers and parents who have guns in their homes. I believe in the second amendment and I understand the need for security in our schools, hospitals, stores are all very important. My plan is to present a bill to Congress that will protect the second amendment and put a police officer in every school. My plan also covers putting more officers on the streets and where higher populated areas can be covered.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, October 14, 2018  C3

2018 VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

U.S. HOUSE, 1ST DISTRICT: ROGER MARSHALL Why are you running for this office?

There is still much work to do: We are in the middle of wrapping up the Farm Bill to get to President Trump's desk, we must make permanent our historic Tax Cuts & Jobs Act has unleashed warp speed GDP growth and economic expansion. That said, NAFTA has become the single most important pending issue for the Kansas economy. Kansas’ First District is the most NAFTA-dependent agricultural district in the country. Mexico and Canada purchase more than $4.5 billion worth of Kansas’ goods each year and I was honored to represent our Kansas ag producers during the final round of NAFTA negotiations in Mexico City before the White House announced the historic new deal with Mexico. A powerful new

North American Free Trade Agreement is essential to take on China. I want to continue to advocate for our farmers and ranchers around the world while President Trump. How can the federal government help control the cost of health care?

As a physician, hospital executive, and now your Congressman, I can say unequivocally that despite my voting for full repeal of Obamacare, I am still ashamed that the Senate did not have the political courage to repeal and replace this awful piece of legislation. Congress must to band together behind a step-by-step plan next year that includes key items such as: risk sharing, HSA expansion and additional flexibility to states - in order to “stop the bleed” of this excessive rise in cost of coverage since

Obamacare. The (un)Affordable Care Act has forced extreme consolidation of insurance companies, skyrocketed the price of care for patients, and has limited the options of the patient. We must fix this one victory at a time - that is best accomplished by implementing policies that promote transparency, innovation, and consumerism of the entire healthcare industry; ensuring true prices of care are easily accessible to the public and that patients can be conscious consumers. More than ever, our healthcare debate needs to be framed around the patient and nothing else. What is your opinion of President Donald Trump’s job performance and how do you rate the Trump Administration’s impact on Kansas agriculture?

I think that the booming

performance of the U.S. economy should suffice as an answer to President Trump's job success. Record unemployment. Record wages. Record economic growth. Record stock market. On the world stage, President Trump has wasted no time. ISIS has been decimated. North Korea is at least moving in the direction of denuclearization. He called Europe's bluff and finally forcing other countries to pay into NATO. In Kansas the story is slightly more complicated: The President's $12B in emergency farm aid was a start, but it’s more or less putting a band-aid on a deep wound. I appreciate that the Administration recognizes what a negative impact the tariffs have had on Kansas producers. The next step is wrapping up NAFTA as soon as possible, now that the President reached a deal

ROGER MARSHALL

(incumbent) Town of residence: Great Bend Party affiliation: Republican Age: 58 Job: Physician Prior elected offices: U.S. congressman

with Mexico. We must take care of producers as this administration works to end unfair trading practices and ultimately get even better deals for our farmers and ranchers. But time in finite and patience only lasts so long...

D E M O C R AT

U.S. HOUSE, 1ST DISTRICT: ALAN LAPOLICE Please outline reasons you are the best candidate in the field to serve in the U.S. House?

The greatest threat we currently face as a nation is the divide. It grows wider with each election and now, with each news cycle and tweet. Incumbent Marshall acknowledged this when he first ran. Now, he is more of the problem than his predecessor. No issue can be addressed while leadership is so tragically dysfunctional. We are left completely unprepared for real threats. The current farming crisis has the potential of being worse than the 80s crisis. Our National debt is skyrocketing. Healthcare has only gotten more unaffordable. Our crumbling Infrastructure is still

unaddressed. This trade war will devastate American producers. Our allies are becoming distant and our enemies are emboldened. This does not even take into account the unforeseeables such as a global pandemic and even more devastating natural disasters. America’s historic strength came from her unity as well as her diversity. Building a middle class made us unique in the world. Recently, we’ve lost all of our strength. I want it back. I will give everything to restore greatness in America through unity, through tolerance and through hope. I’ll address each of the crisis we face regardless of how it may look politically because I am the only candidate for this office that is a patriot and not a coward.

President Donald Trump has been active on international trade. How has the president's actions helped or hurt the Kansas economy, especially agriculture, and how would you adjust the government's approach to trade?

No producer can say the ag economy is better because of the trade war. Some still hold out hope that it will get better in the long run but they truly have little to base this on. Marshall believes the tariffs are necessary because “China and Canada are stealing our intellectual property” (His words, not mine.) This is nonsense. America has always been the world’s most reliable producer of food. We’ve been the only country to produce twice what we consume. Now, this is

changing. We’ve become unreliable, unstable and irrational. Other nations (Brazil, Russia, Kazakhstan) are swooping in to steal our production. Without very strong signed multinational trade agreements, bean production will all go to South America and wheat to Russian backed countries. 17 years in occupying the Middle East hurts as well (see Pax Americana). What we must do immediately is negotiate multinational trade agreements like NAFTA, TPP, TTIP and others. We must become dependable both agriculturally as well as politically. We must stop letting lobbyists who serve Cargill and ADM dictate trade and we must tie the hands of global speculators who are intentionally

ALAN LAPOLICE

Town of residence: Clyde Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 46 Job: Educator (teacher and school administrator) Prior elected offices: None

depressing markets to maximize their profits. My District is Agricultural. I understand this. Marshall serves Wall Street and farmers need to understand that.


C4  Sunday, October 14, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

SECRETARY OF STATE: BRIAN 'BAM' MCCLENDON Why are you the right candidate for Kansas secretary of state at this time?

My Kansas education and my business experience are grounded in professional accountability, customer service, and problem-solving using technology, rather than partisan politics. If we want to keep our elections and data secure, protect the fundamental right of all eligible citizens to vote, attract and cultivate new businesses and innovators, and open the digital doors of our democracy to all citizens, it requires qualified leadership focused on solving shared problems. I am an engineer with an abiding passion for Kansas. I've built small startup companies and led teams of over 2,000 professionals as a vice-president of engineering at Google - a company that I helped grow from a Fortune 1000 company to a Fortune 5 company. I do not think in partisan terms, but rather about the impact of government actions on the lives of Kansans. Years ago I made the Kansas apartment I grew up in the center of Google Earth. Recently, I helped build a nonpartisan app - called KSVotes - that has allowed more than 10,000 eligible Kansas citizens to register to vote in minutes. I have the skills and experience

to help secure our private data, ensure our elections run smoothly and verify that all votes are counted. Explain in detail a life experience that guides your personal and professional conduct and how that wisdom would influence your work as secretary of state?

Growing up, I delivered newspapers for the Lawrence Journal-World. Collecting monthly payments from each customer was a chore, but it allowed me to meet with my customers one-on-one and hear about any delivery or content concerns. This taught me that customer service matters and that building a product needs to have significant feedback from its users.Throughout my career, testing and iteration have been a big part of my approach to building great products. Over time things improve and the sharp edges are removed. In particular, at Google I saw clearly that people will use a technology IF it’s easy to use and accessible, and they will tell you that if you ask them. As Secretary of State, my customers are the voters, businesses, and citizens of Kansas and I will listen carefully to their feedback as we build better tools for them such as online voter registration, advance ballot requests and a streamlined business

registration process. What is your view on the state's — now unconstitutional — requirement that people offer proof of citizenship when registering to vote? Would you, as secretary of state, have relied on in-office counsel to defend that law in federal court or would you have hired contract attorneys with expertise in the subject to represent the state?

First and foremost, state law in this context should comply with federal law. The issue is citizenship, not on-demand access to a birth certificate. With better technology and interstate cooperation, the State of Kansas can more efficiently and cost-effectively verify citizenship. The threat of a felony conviction for perjury has historically been an effective deterrent to this kind of voter fraud. I would not have been in court in the first place. Preventing voter fraud is important and my technological expertise will be far more effective than Kris Kobach’s law degree in preventing the rare instances of illegal voting in Kansas. This is a budget prioritization issue, not an opportunity for self-serving publicity. There’s no evidence of voting by non-citizens at any level that could impact the results of elections. However,

protecting our elections from confirmed foreign interference, protecting the private data of Kansas citizens, protecting the fundamental right of every eligible citizen to vote, and increasing voter engagement are the critical challenges. With limited resources and taxpayer dollars, the Kansas Secretary of State should prioritize actual solutions to these issues rather than wasting money and time on costly and unnecessary litigation. How do you view the state's mandate that Kansans present a photograph identification when voting? Does this type of law create a deterrent to voting or inspire confidence in election security?

There should be no general issue with providing photo ID at the polling place in order to receive a ballot so long as the state provides consistent and affordable access for all eligible citizens to obtain a valid photo ID; so long as such access is coordinated across state agencies and is clearly and publicly communicated to citizens; and so long as such a requirement doesn’t violate federal law. Many states - including our neighbors - and even counties do this and the State of Kansas should be able to provide this service to its eligible citizens. Kris Kobach and Scott

BRIAN MCCLENDON

Town of residence: Lawrence Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 54 Job: Information technology Prior elected offices: None

Schwab claim that obtaining a photo ID “is simple.” A glance at Kobach’s own website: http://www.gotvoterid.com/ valid-photo-ids.html clearly demonstrates that that process isn't simple in the least. Voter ID requirements can create an unconstitutional deterrent to voting by eligible voters, and penalize groups of voters, if IDs are made difficult for eligible citizens to obtain. But I also think ID requirements to vote can help create confidence in election security. With better technology and inter-agency cooperation, the State can balance these challenges and efficiently and cost-effectively make valid photo ID available to all eligible citizens.

L I B E R TA R I A N

SECRETARY OF STATE: ROB HODGKINSON Why are you the right candidate for Kansas secretary of state at this time?

I have the “trifecta” of experience that the Kansas Secretary of State’s office needs and neither of my opponents have all three. First, I have an IT background with experience being responsible for a company’s entire IT/IS enterprise. Second, I also have small business experience with an exterior remodeling company I was a partner/owner in; we tripled in size during the recession. Third, I have election experience from a third party “Outsider” perspective having testified in many legislative committees. Elections have been a passion for me for over 16 years now. In 2009 I was part of a study group called “the Future of Kansas Elections. In 2010 I was part of a televised forum about the importance of voting. I was the catalyst for the special election law update in January 2017 I will not be wearing the uniform of one of the 2 big political parties; the Kansas SoS should answer to

Kansans, not the big parties. I am the expert in the major/ minor party knowledge in Kansas – the Green party called me last summer to find out how to get on the ballot. I will restore the credibility of the Kansas Secretary of State office. Explain in detail a life experience that guides your personal and professional conduct and how that wisdom would influence your work as secretary of state?

Family – taking care of each other. I have always helped others when they needed or asked for help. Dad passed away this year after a couple rough years. I let my businesses go into a holding pattern while I made the 3-hour drive from Stilwell to Hutchinson many, many times to take care of Dad’s needs. That service attitude of taking care of others I learned from family (and being a 5th generation Kansan helps too) and has worked well for me in both the political and business world. People know me as someone with integrity

and passion for all I do. This experience will let me guide the Secretary of State’s office with an eye to the big picture of serving Kansans. Doing the little things right, leads to the big picture of being a very positive, results oriented organization. This office really should not be “partisan” in nature and I will make sure it stays fair to all. What is your view on the state's — now unconstitutional — requirement that people offer proof of citizenship when registering to vote? Would you, as secretary of state, have relied in-office counsel to defend that law in federal court or would you have hired contract attorneys with expertise in the subject to represent the state?

The citizenship requirements that have been struck down by the courts were no help for security and made it harder to register to vote. Someone signing up to vote (register) signing a statement, under penalty of perjury, at the bottom stating they are citizens is enough. If that statement is incorrect, we can

file either perjury or election fraud charges if needed. The proof of citizenship rules was simply a voter suppression technique to minimize competition. I believe contract attorneys with expertise would be a better option than in-house attorneys if/when needed. How do you view the state's mandate that Kansans present a photograph identification when voting? Does this type of law create a deterrent to voting or inspire confidence in election security?

A picture ID can be a good idea, however, needs some additional things in place to make it work well. On the back of my credit cards – I don’t sign them, I have a note there for the person taking it to ask for my picture ID. It would be unlikely that a poll worker would know everyone coming in to vote. I believe some sort of ID should be used. Not a fan of utility bills as an ID, as those can be easily duplicated or found. Now the caveat: We must have a system for all

ROB HODGKINSON

Town of residence: Stilwell Party affiliation: Libertarian Age: 59 Job: Realtor Prior elected offices: None

people to easily get a useable ID (with a picture is better). Today, I don’t believe that is in place. Elderly, disabled and others that don’t drive, may not have an easy way to get to a driver’s license office to get an ID, plus in the KC area anyway the lines can be staggering, some of the people noted above just can’t handle those type of long waits. So, while I am in favor of an ID for voting, we must have a way for that ID to be easily acquired.

REPUBLICAN

SECRETARY OF STATE: SCOTT SCHWAB Why are you the right candidate for Kansas secretary of state at this time?

Kansans want a Secretary of State who will concentrate on getting the job done, run an efficient office, and deliver trusted election results. I’m the only candidate with the necessary background to accomplish this. As Chairman of the House Elections committee in 2011, I helped spearhead the passing of the SAFE Act requiring proof of citizenship for new voters and photo ID at the polling place. As Secretary of State, we want to ensure the legislative intent of that policy is executed with excellence and interpreted the same across all 105 counties. I’m the only candidate in the race with both extensive legislative and private sector experience to ensure our clerks have the resources they need, the SAFE Act is defended, our business filings are streamlined and we have cutting

edge IT security in place. Explain in detail a life experience that guides your personal and professional conduct and how that wisdom would influence your work as secretary of state?

Growing up in Great Bend, Kansas taught me hard-work, integrity and dedication. As a lifelong Kansan, it’s been an honor to serve this state. For the past 16 years I have worked in a bi-partisan fashion to make policy in the Legislature. From Voter ID to tax policy, we have been able to pass measures that benefit Kansas. We understand the office needs a professional. It is not the Department of Commerce. It is not the Department of Administration. The Secretary of State is literally a secretary for the state of Kansas. We are the only ones in this race who understand this and the boundaries of the office. As Secretary of State, we’ll deliver dependable,

experienced leadership the Kansas way. What is your view on the state's — now unconstitutional — requirement that people offer proof of citizenship when registering to vote? Would you, as secretary of state, have relied in-office counsel to defend that law in federal court or would you have hired contract attorneys with expertise in the subject to represent the state?

This issue has been politicized by the left and unfortunately some Judges allow their decisions to be influenced by personality conflicts. I stand behind the requirement that newly registered voters prove their citizenship and I support appealing the court decision. That said, it’s important that this policy be carried out as effectively as possible. The Secretary of State’s office needs to have clear guidelines in place for the county election officials to follow. As a state agency, we owe it

to all Kansans to make the registration process as easy to navigate as possible. If we do this and execute this policy with excellence, many of the concerns with proof of citizenship will go away. I am not an attorney. As Secretary of State I will work with the Attorney General to provide legal counsel when it comes to litigation matters. The Attorney General is the expert in this area and best able to ensure both a credible legal defense and that tax payer dollars are used effectively. How do you view the state's mandate that Kansans present a photograph identification when voting? Does this type of law create a deterrent to voting or inspire confidence in election security?

In 2011 as Chair of the House Elections Committee I played a leading role in passing the bi-partisan SAFE Act that required photo ID when voting. Photo ID has had

SCOTT SCHWAB

Town of residence: Olathe Party affiliation: Republican Age: 45 Job: Health care sales Prior elected offices: Kansas House, speaker pro tem

widespread support across Kansas and passed with a large bi-partisan majority. Getting on an airplane, cashing a check, and so many other things we do on a regular basis require a photo ID. It is a simple but effective election security measure to ensure Kansas has trusted results on election day.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, October 14, 2018  C5

2018 VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

ATTORNEY GENERAL: DEREK SCHMIDT Why do you believe you are the best candidate for attorney general in Kansas?

I have almost eight years' experience leading the office, regularly visit all 105 counties to listen to and remain accountable to Kansans, have successfully argued two cases for Kansas before the U.S. Supreme Court, maintain good working relationships with prosecutors and law enforcement statewide, and am passionate about public safety and consumer protection.

What are three legal reform proposals you would support in 2019 as the state's top law enforcement officer?

I have not yet decided the legislative recommendations the attorney general's office would present to the 2019 Legislature. One idea I am considering is to propose repealing the requirement for the attorney general to defend state agencies that violate open government laws.

How can the attorney general's office improve its own response to Kansas Open Records Act requests and lead the state in

advancing the promise of government transparency?

Continue to diligently follow and enforce the law.

Please make the case for or against the proposition the federal case regarding voter registration with proof of citizenship ought to have been handled by the attorney general rather than the secretary of state? And, generally, should the secretary of state have the power to charge cases of alleged voter fraud?

The attorney general's office is handling the appeal of this case, successfully represented the Secretary of Revenue in the trial court and would have been willing to represent the Secretary of State in the trial court if requested. The Secretary of State's authority to prosecute criminal voter fraud should be repealed after the current Secretary of State leaves office.

What is your perspective on the death penalty with particular emphasis on a legislative proposal to convert these sentences to life without possibility of parole? Do you believe capital punishment is a deterrent? Is it justice? What about the

emotional and financial cost of the appellate cases?

I support the current Kansas capital murder statute, including its death penalty provisions.

Do you believe the so-called "constitutional" concealed firearm law balances public safety and the right to bear arms? What are benefits of firearm training for license holders?

I believe all who carry concealed firearms should first obtain appropriate training.

How would you as attorney general advise the Legislature on reform of state marijuana law given interest in various states regarding medicinal and recreational consumption?

I would not choose to advise the Legislature on this policy matter, but if asked for my views, I would say I do not recommend legalization outside the existing drugapproval process, particularly for recreation.

What are your views on the use of video cameras by law enforcement officers? How would you prefer the video be shared with the public?

Video can be a useful tool. Its principal value is as evidence in legal proceedings. The attorney general sits on a state board with the secretary of state and lieutenant governor to decide election disputes. Is this system effective? Is it tainted by politics of the three members? Is there a better way?

I have no strong feelings about this. Somebody has to decide, and there are strengths and weaknesses to any group assigned to decide. The critical issue is to ensure that any decision can be reviewed by an impartial court, which is the case under current law.

What are your recommendations for improving the Kansas Bureau of Investigation's ability to perform its duties? Could the KBI make use of new authority, additional personnel, facilities or other reforms?

We have made tremendous strides in building the new forensic science center and partnering with Washburn University to train scientists, in establishing the new digital forensics capacity, in creating the Child Victims Unit, in

DEREK SCHMIDT

(incumbent) Town of residence: Independence Party affiliation: Republican Age: 50 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: Kansas attorney general; Kansas Senate

launching the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative to process untested rape kits, and in standing up the new Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force. We are also adding more than one dozen new field agents this year, but the total number of agents remains insufficient for a state the size of Kansas. Therefore, the next critical need is to add more field agents.

D E M O C R AT

ATTORNEY GENERAL: SARAH SWAIN Why do you believe you are the best candidate for attorney general in Kansas?

I have spent my entire career fighting for the rights of Kansans. I’m a third-generation Kansan who was raised in poverty in rural central Kansas, along with my five siblings.  I worked hard, put myself through college and law school, and eventually became a lawyer.  For the past fifteen years, I have owned and operated a law firm built on principles of defending the Constitution, zealously advocating for my clients, and seeking the truth. I would bring these same principles to the office of Attorney General.

What are three legal reform proposals you would support in 2019 as the state's top law enforcement officer?

I support comprehensive criminal justice reform. As Attorney General of Kansas, I would focus on ending the war on drugs, legalizing marijuana, and reducing the populations in our jails in prisons with sensible and cost-effective measures.

How can the attorney general's office improve its own response to Kansas Open Records Act requests and lead the state in advancing the promise of government transparency?

Kansas has been deemed one of the most secretive governments in America. I believe

that a lack of transparency in government leads to distrust. I support a transparent government and I will fight to make records available to Kansans, especially in cases involving misconduct on the part of our public servants and/or elected officials. Please make the case for or against the proposition the federal case regarding voter registration with proof of citizenship ought to have been handled by the attorney general rather than the secretary of state? And, generally, should the secretary of state have the power to charge cases of alleged voter fraud?

I do not support the actions taken by our secretary of state. The secretary of state should not have the power to charge cases of alleged voter fraud.

What is your perspective on the death penalty with particular emphasis on a legislative proposal to convert these sentences to life without possibility of parole? Do you believe capital punishment is a deterrent? Is it justice? What about the emotional and financial cost of the appellate cases?

As an attorney, I’ve spent my career on the front lines of the criminal justice system. I know that the system is flawed.  Several high profile exonerations have put Kansas in the national spotlight and have shown that sometimes

the system fails. Based on my firsthand experience within the system, I do not support the death penalty. As Attorney General of Kansas, I would work to abolish the death penalty and have all pending death sentences converted to LWOP. Do you believe the so-called "constitutional" concealed firearm law balances public safety and the right to bear arms? What are benefits of firearm training for license holders?

No. I support sensible gun regulations.

How would you as attorney general advise the Legislature on reform of state marijuana law given interest in various states regarding medicinal and recreational consumption?

In 2018, Kansas is one of only four states that does not allow medicinal or recreational use of marijuana. I support the full legalization of marijuana in Kansas. As the daughter of a disabled veteran, I’m well aware of the medicinal benefits of cannabis in treating PTSD.  I believe our veterans, the elderly, and patients should have the choice to use cannabis to treat their ailments instead of being forced to rely solely on pharmaceuticals. I also believe that the faltering Kansas economy would reap huge benefits within a regulated cannabis market. Taxes collected from a booming

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT ADVANCE VOTING With advance voting, any registered voter may vote by mail or in person before Election Day. The Kansas Secretary of State's Office provides the following information about advance voting. The final day to apply for an advance voting ballot to be mailed is Tuesday, Oct. 30. An advance voting application can be found at bit.ly/CJadvance, or you can contact your county election officer to request an application for an advance voting ballot. Complete the application and return it to your county election officer. You can have your ballot mailed to you starting 20 days before the election. You may vote in person in the county election office starting the Tuesday before Election Day, or up to 20 days before the election, depending on the county. All ballots must be postmarked on or before Election Day and received no later than three days after the election. Any mailed advance ballot may be handdelivered to the county election office or any polling place within the county by close of polls on Election Day. Sick, disabled or non-English proficient voters may receive assistance in applying

for and casting advance voting ballots. Here are some important advance voting dates for the 2018 general election. Oct. 16: Last day to register to vote before the general election. Oct. 17: First day advance ballots are mailed. In person advance voting may begin. Contact your county election office to find out when and where. Oct. 22: Shawnee County voters may begin advance voting from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the county election office, 3420 S.W. Van Buren St. Oct. 30: Deadline for voters to apply for advance voting ballots to be mailed for general election. Nov. 5: Noon deadline to cast advance voting ballots in person at county election office. Nov. 6 (Election Day): Mailed advance voting ballots must be postmarked on or before Election Day and received in the county election office no later than the third day following the election. Advance ballots may be hand-delivered to the county election office or to any polling place within the county by 7 p.m. For more information, call (800) 262-8683.

cannabis market could be used to fully fund our schools, provide increased pay to teachers, and finance substance abuse treatment centers. Legalizing cannabis (either recreationally or medicinally) in Kansas would undoubtedly lead to a reduction in opioid overdoses and increased treatment centers would save lives. Overall, legalization of marijuana in Kansas makes total sense and a large majority of Kansans seem to support such an effort. So why do our elected officials in Topeka keep blocking efforts to move Kansas forward? What are your views on the use of video cameras by law enforcement officers? How would you prefer the video be shared with the public?

I support the use of body cameras by the police at all times and I believe they should be mandatory. As Attorney General of Kansas, I will fight to make police body camera videos accessible to the public.

The attorney general sits on a state board with the secretary of state and lieutenant governor to decide election disputes. Is this system effective? Is it tainted by politics of the three members? Is there a better way?

Based on what I have seen from the board this election cycle, it seems to be a highly

SARAH SWAIN

Town of residence: Lawrence Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 42 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: None

partisan entity that is more interested in maintaining the party line than in seeking the truth. The creation of a truly bi-partisan board would be ideal and it should include members from the public. What are your recommendations for improving the Kansas Bureau of Investigation's ability to perform its duties? Could the KBI make use of new authority, additional personnel, facilities or other reforms?

I believe transparency and accountability are the pillars of forging trust between the public and law enforcement. I would work closely with the KBI to make sure that it is acting in a manner that encourages the public’s faith and trust in the law enforcement community.


C6  Sunday, October 14, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

GOVERNOR: LAURA KELLY Please outline why you are the right candidate for governor at this time in Kansas history?

We all know that Kansas has been through a world of hurt these past eight years. Everywhere you look — our schools, roads, economy — all devastated by the reckless Brownback tax experiment. I’m running for governor to undo the damage done by Sam Brownback and put our state back on track. It’s been my lifelong mission to do right by Kansas kids and families. When Sam Brownback made the largest cut to our schools in state history - resulting in larger class sizes and a shorter school year - I fought back. I led efforts to expand early childhood education by doubling the number of kids able to enter kindergarten ready to learn. And I helped lead the effort to end the Brownback tax experiment and put Kansas on the road to recovery. It’s time to restore Kansas and invest in our people again. I have the experience, relationships and knowledge to get to work on day one and deliver results for the people of Kansas. As governor, I will invest in our public schools, expand Medicaid and support rural hospitals, and invest in roads and infrastructure to support businesses and encourage innovation. I am a no-nonsense problem solver who will put the best interests of our families first.

What do you think of the recommendation by Gov. Jeff Colyer’s task force to seek full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas? Is expansion wise or foolish? How would you reform KanCare, the state's privatized Medicaid program?

I have consistently supported expanding Medicaid to provide affordable health coverage to more Kansas families and support to our hospitals. It will grow Kansas’ economy

and create thousands of good paying jobs in the process. As governor, I will advocate for and sign legislation to expand Medicaid in my first year. However, I will also reform the KanCare program to ensure that our healthcare system is putting people first, not profit. Privatizing KanCare to out-of-state insurance companies has been a mess since the beginning. I will work with health leaders, advocates, and experts to fix our Medicaid system and find the plan that best meets the needs of Kansans, and provide increased oversight and accountability. What are three state government programs — be very specific — that warrant reduction in spending? What are three areas of state government requiring immediate investment?

The Brownback experiment caused a budget crisis that resulted in significant cuts to schools, agencies like Department of Children and Families, more than $2 billion swept from highways, and other damaging cuts. However, we can reduce spending and increase the efficiency of state government in other ways. First, we must do away with “no-bid” contracts. This is an inefficient, not to mention corrupt, way to manage state business. We must use a competitive bidding process — unless it is an emergency — to help save tax dollars by getting the best deal. Second, we will conduct a review of current incentive programs and tax credits to eliminate waste and ensure they are delivering the economic impact and job growth they should. We also must look at our sentencing guidelines surrounding first-time, nonviolent drug offenses to ensure that we are not spending money on prison space for people that need treatment,

not jail time. And lastly, we should immediate stop spending tax dollars to pay for contempt fees or other penalties when a state official is abusing his/her position. My top priority is investing in our schools, infrastructure and healthcare. As a result of the Brownback experiment, we’ve seen bigger class sizes and teachers fleeing the state. That is unacceptable. And as governor, I will fully fund our K-12 schools and invest in early childhood education so our students are ready for the jobs of the future. Secondly, more than $2 billion was swept from the state highway fund to cover budget holes. We must remedy this so that our roads are the best for our communities and businesses. We must also invest in broadband in all parts of the state. Lastly, we must expand Medicaid so that all Kansans have access to affordable, quality healthcare that meets their needs. Kansas tax policy has been in flux: Income tax cut and increase, sale tax rise, tinkering with property taxes. Explain how you would modify the state's tax structure to bring stability to government and certainty to businesses and individuals? Is there sufficient public transparency of large tax breaks given businesses by the executive branch?

For the last eight years, Kansans has been devastated by Sam Brownback’s tax experiment. It caused massive cuts to our public schools, crippled our economy, cost us jobs and drove us into debt. That’s why I led the bipartisan effort to reverse the Brownback tax plan last year and put Kansas on the road to recovery. Since then, we’ve had 15 months consecutive of job growth and we were able to invest in schools for the first time in five years. That is progress,

but we have a long way to go. First, we must make sure the state budget is stable. As governor, I will work with tax experts to make our tax structure more fair and balance the budget without raising taxes. Once the budget is stable, I will focus on reducing the food sales tax and providing property tax relief to help working men, women and their families thrive. What are your solutions to the rise in violent crime and the epidemic of drug abuse? How should Kansas handle calls for legalization of medicinal and recreational marijuana?

This is a complicated issue that demands serious attention from our leaders. First, we must invest more in public safety to ensure law enforcement officers have the tools they need to do their jobs safely. But we must also prioritize programs that prevent criminal behavior - like early childhood education and community mental health services. Studies show that providing early intervention in these areas decreases the chances for later criminal activity. We also need to review Kansas sentencing guidelines to make sure violent offenders are incarcerated and first-time, NON-violent drug offenders get the treatment they need. It’s also crucial that we expand medicaid to support hospitals, clinics and facilities assisting people dealing with drug addiction. Lastly, I support the legalization of medical marijuana. I’ve seen first-hand how it can help people with significant illnesses. It can also help combat the opioid crisis by providing another pain relief option.

Is it prudent to arm public school teachers to boost security in buildings? What other recommendations do you

LAURA KELLY

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 68 Job: Legislator Prior elected offices: Kansas Senate

have for keeping people from attacking school children?

We should not arm public school teachers. We need fewer guns in schools - not more. No student or educator should feel unsafe going to school, and parents shouldn’t worry when they drop their child off at school. I have been a long time supporter of the Second Amendment. Like most gun owners, I support common sense safety measures to protect our children. I support “red flag” legislation that allows law enforcement to remove guns when a person is found to be a threat to him/herself or others. And I have voted to ban guns on campuses. It’s also essential that we increase mental health services available to Kansas students. I support adding new year-round psychologists and clinical social workers to our school support staff to assist students struggling with mental illness. As governor, I will bring people together — law enforcement officials, school officials, mental and public health experts and parents —to find common ground and meaningful solutions to this problem.

REPUBLICAN

GOVERNOR: KRIS KOBACH Please outline why you are the right candidate for governor at this time in Kansas history?

Growing up in Topeka and today, I’ve been frustrated seeing how politicians in the Capitol never change the way things are done. I am going to end the culture of corruption by pushing for term limits and by decreasing state spending so taxpayers get some relief. Kansans are being taxed to death, and I want to create a Kansas where my daughters can afford to raise their own families in the future.

What do you think of the recommendation by Gov. Jeff Colyer's task force to seek full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas? Is expansion wise or foolish? How would you reform KanCare, the state's privatized Medicaid program?

Expanding Medicaid is fiscally irresponsible. In the 31 states that expanded Medicaid, costs exceeded estimates by 76 percent. States are now spending one out of every $3 on Medicaid. It’s unaffordable and unsustainable over the long term. There are a lot of innovative solutions to lowering the cost of medical care and treatment. As Governor, I will push for a direct primary care option for Kansas’s Medicaid program, allowing families unlimited access to their physician for as little as $50 per month.

What are three state government programs — be very specific — that warrant reduction in spending? What are three areas of state government requiring immediate investment?

The simplest way to begin trimming the state budget is through natural attrition.

Approximately 11,000 Baby Boomers retire per day in the U.S. When the retirees are Kansas government employees, we should not replace them if possible. In 2017, Kansas spent $377 million on public benefits to illegal aliens. That number must be reduced as much as possible, specifically by requiring verification of lawful presence when an alien requests public benefits. In-state tuition for illegal immigration must be eliminated. This is a taxpayer subsidy. Investment areas: We need to complete construction of T-Works projects and have the legislature stop robbing the highway fund. We also need to revise the way education money is spent to ensure 75 cents of every education dollar is spent in the classroom on instruction. This will result in higher teacher salaries. Kansas tax policy has been in flux: Income tax cut and increase, sale tax rise, tinkering with property taxes. Explain how you would modify the state's tax structure to bring stability to government and certainty to businesses and individuals? Is there sufficient public transparency of large tax breaks given businesses by the executive branch?

Kansas is the high-tax state in the five-state region, and as Governor, I will work to lower income, sales, and property taxes. I am the only candidate to sign the No Tax Hike pledge. Lowering property taxes will be a priority. I propose limiting appraisals to 2 percent per year, and only reappraising properties every other, or every three years.

That will provide some stability for home and business owners. What are your solutions to the rise in violent crime and the epidemic of drug abuse? How should Kansas handle calls for legalization of medicinal and recreational marijuana?

I’m skeptical of legalizing medicinal marijuana. Products like CBD oil offer some relief, and scientists are working quickly to develop medication that offers the same benefits of marijuana without the psychoactive side effects. In states where medical marijuana is legal, officials have had a difficult time limiting its use to those who medically need it. Legal, medicinal marijuana just becomes a ridiculously open gateway for people who want to use the drug recreationally.

Is it prudent to arm public school teachers to boost security in buildings? What other recommendations do you have for keeping people from attacking school children?

We protect the President, dignitaries, and even celebrities with guns, but to protect our children, we use a sign that says “no guns.” And when something goes wrong, the children and staff in a school building wait defenseless for a good guy with a gun to arrive. The sooner the good guy with a gun arrives, the sooner an incident ends and the more lives are saved. Arming trained and willing teachers and school staff shortens the amount of time it takes for a good guy with a gun to arrive. Has President Donald Trump's

trade war hurt or helped Kansas farmers? How would you share trade policy to deliver for the state’s agriculture economy?

We need to give Trump’s trade policies time to work. While people are worried about how tariffs might hurt Kansas farmers, they’re ignoring the other side, and that is this: China is a big consumer of soy, and few nations have the ability to feed their appetite for soy. Brazil and Australia are the only options, and neither can ramp up production quickly enough to meet Chinese demand. Americans need to hold firm to give the President the best position to negotiate more favorable trade deals with other countries.

How would you as governor approach illegal immigration given divergent interests of Kansas business owners, children of an illegal immigrant who grew up in the state and the individuals who arrive in Kansas after fleeing persecution in other countries?

Kansas is the only state in the five-state region that does nothing to discourage illegal immigration. In 2017, we provided $377 million in public welfare benefits to illegal immigrants. We offer in-state tuition to illegal immigrants. When I am Governor, we will no longer be the sanctuary state in the Midwest.

How would you tweak the $525 million, five-year school funding law adopted in 2018 to improve student performance and would you embrace a constitutional amendment to restrict litigation on state aid to districts?

KRIS KOBACH

Town of residence: Lecompton Party affiliation: Republican Age: 52 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: Secretary of State; Overland Park City Council

The Kansas Supreme Court has twisted the word “suitable” beyond recognition. Article VI of the Kansas Constitution states, “The legislature shall make suitable provision for finance of the educational interests of the state.” It does not require a specific dollar amount, and it doesn’t empower the judiciary to set spending amounts. We should focus on how the money is spent. We need to ensure that 75 percent of school funding is spent in the classroom on instruction and not on more administrators. The lieutenant governor sits on a state board with the secretary of state and attorney general to decide election-oriented disputes. Is this system effective? Is it tainted by politics? Is there a better way?

The system is effective and has worked well for Kansas for decades. The State Objections Board adheres to past precedence to ensure that similar cases are treated the same way.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, October 14, 2018  C7

2018 VOTERS GUIDE INDEPENDENT

GOVERNOR: GREG ORMAN Please outline why you are the right candidate for governor at this time in Kansas history?

Over the past decade, Kansans know intuitively that something has gone very wrong with our state. I believe what happens over the next five years will determine the path our state is on for the next couple decades. I have innovating plans for growing and diversifying the Kansas economy, creating good paying jobs, improving education by emphasizing workforce development and closing the achievement gap, and ensuring healthcare access and affordability for all Kansans. We can do all of this without raising taxes. You can read in detail about all of my policy proposals on my campaign website at www.ormanforkansas.com/ issues. I’m also the only candidate in this race who has any meaningful experience in the private sector, creating jobs and making companies more efficient. I have experience getting better results from large organization and can make sure every dollar that Kansans entrust the state with is spent wisely. Kansas is a $17 billion enterprise. It has almost 40,000 employees. We are hiring the CEO for our state. I have the experience running

organizations of the size of most of our state agencies. My Democrat opponent has never run anything. My Republican opponent has run two small organizations poorly. What do you think of the recommendation by Gov. Jeff Colyer's task force to seek full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas? Is expansion wise or foolish? How would you reform KanCare, the state's privatized Medicaid program?

Yes, we should expand Medicaid, but we must do it in a responsible way and ensure some level of payment participation by patients as their incomes rise. Without Medicaid expansion, we send a terrible message to hard working Kansans who don’t make a lot of money. We tell them if they get sick, they should quit their job. That’s the wrong message. We need to be building pathways so that people can improve their lives and contribute more, not throw up more obstacles. The lack of Medicaid expansion also hurts us from a workforce development standpoint. A $12 an hour job in Kansas without health insurance is much less desirable than a $12 an hour job in one of the 33 states that have expanded Medicaid. As I’ve traveled the state and spoken to the administrators

at many of the regional hospitals, it’s become clear that our healthcare infrastructure is on the brink of failing financially. Medicaid expansion would help shore up our healthcare infrastructure that many Kansans rely on for care. I have a plan to expand Medicaid at no cost to Kansas taxpayers. It can be read at www.ormanforkansas.com/ problem_solving_platform What are three state government programs — be very specific — that warrant reduction in spending? What are three areas of state government requiring immediate investment?

We should end the border war with Missouri. We should institute a “no-fly zone” that extends 40 miles around downtown Kansas City. Under this agreement, we would not to recruit companies to move from the Missouri no-fly zone to the Kansas no-fly zone, assuming Missouri agrees to do the same. The Hall Family Foundation, conducted a study that found, every net new job created came at a cost of $301,000. That’s an extremely poor investment of taxpayer dollars. We spend far too much money at the city, county, and state level arresting, booking, confining, trying, and incarcerating young people for using marijuana. We should specifically reduce the

penalty for the recreational use of marijuana to a citation, like a speeding ticket. We also don’t do a good job of actively negotiating the prescription drugs we buy in the Medicaid system. We shouldn’t pay $10 a pill when Canada is paying $2 a pill for a drug. Collectively, we can save hundreds of millions of dollars in Topeka. We should spend more on Infrastructure, career education, and meet the mandate on public schools. We can expand Medicaid at no net cost to Kansas. Kansas tax policy has been in flux: Income tax cut and increase, sale tax rise, tinkering with property taxes. Explain how you would modify the state's tax structure to bring stability to government and certainty to businesses and individuals? Is there sufficient public transparency of large tax breaks given businesses by the executive branch?

With the repeal of the Brownback experiment, we should maintain a stable tax policy and give businesses certainty on taxes. We should target tax incentives to communities that work with the state to create a better environment for our industries to thrive. The Brownback tax plan went too far too fast and led to significant increases in property

GREG ORMAN

Town of residence: Fairway Party affiliation: Independent Age: 49 Job: Entrepreneur and businessman Prior elected offices: None

taxes and indiscriminate cuts to state services. Our economy grew more slowly than neighboring states and many Kansans were priced out of their homes. Brownback’s most significant mistake was not changing course when all evidence suggested his plan was failing. In the private sector we don’t have that luxury – companies that avoid inconvenient facts go out of business. I believe we should maintain a stable tax policy until we fully understand the financial impact of repealing the Brownback tax plan and have addressed the funding needs of a number of our agencies that have been starved for resources during the past several years.

L I B E R TA R I A N

GOVERNOR: JEFF CALDWELL Please outline why you are the right candidate for governor at this time in Kansas history?

I am not a career politician. I am the only candidate that supports legalization of medical and recreational marijuana. I want to pardon all non-violent cannabis offenders so that we can put law enforcement officers back on the streets fighting the real issues: sexual assault, human trafficking and other violent crimes. I also support responsibly cutting government spending, abolishing the tax on food and water, lowering private property tax, and defending the 2nd Amendment. Kansans are looking for the candidate who will not bend to the corruption found in Topeka, and Kansans want a Governor who is going to end the corruption. Kansans also want less government intrusion in their lives. I am the only candidate who will be the lead representative for the average Kansan. It’s time to give the power back to the people!

What do you think of the recommendation by Gov. Jeff Colyer's task force to seek full expansion

of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas? Is expansion wise or foolish? How would you reform KanCare, the state's privatized Medicaid program?

According to Fort Hays State University’s Kansas Speaks poll, 69% of Kansans support expanding Medicaid. I believe if Kansans want it, the representatives in Topeka should work to implement Medicaid expansion. However, Kansas should responsibly cut government spending to ensure expanding Medicaid does not create budget problems and increased taxes in the future. KanCare has created a government granted monopoly to three giant insurance corporations in the State’s healthcare industry. KanCare should be overhauled to allow for small businesses and nonprofits to offer services. There is too much red tape preventing care for all Kansans due to the stranglehold insurance companies have over Kansas’ healthcare system. I will work with the federal government to allow for pharmaceutical drugs from other countries to be sold in Kansas, and insurance companies from

other states should be allowed to cover Kansans. What are three state government programs — be very specific — that warrant reduction in spending? What are three areas of state government requiring immediate investment?

Four government programs that warrant reduction in spending are Corrections and Facilities, Department of Commerce, the Board of Barbering, and the Board of Cosmetology. The first thing I will do is pardon all nonviolent cannabis offenses. This will save the state $20,000,000 per year in prosecution and imprisonment. We will also figure out which agencies may be eliminated altogether, like the board of barbering and cosmetology. People who want to enter the workforce for barbering or cosmetology should not be required to obtain a license. I will work with the state legislators to auction off the Governor's mansion and use the proceeds toward mental health funding or for another positive cause. The Kansas

Corporation Commission will see cuts due to corporations taking advantage of checks in the mail to hire citizens, then fire citizens, receive another check in the mail, hire more citizens, then fire more citizens. Three areas of state government requiring immediate investment are mental health, KPERS, and KDOT. Kansas tax policy has been in flux: Income tax cut and increase, sale tax rise, tinkering with property taxes. Explain how you would modify the state's tax structure to bring stability to government and certainty to businesses and individuals? Is there sufficient public transparency of large tax breaks given businesses by the executive branch?

The reason why the tax code is modified so frequently falls squarely on wasteful government spending. Kansas will get its fiscal house in order when I am Governor. It’s time to responsibly cut spending so Kansans and businesses can enjoy more fruits of their labor. I will work to abolish the sales tax on food and water and lower

JEFF CALDWELL

Town of residence: Leawood Party affiliation: Libertarian Age: 32 Job: Sales Prior elected offices: None

private property tax. If we responsibly cut enough government spending while continuing to build a surplus, Kansas will then look to cut income tax. Everyone should be treated equally under the law. There shouldn’t be special tax breaks to large corporations if everyone does not get a special tax break. It’s time to create an even playing field for all Kansans, cut government spending responsibly, and lower taxes for everyone equally.

INDEPENDENT

GOVERNOR: RICK KLOOS Please outline why you are the right candidate for governor at this time in Kansas history?

I believe I'm the best candidate because I would work to unite Kansans. I believe we can do politics better than we do now and with so much turmoil, it's important to have a governor who advocates for peace. With my experience as a police/ hospice chaplain, clergyman, real-estate agent, and founder and director for the past 10 years of a successful nonprofit that employs close to 40 people, I have had the opportunity to work closely with people from all walks of life. I have the experience it takes to unite us through bipartisan efforts. Because of my experience in the nonprofit organization, I also realize that the state cannot be ran as just a business; but rather needs to have a healthy balance of service and business.

What do you think of the recommendation by Gov. Jeff Colyer's task force to seek full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas?

Is expansion wise or foolish? How would you reform KanCare, the state's privatized Medicaid program?

I believe we should expand Medicaid and believe it would be a wise decision. This is important because I see it as a humanitarian issue and also because our hospitals and nursing homes are the economic drivers to many of our rural cities. We are missing out on billions in federal dollars that we pay into and that need to come back to Kansas. Around 81 percent of Kansans want to expand Medicaid, as well as those who are in the Kansas House and Senate. I would also like to look at adjusting our privatized system. We are outsourcing Kansas’ dollars out of state to companies that have not held up to their end of the deal. With so much backlog and complexity, I believe we can do better than that.

What are three state government programs — be very specific — that warrant reduction in

spending? What are three areas of state government requiring immediate investment?

One of the biggest areas I think the state needs to invest in is the Kansas Department of Transportation. Too much has been taken from this fund and it’s time we stop taking from it once and for all, and begin putting back into it. I also believe education is an important area we should be investing in. Supporting Education Redesign will help address the 48,000 jobs we can’t fill. Lastly, I’d like to invest in Kansas’ wildlife response. This is an area that a recent state audit found was underfunded and understaffed. At this time I don’t believe there are many areas we could cut because in recent years we have cut so much like with KDOT. I would, however, like to see cuts in outsourcing jobs and funds out of state. I would like to see more incentives that help divert the “use it or lose it” concepts and also would like to have more external independent audits to find where we can

save. However, I believe overall that Kansas does well with our tax dollars. Kansas tax policy has been in flux: Income tax cut and increase, sale tax rise, tinkering with property taxes. Explain how you would modify the state's tax structure to bring stability to government and certainty to businesses and individuals? Is there sufficient public transparency of large tax breaks given businesses by the executive branch?

I support the three-legged stool approach to taxes, which includes sales tax, income tax, and property tax. When you take one away it puts pressure on the others. I think we need to stick with what we know works. We see the result of cutting one tax completely out, and now we have high taxes. I believe we need to look at lowering taxes, but I think the way we go about it is by growing our state and adjusting along the way when we know we’re in position to do so. Kansas is fifth in the nation for people moving out. We’re

RICK KLOOS

Town of residence: Berryton Party affiliation: Independent Age: 52 Job: Director of God’s Storehouse Prior elected offices: None

not going to be able to cut taxes if we don’t start growing. With a good infrastructure, skilled workforce, and a balanced government I believe we will set the tone for businesses to move here. We have to change our perception of how people view Kansas if we’re going to see it grow. Lastly, I think we could definitely be more transparent and get away from “behind the door” deals.


C8  Sunday, October 14, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

STATE TREASURER: JAKE LATURNER Why are you the best candidate to perform duties of Kansas treasurer during the next four years?

Having served as State Treasurer for the last year and half, I am proud to say that we improved the services offered to all Kansans, while saving the taxpayer’s money. I have taken the time to analyze agency operations, allowing us to find innovative solutions, efficiencies, and streamline processes. For example, this last fiscal year we set a record for the most unclaimed property returned to Kansans in a single year by more than 12%. We have put over $35 million back into the pockets of Kansans. Our Learning Quest 529 Education Savings Accounts were ranked Top 5 in the nation by Forbes. We also launched the ABLE savings program for individuals living with a disability and enhanced it with legislation. Additionally, we launched a brand new, user and mobile friendly website that improves the claims process and allows for direct deposit. All of these things have been accomplished while decreasing the square footage of the office and reducing the budget. I list these things because not only am I running for State Treasurer, but I have a proven record of success in the office.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your personal conduct and how that wisdom would influence your work as treasurer?

As the proud son of a teacher, I saw shining examples of public service in my father and grandfather. My Grandpa Joe was a probate judge, who had an incredible sense of right and wrong. When he passed away, the headline in the local paper read “He had a gut feeling for fairness.” From a young age I learned that public service is about meeting people where

they are and treating them with the respect they deserve. A picture of my grandfather hangs on a wall in my office; it reminds me daily what it means to be a true servant leader. Which of your previous jobs -- excluding the post of state treasurer -- best aligned yourself with duties required of person elected or appointed to the job? What skills do you lack that would be beneficial to performing the role and would you fill that gap? Should the treasurer be required to have experience in banking, finance or a related field?

Prior to becoming State Treasurer, I was twice elected to serve the people of Southeast Kansas in the State Senate. During that time, I served as Chairman of the Federal and State Affairs Committee and served on the Financial Institution and Insurance Committee. During this same period, I worked in customer relations for one of the nation’s premier rail companies. Prior to that I worked as a District Representative for FormerTreasurer, Congresswomen Lynn Jenkins. In my view, to become an effective public servant one must “know what they don’t know.” I have gained valued institutional knowledge since becoming Treasurer, I have listened closely to the counsel of managers and employees who have served the State of Kansas and the Treasurer’s Office for decades. I have also put a greater emphasis on customer service. No matter what position I have served in, it has been about providing a better service to the customer. That has been my focus since becoming Treasurer.

Please offer justification or opposition to a treasurer's direct participation in radio, television and other advertising related

to the state's college savings program? Does it amount to unfair use of resources to bolster the incumbent's profile in advance of elections?

The Treasurer’s Office is statutorily obligated to administer the Learning Quest 529 Education Savings Accounts. It is the duty of the Treasurer to raise awareness of the program, so that as many Kansans can take advantage of the benefits available to them as possible. Promotion of the 529 program over the last year has been in line with the promotion of previous Treasurers of both parties. Kansans have told me they appreciate knowing that my family and I utilize Learning Quest to save for my children’s future. They appreciate knowing that we are willing to invest in the same program I am encouraging Kansans to utilize. Additionally, there is a blackout period in place, by Kansas statute, that prevents advertisement leading up to elections. I not only support the law, but in an abundance of caution, we ended the advertising over one month before it was required and seven months before the general election. This ensured that the advertisement promoting this important program but did not influence the election results. How should the treasurer's office broaden services to the state? What services should be curtailed or eliminated?

I believe the Treasurer’s role in State Government is to be a watchdog Kansas taxpayer funds. No matter who is Governor, Republican or Democrat, it is important to have a separate elected official checking the books. In order to better perform this role, my office has been looking at implementing an online checkbook, which would disclose

state expenditures down to the transaction level. I believe Kansans deserve this information and should feel empowered to hold their elected officials accountable. As mentioned before, we are focused on making the office run more efficiently and effectively. While it has taken some time, we have made great strides on moving toward direct deposits (ACH) for transactions as opposed to relying solely on issuing paper checks. ACH payments are secure and save $2.78 per transaction. We’ve engaged with other agencies and are encouraging them to do the same. Is it appropriate to keep the job of treasurer an elective position? Or, should the job be filled by the governor's nominee subject to Kansas Senate confirmation? Or, could the duties be performed by a state commission comparable to KPERS?

The Official Seal of the Treasurer’s Office features a watchdog guarding a vault. This accurately depicts our primary duty. It is imperative to have an independently elected official oversee all state financial transactions. As I mentioned earlier, no matter who is Governor, Kansans deserve an independently elected official looking over the books and who can be held accountable by voters.

Would you argue for or against liquidation of a $300 million fund managed by the treasurer's office that was used to help balance the state budget in 2017? What would you do if the Legislature balked at a pledge to repay the money?

The legislature’s decision to give the Pooled Money Investment Board more liquidity during a difficult financial period was understandable, as this was one of several difficult choices. The legislature has

JAKE LATURNER

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 30 Job: Politician Prior elected offices: Kansas treasurer; Kansas Senate

agreed to make repayments, which is appropriate. At this time, I am not inclined to support the elimination the fund in question and legislators have said they fully intent to repay the loan. From conversations with legislators, they do intend to make repayments and I am grateful for the collaboration. What is your view of unclaimed, mature U.S. Savings Bonds in federal hands? Should states take control of the bonds to improve prospects of locating rightful beneficiaries? If owners can't be found by a state, would you want states to cash those bonds and make expend the proceeds?

As the lead plaintiff in the case against the Federal Government, I strongly support returning these funds to citizens. The U.S. Treasury has done virtually nothing to return these funds to their rightful owners. Our office is well-equipped to return the funds through our Unclaimed Property system, and the United State’s Court of Federal Claims ruled in our favor last summer. The federal government has appealed the decision and we will continue to see this through until the end.

D E M O C R AT

STATE TREASURER: MARCI FRANCISCO Why are you the best candidate to perform duties of Kansas treasurer during the next four years?

I believe that I am the best candidate to perform the duties of Kansas Treasurer during the next four years because of my lifetime of experience managing numbers and finance. I have served on the Lawrence City Commission and as Mayor of Lawrence and also served in the Kansas Senate for fourteen years including as a member of the Senate’s Ways and Means and Assessment and Tax Committees. In addition to my career at the University of Kansas, I have served as the treasurer for several non-profits, was the “tax matters partner” in a small business and am chair of the Endowment Committee for my congregation. Along with having the skills and experience needed to manage the office, I am acutely aware of the financial damage done to the state of Kansas by the Brownback administration and how difficult it will be to repair that damage. The upcoming election gives Kansans an important opportunity to get our state back to fiscal responsibility; I am ready to step up and meet that challenge as State Treasurer.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your personal conduct and how that wisdom would influence your work as treasurer?

I grew up with a brother and sister both very close in age; often things needed to be divided up. To make sure things were fair, my mother designated one of us to make the list of chores or cut the pies and then let the other two siblings choose first. With this approach, my mother taught the three of us the value of fairness and the importance of doing our best to make sure

things were evenly divided. I still try to make decisions with that lesson in mind; it’s important that everyone‘s fair share is identified. As the Kansas Treasurer I will remember this lesson and do my best to ensure Kansas dollars benefit all Kansans. Which of your previous jobs -- excluding the post of state treasurer -- best aligned yourself with duties required of person elected or appointed to the job? What skills do you lack that would be beneficial to performing the role and would you fill that gap? Should the treasurer be required to have experience in banking, finance or a related field?

My jobs as the assistant director of Facilities Planning and staff for the Office of Information Research and Planning at the University of Kansas working with space management best align with the duties required of the State Treasurer. In those roles, I kept track of the ways spaces were used, balancing numbers and making reports, prioritized requests for renovations, and managed a staff. Although I have 40 years of experience with finance as a business owner and also experience during my time as Mayor and as a Senator, I am not a certified public accountant; I would hire a CPA as my assistant treasurer. I do think that our statutes should be changed to require that the treasurer have experience in banking, finance, or a related field.

Please offer justification or opposition to a treasurer's direct participation in radio, television and other advertising related to the state's college savings program? Does it amount to unfair use of resources to bolster the incumbent's profile in advance of elections?

Advertising that encourages

families to save for posthigh-school education is appropriate, however I do not believe that the direct participation of the State Treasurer helps to explain or promote the program. Money spent on advertising adds to the costs of administering the program. The State Treasurer should ensure that the benefit of advertising to the programs and our Kansas families is paramount. An individual, especially one who is appointed, not elected, to this position does receive an unfair advantage by using those resources to bolster his or her profile. I have pledged not to appear in such advertising. How should the treasurer's office broaden services to the state? What services should be curtailed or eliminated?

The Treasurer’s office should continue the ongoing work of cash management, overseeing receipts and expenditures, acting as the registrar and transfer agent for municipal bonds in instances where the Treasurer is designated as the paying agent, and finding the rightful owners of unclaimed property. The information in the annual reports should be easily accessible on the Treasurer’s website. I am not aware of any services should be curtailed or eliminated however would keep an eye out for such. I would like to see the program for locating matured U.S. Savings Bonds expanded as well as broadening the Kansas Learning Quest Program so that educational savings plans are established for every Kansas child.

Is it appropriate to keep the job of treasurer an elective position? Or, should the job be filled by the governor's nominee subject to Kansas Senate confirmation? Or, could the duties be performed by

a state commission comparable to KPERS?

I believe it makes sense to have an elected Treasurer who is independent from the Governor’s office. Some have expressed concern in the past that an appointed treasurer could be pressured to withhold some disbursements, such as school payments. Accurate and reliable reporting of receipts and expenditures to the public should come from an elected Treasurer. Further consolidation of power in the executive branch is not necessary and does not reflect good stewardship of Kansas funds. Although a state commission could oversee receipts and expenditures, an individual would best serve as an ex officio member of the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System. Would you argue for or against liquidation of a $300 million fund managed by the treasurer's office that was used to help balance the state budget in 2017? What would you do if the Legislature balked at a pledge to repay the money?

I would argue against making a loan from the Pooled Money Investments Board funds to balance the state budget; in this case, the $319 million “borrowed” in 2017 was taken from the state’s “idle” monies. Since the money in those funds has been set aside for future expenditures, I would request the authority to delay paying other bills if the Legislature balked at their pledge to repay those dollars. Balancing the budget should mean collecting enough in receipts to cover expenditures rather than simply moving money from one account to another or adding to our debt to meet fiscal needs.

What is your view of unclaimed, mature U.S. Savings Bonds in federal hands? Should states take

MARCI FRANCISCO

Town of residence: Lawrence Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 68 Job: State legislator Prior elected offices: Kansas Senate; Lawrence City Commission; Lawrence mayor control of the bonds to improve prospects of locating rightful beneficiaries? If owners can't be found by a state, would you want states to cash those bonds and make expend the proceeds?

The State Treasurer helps return unclaimed property to its rightful owners and heirs, and this help should extend to the estimated $151 million unclaimed, mature U.S. Savings Bonds issued to owners with addresses in Kansas. Unfortunately, the Federal Treasury has ended their “Treasury Hunt” program that began in 2000 so that the suggestion on the current Treasurer’s website to search there is not helpful. Owners can still submit form 1048 to claim lost, stolen, or destroyed bonds to the federal government. While I believe that state treasurers should be given information about bonds that were purchased by individuals in their states to help locate rightful owners, taking control of the unclaimed bonds should not be necessary to locate rightful beneficiaries and could be inappropriate if the owners are now residing in other states. These monies should not become the property of the state.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, October 14, 2018  C9

2018 VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER: NATHANIEL MCLAUGHLIN Why are you the right candidate for Kansas Insurance commissioner at this time?

I am the right candidate at this time because I have both the political independence to regulate objectively for all Kansans, and the compassion to advocate for and to assist the three hundred fifty thousand Kansans age 19-64 without health insurance obtain health insurance. My business experience managing an annual budget of thirty-three million dollars is an advantage in leading and directing this important component of our government. My values of work, faith in God and respect for neighbor and country are in sync with the values of most Kansans.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your personal and professional conduct and how that wisdom would influence your work as insurance commissioner?

On December 29, 2014. A blood vessel burst in my brain. This incident caused me to be comatose in ICU for two weeks, resulted in complete paralysis of the left side of by body, and my placement in a rehabilitation facility for eight weeks. Because I had acquired quality affordable private health insurance year over year

until the time of the medical scare, my sons were able to obtain the best medical care for me and were able to select facilities based upon quality of care reputations. The wisdom acquired from this experience will influence my advocacy for quality medical insurance products. I will advocate for private health insurance products as well as Medicaid expansion as long as such expansion does not add to the tax burden upon our citizens. A task force formed by Gov. Jeff Colyer recommended expansion of eligibility for Medicaid in Kansas consistent with the Affordable Health Care Act. What is your view of that proposal? What alternative ideas do you have about improving delivery of health insurance to the working poor in Kansas?

I have a very favorable view of the proposal because expanding eligibility would provide health care to an estimated 150,000 uninsured Kansans, help individuals with drug abuse problems such as opiate disorders, and help reduce the resulting financial drain from hospitals, law enforcement, families, and our courts. In response to improving delivery of health insurance to the working poor in Kansas, I would recommend extending

Medicaid to any adult who makes less than 138% of the federal poverty income bar. I would ask the governor to offset any increase in costs by moving the $8.3 million taken from the insurance depaartment’s budget back to the insurance department. What elements of the ACA, such as the provision regarding pre-existing conditions would you retain assuming the ACA were replaced?

The regulations on all health plans that prevent health insurers from denying coverage for pre-existing conditions and from charging hight premiums based on and gender.

Do you think it appropriate of candidates for insurance commissioner to accept contributions from securities or insurance companies subject to regulation by the commissioner? Is it acceptable for an insurance commissioner to establish a political action committee and make donations to political allies?

No (to the first). Yes (to the second), as long as that political action committee does not make donations to the insurance commissioner’s campaign.

Should the position of insurance commissioner be an administrative position

appointed by the governor?

No.

Are you satisfied with transfer to the attorney general of authority to prosecute securities fraud cases aand placement of other securities oversight with the insurance commissioner?

Yes.

Is there any merit to imposition of a state law limiting state insurance commissioners from working as a lobbyist in Kansas for a specific number of years after leaving the job?

No.

Please share your suggestions for reforming the insurance department with an eye to improving services and limiting costs?

Internally, I believe in working with the talented staff already employed at the insurance department before suggesting changes. Using a Steven Covey principle, I would seek first to understand and then to be understood. This would be accomplished by establishing a “Bright Idea” program whereby employees would receive special recognition and other honors for ideas implemented that help achieve cost savings aor improve quality of services. Externally, I would establish a commissioner advisory group composed of

NATHANIEL MCLAUGHLIN

Town of residence: Kansas City, Kan. Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 64 Job: Retired district executive for Sodexo Healthcare Services Prior elected offices: None

representatives of healthcare service providers, advocacy groups, professional associations, the legislative branch and the insurance industry. This group would meet semiannually to discuss and make recommendations to the commissioner for improving the insurance landscape of Kansas. What is a little-known function of the state insurance department that ought to be appreciated by the public?

The function to educate the public on insurance matters and to be an advocate where prudent to do so.

REPUBLICAN

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER: VICKI SCHMIDT Why are you the right candidate for Kansas insurance commissioner at this time?

I believe my background as a pharmacist and state senator provides me the experience and knowledge to positively impact the Kansas Department of Insurance. The number one insurance issue brought to my attention by voters is the cost of insurance, specifically health insurance. Kansas is long overdue for a discussion about why insurance costs so much and what we can do to lower costs. I plan to facilitate that discussion and work with stakeholders to identify changes that could result in consumer savings.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your personal and professional conduct and how that wisdom would influence your work as insurance commissioner?

I became a pharmacist because I wanted to help people and I’m running for Insurance Commissioner for the same reason. What I've learned in my years as a pharmacist goes far beyond what any books, class or professor could have taught me. I've learned the importance of customer service, the value in teaching those around you, the compassion to take care of people, the patience to lead a team and

the discipline to get things done. I believe all those things will serve me well as Insurance Commissioner. A task force formed by Gov. Jeff Colyer recommended expansion of eligibility for Medicaid in Kansas consistent with the Affordable Care Act. What is your view of that proposal? What alternative ideas do you have about improving delivery of health insurance to the working poor in Kansas?

I have voted to support Medicaid expansion. Hospitals in Kansas, especially those in rural areas strongly support expansion as it will help give more lowincome Kansans access to healthcare. Kansas taxpayers are paying for the expansion of Medicaid nationally. Medicaid expansion in our state would allow Kansas to get back money our taxpayers have paid to the federal government. If we don’t take it, it goes to other states. I believe we should put those dollars to use in Kansas.

What elements of the ACA, such as the provision regarding pre-existing conditions, would you retain assuming the ACA were replaced?

While the Affordable Care Act was controversial, the pre-existing conditions provision was one that both Republicans and Democrats

supported. So much so, that Republicans included it in their proposed changes to the ACA. It is vital Kansans be able to get insurance coverage regardless of their pre-existing conditions. I also support retaining the provision that allows kids to stay on their parents health insurance until they are 26. Do you think it appropriate of candidates for insurance commissioner to accept contributions from securities or insurance companies subject to regulation by the commissioner? Is it acceptable for an insurance commissioner to establish a political action committee and make donations to political allies?

It is common practice for many insurance or securities companies to be supportive of candidates for insurance commissioner. It is then up to each commissioner to make their own decisions, independent of influence. I have no plans to establish a political action committee if elected.

What is your perspective on suggestions the insurance commissioner's post should be converted from an elective position to a job subject to nomination by the governor and Senate confirmation?

I strongly support the democratic process that allows for the public’s participation in choosing their leaders.

Kansans have been well served with an elected Insurance Commissioner. The four-year term is appropriate to provide for the proper checks and balances in leadership. Are you satisfied with transfer to the attorney general of authority to prosecute securities fraud cases and placement of other securities oversight with the insurance commissioner?

As Insurance commissioner, I will review all aspects of the office to ensure quality service to Kansans, including the authority transferred to the Attorney General.

Is there any merit to imposition of a state law limiting state insurance commissioners from working as a lobbyist in Kansas for a specific number of years after leaving the job?

This decision would be made by the Legislature, independent of the Insurance Commissioner.

Please share your suggestions for reforming the insurance department with an eye to improving services and limiting costs?

Again, the number one insurance issue brought to my attention by voters is the cost of insurance. Kansas is long overdue for a discussion about why insurance costs so much and what we can do to lower costs. I plan to facilitate

VICKI SCHMIDT

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 62 Job: Pharmacist Prior elected offices: Kansas Senate

that discussion and work with stakeholders to identify changes that could result in consumer savings. We also need to make sure Kansas is open for business and ensure regulations allow for a competitive market so consumers have options. What is a little-known function of the state insurance department that ought to be appreciated by the public?

The Kansas Insurance Department has partnered with the Kansas Insurance Education Foundation to establish an insurance certificate for college students at Kansas universities. This great program allows students a jumpstart on a career.

Follow these steps to ensure your vote counts The Capital-Journal

The midterm elections are less than a month away, and with federal, state and local positions on the ballot, it is important that people who intend to vote ensure they are properly registered. Tuesday, Oct. 16, is the final day to register to vote in the general election that will be held Tuesday, Nov. 6. Here is some information from the Kansas Secretary of State’s website that may be helpful during this election cycle. When are the polls open for the Nov. 6 general election?

The polls for the primary

election will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Election Day. All voters who are in line when the polls close are allowed to vote. Can I check to make sure I am registered to vote?

Visit the Secretary of State's website at bit.ly/CJvotercheck and enter your first and last name, date of birth and county of residence. How do I register to vote?

There are three steps. 1. Obtain the voter registration application. You may use the Kansas form or the federal form. (a) The Kansas Voter

Registration Application form is available for printing on the Secretary of State’s website, bit.ly/CJvoterform, and on the various county election office websites. It is also available at many locations established by the county election officer. Banks, libraries, schools and government offices usually have the form. Also, everyone has an opportunity to register when applying for or renewing a driver’s license or applying for public assistance. (b) The federal Voter Registration Application is accepted in Kansas. The federal form is found at bit.ly/

CJfederal. 2. Fill out the application legibly and completely, then sign it. 3. Deliver the completed application in person or by mail, fax or email to the county election officer in the county where you live. It must be returned no later than the 21st day before any election. How do I find out where I vote?

After registering, you will receive a voter registration certificate which shows the location of your voting place. If you are unsure where to vote, contact your county election officer. A list of county election officers and

contact information is available at bit.ly/2uiLOan. You may also find your polling site by entering your home address and ZIP code on the Secretary of State's website at myvoteinfo. voteks.org. Where can I get election results?

For local election results, contact your county election officer. For state and national results, contact the Secretary of State’s office at (785) 2964561. The Secretary of State’s office and some local county election offices may post the results online as they come in on election night.


C10  Sunday, October 14, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE, 47TH DISTRICT: RONALD B. ELLIS Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I have lived and worked in Jefferson County for over forty years. I know the people I represent. I am involved in the county through membership in a variety of organizations and boards. I taught history and government in Oskaloosa Public Schools for 37 years. I own three farms in Jefferson County and raise cattle. I understand the issues that are important to the people of District 47 because these are the same issues I face every day. I have completed my first two-year term in the House where I served on the Agriculture, State and Federal, and Health Committees. I have made a number of connections and alliances with other representatives and leadership in order to get the business of Kansas accomplished without wasting taxpayer time and money.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

My father died unexpectedly when I was a freshman in college. This required me to make some difficult decisions regarding my ability to continue my education. My parents lived on a farm where we raised cattle for a living. Who was going to take care of the cattle? How would I afford my tuition? I decided that, with help from my neighbors, I could continue my education and take care of the cattle and help on the farm. I moved back home while continuing my education at a local junior college. This required me to develop great time management skills as well as skills in prioritizing. I also learned to sacrifice and spend every evening, weekend, and summer working. A friend and I hauled hay all summer so that I could earn my tuition money. I needed and depended upon my neighbors to help with the cattle in my absence. We made

agreements with a handshake and a willingness to live up to our word. By the time I completed my Associates Degree, I had the farm and cattle work at a place where I could live in Emporia during the week, but I still spent every weekend working at the farm. I am a strong believer in setting priorities and honoring your commitments, working hard in every endeavor, offering stability in all situations, being reliable, and treating other people right. I still believe that a handshake and your word mean more than a legal contract. These are all lessons which guide me in my life and in my work in the legislature. I followed through on my priorities to my constituents. While I sometimes disagreed with other house members, I always treated them with respect and found common ground upon which we could connect. What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

I believe each government department and program should undergo an annual review of expenses and outcomes with a focus on increased efficiency. We cannot afford to spend any money without accountability. In the last two years, the legislature has committed to a 525Million 5-year plan to give school districts the ability to plan a budget. The plan isn’t perfect, but it is a good start. State government needs to stop the habit of transferring money from departments to the state budget. Priorities need to be established including our state highway budget. Kansas Public Employees Retirement System needs to be fully funded and an aggressive repayment schedule needs to be put in place. Kansas has challenges, but they can be met by reasonable legislators working together to set priorities and live within

an established budget. It’s the Kansas thing to do. How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

The 2012 tax cut was too much, and when it was discovered that the plan was not working, there was no remedy to correct either by decreasing spending significantly or reevaluating the levels of the tax cuts. The 2015 sales tax increase attempted to offset the tax cuts; I would advocate for the sales tax returning to previous levels since the 2017 tax increase was enacted. That being said, the 2017 tax increase was too much and significantly higher than what was needed to fund the state’s needs. I believe a lower tax increase would have been kinder to the tax paying citizens in Kansas and would have met the needs of the state.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

The Kansas Health Institute reports that approximately 90% of Kansans are covered by private insurance coverage and by public coverage including Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, and other public programs. Of the remaining 300,000 Kansans without coverage, over 50,000 are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP but not enrolled and an additional 151,000 qualify for financial assistance to buy coverage on the health care exchange. The remaining 100,000 Kansas are those people who do not have access to public coverage and who do not qualify for financial assistance. I believe the Insurance Commissioner, the Kansas Hospital Association, the Kansas Medical Society, and other key stakeholders could come together and develop a uniquely Kansas

solution for Kansans without coverage and could do so in a more economically prudent manner than expanding Medicaid. I support work and training requirements for all able-bodied Medicaid recipients as these skills will provide a long-term solution for the Kansan to have a better life and not be dependent upon a government program for healthcare. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

The Kansas Constitution uses the word “suitability.” The Supreme Court believes they have the power to determine “suitability” and thus legislate the amount of money that is provided to schools. The legislature is charged with determining how monies are allocated and spent in the state. I believe the $525 million five-year plan will give schools a better forecast of the monies they will have available year to year and complies with the Constitution. A Kansas Constitution amendment may be necessary as courts should not dictate any funding levels. If it takes a change in the state constitution to remedy the current situation, I would strongly consider it.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

Immigration is a federal responsibility and federal law requires employment eligibility verification for all individuals hired for employment in the US. Some states have enacted laws requiring employers to use E-Verify rather than relying on employees to provide the required documents. E-Verify should tighten the process and

RON ELLIS

(incumbent) Town of residence: Meriden Party affiliation: Republican Age: 65 Job: Self-employed as cattleman Prior elected offices: Kansas House

diminish the use of counterfeit photo IDs and social security cards. The Safe and Fair Elections Law of 2011 stipulates the need for photo ID when casting a vote in person and signature verification along with a copy of a photo ID when voting by mail. A process similar to employment E-Verify could be developed to enhance election security. Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

These decisions should be made and funded at the local school district level, particularly the decision to hire and arm safety officers in the schools. The schools in my district have locked doors, limited access, and the requirement that a visitor be identified prior to admission to the school. I would recommend each school working with local law enforcement to conduct a threat assessment and develop an action plan to address issues identified. I would also recommend a forum for sharing positive actions among and between schools to learn from each other and continually improve the ability to provide a safe school environment.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE: 47TH DISTRICT: GEORGE B. HANNA Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

There are so many reasons over the last few decades that have continued to motivate me to stay engaged in local politics. The major factor continues to be the willingness many legislators to be more concerned of how their donors will react to a vote, than their constituents. I hope to build a culture of inclusion by applying a common sense approach, in a bipartisan manor, showing my future colleagues the importance of diversity. For far too long big money has negated voters, at all levels, allowing for further division among Americans.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

As an early teen I was a rebellious. I was partially raised on a cattle ranch by my Grandparents, learning the value of a hard day’s work, or a ward of the state. Refusing to stay in the state’s facilities I became homeless. I was a migrant worker in Manhattan, living on the roof of the Greyhound Bus station. I lived in a newspaper recycling bin in Lawrence for a winter, working odd jobs or fast food until it was discovered that I was only 14. As an adult, I take great pride in getting things done, not only for myself, but others that may not be able to on their own. Going from a resourceful teen to a successful business manager/owner, husband of nearly 30 years, Father and Grandfather has given me the tools to empathize with

a broad portion of society. I would tell my employees that as long as the error was made in the customers favor, it was not an error that couldn’t be overcome. I believe that today. Legislators must be responsible for every voter in as equitable a way as possible, while still providing the services elected to provide. Please see HannaForKS47.com for my complete backstory. What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

I would support the state no longer providing a moratorium to some corporations to come to the state. I recognize that this is not a direct “spending” reduction, however, failure to bring in revenue adds to burden of all expenditures from the state’s revenue. There are literally hundreds of areas where the tax burden could be reduced on the average Kansan if there were an appealing infrastructure to where large corporations would want to take advantage within their business operation, not some temporary bribe often going to investors, then leaving Kansas once the incentives expire. Where we should increase spending is Pre-K Education. I see this more of an investment to reduce overall spending across several planks of our state budget. An increased attention to pre-K would reduce healthcare, K-12 and criminal justice, to name a few. By recognizing disabilities earlier would reduce their impact later in life.

How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

2012 was reckless; it was much like quitting a job before you have another to fill the income loss. 2015 was nothing but a knee jerk reaction to denial of how devastating the Brownback experiment was to Kansas and it targeted many least able to afford. 2017 was what Kansas should have done in 2014 or 2015, once it became clear the experiment had failed, despite numerous attempts to “revise” the method used to ascertain where the state was and budget needed to be balanced. Today we are still too dependent of sales and property tax, but at least we can provide the services expected by Kansans. Kansas should be working toward a equitable tax plan while reducing the regressive taxes like sales tax on food and sales tax on utilities.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

I wholeheartedly support Medicaid expansion on the way to a universal healthcare for all system. I would also support bringing control back into the state, with clear objectives, guidelines and oversite. I support this because there is an expanding segment of Kansans that fall into the gap of not being able to have health insurance and no means to pay the exorbitant costs, additionally to allow nearly 2 million dollars

a day to escape Kansas because of our refusal to expand hurts Kansans and is reckless. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

I would accept the $525 million as sufficient today. The reason I say “today” is I also feel that there are many school districts that are “top heavy.” Kansans take pride (or at least used too) in our education and don’t mind spending money to continue that excellence, what they do mind is seeing it go to private schools when their own children can’t go or large administration salaries without the student enrollment to support such administrations. It has become too easy to ask for more money without asking the hard questions from within at the same time. Any attempt to remove judicial oversight would be vigorously fought by myself and any other Kansan that believes in why the three branches of government were founded over 200 years ago.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

There should be an aggressive attempt to prevent unlawful hiring. Companies should be assisted by Kansas and the Federal Government to provide a clear path to citizenship for new hires. Any

GEORGE B. HANNA

Town of residence: Tecumseh Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 48 Job: Artist Prior elected offices: None

attempt to circumvent that process should be met with heavy fines and deportation. With today’s culture of deport first and provide a convoluted process for immigration only serves to increase illegal activity. We should be welcoming to those that want to come to the U.S. for the same reasons our ancestors did. Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

ABSOLUTELY not! Additional School Resource Officers and a health relationship with local law enforcement will provide the security many feel is needed. Kansas has been fortunate to not have had a school shooting and I feel it is largely due to the outstanding teachers of Kansas. Creating a problem where one does not exist is foolish. We should be asking the teachers what THEY need to increase security.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, October 14, 2018  C11

2018 VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE, 50TH DISTRICT: FRED PATTON Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

When I first ran for the House, I was concerned about the direction our state was headed. Since being elected, I have worked across the political spectrum and served as a voice for common sense solutions so that we could begin to get our state back on track. While we have made progress on balancing the budget, restoring tax fairness, and funding our schools, we still have a lot of work to do to make Kansas a place future generations want to live, work, and raise their families. It is for that reason that I am running for re-election.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

There isn’t one experience that guides my conduct or influences my decisions in the Capitol. Instead, it is a lifetime of experiences, relationships, challenges, and successes that have helped develop who I am today. Like most people, I have experienced tragedy, but I have also experienced plenty of happiness and more than my share of good friends and family. All of life’s experiences, both good and bad, happy and sad, help to shape the person we are and the wisdom we have when making decisions for ourselves and others. If I had to pick one experience, I would have to chose being a dad. I make giving back to our community a priority because I want my children and others their age to live in a state that will provide them opportunities to be successful, both personally and professionally. It is with that goal in mind that I try to guide my conduct and make decisions as a legislator.

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

The vast majority of our state budget goes to fund human caseloads (such as KanCare), KPERS, and education. While we must continue to look for efficiencies in these areas, state budget profiles show these areas will continue to grow as a percentage of the budget for the foreseeable future. To look for spending reductions, the

Legislature should continue to review the recommendations made by the Alvarez & Marsal efficiency study, which included 105 individual recommendations that the consultants believed could result in $2.04 billion in savings. Many of the recommendations made are not feasible, but so far 29 of the recommendations have been implemented and another 24 are in progress. Mental health, highways, and our hospitals are examples of areas that should be a priority for greater investment. Not only are there needs in these areas, all three of these are examples of areas that result in additional costs elsewhere when not adequately funded. How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

Our state, our schools, and our economy faced very serious challenges after implementation of the 2012 Brownback tax plan—challenges that required real revenue reform from the Legislature. In 2017, I supported the proposal that reversed a portion of the Brownback tax plan. We have now put Kansas on a sustainable course that provides stability to our families, our seniors, our schools, and our businesses. I voted against the sales tax increase in 2015. As revenues stabilize thanks to the action in 2017, the Legislature should begin reducing our high sales tax rate, especially on food and other necessities.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

Improving access to health care is extremely important to our state. We must also maintain quality and cost effectiveness. The Legislature and Governor should work together on a Kansas specific solution to improve our health care system and save our hospitals which could include expanding the state’s KanCare program in a responsible way. Any program should include work and training requirements for “able-bodied” recipients. We should also

provide additional resources to our safety net clinics and mental health systems. These investments in providing better access will improve both the health of Kansans and the Kansas economy. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

As Chairman of the House K-12 Budget Committee, I am proud of the work we accomplished regarding school finance. We passed a bipartisan bill that, when combined with the additional funding allocated last year, will increase annual state funding for our schools by nearly $825 million above 2017 funding levels. This amount is in line with testimony received over the past two years from our schools and our State Board of Education. These additional dollars are already making a significant difference to schools across our state. I respect the decision Kansans made in 1966 to add the current language to our constitution. However, I don’t agree with the plaintiff's attorney when he said all other areas of the state budget should suffer to fund schools. The Court has determined that the additional funding we added over the past two years is still unconstitutional. While the Courts have had significant input on school funding, Kansans have not had a direct voice on the topic in over 50 years. Given that, it may be time to again ask Kansans if they want to change the constitution in some manner or leave it the same.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

Immigration is regulated at the federal level. Federal law bans employers from hiring illegal immigrants. Some states have required employers to go beyond the federal minimum when it comes to employee hiring by requiring employers to use the E-Verify system to confirm a prospective employee’s immigration status. While the US Supreme Court has

held that the federal government has jurisdiction over immigration law, the Court has allowed states to require E-Verify. Before mandating E-Verify for private businesses in Kansas and requiring them to comply with this potentially expensive government regulation, I would want to learn more about the effectiveness of E-Verify and receive input from our business owners on the impact to them. Over the next five years, Kansas already has plans to spend nearly $5 million to strengthen voting systems thanks primarily to a grant received from the federal government. These plans will not only address cyber security, but will also go toward protecting voter rolls, auditing election results, and updating voting machines. Election security must be something we continue to monitor at both the state and federal level. Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

As a 16-year member of the Seaman Board of Education, I am a strong advocate for local control, especially when it comes to education. Those at the local level know best how to address the challenges before them. That being said, I also believe that through collaboration and partnerships with other government agencies, with business and industry, and with education experts we can do a better job of not only educating students, but also providing them with safe and secure schools. As one of the legislators who worked closely on the Kansas Safe and Secure Schools Act this past session, I believe we can take steps at the state level to assist our schools with security. Like we did earlier this year, we can provide schools resources to construct more secure entrances, to add security cameras, and to provide training. When it comes to purchasing firearms for teachers, districts already have the authority to allow their teachers to carry firearms, but that is a decision they make at the local level, not at the state level.

What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

I am Pro-Life and am

FRED PATTON

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 44 Job: Attorney Prior elected offices: Kansas House; Seaman School District Board of Education president

proud of the work we have done to protect the most innocent amongst us. We must continue to identify the issues parents face when in a difficult situation and then undertake efforts to address those needs. We must also address our adoption and foster care programs so that adoption is accessible and affordable for more families. While we have begun to see some positive change, we have a long way to go. Far too many children in our system are waiting for a loving, permanent home. A transportation task force is meeting to prepare for the state's next big highway program. What do you want to see in that package in terms of priorities and financing?

According to a recent analysis of our highway system, 34% of our highway pavement is rated as being below good condition. This percentage continues to increase due to insufficient funding for maintenance and repairs. In Fiscal Year 2018 alone, nearly $500 million in sales tax funds were swept from KDOT to fund other purposes in the state general fund. Not only do we want quality highways for safety, but highway accessibility is the number two criteria companies consider when they are selecting sites for bringing new businesses to our state. We have historically had a very high-quality highway system. We must make this a priority in the next highway program by taking steps to protect the sales taxes already collected for transportation from being used for other purposes.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE, 50TH DISTRICT: DAN BRENNAN Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I would like to represent the people of the 50th House District. To give voters a choice between candidates during an election is important. However, there is not a lot of policy differences between me and my opponent. I do come at problems from a bit of a different angle because of my experiences. I desire to give back to society what I have received.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

I experienced homelessness after a divorce years ago, so I know first hand what that experience was like and now I am on the area's Homeless Task Force working to address issues that the homeless face everyday. This task force is made up of many different organizations that strive to work on this issue. The skills that I learned from pulling myself from the brink of destruction will also help me set about, I believe, improving the state of the state.

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater

investment?

The legislature has cut to the bone most social services, state contributions to education was underfunded for several years, KPERS as well. The only place I have not seen any reductions in spending might be within the administration. Where we do need to invest more is into infrastructure and education.

How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

The Brownback experiment upset the entire apple cart and it will take several different steps and the incremental process to heal all the damage will extend beyond 2019 there isn't any doubt.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

Yes, I support medicaid expansion in Kansas. We should have at the start of the Affordable Care Act's implementation. In fact, I would love to see discussion and research on devising a state run healthcare for-all plan. I believe that it would attract businesses and investment for the quality of

life benefits by residing in this state. It might even benefit a company by not having to package health insurance in their employee benefit. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

Yes it could be considered sufficient, but I desire more than sufficient. I would like more than just adequate to get by with. I would like to invest in the future by having the best schools possible. To stop the teacher drain that has been happening we need to value those educators. Let them now they are valued by paying them sufficiently, and adequately. If funding is adequate, equitable there is no constitutional violation. There is no reason to alter the constitution simply because of some belief that it is okay to under fund the education of our children.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

I am not sure there is much the state can do with Federal

enforcement of immigration laws. Our elections are fairly well protected against inperson fraud. I encourage those who disagree to work the polls during election day and learn just how secure it is already. What would be nice is to have a state standard throughout the counties on how everything works. Counties are a mish-mash of different policies and procedures. I remember Kansas having a really good Secretary of State. It would be nice to have one once again that encouraged people to get out and vote. Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

Absolutely not. That is not what is needed to reduce gun violence. Putting more guns in more hands will result in more injury and possibly more death. If we want secure schools we need to come up with the money to upgrade security measures across this state. It can be done if the people wish to do so. I can help in the process to address extra security measures.

What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

The same as the Federal

DAN BRENNAN

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 63 Job: Executive director of Capital City Equality Center Prior elected offices: Precinct committeeman

standards. I am all for a woman to have full bodily autonomy. A transportation task force is meeting to prepare for the state's next big highway program. What do you want to see in that package in terms of priorities and financing?

There are several projects from the last transportation plan that were put on hold due to constant theft to make up for reckless tax experimentation. So we should get back to funding those needs and assess which other projects that need maybe even more urgency and expedite those first. Financing can be handled the same way as the last major highway program. Investment is the word.


C12  Sunday, October 14, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE, 51ST DISTRICT: RON HIGHLAND Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

Having been in the House of Representatives for six years gives me more opportunity to educate other Representatives while deliberations on bills take place. That experience counts. As an Infantry Platoon Leader, Veterinarian in private practice, instructor, research and development leader in MultiNational corporations, and chair of the county party I have the background to approach all decisions from an informational basis, not emotional or influenced by other special interests.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

Serving as an Army Infantry Platoon Leader during the Vietnam War era is where I learned personal responsibility, leadership, and working with people during difficult circumstances. During that period, I became aware and sure of my principles concerning life, faith, caring for others, personal freedom, and government involvement in individual freedoms.

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

I am convinced there are agencies that could reduce their spending without harming their mission, but I would hesitate to vote for random cuts. Any reductions must be made after careful evaluation of their mission, any duplication of efforts with other agencies, and reviewing their priority-based budget proposal. This will make the priority-based budgeting process a valuable tool in the process. A yearly audit for all agencies and organizations receiving taxpayer funds should be put in place.

How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

All tax decisions must be based on careful evaluation of what the effect will be on businesses, families, and individuals. The goal is to increase taxpayers. The original tax bill should have rewarded employers when

they hired new employees. I had a bill written to make those adjustments, but it was never considered. I cannot vote a general tax increase if the effects on agriculture, accounting for 45% of our economy, causes a reduction in revenue in the long term. We must retain businesses and employees in our border counties, where the state receives 36% of total sales tax revenues and 35% of total income tax revenues. A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

I will not support Medicaid expansion as proposed. After reviewing the cause and effect on states that did expand, the cost for implementing is too high and the potential harm to those who are in need today is a risk I am unwilling to take. Perhaps it is time to think outside of the norm and consider forming a compact with other mid-western states to allow insurance companies to compete across the entire area.

The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

I voted no on the latest school funding bill for several reasons. The Kansas Supreme Court has overstepped its constitutional authority, in my opinion, and an amendment should be put before the voters to align the Court with the Kansas Constitution. The bill contained no accountability measures, and it funded mental health measures for a few school districts. I sympathize with the need for dealing with the mental health crisis in our state, but it should be a state-wide activity, not a few selected sites. The five-year promissory note is without precedent. A subsequent legislature is not obligated to comply.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

RON HIGHLAND

(incumbent) Town of residence: Wamego Party affiliation: Republican Age: 71 Job: Retired veterinarian Prior elected offices: Kansas House; Wabaunsee County Republican Precinct Committeeman

Voting is a privilege given to residents of our state. Proof of citizenship must be a criterion without exception. Canada has developed a carefully controlled worker visa program that should be evaluated for implementation in Kansas. E-verify is in place and must be used by anyone hiring. The need for workers is great and a system can be developed that is both controlled and sympathetic to humanitarian needs.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE, 51ST DISTRICT: NOAH L. WRIGHT Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

Because we have gutted funding of our education system to pay for huge tax breaks for the wealthiest Kansans and corporations. I believe that our kids deserve better than this and that working families should not be the ones that have to make up for the deficit created by this debacle. But the Republican candidate for Governor and his legislative allies, proclaim that their first priority is to remove the Supreme Court from upholding them to do their jobs — fund education under the Constitution. Furthermore, they are proudly touting the fact that they will continue to defund public schools. Dare I say repeating patterns and not learning from their lapse in judgement? I want to protect our kids, our teachers, and our schools. Also, as a member of a family with health issues that pose financial risks, I worry about both the overall health care battles in our state as well as have empathy for those in our state who cannot afford to have health care insurance coverage. Finally, I think that policy makers have lost sight of the real picture and they need to remember what the purpose of the position is and who they are truly working for. Politicians who like the title and perks – but with no vision, no plan and no care for the future – the ones after a legislative session that mumble excuses as to why they accomplished nothing are the first to go. While I treasure the contributions that have been made by our senior citizens, I believe that it is time for new visions, new ideas and, yes, a younger generation of representation to bring its ideas and solutions to Topeka. Kansas needs to reclaim itself as a pioneer of possibilities and well-being.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

The single most significant experience has been becoming a father of 2 young children who will be enrolling in our public education system next year. Being responsible for the upbringing of others is an awesome challenge. Seeing their dependence on my wife and I as parents to consistently demonstrate and teach them values of kindness and appreciation of the world around

them drives my zeal to make our state a better place for them to establish their roots and grow up in. It’s not what my children will grow up to be or own that will define who they are but it will be their solid character that they will be proud of most. Our family unit’s way of making tough decisions such as being fiscally responsible, determination to embrace opportunities, and taking ownership in one’s part are important practices that translate to all areas of life. Furthermore, the way we handle and follow through with the day-to-day challenges and joys along with how we interact and treat others will be at the core of our children’s foundation. We’re all just people. Being actively engaged in our relationships with conversations and listening is the key to understanding. And becoming informed is how we make quality decisions. We are linked together by the help we receive, the network of others made available to us, feelings validated, and the futures they make possible. What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

I don't pretend to be an expert at many of these various programs. I do know that I am a good listener, and have learned through my education and experience to consider all the alternatives as opposed to rushing to some ideological judgement. I am ready and eager to work with everyone, even with those who do not share my viewpoints. As a business owner, I value consistency, stability, and forward progress. I look forward to the additional on-the-job learning about how all of our state programs work, where we can improve efficiencies and reduce costs, and where we can ultimately make better use of the opportunities presented to us. Because we have witnessed firsthand that when proper practices are not followed, misfortunes arise.

How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

Collapse deepens an appreciation of existence. This is why talking about failure is key to success. The 2012 income tax was an abysmal failure.

It did NOT give a shot of adrenaline to the economy of Kansas. All it did was plunder our education system, our pension program, and our infrastructure. There went generations of hard work down the drain…Unfortunately, we now are faced with the need to recover as best we can from that, without going off on another extreme on the other side of this issue. As a business owner I know that consistency and stability are more important than a specific tax rate. Wild swings in taxes are not an incentive to move my business elsewhere, or for someone to move theirs here. Predictability is key to a successfully growing economy. I also believe that working families are the drivers of our economy. So, as for sales taxes, they tend to hit families and lower income people more than upper income folks, so lowering income taxes on the highest rates while increasing sales taxes seems a bit unjustified. There is no reason that the majority of us were the ones that were targeted to make up for the deficiencies of the failed experiment. In the end, we have to find a balance that keeps our schools funded, protects the less fortunate among us and promotes a growing business sector. A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

Yes. That is the direction we should be headed. There is a reason that a state task force recommended full expansion. This is supported by many on both sides of the aisle. So, we must recognize and plan to account for the disadvantaged as well. Kansas does not exist as an island. We are a part of these United States and have a role to play in figuring out how our society will live. Health care in our country and state is a mess. Yes, with such focus on finding the cure, we have excellent treatment readily available, but we pay exorbitant amounts for it, and yet do not have the world's best health care system. When those at the lowest end of the economic scale are forced to use emergency rooms for primary care, it costs all of us. My hunch about the battle over expansion Medicaid is that it is rooted in an intense animosity

toward the Affordable Care Act. Lost is the fact that the act largely paralleled the successful Romneycare that has existed in Massachusetts for years. There are many details and specifics that should be considered. But overall, expanding Medicaid has seemed to work well where it has occurred. Prevention, however, either through education and/or medical treatments, is the first step in providing stability with healthy, productive, and thriving communities. Not until someone is personally effected by a serious medical condition do they then realize what’s really important. Let’s recognize the identity and worth of each other and we will live well as we help others live well. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

The administration’s lapse in judgment already shortchanged the potential of thousands of students. I am grateful to have had an excellent education that includes 2 degrees from Kansas State. My opponent also has taken full advantage of acquiring an excellent education through public schools. I do not think that you can ever invest too much in our children’s future because it’s our future as well. But I believe that the issue is more about whether there should be checks and balances in our state governmental system, or should the executive branch, or the legislative branch be untouchable by the judiciary. A Constitution sets forth our values, and what we believe to be important. The Kansas Constitution provides for the Judiciary to insure that the Executive and Legislative branches are upholding the Constitution. I am in full support of the principles of checks and balances. I do not favor amending the Kansas Constitution to remove that function from the Supreme Court just because we don't like the opinions of one branch of the government. Lastly, I believe that the biggest problem facing our school systems are paying for the highest quality teachers we can get, making sure they have the curriculum and materials to make a

NOAH L. WRIGHT

Town of residence: Wamego Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 40 Job: Owner of Oz Winery Prior elected offices: None

difference in the education of our children for this changing world, and acknowledging them as the professionals they are. One can argue that we spent less money decades ago and produced a better educated young adult. Battling over dollars obscures and distracts from the real challenges we face. How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

We certainly need to abide by federal law regarding immigration. At the same time, we need to acknowledge that our businesses and industry are in desperate need of trained workers. So again, it is not only an immigration issue, but another factor to the education debate. I'm a believer in facts and analysis. We have more than enough data that tells us that election security has nothing to do with illegal immigrants voting. The claims that thousands have voted in Kansas illegality has NEVER been shown to have occurred. The facts show just the opposite. However, election security is also at risk when we have voting machines tied to the internet and dependent upon computer systems that can be attacked. I do not have the facts about the costs of using only paper ballots, but I believe that in our democracy, the sanctity of our elections must be protected. At the very least, I also don't think it helps our state if the oversight of elections is in the hands of the people who are a candidate or strongly supports party line agendas. That seems to be a bit of the fox watching the hen house! It is our obligation that all public reporting should be clear and easily understood Of the people, by the people, for the people.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, October 14, 2018  C13

2018 VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE, 52ND DISTRICT: BRENDA DIETRICH Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I am seeking a second term as State Representative for the same reasons I ran in 2016. I ran to get our state back on the right track by restoring stability to the state budget and adequately funding essential services. Everyone I talked to was concerned about public safety, education,roads and bridges, programs for our disabled, elderly, and our foster children. I worked hard to be a voice for the people of the 52nd House district while also being a good steward of our tax dollars. I have proven that I am willing and able to work with others to find common sense solutions to complicated issues in order to create a better Kansas for those that I serve.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

The life experience that has guided my conduct was when I became the Superintendent of my first school district and learned very quickly that everyone was watching my actions, words, and decisions with deep interest and that I was accountable to all of them. I embraced that knowledge by becoming a principle-centered public servant; a holder of the public’s trust; and someone who would always act responsibly and ethically. What consistently defines me are the experiences I have had serving my students, families, staff members and communities with a deep commitment to competence and care. My goal is to always add value, to be a good steward of our taxpayer

dollars, and to work collaboratively and respectfully with everyone in the legislature to arrive at reasonable common sense solutions that are in the state’s best interest. Legislators are the voices of Kansas and should conduct themselves accordingly. What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

Rather than talking about spending increases and decreases, I believe we should talk about reform. Real governmental reform requires the state to operate more efficiently and effectively, which means identifying problems and fixing them at their source. Our residents expect state government to use their tax dollars wisely and to fund essential services. When I visit with constituents they want our state to invest in infrastructure (roads and bridges), public safety, social services (mostly access to healthcare), economic development, and education.

How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

The impact of the 2012 tax cuts created an unbalanced and unfair tax code, reduced our bond rating, and forced extreme reductions in core services. In 2015, the Legislature was deficit spending, delaying KPERS payments, sweeping funds from KDOT and other agencies, eliminating thousands of state jobs, and scrambling for more revenue. The Governor believed an increase in sales tax was necessary to balance the budget.

The 2017 legislature restored some of the tax cuts of 2012, and have gotten our fiscal house in order. As state revenues stabilize, thenext step would be to strategically plan a reduction in sales tax, especially on food. A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

We know that access to healthcare in Kansas is a problem for many of our residents. For some, the issue is that our low-wage earners make too much for traditional Medicaid, yet not enough to qualify for insurance subsidies under ACA. Data suggests that expanding Medicaid would provide coverage for as many as 80,000 Kansans each year and would also provide additional resources in rural areas for hospitals, clinics, and doctors. Healthcare experts in Kansas believe we should take advantage of the federal dollars to expand Medicaid, otherwise they are being lost to other states. Any plan for expansion should have rigorous checks and balances to make sure the dollars are going to serve the people they are intended to serve.

The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

The Supreme Court will be the determiner of constitutionality, but I do believe

the additional new funding provided in this bill and the increased funding included in last year’s bill, which will result in $825 million over 6 years, is a substantial investment in public education. It is imperative the legislature honor these financial obligations to our schools. As a former Superintendent, I am pleased with this bill’s increased accountability measures, assurances of a greater investment in Special Education, and the ability to provide our schools with the resources they need to make significant progress. The additional $525 million was accomplished without a tax increase. I’m confident we can find an equitable and adequate solution to the school finance lawsuit that does not require a change to the Kansas constitution. How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

Immigration should be addressed by the federal government, not the State Legislature.

Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

No. I was proud to support the Kansas Safe and Secure Schools Act, which requires the State Board of Education to develop school safety plan guidelines in partnership with public safety, law enforcement and public health agencies. Each school district is unique and I believe this plan will help all districts put together their own safety plan

BRENDA DIETRICH

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 65 Job: Retired from education, where she was superintendent of the Auburn-Washburn School District Prior elected offices: First elected to Kansas House in 2016

that works for them. What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

I am Pro-Life, but I am also Pro-Adoption and Pro-Foster Care. There are many reasons individuals or families might find themselves considering making a difficult decision regarding parenting. It is incumbent upon us, as a state, to provide safety nets for those fragile Kansans to help them through these agonizing situations. We are in need of more foster care homes and an affordable option for families who want to adopt so they can bring the thousands of kids in Kansas waiting for a forever family into their loving homes. As a member of the House Children and Seniors Committee, I have seen the issues in our foster care system and the barriers to adoption services.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE, 52ND DISTRICT: TONI SCALIA Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

“There is an elephant in the room” means that there is a truth that we all know exists, but that we ignore. With great respect for the office, I believe that the proverbial elephant is the current occupant of the Oval office and the truths that we are ignoring are specific Democracy damaging actions coming from the Oval Office that trickle down and are mirrored in actions taken by our Republican led Kansas State legislature. Here are some of them. First, the lack of transparency in the Oval Office is mirrored in gut and go and the passage of unsponsored bills. Second, the Federal tax reform law that is actually a tax cut for the top 1%, includes a section to destroy the individual mandate of the ACA and is mirrored by Kansas state attorney general’s participation in the Texas lawsuit that seeks to end the individual mandate. Lastly, Trump’s actions that politicize the judiciary are mirrored in Kansas by the attempt change the Kansas Constitution in order to disallow judicial review of the current Constitution with respect equity in school funding. I am running to give voice to these damaging actions against our Democracy.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decision as a legislator.

I lived in a Roman Catholic Convent school from the ages of three to twelve. When my parents divorced, my father remarried a Jewish woman and so I acquired a Jewish Grandmother who always made me the best strawberry pie in the world on the rare holidays that I was able to leave the Convent and she made sure that I had two slices to everyone else’s one. When my Jewish Grandmother died the nuns told me that she would not go to heaven because she was not Catholic. I was struck by the great injustice that a person of such good works

as strawberry pies and my two slices could not go to heaven because of her differing faith. Justice, fairness, and equality for all regardless of any differences they might have from one another became my faith. I also lived those nine years in the constant state of having no power over how I lived my life and my professional life as a social scientist and author has been one of doing my best to ferret out social injustices and inequities and searching for actions that would empower the unempowered. I cannot wait to apply these life lessons of equity and empowerment to legislation for all Kansans. What are the specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

Spending Reduction: Do not spend Kansan’s taxpayer dollars to take away rights as did Kris Koback when he spent taxpayer funds in a failed attempt to remove voting rights from thousands of Kansans and was challenged by the court for, ‘patently misleading representations to the court.’ A second example is the refusal of the Republican led legislature to pass Medicaid Expansion costing of 950 million dollars two years running and the 45% more for Medicaid recipients if Medicaid Expansion is not approved as we move forward. A second example is the spending of the current attorney general on health care by joining a lawsuit for an undisclosed cost against the individual mandate of the Affordable Care Act which will result in Kansans paying increased costs for medical insurance. This is an egregious example of spending taxpayer dollars that cause taxpayers to pay more. Spending Investment: Identify programs within a framework of best return on investment such as investments in small business specific to health insurance and pension benefits. Small business employs 51% of Kansas

workers. These investments will lead to reduced turnover, higher wages and increased consumer spending. How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and the 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

I was against the 2012 income, against the 2015 sales tax, for the 2017 income increase, and would suggest the addition of two additional tax brackets at the top income levels.

A state task force has recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? Why?

Yes, I support full Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. In a previous survey I recounted the incident in which 27 children tested positive for TB in a public Kansas high school. Low income groups do not access medical care in the early stages causing a risk to all residents. In addition, I would support a Kansas State Health Initiative for income levels above eligibility for Medicaid and age levels below eligibility for Medicare. This population is one medical catastrophe away from financial disaster and health care should not be postponed until they are poverty stricken. There is insufficient time and space here to discuss costs of such a Kansas State Health Initiative I firmly believe is doable.

The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

I don’t think it is possible to project 5 years ahead regarding sufficiency of funds allocated and with the same reasoning it is difficult to project targeting of funds. This said, what we are looking for is an equitable distribution of funds that will have not only equality of opportunity

but equality of outcomes. Indicators such as graduation rates, reading levels, math competency, computer skills are quantitative and therefore measurable but qualitative measures are for more difficult to identify and even more so to measure and it is these qualitative measures that must be factored into funding distributions if equality of outcome is our goal as I believe it should be. No! I do not believe that the Kansas Constitution should be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance. To change the constitution is akin to attacking the judiciary because you don’t agree with their responsibilities and the resultant consequences of those responsibilities so you take away those responsibilities. It is, in my view, trickle down Trumpisim. Being fair, opting for equality, being Democratic is not easy. Let’s deal with it on both sides of the isle. How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the US and in terms of election security?

In terms of election security there is little evidence that illegal immigrants, who are attempting to remain undetected, are engaging in our electoral process. Regarding companies hiring people illegally, they are doing so to save on payroll and of course by hiring illegal immigrants these companies are fostering illegal immigration. Levy fines on such companies that are double their savings on payroll and double the fines again for each successive violation.

Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

No! Teachers are not police officers. I believe that school safety can be upgraded both technically and behaviorally. With regards to technical upgrades, entry–point scanners

TONI SCALIA

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 78 Job: Retired professor of sociology; author/writer Prior elected offices: None

have been used successfully in other venues. With regards to behavioral upgrades the use of mandated reporters employed in a buddy system and with a well designed follow through protocol can be implemented with appropriate training. The majority, if not all, school shooters have been known to authorities but there is an absence of prospective shooter profile and an absence of a coordinated follow through procedure that is acted upon by identified employees within identified positions. Implementing such a system would not be costly. Lastly, in my view, my opponent’s vote to allow 18-20 year olds to obtain a concealed carry permit is antithetical to the concern of school safety. What do you believe should be the state’s legal standard regarding abortion?

According to the ACLU, Kansas has more laws restricting reproductive freedoms and women’s health than any other state, except Oklahoma. I have not been able to determine how much money, taxpayer money [and half of those taxpayers are women] has been spent in efforts to deny women their freedoms and their health. I believe that the state’s legal standard regarding abortion should be no less than that guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.


C14  Sunday, October 14, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 VOTERS GUIDE REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE, 54TH DISTRICT: KEN CORBET Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

Rural Kansans need someone who is willing to stand up for them. I have lived in this area my entire life. My wife, Bev, and I met here, raised a family here, and built a business right here in the 54th district. My job in the House is to represent the people and values of the 54th district. Those values are who I am. I pledge to continue fighting for my friends and neighbors in the Kansas House on important issues including protecting the unborn, defending the 2nd Amendment, and lowering property taxes and utility rates.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

I’ve been a small business owner in the 54th district for over 30 years. It’s a family operation. To survive as a small business owner requires hard work, sound budgeting, efficient operations, and taking care of your employees. These principles also apply to being a legislator. As the Representative of the 54th district I have a duty to make certain that every tax dollar is spent wisely and state government operates efficiently without waste. This is why I’ve supported performance based budgeting and the Kansas state wide efficiency review. Operating a thriving business requires taking care of your employees. In the past I have spearheaded a bonus for state employees and I support fully funding KPERS. With this approach we can have a state government that provides essential services while at the same time not taxing our citizens into oblivion.

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

Finding efficiencies is a never-ending process. Every day, companies like Amazon are looking for better and more efficient ways to do business. This leads to lower prices and faster service for consumers. Government should operate the same way. We should never get stuck in the mindset of “it’s always been done this way.” Every state agency and program should constantly be looking at better and more efficient ways to operate. The legislature should encourage this approach. In addition we should be using innovative technologies to lower the cost of doing business. Just like in the private sector, this approach will lead to the ability to do more for less. These savings can then be used to ensure we have sufficient highways, properly staffed correctional facilities, a fully funded KPERS program, and of course be passed on to the taxpayers in the form of lower tax rates. How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

I believe in low taxes across the board. When I’m out talking to the people of the 54th district they don’t tell me they want higher taxes. Instead I hear complaints about income, sales, and property taxes. In order to lower taxes we need to operate state government more efficiently. Whether a family budget or the budget of our family business you simply cannot spend more money than you bring in. When that starts to happen it is time to tighten your belt and find ways to save. Unfortunately it does not work that way in government. There are people across the 54th district struggling to make ends meet. We owe it to them to reduce their tax burden and ensure that their government is operating responsibly.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

I oppose expanding Medicaid/Obamacare in Kansas. Medicaid is a safety net program and expanding this program turns it from a safety net program to a program covering able bodied adults. The better option is to create an economy where these individuals can find gainful employment. Thankfully Kansas is experiencing record low unemployment. In addition, state after state that has expanded Medicaid under Obamacare has seen costs far exceed expectations. There are estimates that expansion in Kansas will cost the state $1.1 billion over 10 years. It will likely cost much more than this. We simply cannot afford this extra cost without another significant tax increase.

The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

There is nothing more important than our kids, and they deserve a quality education. We spend over $5 billion a year on K-12 which amounts to over $13,000 per student. Our focus should be on using those funds to provide an innovative, student focused education system that best prepares our kids to eventually enter the workforce. We invest over half of our state budget into K-12. There should be no question our school finance plan is constitutional. The school funding debate has been dragging on for decades— costing millions of dollars. Over half the state budget goes to public

school districts. The constant litigation needs to end, and the focus needs to shift to how best use the billions of dollars in the K-12 system. That cannot happen until the uncertainty of these legal battles end. The only way that can happen is if the people of Kansas decide, via constitutional amendment, how they want schools to be funded going forward. How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

It is time for e-verify in Kansas. Illegal immigration is a major issue in our country. Illegal immigration is a drain on resources, contributes to crime problems, and results in a loss of jobs for citizens and those here legally. Jobs are the magnet for illegal aliens. E-verify is a system that will help prevent companies from hiring illegal aliens in the first place and is the most significant deterrent we can put in place to address illegal immigration in Kansas.

Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

The reality is there are evil actors in this world who want to hurt and terrorize people. We need to be vigilant about protecting our kids in public school buildings. Armed security is used to provide protection in most government buildings, public sporting events, and numerous other places. Yet we continue to try and protect our children with stickers and good wishes. The state must play an active role in working with local school boards to ensure proper security is in place. This includes armed security. I also support empowering teachers to carry a firearm if they are willing and capable.

KEN CORBET

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 69 Job: Owner/operator of Ravenwood Lodge Prior elected office: Kansas House

What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

I am 100% pro-life. Life is precious and we all have a duty to protect defenseless children. I am proud to have helped make Kansas one of the most pro-life states in the country.

A transportation task force is meeting to prepare for the state's next big highway program. What do you want to see in that package in terms of priorities and financing?

Infrastructure is important to Kansas and our economy. Kansas has some of the best roads in the nation and we need to make it a priority that they stay this way. It is also important that we stay on top of developing needs. A major need in the 54th district is an interchange connecting Auburn road with the Kansas Turnpike. The state budget needs to work in a similar fashion as a family budget or the budget of my small business. We must prioritize needs and operate efficiently. Doing this will reduce the need to sweep funds from the state highway fund, leaving sufficient funding to perform the necessary preservation and expansion projects.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE, 54TH DISTRICT: SARAH COATS Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I am running for Kansas House because every day working families need to be represented. I believe if I would be able to bring a unique and strong knowledge of how the policies and laws affect Kansans. There’s a value in understanding on a deep, personal level what the state does or is supposed to do for people, and what its shortcomings are. I understand what needs to be fixed and how to fix it. I don’t lose sight of who actually needs support. The people deserve an elected representative that votes with the people’s best interest in mind and not their own.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

My son was born in October 2008. The life experience that has guided my life the most is being a mother. When I am working with families I try to provide the level of services I would want for my own family. This is a guiding principal in my life that will carry into my work in the State House. I’m a working mother and understand the challenges of many working families.

What are specific state government programs in need

of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

The private insurance companies for Medicaid are an expensive broken system. The KanCare system needs to be changed back to a single provider for Medicaid. It’s vital we expand Medicaid to help Kansans get medical care. How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

The tax cuts in 2012 were for corporations and not for the working people that keep the state running. The state is not in any better financial situation than they were in 2012 when this started. The sales tax hike in 2015 that Ken Corbet voted for put a higher burden on working families and requires us to pay more than our fair share of taxes. The 2017 budget changes have already begun to show successful with positive numbers being reported. Kobach wants to restore the cuts to the wealthy and keep pressure on the working class people. After six years of the failed budget attempts we know the Brownback/Kobach budget doesn’t work.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If

so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

I fully support expanding Medicaid. We currently pay into the federal program to expand Medicaid without any of the benefit of receiving the services. Our Kansas tax dollars are going to other states that have expanded Medicaid. Kansans deserve the benefit from the program they pay into. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution to be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

No. The legislature should do their and adequately fund schools and pass a working budget.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

Hold employers accountable that hire undocumented workers, not the workers themselves. Undocumented workers are not a threat to election security.

Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers?

What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

I am a responsible gun owner in support of common sense gun laws. I am not in favor of arming teachers. Teachers have overwhelmingly said they do not want guns in the classroom or to be charged with that task. I would like to see more student resource officers available to schools. They provide safety in an emergency and provide a lot of support to staff, students and families. What do you believe should be the state’s legal standard regarding abortion?

The legal standard should be constitutional and provide access to routine healthcare.

A transportation task force is meeting to prepare for the state's next big highway program. What do you want to see in that package in terms of priorities and financing?

The roads and highway funds have been robbed for years to make up for the Brownback/Kobach failed tax experiment. It’s obvious the roads have not been a priority. When my family and I drive in our district we see the decay of the roads and bridges in rural areas. This makes travel for school, medical needs, and employment even more challenging.

SARAH COATS

Town of residence: Auburn Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 33 Job: Social worker Prior elected offices: None


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, October 14, 2018  C15

2018 VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE, 56TH DISTRICT: VIRGIL WEIGEL Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I am a candidate for the Kansas House because I want to continue the work that has already been accomplished in the Kansas Legislature these last two years. Repeal of the Brownback tax experiment, funding our schools and more funding for KDOT road and bridge projects. We need sales tax relief on food which I have already started on.  And finally increased services for our veterans and military.  I would like to continue to be a voice for all citizens of the 56th District and work with legislators of both parties to solve the  problems facing Kansas.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

A life experience that guides my conduct and the wisdom I received is-first, I have to acknowledge the influence of my parents, their guidance and support and making sure I received a good education that prepared me for life. The one life experience I can point to is my military service.  I served three years in the US Army in a armored regiment as a armor crewman and tank commander.  I learned to work with other soldiers from varied backgrounds to complete our mission.  The soldiers in our unit had to rely on each other to carry out our assignments and maintain safety and security in difficult situations.  That experience stays with me to this day.  It guides me in my decisions I make as a legislator and reminds me to always try to help Kansas citizens with their problems.

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

Specific state programs in need of spending reductions is best examined by looking at all spending programs and see if there is reductions or adjustments to be made. Programs in need of greater investment are KDOT programs to repair and replace road and bridges and improve our infrastructure which will in turn help spur economic development.  The Department of Agriculture and the Kansas Water Office program specifically need more resources to help our farmers and water districts. And the Kansas Commission on Veterans Affairs for increased services for Kansas veterans.

How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

The 2012 tax experiment was a failure and severely hurt the Kansas economy. When the Kansas Legislature overrode the governor's veto it started a recovery processbut it will take years to fully recover.  The 2015 tax hike was the largest tax hike in Kansas history at that time.  I was not in the Legislature  when that 2015 tax increase was enacted and I would not have voted for such a increase on our Kansas citizens.  The 2017 tax increase was necessary because the Brownback Administration had  created a huge budget imbalance.  We now have a balanced budget and our financial situation is now improved

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

I support Medicaid expansion because it will help over 150,000 Kansans-the working poor, students and those with physical and mental illnesses that fall short of qualifying for disability. Also Medicaid will help rural and small hospitals to continue to operate, helping the economy in those areas.  Millions of Kansas taxpayer money goes to the federal government.  Kansas should expand Medicaid and get back some of that tax money to be used for Medicaid expansion rather than that money being sent to other states for Medicaid expansion.

The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

The Legislature has committed 525 million dollars over the next five years to Kansas public education (K-12) This was a good faith effort by the Kansas Legislature.  We want to make sure our children get a good education which includes great schools and dedicated teachers.  I do not believe the Kansas Constitution should be amended to curtail discussion over school funding.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring

people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

The Kansas Legislature should make sure Kansas companies are in compliance with immigration law. That being said, the reality is that many jobs in Kansas go unfilled and employers recruit workers who may not always be here legally.  IT would be better to help those people apply for citizenshipwork and pay taxes legally and thereby grow the Kansas economy.  As for election security and voting by illegal immigrants I do not see this as a problem in Kansas.

Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

I do not want to see Kansas tax dollars being used to purchase firearms for teachers. Teachers are recruited and hired to teach not be part time police officers or school security.  I do support looking at upgrading security in Kansas schools by building enhancements, such as many federal buildings and a visible increase in school police or security officers who are well trained.

What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

Abortion is legal in Kansas. It should be provided ethically and safely by a medical doctor in a professional setting per Kansas law.  I would hope that the woman would consult with her medical doctor and close family in this decision.

A transportation task force is meeting to prepare for the state's next big highway

VIRGIL WEIGEL

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 65 Job: Retired state enforcement agent Prior elected offices: Kansas House

program. What do you want to see in that package in terms of priorities and financing?

The transportation task force which includes government leaders, business leaders and community partners is a good step toward meeting the needs of Kansans for transportation and infrastructure now and in the future. Priorities should include repair or replacement of bridges that are no longer safe and new roads or repair of existing roads that have become less safe to travel on.  These are all high priority projects.  We can no longer keep putting off these projects because  money earmarked for those projects were swept out of KDOT to help pay for other areas because of the 2012 failed tax experiment.  By funding these KDOT projects this will promote an expanding economy and provide safe roads and bridges for our Kansas citizens.

REPUBLICAN

KANSAS HOUSE, 56TH DISTRICT: MICHAEL SNOWDEN Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I will be an active voice for our district. I've grown up in Topeka, I went to school in Topeka, and I work in Topeka. I am passionate about our community, and I will be your voice in the legislature. It’s time for a change. I have been going door-todoor engaging with the people I want to serve and hear directly from you the voter. I want to help bring compassion and common sense to the Capitol.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

I have learned to serve people because of being called into the ministry. It has been quite a journey. Ministry is not a regular full-time job. I have office hours, but often we are called to serve the congregation outside of those times. I attend to the needs people have including the loss of a loved one or a bad report from the doctor, the list goes on. I care about people, and I want to be there for people. I can help people walk through difficult moments. Compassion will help me serve the voters.

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

So much comes down to listening to the voters, expressing the priorities of the voters, and making sure our budget reflects the voter's priorities. We have great state employees who work

hard to spend our state funds efficiently. Large increases in spending without it getting to the class room, roads or law enforcement is unacceptable. If members of both parties work together, I believe we really can see positive change with our budgeting process. How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

The legislature recently raised your taxes. I don’t think we need to raise taxes again. We must stop increasing sales and property taxes because this hurts hardworking families and people on fixed incomes, particularly our seniors. I will work eliminate the food sales tax. Removing the tax Kansans pay on food would be a benefit to seniors on fixed incomes. It is my sincere hope legislators will work together to put an end to the tax Kansans pay on groceries.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

Low-income families struggle. I feel the pain and frustration they experience when making hard choices. We can help. Let’s bring high paying jobs to Kansas so they can afford health care. Let’s lower the cost of healthcare by continuing the process of allowing physicians assistants and nurse practitioners to serve where appropriate,

which lowers the cost and increases the access. We may need to make Medicaid adjustments, but I have concerns about the government using taxpayer money to pay for expenses for able-bodied singles. I bring an active ear to listen to the voters and a compassionate heart to work together in finding real solutions. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

As I’ve said before, Kansas children deserve a quality education and ensuring a quality education for them should be the priority. After some minor modifications, this plan will comply with the court’s order, but if we do not address the overall issue of giving our students the quality education they deserve, then we have fallen short. Regarding amending the Kansas Constitution, I think it is clear the legislature’s responsibility is to fully fund public education and if elected I will work diligently to make sure that I uphold that constitutional mandate.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

While we should treat all human beings with decency and respect, that doesn’t mean companies can offer an illegal immigrant a job. If a company hires an illegal

immigrant, there should be consequences, whether in fines, or even in the possibility of no longer being allowed to do business in the state of Kansas. To the second part of the question: When illegal immigrants vote they are effectively canceling out the vote of an American citizen, this is unacceptable. I am proud our state values secure elections, and in recent years we have seen positive change in election security. Because of that, Kansans can trust the security and validity of our elections every time. Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

We must protect our children, but teachers should focus on teaching. I would rather teachers have a pay raise than a gun. We should increase the security of public schools with trained law enforcement. I am grateful for the men and women of Topeka Police Department and the Shawnee County Sheriff’s Office who are dedicated to serving our community with excellence. They do an outstanding job.

What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

I am against government funding of abortions. I am against late term abortions. I am against live dismemberment abortions. I believe we should replace abortion with more compassion alteratives. I am proud to have the endorsements of both Kansans for Life and

MICHAEL J. SNOWDEN

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 24 Job: Worship pastor, First Assembly of God Prior elected offices: None

the Family Policy Alliance of Kansas: both organizations work tirelessly to defend the rights of the unborn. And I promise that same level of commitment if elected to the legislature. A transportation task force is meeting to prepare for the state's next big highway program. What do you want to see in that package in terms of priorities and financing?

Roads and transportation has always been important for the Kansas economy. We enjoy some of the best roads in the country. I am concerned that the state robbed money from the highway fund in a failed attempt to balance the budget. We can do better. I look forward to working with all stake holders to create a great highway program that will boost our economy and bring high paying jobs to Kansas.


C16  Sunday, October 14, 2018  The Topeka Capital-Journal

2018 VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE, 53RD DISTRICT: JIM GARTNER Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I am unopposed this election cycle but want to continue representing my constituents in the 53rd District to the best of my ability.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

I served in the Marine Corps for three years during the Vietnam Nam conflict. The Marines taught me that I take responsibility for my actions, which I continue to practice as a State Legislator.

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

I cannot think of a program specifically that I would recommend spending reductions. We have a process in place that reviews every department budget basically every year. These budgets are scrutinize and recommendations are made to the appropriations committee. These budget committees would also recommend any additional funding increases if required. How do you perceive the

2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

I voted for overturning the Brownback tax experiment which was putting are state in a financial crisis. We now are returning to some form of financial stability when you look at our revenue picture. If the legislature did not stop this experiment our State today would be in financial ruin. Looking forward towards next session hopefully revenues will continue to increase and we can take a look at reducing the sales tax on food. My personal goal would be to eliminate this altogether. A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

I have and will continue to support Medicaid expansion, it just makes common sense. We have at least 140,000 Kansans that cannot acquire health insurance, we need to fix this dilemma. The State has sent billions of dollars to Washington who in turn send this money to states that have adopted some form of

Medicaid expansion. I also feel that would help our rural areas of the state and help their hospitals continue to provide much needed health care. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

I voted for the education bill last session, even though I did not believe it was adequate, the Supreme Court has ruled and now the legislature needs to fund a cost of living increase every budget year which I believe is appropriate. I also think we need to take a look at special education funding, it is inadequate and we need to address this problem. I would not support a constitutional amendment, I believe the final decision should stay with the Supreme Court, they decide on the constitutionality of legislation.

How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

The legislature should make sure that companies use

e-verify to screen applicants for positions. I know we have some illegal immigrants in our state working various service type jobs, but overall I do not see this as one of our major problems. Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

The state should not allocate money to school districts for the purchase of firearms for teachers. I believe by providing money to help school districts increase the security in their buildings is a much better way to keep our schools safe. In fact we did allocate some 5 million for grants in the education bill which has been allocated by the Department of Education.

What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

I believe until Roe v. Wade is overturned woman have the right to abortion services.

A transportation task force is meeting to prepare for the state's next big highway program. What do you want to see in that package in terms of priorities and financing?

JIM GARTNER

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 70 Job: Retired from telecommunications industry in 2001; AT&T lobbyist until 2014 Prior elected offices: Kansas House

I will wait until I review the recommendations made by the Transportation task force. Kansas in the past has done a fabulous job with laying out a ten year plan for roads and infrastructure. It has worked until the disastrous Brownback tax plan diverted revenue from that plan into the State General fund to make end of year budgets. The transportation plan projects had to be curtailed which cost the state millions of dollars in economic growth. Hopefully we can get back on track and have some of the best roads in the Nation.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE, 55TH DISTRICT: ANNIE KUETHER Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I am running to represent the people of the 55th district and to continue to return Kansas to be the best place to live.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

I was raised by two, very principled parents who lived what they taught - that everybody deserves equal opportunities and to give back to the community; my favorite quote from my Mother,”It never hurts to ask” is a good motto to live by!

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

Kansas is in the very early stages of recovering from the “Brownback Experiment” which destroyed our state finances. So I am not aware

of a whole lot of excess anywhere. Programs that need greater investments are at the Department of Children and Families; Transportation; Education (cost of living adjustments), teachers, salaries; the state Water Plan. But nothing will be fixed overnight! How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

The 2012 income tax plan devastated the state and the 2015 and 2017 increases, began the restoration of fair tax practices. Kansas should return to the 3-legged stool policy of equal sales, property and income tax. It is a proven formula. I will point our that even with any increases, Kansas are still paying less in taxes than before the 2012 tax plan.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas. Do you support that idea? If

so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

I do support Medicaid expansion. Currently other states that have chosen to expand, are using Kansas tax-payer dollars to take care of their citizens. Kansas is losing millions of dollars of OUR money! By expanding Medicaid, we could insure over 150,000 Kansans.

The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

First of all, I rather object the term, “funnel.” The Kansas Constitution requires that we fund education. By adjusting the amount to include cost of living money, this amount should be sufficient and as for being properly targeted, it should be determined by

the local school boards. The House Judiciary Committee voted on the Constitutional amendment…I voted, no. Our Government is set up to provide checks and balances - by allowing the Legislature to be the only body to determine funding for education is establishing  a very dangerous precedent. And if we determine to allow that…what is next? How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

The US Congress should establish fair and responsible standards regarding regarding illegal immigration. It is my understanding that our elections have not been impacted or hacked.

Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

ANNIE KUETHER

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 66 Job: Retired Prior elected offices: Kansas House

Allocating funds for arming teachers is not he best way to spend our limited resources. Any decisions should be made at the local level. Otherwise it is a mandate. What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

Abortion is legal and should be a private matter.

D E M O C R AT

KANSAS HOUSE, 57TH DISTRICT: JOHN ALCALA Why are you a candidate for the Kansas House?

I’m running again for the Kansas House because I believe the people of my district need a strong voice that represents each and every one of them in the Statehouse — but that strong voice must also be one who is able to listen to those people and understand their needs. Serving this community is an honor and something I consider very important.

Explain in detail a life experience that guides your conduct and how earning that wisdom would influence your decisions as a legislator?

The bottom line to this question is: Just listen to people.

What are specific state government programs in need of spending reductions and programs in need of greater investment?

Of course, we need to finish fully funding education — something I believe we can do simply and quickly when the 2019 session begins. Our social service programs and

infrastructure funding that has been slashed to balance the budget needs restoration, as well as higher education. How do you perceive the 2012 income tax cut, 2015 sales tax hike and 2017 income tax increase in context of tax policy reform in 2019 and beyond?

To put it simply: the 2012 tax experiment bankrupted the state; the 2015 tax hike passed just because Brownback and his conservative allies in the Kansas legislature knew it, wouldn’t back down, and instead chose to place the burden on the middle class. The 2017 tax increase, by that point, was absolutely necessary or none of our shared priorities would have been funded - now or in the future. Looking ahead, I believe we learned lessons from all of these “reforms” — some that we certainly foresaw — and we will use that knowledge to create meaningful, fair tax reform in the future.

A state task force recommended full expansion of Medicaid eligibility in Kansas.

Do you support that idea? If so, why? If not, how would you resolve health insurance challenges faced by low-income Kansans?

Absolutely. More than 150,000 Kansans could have health insurance that can’t get covered now. If that weren’t reason enough, it also makes fiscal sense, because Kansas pays taxes that fund Medicaid and don’t see anything in return when we don’t expand. We actually pay for other states to fund Medicaid expansion, but we refuse the millions in federal dollars that would pay for it right here in our state. The Legislature promised to funnel $525 million over five years to Kansas public education in response to a lawsuit. Is that amount sufficient? Properly targeted? Ought the Kansas Constitution be amended to curtail wrangling over school finance?

The Supreme Court believes we still haven’t quite met the adequacy portion of the suit, which, had our colleagues on the other side of the aisle voted for Rep.

Ed Trimmer’s amendment that would have accounted for inflation, the plan would have been found adequate. Therefore, I believe we should follow the direction of the Court and finally end the cycle of litigation. We need to do our jobs as the Constitution lays them out — not change or amend the Constitution to fit a political expediency or because they simply disagree with it. How should the Legislature approach illegal immigration in terms of companies hiring people unlawfully in the U.S. and in terms of election security?

Our nation’s immigration system is a disaster and it is only getting worse. The federal government has the bulk of the responsibility in fixing our current immigration system but Kansas can do more to work within the system as it exists today.

Should the state allocate money to school districts for purchase of firearms for teachers? What ideas do you have for upgrading security in public school buildings?

JOHN ALCALA

(incumbent) Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 59 Job: Retired Prior elected offices: Kansas House; Topeka City Council

Absolutely not. Bringing guns into our schools does not make our schools any safer. I would prefer to see meaningful gun safety reform. What do you believe should be the state's legal standard regarding abortion?

Roe v. Wade is the law of the land and Kansas needs to take steps to help ensure the health and safety of women is protected and valued in Kansas.


The Topeka Capital-Journal  Sunday, October 14, 2018  C17

2018 VOTERS GUIDE D E M O C R AT

SHAWNEE COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 1: CHRIS PALMER How important is it for officials with Shawnee County to get along with officials from the city of Topeka?

Critically. While important to find common ground, it is equally important to recognize that the commission represents the entire county and not just the residents of the city of Topeka. To that end the commission should be a strong voice for all residents of Shawnee County. This means working together but also being an advocate for county residents who live outside of Topeka. The times we have made the most progress as a community have been when both entities worked together while recognizing and respecting the role each play in our shared successes. Shawnee County has many distinct communities outside the city limits of Topeka; many of those are in the first district and their views are just as important as others.

County commissioners plan Oct. 1 to consider approving a revised version of a proposed comprehensive land use plan for Shawnee County’s unincorporated areas. Where do you stand on that plan?

Shawnee County has never had a comprehensive land use plan. Having a plan in place gives the county much more say in what happens in the three mile, “Extra Territorial Jurisdiction” that surrounds the City of Topeka. The plan that will be voted on is much different than the one originally presented over a year ago. The Commissioners took

the feedback they received from the planning commission and county residents most impacted and removed or modified much of what those who live in those areas found objectionable. While the compromise is not what those who feel strongly on either side would want, I think the benefits of having a plan in place and the jurisdictional rights it gives the county make it the right thing to do. Plans are just a map to the future; the real question is what comes next? We should be careful to not open the door to burdensome rules and regulations as the result of the plan. Which do you prefer, the current arrangement in which Shawnee County contracts with an outside company to provide coroner’s services or the prior arrangement in which the coroner and his or her employees worked directly for the county?

The opinions that matter most are the District Attorney, Sheriff's Department and the Topeka Police Department. It is my understanding they all are satisfied with the operations and view them as an improvement from years past. It is the role of the Commission to ensure that any contractor doing the service they are contracted to perform does so in a professional and competent manner.

How satisfied are you with the way things are going at the Kansas Expocentre?

I think the new management company has done a better

job of booking and promoting events. I look forward to continued growth. There also seems to be renewed passion for hockey with the Topeka Pilots and owner Lamar Hunt Jr. Do you have any problem with anything commissioners have done so far in terms of planned improvements for the Expocentre?

The voters of Shawnee County made commitment to the Expocentre and its renovation along with other economic development items in 2014 with the passage of a 15-year half cent sales tax extension. The plans released look great and are exciting, but the cost has not been established. Can we afford the plan? We need to make sure that the changes are worth the money we are spending. Additionally, I think that the commission should address the immediate safety issues like the parking lot and steps.

As of Sept. 14, District 1 included 10,349 registered voters who are unaffiliated. What would you say to them?

My message is the same to all voters regardless of their affiliation. There is no time or room on the Shawnee County Commission for partisan politics or pontificating. Issues taken up at the county level are tied to efficient and effective management. Working as a good partner with other public and private entities to make us proud to live in Shawnee County

and attractive enough so our kids want to make Shawnee County their home as well; all while making the trains run on time! Does Shawnee County’s government have a problem with transparency?

Although much of what gets faulted for, “lack of transparency” may be lack of engagement by the citizens of Shawnee County in public meetings, hearings and town halls when ideas, programs, budgets, etc. are discussed. I think Shawnee County as well as all levels of government can always do better in terms of engaging citizens in the process of decision making.

As a commissioner, how would you be similar to the commissioner who’s being replaced, Shelly Buhler?

I think Commissioner Buhler has been deliberative and thoughtful in her public service. She has also exhibited a passion for community service. I share that same passion. My leadership in several organizations such as having served as President of the Friends of the Topeka Zoo Board of Directors, Chair of the Topeka/Shawnee County Homeless Task Force, being an active member and past board member of Downtown Topeka Rotary, (to name a few) have only furthered that passion.

How would you be different from Buhler?

Aside from the obvious, gender and body mass index? In the more than two decades

CHRIS PALMER

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Democrat Age: 50 Job: Executive director of Cornerstone of Topeka Inc., a private, nonprofit affordable housing developer and provider that owns and manages 15 properties Prior elected offices: None

working and now running a business in the private sector I would bring a new set of tools to the job. I come from a different background than Commissioner Buhler. We are all products of what has brought us to this point in our lives and careers. My wife and I were both born and raised in Shawnee County. I am the Executive Director of a private, non-profit company that develops and provides affordable housing in our community. Previously I had been in Commercial Real Estate & Business Brokerage and have also worked in healthcare management. These experiences have provided me the ability to understand how government can be a good partner or a burden for business in our community.

REPUBLICAN

SHAWNEE COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 1: BILL RIPHAHN How important is it for officials with Shawnee County to get along with officials from the city of Topeka?

As one who has been employed by both the city and the county, I have an in-depth understanding of the fact that both entities strive to improve the quality of life for the citizenry. In working toward the same goal, there is tremendous value for the County Commission and the City Council to have a good relationship. Mediocrity requires little, but great accomplishments always demand a lot of work and are never easy. I cannot comprehend why one wouldn’t want allies in the process toward accomplishment. Foundational to a strong working relationship between the two entities would be clear and timely communication, positive attitudes, promotion and sharing of opportunities, a maturity level that allows the sharing of credit and accomplishment, and keeping commitments. In simple language – try to be helpful!

County Commissioners plan Oct. 1 to consider approving a revised version of a proposed comprehensive land use plan for Shawnee County’s unincorporated areas. Where do you stand on that plan?

The evolution of the comprehensive plan has, after much debate and many changes, ultimately come down to a decision regarding how the three-mile area immediately outside the city limits is developed. That threemile area includes a population comparable to the city of Salina. At current, it is the sole responsibility of the city to manage the growth in this area. There are a number of options on the table related to how the county and city could work together in the process of management of its expansion. I see the most viable option as an interlocal agreement on landuse development. This would require creating a joint planning commission between the

city and county. Having been on an advisory board to the city planning commission and having worked with them for years, I feel that there would be value for the county to have a seat at the table.

with the numerous event centers that are within 200 miles of Topeka.   In general, I feel that the management has done an adequate job under the restraints of an undersized facility and an aging structure.

Which do you prefer, the current arrangement in which Shawnee County contracts with an outside company to provide coroner’s services or the prior arrangement in which the coroner and his or her employees worked directly for the county?

Do you have any problem with anything commissioners have done so far in terms of planned improvements for the Expocentre?

I believe that either system can work if done well. The advantage of contracting the services out include that the county wouldn’t be directly involved in paying salaries and benefits; the county might not have the responsibility of a facility to maintain; personnel problems would be handled by the contracted company. The disadvantage is that the services very likely would be more expensive because the contracted company would need to make a profit whereas a coroner’s office run by the county could work on a breakeven basis.  My tendency would be to favor the county retaining management of the coroner’s office, but my opinion could be swayed when given access to the numbers and contracts.

How satisfied are you with the way things are going at the Kansas Expocentre?

The Expocentre has a capacity of 10,000 seats with a 44,500 square foot exhibition hall, a conference center, and livestock arena. It hosts up to 400,000 users per year.  The benefits to the local economy from the events at the venue are estimated to be about $13 million dollars per year.  The annual cost to taxpayers in subsidizing the Expocentre  is $1.5 million dollars. At this point, the capacity and technological limitations of the facility are hindering our ability to bring in large conferences and premier events. Upgrades are needed in order to keep the Expocentre competitive

The current county commissioners have retained the services of a reputable architecture firm that is local. I appreciate that.   As they progress through the design process, I hope that the users, management, and staff are given the opportunity for input to assure that we have the best possible facility for our money.

As of Sept. 14, District 1 included 10,349 registered voters who are unaffiliated. What would you say to them?

My message to them would not be any different than it is to any voter. What I bring to the table is a practical problemsolving background that comes with having been raised on our family farm. That, combined with a degree in landscape architecture, led me to a career directing the development of parks in Shawnee County for over 30 years.  Some of my favorite accomplishments include miles of hike and bike trails, development of 130+ parks, design of skate parks, being the designer of the first all accessible park in Kansas, and working with veterans in the establishment of the Gage Park Veteran’s Memorial.  I have written and procured millions of dollars in grants for local projects and worked with NOTO, Complete Streets, and the Riverfront Development team. My tenure as the president of the local chapter of Keep America Beautiful has eclipsed 10 years.  As a past president of SERTOMA, I chaired the Great Topeka Duck Race.  I am a graduate of the 2004 Leadership Topeka class.  For

many years, I coached youth sports and participated in a mentoring program at a local grade school. As a County Commissioner, my focus would be to: • battle the beast of bureaucracy that leads to a lack of efficiency and vision • add a voice of experience in planning, development, and project management to the board of commissioners • establishment of a capital improvement plan that promotes economic development and addresses the infrastructure needs of Shawnee County • stand for property rights Above all, I would ask for their vote! Does Shawnee County’s government have a problem with transparency?

I do not believe that transparency is a big problem. Most of what the Board of County  Commissioners does is public record. Generally, requests can be made for information that might not have been presented publicly.

As a commissioner, how would you be similar to the commissioner who is being replaced, Shelly Buhler?

Known as one who is consistently civil to other public officials, responsive to her constituents, supportive of staff, and dedicated to being knowledgeable on the subjects at hand, Shelly Buhler has certainly set an example that I would aspire to. Living in Rossville, her finger has been on the pulse of the small communities that are in our district. I like to believe that I too could bring insights related to the small farm community because I grew up on a farm and went to school in a town of 250 residents.  That farm is still in my family and I certainly understand the issues that come with that particular profession. I would be glad to say that, for myself, I will be retired from my current position and serving as county

BILL RIPHAHN

Town of residence: Topeka Party affiliation: Republican Age: 62 Job: Landscape architect working for city of Topeka and Shawnee County in the planning and development of parks Prior elected offices: None

commissioner will be my full time job. How would you be different from Buhler?

Unlike Ms. Buhler, the past 30+ years of my life have been immersed in planning, design, and project management. My connections within Topeka have been established through work with many community groups.  Whether putting in the carousel at Gage Park or moving a church to the grounds of Old Prairie town, or numerous park improvements, I know the staff and volunteers who worked tirelessly on projects; I know the contractors who worked on projects; I know the engineers and architects who worked on projects.  I even know the guys from Westar who moved power lines so that we could, in the middle of the night, get the church moved down Topeka streets on the way to its current location.  It is my belief that those connections will be a benefit as I strive to serve the community as a County Commissioner. My background in landscape architecture causes me to be a person who habitually sees possibilities.  Shelly Buhler’s gifts have brought much to the county; I’m anxious to see how my own strengths can be used to move Shawnee County forward.


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