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TAY S I D E P O L I C E

Contents

Introduction

2 Information

T

3 Background: Delivering Local Policing

his report is aligned with the objectives set in Tay-

side Policing Plan 2011-2014.

6 Summary of Results

The objectives are focused upon

10 Policing Tayside Scorecard

delivering a quality service to

13 Policing Dundee, Angus, Perth & Kinross

local communities.

38 Public Protection 44 Crime 56 Road Safety

Results are presented under the

59 Service Satisfaction

governance structure of Tayside

62 Public Perception

Police Performance Framework .

MARCH 2012

4 Introduction and guidance

65 Supporting Delivery 71 Tayside Police Performance Framework

The purpose of the report is to provide the public and

COMMUNITY PRIORITIES

other stakeholders with performance results covering a broad range of policing ac-

VISION AND VALUES

tivity, in accordance with the principles of demonstrating Best Value, thereby STANDARDS

ensuring greater transpar-

OF SERVICE

ency and accountability.

REVIEW

MANAGE

ENGAGE

RESULTS

RESOURCES

AND LISTEN


Information This report is in the process of development and will ultimately reflect all the performance indicators contained in Tayside Police Performance Framework (Appendix A).

2


BACKGROUND DELIVERING LOCAL POLICING Building public confidence and trust is how Tayside Police aims to improve satisfaction with the quality of service provided to its communities. This is achieved through the effective delivery of policing services which meet the needs of local communities. It is about ease of access to services, giving the public a voice in order to influence how the force responds to issues that matter to them, delivering appropriate and robust interventions, working with partners, providing feedback to the public and keeping them informed of progress and improvement. The force uses performance indicators to gather information about performance, quality of service and public perception. These are illustrated below. Those marked with a tick also contribute to the following:  The Scottish Policing Performance Framework  ‘Scotland Performs’ - the National Government Framework (Single Outcome Agreements)  The Force Control Strategy

INDICATORS SERIOUS AND ORGANISED CRIME

 

 

3.

COUNTER TERRORISM





4.

FIREARMS

5.

ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

6.

CRIME

7.

ROAD POLICING/SAFETY

8.

SERVICE RESPONSE

1.

PUBLIC PROTECTION

2.

   

   

   

SUPPORTING DELIVERY

C

orporate support forms an important role in ensuring that appropriate resources are in place to deliver an efficient and effective service to the public.

The challenging economic climate means that robust monitoring and reporting processes are instrumental in ensuring that the force is on track to deliver its objectives within the resources available. At the same time, the Scottish Government has set stretching environmental and energy reduction targets for Scotland. As a major employer in Tayside, Tayside Police is committed to demonstrating its contribution to this aim.

MEASURES 9.

CORPORATE SUPPORT

10.

PARTNERSHIP - SCOTTISH POLICE SERVICES AUTHORITY

3


INTRODUCTION

T

HE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS within Tayside Police Performance Framework are derived from detailed policing plans and business plans prepared for 2011, outlining what the operational divisions and supporting departments intend to deliver in support of the priorities set out in Tayside Policing Plan 2011-2014. These form the basis for this performance report. The community priorities of ‘Public Safety’ and ‘Public Reassurance’ underpin the force policing plan for the next three years. The indicators under ‘Public Safety’ and ‘Public Reassurance’ arise from the force control strategy and divisional plans. The areas that have been identified as a potential threat to Tayside communities include antisocial behaviour, public protection, serious and organised crime, terrorism, roads policing/safety and firearms. The extent to which alcohol and drugs are a key influencing factor is built into analysis of results.

Analysis of data and context with respect to the performance indicators, combined with the output from public consultation, provides an indication of the extent to which the force is succeeding in contributing to improved community outcomes.

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS •

• •

Customer Satisfaction: First Contact: overall satisfaction rating Customer Satisfaction: First Contact: provided with name of call handler Customer Satisfaction: updating the public on the progress of their enquiry Customer Satisfaction: Police visibility Customer Satisfaction: overall experience of service provided

4

• • • • • • •

Crime Groups 1-4 Violent crime Robbery Vandalism Domestic Housebreaking Roads Casualties Proportion of working time lost to sickness absence

CONTEXT INDICATORS are not measures of performance per se; rather they provide additional background information in relation to the demands placed upon the force and the environment in which it operates.

WHAT THESE WILL TELL US ABOUT PERFORMANCE Tayside Police Key Performance Indicators help the force define and measure progress toward the achievement of standards of service and force objectives. Monitoring results over the longer term allows the force to see where sustained improvement is developing, or to identify challenges which require to be addressed.

CONSULTING, ENGAGING AND LISTENING Public consultation and feedback runs as a thread throughout the performance framework and provides the information that lets the force know whether it is doing things right. ‘Customers’ include our staff.

BENCHMARKS Where information is available, Tayside Police performance is shown in relation to the most recent results from other forces or partner agencies.


GUIDANCE INTERPRETATION OF RESULTS

B

aselines for improvement adopt the methodology used in previous years, incorporating the most recent three years average performance.

The following broad rules are applied to control charts to highlight causal factors other than random variations operating within the recorded data: •

For some KPIs an adjusted improvement target was agreed rather than the straight three-year average. This takes account of developing trends or patterns over the last 36 months and adjusts the target up or down accordingly. Improvement Targets are agreed annually through a process of consultation with divisional commanders and heads of departments. These are ratified through the force Performance Committee chaired by the Deputy Chief Constable.

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Results are colour-coded against the following criteria: On or above target Below target

Control charts are shown for reported crime. These are monitored on a monthly basis. The charts set 'controls' described as Upper Control Limits (UCL) and Lower Control Limits (LCL). Applying statistical formulae to historical data defines the control limits. These are currently set at 2 standard deviations from the mean (average) for the years 2008/09 to 2010/11. This means that results lying outwith these limits should be regarded as significant and would benefit from further investigation as to whether the outcome was the result of a known causal factor as opposed to random fluctuation.

• •

any point that lies outside the UCL or LCL six or more consecutive points running upwards or downwards seven or more consecutive points zigzagging above or below the mean.

PERFORMANCE REPORTING Where performance is adhering to the ‘norm’, i.e. remaining within upper and lower control limits, minimal reporting takes place. Areas of concern or exceptional performance, lying outside the upper or lower control limits, is commented upon. In addition, areas of police business not contained within the key performance indicators (such as fleet, health and safety, staff development) are reported on with a view to producing a balanced view of organisational activity. This promotes the diverse range of services that support operational policing. PUBLICATION OF PERFORMANCE RESULTS This document is published monthly on the force web-site in accordance with the statutory requirement under Section 13 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 2003 which covers public performance reporting in relation to the publication of performance information and evidence of continuous improvement. An abbreviated ‘Performance Scorecard’ is published by the seventh working day of each month on the force web site.

5


Summary of results: Apr 2011– Mar 2012 1.

later in this document.

STANDARDS OF SERVICE

Two out of four customer satisfaction targets were achieved for the year April 2011 to March 2012 and both in relation to first contact. Overall satisfaction at first contact evidenced a statistically significant 2.9 percentage point improvement compared to the same period the previous year rising from 90.7% to 93.6% and exceeded the 2011/12 target by 2.1 percentage points. Further analysis indicated no statistically significant differences in satisfaction between those reporting a crime and those in contact for reasons other than to report a crime with 94.6% and 92.6% satisfaction reported respectively.

The proportion of respondents who were provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry rose 2.9 percentage points from 80.8% to 83.7%, which exceeded the target set at 80.0% for this indicator. •

Results finalised at 61.0% in relation to the service user receiving an update on the progress of their enquiry. This represented a slight reduction of 0.2 percentage points when compared to the 61.2% recorded in the same period the previous year and fell short of the force target set at 65.0%. Further examination of this indicator, however, encouragingly suggested that those service users reporting a crime were statistically significantly more likely to have received an update on progress of their enquiry than those who made contact for reasons other than to report a crime (73.1% compared to 45.6%).

2.

Satisfaction with the overall service provided by Tayside Police failed to achieve the target of 85.0% but returned a minimal improvement of 0.2 percentage points compared to the commensurate figure the previous year, rising from 82.3% to 82.5%. Further analysis also indicated that satisfaction with overall service was statistically significantly higher for those who had reported a crime than those who made contact for other reasons (87.2% compared to 77.5%).

50.8% of service users thought that the current level of police patrols in their neighbourhood was ‘about right’ for their community needs. Conversely, 48.6% felt it was ‘too little’ and a minimal 0.6% that it was ‘too much’. The majority of respondents, 71.3%, felt reassured when they witnessed an officer on patrol in their neighbourhood. Over half of the respondents confirmed that they did not know anything about the community officers who looked after their neighbourhood, 55.9%, whilst a further 22.2%, although unable to identify their local officer by sight or name, knew how to contact them should the need arise. 22.1% of residents were able to recognise their community officer either by name, sight or both. ‘Local newspapers’ were the preferred medium for respondents to be kept informed about actions being taken by officers in their communities. 62.8% of service users agreed that officers understood the issues that mattered in their neighbourhoods and 57.6% felt that officers were dealing with such matters. Overall, 65.0% of respondents had confidence in the police in their neighbourhood. Taking everything into account, 68.8% of service users thought that community officers were doing a ‘good’ or ‘very good’ job in their area.

CRIME

Performance in relation to overall crime groups : • Violent crime (Group 1) - a decrease of 9.7%

(55 crimes) • Crimes of indecency (Group 2) - an increase of 6.6% (28 crimes) • Crimes of dishonesty (Group 3) - a reduction of 16.3% (1826 crimes) • Malicious mischief, vandalism etc (Group 4) - a reduction of 24.0% (1395 crimes)

Community Policing A new community policing section has been included in the Service Satisfaction survey since the beginning of October and the following paragraphs summarise the findings. Caution should be exercised when interpreting the results due to the sample size (n=638). It should be noted that these questions have also been replicated in the Public Perception survey with the results reported

(Data was sourced directly from Apex crime reporting system on 2 April and may differ slightly to other published results due to some reclassification of crimes and any additional ‘no crime’ status being applied in the intervening period.)

At the end of the fiscal year 2011-12 the force achieved 9 out of 10 crime-related targets. The only target not achieved was for the detection of

6


Vandalism where 30.4% was achieved against a target of 32.0%

28.8%, a 0.4 percentage point improvement was recorded for those who felt that crime had decreased rising from 12.4% to 12.8%.

Improvements in detection rates (when compared to the previous year) included Groups 1-4 , robbery and domestic housebreaking . The detection rate for violent crime was marginally lower, despite achieving target.

3.

The main issues of concern to residents when asked unprompted was (1) ‘antisocial behaviour’, 22.2% (20.0%), followed by (2) ‘dangerous / careless driving’, 19.7% (21.7%), and (3) ‘housebreaking’, 13.6% (12.7%). This provides a fairly similar representation of main concerns as in the previous year with a few concerns changing position: ‘antisocial behaviour’ substituting for ‘dangerous/careless driving’ as the number one concern and ‘housebreaking’ overtaking ‘drug dealing/drug abuse’ as the number three concern.

TELEPHONE RESPONSE

Between April 2011 and March 2012, the number of calls answered with 10 seconds failed to achieve the national target figure of 90%. However, the results in recent months have rallied and the 87.8% recorded at the end of March was the highest result recorded since March 2011. when the end of year result was 91.0%.

In terms of prevalence of crime in local neighbourhoods, almost half of all respondents, 46.4% (44.9%) said that ‘antisocial behaviour’ was a common problem in their local area, followed by ‘vandalism/graffiti’, 36.6% (36.7%) and ‘dangerous/careless driving’, 33.6% (36.2%). This result indicates that opinions have remained the same between the two years with ‘antisocial behaviour’ deemed to the most common issue blighting communities.

4. SICKNESS ABSENCE The absence rate for police officers was 3.8% at the end of March and met the target of 4.0%. The police staff result at 4.1% was an improvement on the 4.6% recorded last year and also achieved target (4.5%).

5.

37.4% (36.2%) of respondents confirmed that they were concerned at becoming a victim of crime in their area and when asked to comment on the issues which caused them concern, ‘housebreaking’, 48.5% (42.2%), followed by ‘antisocial behaviour’, 45.4% (43.2%), were the major areas of concern.

ROAD CASUALTIES

Between April 2011 and March 2012, 18 fatalities including one child were recorded, over 47% fewer than the 34 people killed during the same period last year. A further 200 people were seriously injured (178 last year), of which 22 were children.

Whilst feelings of safety walking alone in local neighbourhoods during the day evidenced a minimal 0.1 percentage point dip in confidence in 2011 compared to 2010 falling from 95.5% to 95.4%, feelings of safety after dark witnessed an increase in confidence rising from 60.7% to 62.8%.

The total number of people killed or seriously injured (218) was 6 more than last year’s result. From April 2011, the force adopted the government’s Road Safety Framework Targets to the year 2020.

6.

A fear of crime prevented 4.7% of respondents from taking part in their everyday activities. This represents an increase of 0.9 percentage points compared to the 3.8% who provided the same response in 2010.

PUBLIC PERCEPTION OF CRIME

91.1% of respondents in Tayside perceived their neighbourhood to be a safe place to live. This indicates a minimal 0.9 percentage point improvement compared to the previous year when 90.2% of respondents were of the same opinion.

Community Policing The questions in this section are replicated in the service satisfaction survey. As before, caution should be exercised when interpreting the results due to the sample size (n=515). Results for the corresponding questions in the Service Satisfaction survey have been included in parenthesis for

Whilst opinions remained fairly static between 2011 and 2010 in relation to (1) those who felt that crime levels had remained the same during the year - 58.3% and (2) that crime had increased,

7


comparison purposes. •

improve going forward.

46.4% (50.8%) of residents thought that the current level of police patrols in their neighbourhood was ‘about right’ for their community needs. Conversely, 53.3% (48.6%) felt it was ‘too little’. 67.8% (71.3%) of respondents felt reassured when they witnessed an officer on patrol in their neighbourhood. Almost three quarters of respondents confirmed that they did not know anything about the community officers who looked after their neighbourhood, 72.9% (55.9%), whilst a further 13.6% (22.2%), although not able to identify their local officer by sight or name, knew how to contact them should the need arise. 13.4% (22.1%) of residents were able to recognise their community officer either by name, sight or both. Similar to the results for the Service Satisfaction survey, ‘local newspapers’ were deemed the preferred medium for respondents to be kept informed about actions being taken by officers in their communities. 55.8% (62.8%) of respondents agreed that officers understood the issues that mattered in their neighbourhoods and 47.6% (57.6%) felt that officers were dealing with such matters. Overall, almost two thirds of residents had confidence in the police in their neighbourhood, 58.9% (65.0%). Taking everything into account, 59.3% (68.8%) of residents thought that community officers were doing a ‘good’ or ‘very good’ job in their area.

It can be seen from the above information that service users (Service Satisfaction survey) appear to have a greater awareness than randomly selected members of the general public (Public Perception survey), of the community officers who look after their neighbourhood and also an increased confidence in the officers’ abilities to deal with the issues that matter to them in their communities. When asked to provide views on the force’s service delivery, first in terms of the importance of certain activities and then how well those activities were performed, the greatest disparity in opinion between importance and effectiveness related to police visibility. This suggests that ‘providing a visible presence’ is the main area of policing which the public perceive Tayside Police should

8


POLICING TAYSIDE KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Tayside Land Area: 2,896 square miles Population: 399,550 Police Officers: 1231 Police Staff: 505 Special Constables: 169 Data as at 30 June 2011

9


KEY PERFORMANCE RESULTS SCORECARD APRIL - MARCH 2012 POLICING TAYSIDE

KEY On or above target Below target

POLICING ANGUS

POLICING PERTH & KINROSS

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

91.5% 91.8% 88.6%

3.2

91.5%

91.7%

91.6%

0.1

91.5% 96.2%

91.7%

4.5

80.0% 83.7% 80.8%

2.9

80.0% 79.5% 80.3%

-0.8

80.0%

83.1%

77.9%

5.2

80.0% 87.2%

83.8%

3.4

65.0% 61.0% 61.2%

-0.2

65.0% 58.8% 60.9%

-2.1

65.0%

58.8%

58.6%

0.2

65.0% 64.2%

64.1%

0.1

85.0% 82.5% 82.3%

0.2

85.0% 78.9% 83.3%

-4.4

85.0%

82.9%

82.3%

0.6

85.0% 84.8%

81.4%

3.4

388/1296 (29.9%)

335/1008 (33.2%)

2011-12 Result

2011-12 Target

2.9

1259/3600 (35.0%)

2011-12 Target

%/pp Change

91.5% 93.6% 90.7%

(Response Rate)

2010-11 Result

10

Customer Experience: Overall satisfaction rating of the service provided by Tayside Police

2011-12 Result

received an update on the progress of their enquiry

2011-12 Target

Updating the Public:% of customers who

% / pp Change

the name of the person dealing with their enquiry

2010-11 Result

First Contact:% of respondents provided with

2011-12 Result

First Contact: Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

2011-12 Target

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION:

POLICING DUNDEE

536/1296 (41.3%)

CRIME Groups 1-4 recorded - Detection rate Violent Crime recorded - Detection rate Robbery recorded - Detection rate Vandalism recorded - Detection rate Domestic Housebreaking recorded - Detection rate

17950

14748 17996 -18.0%

46.5% 46.7% 46.4%

0.3

512

-9.7%

540

567

85.0% 85.4% 85.7%

-0.3

124

-21.0%

156

157

70.0% 71.0% 70.7%

0.3

4092

-24.6%

5400

5426

32.0% 30.4% 32.1%

-1.7

662

-23.9%

775

870

30.0% 33.5% 29.7%

3.8

-23.4%

3650

3110

3700

-15.9%

45.5% 46.0% 43.6%

2.4

49.0%

46.3%

52.1%

-5.8

276

-8.3%

100

96

104

-7.7%

75.0% 81.2% 76.4%

4.8

96.0%

90.6%

95.2%

-4.6

77

-26.0%

8

11

10

10.0%

62.0% 64.9% 61.5%

3.4

85.0%

81.8%

80.0%

1.8

2020

-32.6%

1260

1111

1280

-13.2%

27.5% 28.5% 28.4%

0.1

37.0%

31.7%

39.1%

-7.4

403

-34.0%

90

90

97

-7.2%

7.1

40.0%

38.9%

47.4%

-8.5

10000

285

110

3000

545

7610

9938

301

104

2998

611

26.0% 32.5% 25.4%

4300

4028

48.0% 48.3% 155

140

92.0% 90.0% 38

36

80.0% 80.6% 1140

961

36.0% 32.8% 140

169

40.0% 33.1%

4358

-7.6%

48.0%

0.3

162

-13.6%

96.9%

-6.9

43

-16.3%

90.7%

-10.1

1148

-16.3%

34.1%

-1.3

162

4.3%

35.2%

-2.1


KEY PERFORMANCE RESULTS SCORECARD APRIL - MARCH 2012 continued POLICING TAYSIDE

KEY On or above 3 year average

POLICING DUNDEE

POLICING PERTH & KINROSS

POLICING ANGUS

2011-12 Target

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

% / pp Change

2011-12 Target

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Target

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Target

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

People killed

28

18

34

-47.1%

N/A

0

5

-100.0%

N/A

4

7

-42.9%

N/A

14

22

-36.4%

People seriously injured

248

200

178

12.4%

N/A

56

42

33.3%

N/A

57

53

7.5%

N/A

87

83

4.8%

Children killed

1

1

0

#DIV/0!

N/A

0

0

#DIV/0!

N/A

0

0

#DIV/0!

N/A

1

0

#DIV/0!

Children seriously injured

29

22

21

4.8%

N/A

12

10

20.0%

N/A

7

7

0.0%

N/A

3

4

-25.0%

Sickness Absence - police officers

4.0%

3.8%

4.2%

-0.4

4.0%

3.7%

4.0%

-0.3

4.0%

5.1%

6.0%

-0.9

4.0%

4.1%

4.3%

-0.2

Sickness Absence - police staff

4.5%

4.1%

4.6%

-0.5

4.5%

4.3%

3.9%

0.4

4.5%

5.5%

4.1%

1.4

4.5%

2.8%

5.1%

-2.3

Below 3 year average

ROAD CASUALTIES

11

RESOURCES

Finance - Variance from budget

COMMUNITY PRIORITIES

VISION AND VALUES

STANDARDS OF SERVICE

REVIEW RESULTS

MANAGE RESOURCES

ENGAGE AND LISTEN


TAYSIDE CRIME IN MORE DETAIL PERIOD APRIL to MARCH CRIME CLASSIFICATION

2010/2011 Made known

2011/2012

DETECTIONS number %

Made known

DETECTIONS number %

INC./DEC. number %

GROUP 1 Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (Incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Pos of Firearm with intent to endanger life Abduction Threats Others GROUP 1 - TOTAL

0 56 0 248 157 60 7 22 14 3

0 55 0 218 111 60 7 21 13 1

98.2% 87.9% 70.7% 100.0% 100.0% 95.5% 92.9% 33.3%

10 75 0 198 124 72 6 8 15 4

9 73 0 167 88 74 4 7 11 4

90.0% 97.3% 84.3% 71.0% 102.8% 66.7% 87.5% 73.3% 100.0%

10 19 0 -50 -33 12 -1 -14 1 1

33.9% -20.2% -21.0% 20.0% -14.3% -63.6% 7.1% 33.3%

567

486

85.7%

512

437

85.4%

-55

-9.7%

56 9 160 81 37 80

29 7 116 74 26 75

51.8% 77.8% 72.5% 91.4% 70.3% 93.8%

81 2 213 46 47 62

53 1 128 35 23 51

65.4% 50.0% 60.1% 76.1% 48.9% 82.3%

25 -7 53 -35 10 -18

44.6% -77.8% 33.1% -43.2% 27.0% -22.5%

423

327

77.3%

451

291

64.5%

28

6.6%

870 335 484 279 587 458 16 237 6814 333 47 42 589 103

258 98 171 91 120 223 16 167 3872 66 46 29 386 56

29.7% 29.3% 35.3% 32.6% 20.4% 48.7% 100.0% 70.5% 56.8% 19.8% 97.9% 69.0% 65.5% 54.4%

662 259 351 179 391 295 18 221 5983 320 48 18 529 94

222 48 121 55 109 150 18 172 3373 104 47 21 293 25

33.5% 18.5% 34.5% 30.7% 27.9% 50.8% 100.0% 77.8% 56.4% 32.5% 97.9% 116.7% 55.4% 26.6%

-208 -76 -133 -100 -196 -163 2 -16 -831 -13 1 -24 -60 -9

-23.9% -22.7% -27.5% -35.8% -33.4% -35.6% 12.5% -6.8% -12.2% -3.9% 2.1% -57.1% -10.2% -8.7%

11194

5599

50.0%

9368

4758

50.8%

-1826

-16.3%

195 5426 191

58 1742 144

29.7% 32.1% 75.4%

179 4092 146

54 1243 101

30.2% 30.4% 69.2%

-16 -1334 -45

-8.2% -24.6% -23.6%

5812

1944

33.4%

4417

1398

31.7%

-1395

-24.0%

17996

8356

46.4%

14748

6884

46.7%

-3248

-18.0%

179 10 329 73 5 889 395 391 1974 52 92

178 10 328 68 8 870 373 398 1968 49 89

99.4% 100.0% 99.7% 93.2% 160.0% 97.9% 94.4% 101.8% 99.7% 94.2% 96.7%

102 12 300 120 4 808 298 280 2141 66 117

101 12 302 116 4 797 285 279 2147 70 107

99.0% 100.0% 100.7% 96.7% 100.0% 98.6% 95.6% 99.6% 100.3% 106.1% 91.5%

-77 2 -29 47 -1 -81 -97 -111 167 14 25

-43.0% 20.0% -8.8% 64.4% -20.0% -9.1% -24.6% -28.4% 8.5% 26.9% 27.2%

4389

4339

98.9%

4248

4220

99.3%

-141

-3.2%

22385

12695

56.7%

18996

11104

58.5%

-3389

-15.1%

GROUP 2 Rape Assault with intent to rape Indecent assault Lewd & Libidinous practices Public Indecency Others GROUP 2 - TOTAL

GROUP 3 Housebreaking ~ domestic dwelling Housebreaking ~ domestic non-dwelling Housebreaking ~ commercial Theft, attempt theft from locked premises/property Theft, attempt theft from locked motor vehicle Theft, attempted theft of a motor vehicle Convicted thief in poss.of tools etc. w.i. to steal In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from motor vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others GROUP 3 - TOTAL

GROUP 4 Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others GROUP 4 - TOTAL

SUB-TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 4

GROUP 5 Public mischief & wasting police time Escape or rescue from police custody or prison Resisting arrest or obstructing police officer General attempts to pervert the course of justice Sex Offenders' register offences Bail - Fail to keep conditions Possession of offensive weapons Drugs - supply, with intent to supply etc Drugs - personal possession Drugs - manufacture etc Others GROUP 5 - TOTAL

TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 5

Please Note: This document is an end of month 'snap-shot' in time and the data may vary from later publications where updates have been taken into consideration.

12


KEY PERFORMANCE RESULTS: DIVISIONAL SCORECARD APRIL 2011 TO MARCH 2012 SECTION 2 Lochee and Ryehill

SECTION 3 Downfield and Hilltown

SECTION 4 Longhaugh and Broughty Ferry

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

% / pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

Groups 1-4

7610

9938

-23.4%

2072

3027

-31.5%

1947

2332

-16.5%

1865

2195

-15.0%

1726

2384

-27.6%

- Detection rate

46.0%

43.6%

2.4

57.3%

53.9%

3.4

42.3%

41.0%

1.3

42.2%

40.2%

2

40.6%

36.2%

4.4

276

301

-8.3%

70

88

-20.5%

70

65

7.7%

73

59

23.7%

63

89

-29.2%

- Detection rate

81.2%

76.4%

4.8

77.1%

75.0%

2.1

85.7%

75.4%

10.3

82.2%

81.4%

0.8

79.4%

75.3%

4.1

Indecency (G2)

230

198

16.2%

85

92

-7.6%

45

31

45.2%

49

40

22.5%

51

35

45.7%

- Detection rate

62.6%

71.7%

-9.1

68.2%

84.8%

-16.6

57.8%

54.8%

3

57.1%

57.5%

-0.4

62.7%

68.6%

-5.9

Dishonesty (G3)

4920

6216

-20.8%

1520

2087

-27.2%

1298

1509

-14.0%

1136

1282

-11.4%

966

1338

-27.8%

- Detection rate

50.6%

48.5%

2.1

62.8%

59.6%

3.2

46.9%

46.5%

0.4

42.3%

40.7%

1.6

46.3%

41.1%

5.2

Mal Mischief, vandalism (G4)

2184

3223

-32.2%

397

760

-47.8%

534

727

-26.5%

607

814

-25.4%

646

922

-29.9%

- Detection rate

29.3%

29.4%

-0.1

30.2%

32.2%

-2

24.2%

25.9%

-1.7

36.1%

35.6%

0.5

26.6%

24.2%

2.4

77

104

-26.0%

22

34

-35.3%

18

23

-21.7%

23

31

-25.8%

14

16

-12.5%

- Detection rate

64.9%

61.5%

3.4

54.5%

67.6%

-13.1

66.7%

56.5%

10.2

82.6%

71.0%

11.6

50.0%

37.5%

12.5

Vandalism

2020

2998

-32.6%

367

711

-48.4%

484

678

-28.6%

553

750

-26.3%

616

859

-28.3%

- Detection rate

28.5%

28.4%

0.1

28.9%

30.0%

-1.1

23.3%

24.8%

-1.5

35.4%

35.6%

-0.2

26.1%

23.5%

2.6

403

611

-34.0%

59

126

-53.2%

97

136

-28.7%

135

156

-13.5%

112

193

-42.0%

32.5%

25.4%

7.1

33.9%

26.2%

7.7

23.7%

22.8%

1

28.1%

34.0%

-5.9

44.6%

19.7%

24.9

CRIME

Violent Crime (G1)

13

Robbery

Domestic Housebreaking - Detection rate

Caution! Variation in results may appear extreme due to very small numbers of crimes involved. Cells with symbol *** mean that a valid percentage change could not be calculated.

Policing Dundee: Standards of Service ~ April - March 2012

SECTION 1 City Centre and Maryfield

POLICING DUNDEE


KEY PERFORMANCE RESULTS: DIVISIONAL SCORECARD - STANDARDS OF SERVICE - APRIL - MARCH 2012 SECTION 1 City Centre and Maryfield

POLICING DUNDEE

SECTION 3 Downfield and Hilltown

SECTION 4 Longhaugh and Broughty Ferry

91.5%

91.8% 88.6%

3.2

96.8% 90.5%

6.3

92.7% 87.3%

5.4

88.1% 87.1%

1.0

91.9% 90.0%

1.9

80.0%

79.5% 80.3%

-0.8

86.8% 76.3%

10.5

77.6% 77.6%

0.0

78.6% 81.4%

-2.8

78.3% 84.9%

-6.6

65.0%

58.8% 60.9%

-2.1

61.0% 65.0%

-4.0

62.8% 52.2%

10.6

57.4% 71.4%

-14.0

54.7% 55.8%

-1.1

85.0%

78.9% 83.3%

-4.4

85.7% 85.1%

0.6

79.6% 81.2%

-1.6

73.0% 84.8%

-11.8

80.0% 82.7%

-2.7

388/1296 (29.9%)

70/254 (27.6%)

103/332 (31.0%)

Caution should be exercised when interpreting the results at sectional level due to the small sub-sample sizes. First Contact - Improvement in satisfaction with service at first contact from 88.6% to 91.8%. - Reduction in identifying the person dealing with the enquiry from 80.3% to 79.5%. Updating the Public - Reduction in updating the public from 60.9% to 58.8%. Customer Experience - Reduction in overall customer experience from 83.3% to 78.9%.

113/369 (30.6%)

102/341 (29.9%)

POLICING DUNDEE

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

% / pp Change

Response Rate

2010-11 Result

14

First Contact % of respondents provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry Updating the Public % of customers who received an update on the progress of their enquiry Customer Experience Overall satisfaction rating of the service provided by Tayside Police

2011-12 Result

First Contact Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

2011-12 Target

Customer Satisfaction

SECTION 2 Lochee and Ryehill


DIVISIONAL SCORECARD - PUBLIC PERCEPTION - APRIL - MARCH 2012 SECTION 2 Lochee and Ryehill

SECTION 3 Downfield and Hilltown

SECTION 4 Longhaugh and Broughty Ferry

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

% / pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

Crime in neighbourhood % of residents who thought that the crime rate in their neighbourhood had remained the same or improved over the past year

73.0%

61.1%

11.9

75.0%

60.6%

14.4

70.2%

54.1%

16.1

68.2%

61.7%

6.5

79.1%

67.3%

11.8

Feelings of safety after dark % of residents who felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark

49.3%

45.7%

3.6

51.2%

38.7%

12.5

41.3%

49.1%

-7.8

40.8%

43.6%

-2.8

61.0%

53.9%

7.1

Concerns at becoming a victim of crime % of residents concerned at becoming a victim of crime in their neighbourhood

52.2%

50.7%

1.5

52.4%

59.0%

-6.6

56.8%

52.5%

4.3

54.5%

58.4%

-3.9

46.5%

34.6%

11.9

Public Perception

15

Issues that cause most concern in neighbourhoods *Other includes: Litter, Dog Fouling, Fly tipping etc

Response Rate

Antisocial behaviour Drug dealing/drug abuse Dangerous/careless driving Housebreaking Other* Vandalism/graffiti Alcohol related crime Assault Motor vehicle crime Cause no concern: Robbery

Dangerous/careless driving Housebreaking Antisocial behaviour Drug dealing/drug abuse Other Assault Vandalism/graffiti Cause no concern: Robbery Alcohol related crime Motor vehicle crime

Drug dealing/drug abuse Housebreaking Vandalism/graffiti Antisocial behaviour Other Alcohol related crime Dangerous/careless driving Assault Motor vehicle crime Cause no concern: Robbery

Dangerous/careless driving Drug dealing/drug abuse Antisocial behaviour Housebreaking Other Vandalism/graffiti Alcohol related crime Assault Cause no concern: Robbery Motor vehicle crime

Antisocial behaviour Vandalism/graffiti Dangerous/careless driving Drug dealing/drug abuse Alcohol related crime Housebreaking Other Assault Cause no concern: Robbery Motor vehicle crime

318/1296 (24.5%)

45/254 (17.7%)

86/328 (26.2%)

80/340 (23.5%)

107/374 (28.6%)

Policing Dundee: Public Perception ~ April - March 2012

SECTION 1 City Centre and Maryfield

POLICING DUNDEE


Policing Dundee: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 SECTION 1: MARYFIELD

CITY

CENTRE

Targeted Community Activity

AND

Inspector Steve Main said: “The latest monthly results, when taken in conjunction with overall achievement throughout the full reporting period, evidenced the strong performance delivered by all police officers and police staff in the City Centre and Maryfield areas.

Main areas of public concern: dangerous/ careless driving and housebreaking Crime • Reduction of 31.5% in groups 1 to 4 (955 crimes). • Robbery reduced by 35.3% (12 fewer victims) best reduction across Division. • Reduction of 27.2% in crimes of dishonesty (567 crimes). • Biggest reduction in Division in vandalism of 48.4% (344 crimes) • Biggest reduction in Division in domestic housebreaking of 53.2% (67 crimes).

I was particularly pleased with commendable overall reductions in Group 1- 4 crimes which resulted in 955 fewer victims of crime throughout the year. The vast majority of issues which cause most concern in these communities were successfully tackled through collaborative working between police and partners resulting in significant reductions in relation to housebreaking and vandalism, in particular. Improved results in Standards of Service and Public Perception proved that individual community members were very satisfied with the service provided by the police. However, it is acknowledged that there still remain concerns that individuals could become the victims of crime, so it is important that all staff remain focused and determined to deliver high level performance in relation to all aspects of the Community Priorities"

Detection rate • Best detection rate across the Division for groups 1-4 at 57.3%, a 3.4 percentage point improvement over last year • Best detection rate across Division for crimes of dishonesty at 62.8%, an improvement of 3.2 percentage points when compared to last year Standards of Service Best result in the Division from residents in City Centre and Maryfield with respect to satisfaction with service provided at first contact. • Best result in the Division from residents in City Centre and Maryfield with respect to being provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry. • Best result in the Division with an improvement in overall satisfaction with the service provided by the police at 85.7%. •

SECTION 2: LOCHEE AND RYEHILL Main areas of public concern: drug dealing/drug abuse and housebreaking Crime • Reduction of 16.5% in groups 1 to 4 (385 crimes). • Increase of 45.2% in crimes of indecency from 31 recorded last year up to 45 • Reduction of 28.6% in vandalism (194 crimes) • Reduction of 28.7% in domestic housebreaking (39 crimes).

Public Perception* • Improvement in the proportion of people who thought crime in the neighbourhood had improved or remained the same, from 60.6% recorded last year to 75.0%. • Similar positive results with respect to people feeling safe after dark rising from 38.7% last year to 51.2% for the current equivalent period. • At the end of March 2011 59% of residents were concerned at becoming a victim of crime. This had reduced to 52.4% at the end of March this year - however this still indicates that over half of the population are concerned about becoming a victim of crime in the area.

Detection rate Improvement in overall detection rate from 41.0% to 42.3% • Best result in Division for detection rate for violent crime, improvement from 75.4% to 85.7% •

Standards of Service • Residents in Lochee and Ryehill rated the service provided at first contact at 92.7% exceeding the divisional target of 91.5% • Best result in Division of 62.8% of customers who

(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

16


Policing Dundee: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 received an update on the progress of their enquiry.

2013. Whilst the transition may be challenging, I will ensure that at local level our style of policing remains consistent and it will be very much business as usual!”

Public Perception* • A 16.1 percentage point improvement in the proportion of people who thought crime in the neighbourhood had improved or remained the same, from 54.1% recorded last year to 70.2% (69.9% last month) • Concern about becoming a victim of crime, increased from 52.5% to 56.8% and was biggest in division. However, this was an improvement on last two months’ results of 61.4% and 57.1% respectively.

SECTION 3: DOWNFIELD AND HILLTOWN Main areas of public concern: dangerous/ careless driving and drug dealing/drug abuse Crime • Reduction of 15% in groups 1 to 4 (330 crimes) • Increase of 23.7% in violent crime from 59 to 73 • Reduction of 26.3% in vandalism (197 crimes)

Targeted Community Activity Inspector Graeme Young said: Looking at the statistics for the entire year, it was very encouraging to see that crime in my area of responsibility had reduced quite considerably. Whilst I acknowledge the excellent efforts of my staff, I must also thank our partners, outside agencies and members of the public for their contribution and assistance throughout the year. We continued to build on these excellent working relationships and will carry on developing them throughout the year ahead.

Reduction of 13.5% in domestic housebreaking (21 crimes).

Detection rate • Highest detection rate in division for robbery at 82.6% • Highest detection rate in division for vandalism at 35.4% • 5.9 percentage point fall in the detection rate for domestic housebreaking from 34.0% last year to 28.1%.

One of my aims throughout the forthcoming year is to reduce the amount of violent crime. As stated in previous reports, I have already put measures in place to address this issue, including high profile foot patrols by my staff and community wardens, assisted by the Community Impact Team and Close Circuit Television Van.

Standards of Service • Decrease in proportion of people who stated they had received an update on the progress of their enquiry from 71.4% recorded last year to 57.4% (however, improvement on last month’s 55.2%) • Decrease in overall customer satisfaction with the service provided by the police, from 84.8% recorded last year to 73% (last month 74%).

This year saw a dramatic reduction in domestic housebreaking, crimes of dishonesty and vandalism which, I am well aware, are crimes that have an every day impact on our communities. Through various contact methods including Local Community Planning Partnership meetings, mobile surgeries and key individual networks, I shall continue to listen to the concerns of the public and react accordingly

Public Perception* • Improvement in the proportion of people who thought crime in the neighbourhood had decreased or remained the same, from 61.7% recorded last year to 68.2%. (last month 69.4%) • Fewer residents expressed concern at becoming a victim of crime this year (54.5%) than last year (58.4%). This was also an improvement on last month’s result of 57.8%

With regards our standards of service, again the results are very positive, however, I am constantly aware that we can improve upon these even further and shall endeavour to achieve even greater customer satisfaction throughout the coming year.

Targeted Community Activity Inspector Julie Robertson said: "Results for the section over the past year were very encouraging indeed with 330 fewer victims of crime. Not only did we reduce the overall level of crime, we

I very much look forward to the year ahead and to being part of the new Scottish Police Service in

(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

17


Policing Dundee: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 also achieved an increase across most detection rates. This is testament to the commitment and positive engagement of officers who provided intelligence led, focused and effective patrols in areas where they could make the most difference.

ing customers updated. I also encouraged the use of staff in modified roles to assist in this process. Additionally, and more recently, Sergeants and Lead Constables were reminded of the importance of dipsampling crime reports for subsequent contact with complainers. A new process was put in place which will continue on a monthly basis. Whilst understanding victims of crime may not wish to divulge their e mail addresses in addition to their home or mobile telephone numbers, I would strongly urge them to do so as this provides us with another avenue with which to keep them informed.

Work carried out in line with Operations and initiatives such as Dry Up (alcohol confiscation), Siren (drug dealing / drug abuse), and Challenge (dangerous and inappropriate use of motorcycles and motorcycle annoyance), all paid dividends for the whole community. With the arrival of the new Community Impact Team in February 2012, we were able to make an even bigger difference, particularly in terms of drug dealing / drug abuse, (an issue which causes neighbourhoods most concern).

We also listened to the needs of our community and one area they continue to ask us to concentrate on is in respect of dangerous / careless driving, particularly in the vicinity of schools. As a result, we supported several National Roads Policing Campaigns throughout the year and Days of Action to target non compliance with seat belt legislation, use of mobile phones whilst driving, drink / drug driving, and documentation offences, in addition to carrying out checks and patrols to educate road users, enforcing the law where appropriate, in order to make our roads safer.

The key to this success was attributable to to many factors. Our community engagement strategy and commitment to working closely with our partners, continually impressed me. In particular the partnership work carried out by my officers at a local level with local community groups, and the Anti Social Behaviour Team from Dundee City Council, resulted in significant improvements to the quality of life for many of our local residents. We also keenly participated in the local community planning processes. Furthermore, the support of the public who kept us informed about what was happening in their communities, meant we were able to provide an effective and appropriate policing response. Information and intelligence are vital to us and it is with the assistance of local people that the best prospects of us being able to deliver an effective outcome in tackling crime and anti-social behaviour is provided. By continuing to work to an intelligence led approach to response policing and problem solving policing initiatives, we were able to deal with identified priorities.

Overall, our officers performed extremely well and their efforts had a significant impact on reducing crime and making our communities safer.”

SECTION 4: LONGHAUGH BROUGHTY FERRY

AND

Main areas of public concern: antisocial behaviour and dangerous/careless driving Crime

However, one area where we need to do better, is in relation to Violent Crime. Over the coming year, we will be deploying dedicated operations to target hotspot areas at key times, making greater use of mobile CCTV, providing highly visible patrols, carrying out checks in licensed premises and targeting individuals who engage in such activities, through proactive stop and search tactics in order to disrupt them and reduce violent crime.

• Reduction of 27.6% in groups 1 to 4 (658 crimes) • Biggest reduction in Division in violent crime

(29.2%, 26 crimes) • 45.7% increase in crimes of indecency (16

crimes) • Biggest reduction in Division in crimes of dishonesty of 27.8% (372 crimes) set against an improved detection rate from 41.1% to 46.3% • Reduction in vandalism of 28.3% (243 crimes) • Reduction in domestic housebreaking of 42.0% (81 crimes).

Efforts to improve our performance in relation to keeping customers updated on the progress of their enquiry / complaint were made reminding everyone of the force Standards of Service in respect of keep-

(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents

18


Policing Dundee: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 Detection rate • Despite an improvement in the detection rate for groups 1-4 crime from 36.2% to 40.6% this result was still the lowest in division • Fall in the detection rate for crimes of indecency , from 68.6% to 62.7% • An improvement in the detection rate for robbery from 37.5% last year to 50.0% • Best detection rate for domestic HB across Division; significant improvement from 19.7% to 44.6%

However, the majority of information in this report represents real achievement and if we can sustain this progress it will help to make our local communities safer and better places in which to live and work".

Standards of Service • Increase in satisfaction from residents in Long-

haugh and Broughty Ferry with the service provided at first contact from 90.0% to 91.9% - just above target • A decrease from 55.8% to 54.7% this month in the proportion of people who stated they had received an update on the progress of their enquiry. (last month 53.2%). This most recent result was 1.1 percentage points lower than at the same time last year and the lowest across the Division Public Perception* • Best result in Division for perception that crime

levels had fallen or remained the same - 79.1% • Best result in Division for people feeling safe after

dark, improved from 53.9% to 61.0% • Conversely, concern about becoming a victim of

crime rose from 34.6% to 46.5% but was still the best result across the Division Targeted Community Activity Inspector Kevin Williams said: “I was pleased to see that the hard work by local officers and partner agencies, along with the support of local communities paid dividends in some key areas with significant reductions in the overall level of crime. I was particularly pleased that the number of domestic housebreakings reduced and that the detection rate also improved. In addition, the reduction in violent crime was welcomed. However, there were also spikes in crime figures, such as the increase in crimes of indecency, which highlight the fact that continual challenges are faced. We must now endeavour to build on the successes we have achieved and address the areas in which there remains room for improvement, including areas such as our service delivery. (* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents

19


POLICING DUNDEE: Crime in more detail PERIOD APRIL to MARCH CRIME CLASSIFICATION

2010/2011 Made known

2011/2012

DETECTIONS number %

Made known

DETECTIONS number %

INC./DEC. number %

GROUP 1 Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (Incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Pos of Firearm with intent to endanger life Abduction Threats Others

0 25 0 123 104 25 4 13 5 2

0 24 0 97 64 23 4 13 5 0

96.0% 78.9% 61.5% 92.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 0.0%

2 35 0 115 77 30 6 4 3 4

2 33 0 93 50 32 4 3 3 4

100.0% 94.3% 80.9% 64.9% 106.7% 66.7% 75.0% 100.0% 100.0%

2 10 0 -8 -27 5 2 -9 -2 2

40.0% -6.5% -26.0% 20.0% 50.0% -69.2% -40.0% 100.0%

301

230

76.4%

276

224

81.2%

-25

-8.3%

28 4 59 22 23 62

12 4 35 15 16 60

42.9% 100.0% 59.3% 68.2% 69.6% 96.8%

43 0 84 31 22 50

27 0 39 26 10 42

62.8% 46.4% 83.9% 45.5% 84.0%

15 -4 25 9 -1 -12

53.6% -100.0% 42.4% 40.9% -4.3% -19.4%

198

142

71.7%

230

144

62.6%

32

16.2%

611 201 171 122 420 260 12 113 3731 162 34 21 293 65

155 63 64 38 73 107 12 73 2154 23 33 11 190 20

25.4% 31.3% 37.4% 31.1% 17.4% 41.2% 100.0% 64.6% 57.7% 14.2% 97.1% 52.4% 64.8% 30.8%

403 146 151 74 245 158 15 110 3170 146 28 5 221 48

131 23 36 20 61 69 15 87 1844 41 28 11 115 10

32.5% 15.8% 23.8% 27.0% 24.9% 43.7% 100.0% 79.1% 58.2% 28.1% 100.0% 220.0% 52.0% 20.8%

-208 -55 -20 -48 -175 -102 3 -3 -561 -16 -6 -16 -72 -17

-34.0% -27.4% -11.7% -39.3% -41.7% -39.2% 25.0% -2.7% -15.0% -9.9% -17.6% -76.2% -24.6% -26.2%

6216

3016

48.5%

4920

2491

50.6%

-1296

-20.8%

120 2998 105

24 850 72

20.0% 28.4% 68.6%

82 2020 82

15 576 49

18.3% 28.5% 59.8%

-38 -978 -23

-31.7% -32.6% -21.9%

GROUP 4 - TOTAL

3223

946

29.4%

2184

640

29.3%

-1039

-32.2%

SUB-TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 4

9938

4334

43.6%

7610

3499

46.0%

-2328

-23.4%

91 1 126 33 1 463 239 170 989 35 62

90 1 126 28 4 446 223 172 978 32 59

98.9% 100.0% 100.0% 84.8% 400.0% 96.3% 93.3% 101.2% 98.9% 91.4% 95.2%

56 5 128 71 3 423 175 174 1063 35 75

55 5 129 69 3 414 166 173 1068 38 69

98.2% 100.0% 100.8% 97.2% 100.0% 97.9% 94.9% 99.4% 100.5% 108.6% 92.0%

-35 4 2 38 2 -40 -64 4 74 0 13

-38.5% 400.0% 1.6% 115.2% 200.0% -8.6% -26.8% 2.4% 7.5% 0.0% 21.0%

2210

2159

97.7%

2208

2189

99.1%

-2

-0.1%

12148

6493

53.4%

9818

5688

57.9%

-2330

-19.2%

GROUP 1 - TOTAL

GROUP 2 Rape Assault with intent to rape Indecent assault Lewd & Libidinous practices Public Indecency Others GROUP 2 - TOTAL

GROUP 3 Housebreaking ~ domestic dwelling Housebreaking ~ domestic non-dwelling Housebreaking ~ commercial Theft, attempt theft from locked premises/property Theft, attempt theft from locked motor vehicle Theft, attempted theft of a motor vehicle Convicted thief in poss.of tools etc. w.i. to steal In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from motor vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others GROUP 3 - TOTAL

GROUP 4 Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others

GROUP 5 Public mischief & wasting police time Escape or rescue from police custody or prison Resisting arrest or obstructing police officer General attempts to pervert the course of justice Sex Offenders' register offences Bail - Fail to keep conditions Possession of offensive weapons Drugs - supply, with intent to supply etc Drugs - personal possession Drugs - manufacture etc Others GROUP 5 - TOTAL

TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 5

Please Note: This document is an end of month 'snap-shot' in time and the data may vary from later publications where updates have been taken into consideration.

20


KEY PERFORMANCE RESULTS: DIVISIONAL SCORECARD APRIL 2011 TO MARCH 2012 SECTION 2 Montrose and Brechin

SECTION 1 Forfar and Kirriemuir

POLICING ANGUS

SECTION 3 Arbroath

SECTION 4 Carnoustie

2010-11 Result

% / pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

3110

3700

-15.9%

918

1092

-15.9%

700

994

-29.6%

1136

1266

-10.3%

356

348

2.3%

- Detection rate

46.3%

52.1%

-5.8

40.8%

48.6%

-7.8

49.0%

56.5%

-7.5

51.7%

53.1%

-1.4

38.2%

46.8%

-8.6

96

104

-7.7%

24

28

-14.3%

15

27

-44.4%

44

35

25.7%

13

14

-7.1%

- Detection rate

90.6%

95.2%

-4.6

75.0%

89.3%

-14.3

0

97.7%

94.3%

3.4

84.6%

100.0%

-15.4

Indecency (G2)

120

123

-2.4%

28

33

-15.2%

23

39

-41.0%

53

31

71.0%

16

20

-20.0%

- Detection rate

65.8%

87.8%

-22

75.0%

63.6%

11.4

69.6%

82.1%

-12.5

64.2%

103.2%

-39

50.0%

115.0%

-65

Dishonesty (G3)

1721

2105

-18.2%

550

692

-20.5%

394

511

-22.9%

620

747

-17.0%

157

155

1.3%

- Detection rate

51.2%

55.3%

-4.1

44.5%

52.0%

-7.5

56.1%

57.5%

-1.4

59.7%

58.9%

0.8

28.7%

45.2%

-16.5

Mal Mischief, vandalism (G4)

1173

1368

-14.3%

316

339

-6.8%

268

417

-35.7%

419

453

-7.5%

170

159

6.9%

- Detection rate

33.6%

40.7%

-7.1

28.8%

36.9%

-8.1

34.0%

50.1%

-16.1

33.4%

36.9%

-3.5

42.4%

35.2%

7.2

11

10

10.0%

3

4

-25.0%

1

1

0.0%

5

5

0.0%

2

0

***

- Detection rate

81.8%

80.0%

1.8

66.7%

75.0%

-8.3

0

100.0%

80.0%

20

50.0%

-

#######

Vandalism

1111

1280

-13.2%

301

320

-5.9%

245

399

-38.6%

398

415

-4.1%

167

146

14.4%

- Detection rate

31.7%

39.1%

-7.4

26.6%

36.3%

-9.7

30.6%

49.1%

-18.5

31.9%

34.2%

-2.3

41.9%

31.5%

10.4

90

97

-7.2%

38

36

5.6%

23

27

-14.8%

22

30

-26.7%

7

4

75.0%

38.9%

47.4%

-8.5

39.5%

47.2%

-7.7

39.1%

48.1%

-9

40.9%

50.0%

-9.1

28.6%

25.0%

3.6

Violent Crime (G1)

100.0% 100.0%

21 Robbery

Domestic Housebreaking - Detection rate

100.0% 100.0%

Caution! Variation in results may appear extreme due to very small numbers of crimes involved. Cells with symbol *** mean that a valid percentage change could not be calculated.

POLICING ANGUS

2011-12 Result

Groups 1-4

CRIME


KEY PERFORMANCE RESULTS: DIVISIONAL SCORECARD - STANDARDS OF SERVICE - APRIL - MARCH 2012 SECTION 3 Arbroath

SECTION 4 Carnoustie

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

% / pp Change

Response Rate

2010-11 Result

22

First Contact % of respondents provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry Updating the Public % of customers who received an update on the progress of their enquiry Customer Experience Overall satisfaction rating of the service provided by Tayside Police

2011-12 Result

First Contact Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

2011-12 Target

Customer Satisfaction

SECTION 2 Montrose and Brechin

91.5%

91.7% 91.6%

0.1

92.1% 89.7%

2.4

91.9% 88.7%

3.2

93.3% 92.9%

0.4

88.7% 98.0%

-9.3

80.0%

83.1% 77.9%

5.2

90.6% 75.0%

15.6

88.6% 78.1%

10.5

76.3% 78.0%

-1.7

76.9% 83.3%

-6.4

65.0%

58.8% 58.6%

0.2

53.7% 56.9%

-3.2

52.0% 60.7%

-8.7

61.7% 58.2%

3.5

69.6% 59.5%

10.1

85.0%

82.9% 82.3%

0.6

77.0% 82.6%

-5.6

82.0% 79.8%

2.2

88.2% 81.8%

6.4

83.3% 88.2%

-4.9

335/1008 (33.2%)

79/256 (30.9%)

94/258 (36.4%)

95/348 (27.3%)

Caution should be exercised when interpreting the results at sectional level due to the small sub-sample sizes. First Contact - Improvement in satisfaction with service at first contact from 91.6% to 91.7%. - Improvement in identifying the person dealing with the enquiry from 77.9% to 83.1%. This result well exceeds the force target set at 80.0%. Updating the Public - Improvement in updating the public from 58.6% to 58.8%. Customer Experience - Improvement in overall customer experience from 82.3% to 82.9%.

67/146 (45.9%)

Policing Angus: Public Perception ~ April - March 2012

SECTION 1 Forfar and Kirriemuir

POLICING ANGUS


DIVISIONAL SCORECARD - PUBLIC PERCEPTION - APRIL - MARCH 2012 SECTION 2 Montrose and Brechin

SECTION 3 Arbroath

SECTION 4 Carnoustie

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

% / pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

Crime in neighbourhood % of residents who thought that the crime rate in their neighbourhood had remained the same or improved over the past year

71.1%

72.8%

-1.7

72.7%

68.6%

4.1

73.2%

80.4%

-7.2

63.1%

63.3%

-0.2

76.2%

84.9%

-8.7

Feelings of safety after dark % of residents who felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark

67.4%

63.8%

3.6

62.1%

72.2%

-10.1

67.6%

51.6%

16.0

57.1%

56.9%

0.2

79.6%

75.7%

3.9

Concerns at becoming a victim of crime % of residents concerned at becoming a victim of crime in their neighbourhood

33.2%

34.1%

-0.9

30.0%

27.4%

2.6

22.4%

33.8%

-11.4

51.9%

48.6%

3.3

27.2%

20.0%

7.2

Public Perception

23

Issues that cause most concern in neighbourhoods *Other includes: Litter, Dog Fouling, Fly tipping etc

Response Rate

Antisocial behaviour Dangerous/careless driving Drug dealing/drug abuse Other* Housebreaking Vandalism/graffiti Alcohol related crime Cause no concern: Assault Robbery Motor vehicle crime 316/1008 (31.3%)

Dangerous/careless driving Antisocial behaviour Drug dealing/drug abuse Vandalism/graffiti Other Housebreaking Alcohol related crime Cause no concern: Assault Robbery Motor vehicle crime

Dangerous/careless driving Antisocial behaviour Other Housebreaking Drug dealing/drug abuse Alcohol related crime Vandalism/graffiti Cause no concern: Assault Robbery Motor vehicle crime

Antisocial behaviour Drug dealing/drug abuse Dangerous/careless driving Alcohol related crime Vandalism/graffiti Housebreaking Other Cause no concern: Assault Robbery Motor vehicle crime

Antisocial behaviour Dangerous/careless driving Other Housebreaking Drug dealing/drug abuse Alcohol related crime Vandalism/graffiti Cause no concern: Assault Robbery Motor vehicle crime

68/238 (28.6%)

71/239 (29.7%)

82/273 (30.0%)

95/258 (36.8%)

Policing Angus: Standards of Service ~ April - March 2012

SECTION 1 Forfar and Kirriemuir

POLICING ANGUS


Policing Angus: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 ties are not safe places, particularly at night.

SECTION 1: FORFAR AND KIRRIEMUIR

Angus is one of the safest places in which to live, work and to visit in Scotland and our commitment to further augment our Community Policing style by having higher profile Community Officers will hopefully help to better underpin this message.

Main areas of public concern: dangerous/ careless driving and antisocial behaviour Crime • Reduction in groups 1 to 4 of 15.9% (174 crimes). • Reduction in crimes of dishonesty of 20.5% (142 crimes).

There were numerous challenges faced over the last twelve months, none more than the drive to prepare for the Single Police Service for Scotland whilst operating within reduced budgets as a result of the austerity measures. Despite these considerable challenges, the officers within our communities endeavoured to make a difference and I am pleased we again reduced crime and reduced the number of victims of crime within this policing area.

Detection rate • Detection rate for overall crime down by 7.8 percentage points, from 48.6% last year to 40.8% • Best detection rate in division for crimes of indecency at 75.0%, and 11.4 percentage point improvement on last year’s result of 63.6% • Detection rate for vandalism down by 9.7 percentage points from 36.3% last year to 26.6% this year.

I acknowledge that these results could not have been achieved without the shared commitment of our partners and the community themselves and serve to demonstrate that a cohesive and strong community working with the Police and partners can achieve improved safety and security.

Standards of Service • Improvement in the satisfaction with the service provided at first contact expressed by people living in Forfar and Kirriemuir - from 89.7% last year to 92.1%. This result achieved divisional target. • Deterioration in the overall satisfaction rate from 82.6% of respondents last year to 77.0% this year.

I also recognise that there is much still to be achieved and will along with my colleagues work towards addressing the concerns the community has for dangerous driving, anti-social behaviour, drug dealing, vandalisms and housebreaking. I have confidence in the Community Policing style and that these concerns will be alleviated in the coming year."

Public Perception* • Improvement in the proportion of people who thought crime in the neighbourhood had improved or remained the same, from 68.6% recorded last year to 72.7% • Drop in the proportion of people feeling safe after dark, from 72.2% to 62.1%

SECTION 2: MONTROSE AND BRECHIN

Targeted Community Activity

Main areas of public concern: dangerous/ careless driving and antisocial behaviour

Inspector Ally Robertson said: "The most rewarding aspect of the results was the very real reduction in the amount of victims of crime over the past year within our communities.

Crime • Biggest reduction in Division for groups 1 to 4 at 29.6% (294 crimes) • Violent crime down from 27 recorded last year to 15 • Best reduction in Division for crimes of dishonesty, 22.9% (117 crimes) • Best result in Division with respect to a reduction in vandalism of 38.6% (154 crimes).

Across the range of crimes there was a marked and significant reduction. This justifies our Community Policing style of being visible, approachable and active within our communities and responding quickly to the community concerns when they arise. However, this message needs to be better expressed as there still exists a misconception that our communi-

(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

24


Policing Angus: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 Detection rate • Fall in Groups 1 to 4 crime detection rate from 56.5% to 49.0% ( combined with a best in Division 44.4% reduction in recorded violent crime) • Dip in detection rate for vandalism, from 49.1% to 30.6%.

strike a balance and ensure that when crime figures are reduced then detection rates improve. Again, local officers worked hard at ensuring that their contact with the members of the public was of a high quality and that the service they provided was above the expected standard. It is, however, disappointing to see that the follow up contact the officers had with people reporting incidents did not reach the expected standards and this is an area that requires much more attention. The officers are carrying out their enquiries to a high standard but need to ensure that they provide updates to the public on the good work they are doing

Standards of Service • Residents living in Montrose and Brechin expressed satisfaction with the service provided at first contact at 91.9% ~ just above the divisional target of 91.5% • Above target result with respect to Montrose and Brechin residents satisfaction in being provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry - 88.6% against target of 80.0% • Decrease in the proportion of people who stated they had received an update on the progress of their enquiry, falling from 60.7% recorded last year to 52.0%, the lowest result recorded across the Division. (53.5% last month).

It was heartening to see that the good work and high profile presence being undertaken by the local officers was reflected in the public's increased perception of feeling safe after dark and their fear of becoming a victim of crime. Unfortunately the significant reduction in the crime rate was not recognised by many of the public. It is now incumbent on ourselves to ensure that these decreases are highlighted. All opportunities should be taken to advise the community of the reduction of crime within their area so as to enhance their feeling of safety and well being.

Public Perception* • Decline in the number of people who thought that the crime rate in their neighbourhood had remained the same or improved over the past year from 80.4% last year to 73.2% • Increase in the percentage of people feeling safe after dark, from 51.6% to 67.6% • The best result in the Division with respect to the proportion of people concerned about becoming a victim of crime, reducing from 33.8% to 22.4%.

The future challenge for this section is continue to engage with the current policing style, to continue to improve on the current successes and to work hard at reversing our identified failings.”

Targeted Community Activity

SECTION 3: ARBROATH Inspector Mark McInally said: “The impressive results in terms of reductions in the number of crimes committed were due to our local officers completely embracing our policing style which allowed them to be out and highly visible within the community. They were very proactive and engaged with the community, in particular identifying groups and individuals who may have been involved in the above type of activity. The officers regular presence and engagement undoubtedly acted as a deterrent, on the one hand, while providing reassurance to the main community at the same time.

Main areas of public concern: drug dealing/drug abuse and antisocial behaviour Crime • 25.7% increase in violent crime, from 35 recorded last year to 44 this year. Highest percentage increase across division. • Reduction in crimes of dishonesty of 17.0% (127 crimes). Detection rate • Best detection rate across the Division for Groups 1-4 at 51.7%. • Best detection rate across the Division for crimes of dishonesty at 59.7%.

It is always disappointing to see detection rates falling and officers will need to ensure that all areas of their enquiries into crimes are thoroughly investigated. However, having said that, the figures should not be viewed alone and should be read in conjunction with the excellent reductions in the number of crimes committed. The challenge for the future is to

Standards of Service • Best result across the Division (93.3%) with respect to people living in Arbroath expressing satisfaction with the service provided at first contact

(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

25


Policing Angus: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 • Improvement in the percentage of customers who

tact and Overall Customer Experience. This latter category was particularly important, as it was a reflection of how happy the general public was regarding our service delivery, and what we were trying to achieve.

received an update on the progress of their enquiry from 58.2% last year to 61.7% • Best result in Division for overall satisfaction with the service provided by the police, rising from 81.8% recorded last year to 88.2% against a target of 85%

The public perception results were interesting in that they did not reflect the positive outcomes we achieved in reducing most crime types in the area during the year. It was apparent that the local community was not aware of the reducing crime trends and the efforts being put in place to protect the public and their property. In order to address this, a high profile media campaign will be undertaken with the hope of reassuring the public and alerting them to the successes achieved this year.”

Public Perception* • Increased concern about becoming a victim of crime, rising from 48.6% recorded last year to 51.9%, with drug dealing and antisocial behaviour being the main concerns. Targeted Community Activity Inspector Adrian Robertson said: “The reduction in Group 1-4 crime of 10.3% was pleasing, as it supported our commitment to crime prevention and other preventative, proactive work undertaken across the Section during the past year. It was pleasing to note that we also reduced crimes of dishonesty, housebreaking and vandalism.

SECTION 4: CARNOUSTIE Main areas of public concern: dangerous/ careless driving and antisocial behaviour

The drop in detection rates is partially attributable to the challenges presented by the outcomes of the Cadder Enquiry (In the past year, the procedures in relation to how persons suspected of a crime are interviewed by the police have changed dramatically. As a result of these procedural changes, the amount of evidence that has been acquired during police interviews has reduced significantly. This has undoubtedly had an impact on the police's ability to acquire crucial information from suspects, and the number of crimes detected by police has dropped as a result).

Crime • Increase in vandalism of 14.4% (21 crimes).

The increases in violent crime and crimes of indecency were concerning, and we are looking at means of addressing this in the year ahead. Many of the violent crimes were linked to alcohol misuse at local pubs and clubs, and a determined and highly visible approach to policing these premises has been used during the past 2 months and will continue next year. Crimes of indecency were also linked to night time alcohol consumption, and it is hoped our approach aimed at reducing alcohol misuse and educating younger people in this respect will assist in reducing these types of crimes in the year ahead.

Standards of Service • Best result in Division for customers who received an update on their enquiry, from 59.5% last year to 69.6%, and exceeded the target of 65%

Detection rate • Fall in detection rate for Groups 1-4, from 46.8% to 38.2% • Fall in detection rate for crimes of dishonesty from 45.2% to 28.7% • Best detection rate across Division for vandalism at 41.9%, an improvement of 10.4 percentage points over last year.

Public Perception* • Best result across Division for people who thought crime in the neighbourhood had decreased or remained the same despite the fall from 84.9% last year to 76.2% this year. • Best result across Division for proportion of people feeling safe after dark, 79.6%. • Concern about becoming a victim of crime rose from 20% recorded last year to 27.2%.

Our customer satisfaction results showed improvements in 3 out of the 4 areas, and it was very rewarding that we exceeded our targets for First Con-

(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

26


Policing Angus: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 Targeted Community Activity

In addition, the effective deployment of the Community Impact Team provides sections with support to deal with crime that is affecting their area. The Team is highly versatile and available for deployment at times when they can have the greatest impact whether in uniform or covert.

Inspector Fiona Jarrett says: “Over the last year Section 4 performed well. There was a decrease in violent crime and indecencies and a minimal increase in other crimes, with the exception of domestic housebreaking which increased by 75% ~ but this only involved 3 extra crimes.

Community Officers in Eastern Division have a range of abilities that assist their colleagues in terms of crime reduction by carrying out crime prevention reviews and making referrals to partners such as Safe as Houses‘ (Angus Care and Repair). Through community engagement they raise awareness of local crime trends and provide advice and assistance to members of the public and private and retail premises.

Detection rates in housebreaking improved and we had the best detection rate for vandalism within the Division. There was a slight decrease in detection rates in other crimes and this will be addressed in the coming year. The Section improved its contact with the public and had the best result in the Division for updating complainers on the progress of their enquiries. Even though this is the case, the overall satisfaction with the service provided decreased by 5 percentage points and this will have to be improved upon.

With respect to public feedback, we seek to ensure that our communities receive the highest standard of service they deserve as well as to ensure that they are kept fully updated. The ‘Repeat Caller’ initiative identifies individuals in Angus who have contacted the police on a number of occasions to report issues that cause them upset or concern. The initiative looks to ensure that these people receive the highest standard of service from local officers in terms of dealing with their issues appropriately or indeed signposting them to the correct agency.

The Section also delivered the best result across the Division for people feeling safe in their neighbourhoods after dark and for people who thought crime in the neighbourhood had decreased or remained the same. We will aim to keep this public confidence up and strive to improve wherever possible. We have increased the amount of Diversionary projects within the area and this decreased the number of youths causing annoyance calls which made people feel safer in their homes and gave officers the opportunity to interact in a positive manner with the local youths.”

The policing style in the division has greatly enhanced the local standards of service to our communities. Heightened police visibility and true engagement with the public bodes well for the force and will undoubtedly achieve our objectives in this area as well as reductions in crime and increased public confidence.

COMMUNITY SAFETY I have been delighted to see that public perception of the force has improved in recent months. The Community Safety Unit will continue to ensure that through use of our Public Consultation form local communities are updated with local trends and positive messages. Community Officers in Eastern Division will continue to play their part in this important area by engaging with local communities and key individuals to identify local areas of concern and to impact positively thereafter so as to ensure that local perception is confident in the services we provide.”

Targeted Community Activity Inspector Kenny Hart said: “In general terms, lower levels of crime were recorded in Angus and, in particular, in crimes of dishonesty. Although encouraged by this we seek to further support front line officers in areas of crime prevention and reduction, through advice or initiatives, as well as by direct intervention and assistance with issues such as antisocial behaviour and related crime. The Community Safety Unit will continue to examine trends and intelligence wholly to support operational staff but moreover to ensure that our communities are updated so as to impact positively on the public perception of crime.

(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

27


Policing Angus: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 DIVISIONAL SUPPORT

place.

Targeted Community Activity

Officers throughout Angus continued to maximise the use of Anti-Social behaviour (ASBO) legislation to deal with offenders who used their vehicles in an appropriate and anti-social manner. This resulted in numerous warnings and seizures of vehicles thus reducing the anti-social use of our roads and had a positive impact upon the communities of Angus.

Inspector Peter McLennan said: “Crime linked with planned events in Angus remained low. As the Summer events season approaches we will continue to work with our partner agencies and event organisers to ensure we help in facilitating a safe and crime-free environment for everyone attending each event.

Angus Roads Policing Division will continue with the high level of commitment in the coming months participating in National campaigns relating to speeding and inappropriate driving and carrying out local initiatives to make our roads a safer place.”

Events provide an excellent opportunity to engage with our communities and visitors to Angus. Officers take every opportunity to facilitate the enjoyment of the public at the events while minimising disruption to those living in or travelling through the area. We adopt a high profile policing style encouraging officers to be as approachable as possible. The results of this are reflected by the positive way in which officers are received by the public. Community Officers are utilised whenever possible at events within their area so the public get to know their local officers and the officers are in a position to know their community.”

ROADS POLICING UNIT Targeted Community Activity Sergeant Craig McBean said: “The Roads Policing Unit (RPU) continued to impact on road safety/casualty reduction by ensuring that mobile phone, seat belt and speeding offences were given a high priority. The Division actively participated in all National Initiatives/Days of Action as well as conducting high profile Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) activity involving not only RPU officers but also Divisional officers and outside agencies. They continued to work with colleagues from VOSA to check on large goods vehicles ensuring that the condition of vehicles are suitable and also that drivers comply with drivers hours regulations. On 28 March Operation Mermaid was run within Angus. A multi-agency operation that provided a very high profile event to target any road users who were not complying with the law. A considerable amount of effort ensured that the day had a positive impact on road safety and made the roads in Angus a safer (* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

28


POLICING ANGUS: Crime in more detail PERIOD APRIL to MARCH CRIME CLASSIFICATION

2010/2011 Made known

2011/2012

DETECTIONS number %

Made known

DETECTIONS number %

INC./DEC. number %

GROUP 1 Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (Incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Pos of Firearm with intent to endanger life Abduction Threats Others

0 8 0 61 10 19 2 2 2 0

0 8 0 58 8 20 2 2 1 0

100.0% 95.1% 80.0% 105.3% 100.0% 100.0% 50.0% -

3 11 0 45 11 18 0 3 5 0

3 11 0 40 9 18 0 3 3 0

100.0% 100.0% 88.9% 81.8% 100.0% 100.0% 60.0% -

3 3 0 -16 1 -1 -2 1 3 0

37.5% -26.2% 10.0% -5.3% -100.0% 50.0% 150.0% -

104

99

95.2%

96

87

90.6%

-8

-7.7%

13 1 60 33 5 11

6 2 49 39 4 8

46.2% 200.0% 81.7% 118.2% 80.0% 72.7%

19 1 78 9 9 4

12 0 52 6 6 3

63.2% 0.0% 66.7% 66.7% 66.7% 75.0%

6 0 18 -24 4 -7

46.2% 0.0% 30.0% -72.7% 80.0% -63.6%

123

108

87.8%

120

79

65.8%

-3

-2.4%

97 70 100 70 31 79 1 42 1394 70 6 11 122 12

46 25 27 20 13 46 1 28 813 25 6 8 92 14

47.4% 35.7% 27.0% 28.6% 41.9% 58.2% 100.0% 66.7% 58.3% 35.7% 100.0% 72.7% 75.4% 116.7%

90 45 84 33 37 54 1 30 1175 59 3 5 95 10

35 8 29 11 4 34 1 25 661 14 3 3 48 5

38.9% 17.8% 34.5% 33.3% 10.8% 63.0% 100.0% 83.3% 56.3% 23.7% 100.0% 60.0% 50.5% 50.0%

-7 -25 -16 -37 6 -25 0 -12 -219 -11 -3 -6 -27 -2

-7.2% -35.7% -16.0% -52.9% 19.4% -31.6% 0.0% -28.6% -15.7% -15.7% -50.0% -54.5% -22.1% -16.7%

2105

1164

55.3%

1721

881

51.2%

-384

-18.2%

42 1280 46

19 500 38

45.2% 39.1% 82.6%

30 1111 32

13 352 29

43.3% 31.7% 90.6%

-12 -169 -14

-28.6% -13.2% -30.4%

GROUP 4 - TOTAL

1368

557

40.7%

1173

394

33.6%

-195

-14.3%

SUB-TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 4

3700

1928

52.1%

3110

1441

46.3%

-590

-15.9%

39 6 86 21 3 207 69 99 371 6 19

38 6 86 20 3 205 68 98 370 6 19

97.4% 100.0% 100.0% 95.2% 100.0% 99.0% 98.6% 99.0% 99.7% 100.0% 100.0%

19 2 93 14 1 190 47 41 306 14 25

20 2 93 13 1 188 45 42 308 14 24

105.3% 100.0% 100.0% 92.9% 100.0% 98.9% 95.7% 102.4% 100.7% 100.0% 96.0%

-20 -4 7 -7 -2 -17 -22 -58 -65 8 6

-51.3% -66.7% 8.1% -33.3% -66.7% -8.2% -31.9% -58.6% -17.5% 133.3% 31.6%

926

919

99.2%

752

750

99.7%

-174

-18.8%

4626

2847

61.5%

3862

2191

56.7%

-764

-16.5%

GROUP 1 - TOTAL

GROUP 2 Rape Assault with intent to rape Indecent assault Lewd & Libidinous practices Public Indecency Others GROUP 2 - TOTAL

GROUP 3 Housebreaking ~ domestic dwelling Housebreaking ~ domestic non-dwelling Housebreaking ~ commercial Theft, attempt theft from locked premises/property Theft, attempt theft from locked motor vehicle Theft, attempted theft of a motor vehicle Convicted thief in poss.of tools etc. w.i. to steal In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from motor vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others GROUP 3 - TOTAL

GROUP 4 Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others

GROUP 5 Public mischief & wasting police time Escape or rescue from police custody or prison Resisting arrest or obstructing police officer General attempts to pervert the course of justice Sex Offenders' register offences Bail - Fail to keep conditions Possession of offensive weapons Drugs - supply, with intent to supply etc Drugs - personal possession Drugs - manufacture etc Others GROUP 5 - TOTAL

TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 5

Please Note: This document is an end of month 'snap-shot' in time and the data may vary from later publications where updates have been taken into consideration.

29


KEY PERFORMANCE RESULTS: DIVISIONAL SCORECARD APRIL 2011 TO MARCH 2012 SECTION 3 Perth City

POLICING PERTH & KINROSS

SECTION 5 East Perthshire

SECTION 6 South Perthshire

SECTION 7 North and West Perthshire

2010-11 Result

% / pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

4028

4358

-7.6%

2322

2419

-4.0%

660

731

-9.7%

790

830

-4.8%

256

378

-32.3%

- Detection rate

48.3%

48.0%

0.3

52.7%

53.6%

-0.9

43.6%

48.3%

-4.7

44.4%

35.9%

8.5

32.0%

38.9%

-6.9

140

162

-13.6%

98

107

-8.4%

15

28

-46.4%

19

26

-26.9%

8

1

700.0%

- Detection rate

90.0%

96.9%

-6.9

90.8%

94.4%

-3.6

93.3%

107.1%

-13.8

84.2%

96.2%

-12

87.7%

100.0%

-12.3

Indecency (G2)

101

102

-1.0%

48

48

0.0%

27

28

-3.6%

21

14

50.0%

5

12

-58.3%

- Detection rate

67.3%

75.5%

-8.2

62.5%

77.1%

-14.6

77.8%

64.3%

13.5

61.9%

85.7%

-23.8

80.0%

83.3%

-3.3

Dishonesty (G3)

2727

2873

-5.1%

1570

1630

-3.7%

412

427

-3.5%

562

565

-0.5%

183

251

-27.1%

- Detection rate

50.8%

49.4%

1.4

57.6%

58.2%

-0.6

42.2%

45.2%

-3

45.2%

30.8%

14.4

29.0%

41.0%

-12

Mal Mischief, vandalism (G4)

1060

1221

-13.2%

606

634

-4.4%

206

248

-16.9%

188

225

-16.4%

60

114

-47.4%

- Detection rate

34.3%

36.1%

-1.8

32.8%

33.0%

-0.2

38.3%

45.2%

-6.9

36.2%

38.7%

-2.5

30.0%

28.9%

1.1

36

43

-16.3%

32

36

-11.1%

0

1

***

3

5

-40.0%

1

1

0.0%

80.6%

90.7%

-10.1

81.3%

91.7%

-10.4

0.0%

100.0%

-100

66.7%

80.0%

-13.3

961

1148

-16.3%

553

596

-7.2%

193

234

-17.5%

161

210

-23.3%

54

108

-50.0%

32.8%

34.1%

-1.3

31.6%

30.4%

1.2

38.3%

43.2%

-4.9

31.1%

37.6%

-6.5

29.6%

28.7%

0.9

169

162

4.3%

89

94

-5.3%

28

24

16.7%

37

31

19.4%

15

13

15.4%

33.1%

35.2%

-2.1

34.8%

44.7%

-9.9

42.9%

29.2%

14

32.4%

25.8%

6.6

6.7%

0.0%

6.7

Violent Crime (G1)

30 Robbery - Detection rate Vandalism - Detection rate Domestic Housebreaking - Detection rate

Caution! Variation in results may appear extreme due to very small numbers of crimes involved. Cells with symbol *** mean that a valid percentage change could not be calculated.

100.0% 100.0%

0

POLICING PERTH & KINROSS

2011-12 Result

Groups 1-4

CRIME


KEY PERFORMANCE RESULTS: DIVISIONAL SCORECARD - STANDARDS OF SERVICE - APRIL - MARCH 2012 SECTION 6 South Perthshire

SECTION 7 North & West Perthshire

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

%/pp Change

2010-11 Result

2011-12 Result

Response Rate

% / pp Change

31

First Contact % of respondents provided with 80.0% the name of the person dealing with their enquiry Updating the Public % of customers who received 65.0% an update on the progress of their enquiry Customer Experience Overall satisfaction rating of the 85.0% service provided by Tayside Police

2010-11 Result

91.5%

2011-12 Result

First Contact Overall satisfaction rating for service provided at first contact

2011-12 Target

Customer Satisfaction

SECTION 5 East Perthshire

96.2% 91.7%

4.5

96.1% 88.1%

8.0

95.9% 97.2%

-1.3

95.3% 91.8%

3.5

100.0% 97.0%

87.2% 83.8%

3.4

88.4% 79.8%

8.6

90.5% 88.6%

1.9

85.2% 83.3%

1.9

80.6%

94.7%

-14.1

64.2% 64.1%

0.1

61.4% 63.7%

-2.3

70.5% 68.3%

2.2

63.9% 66.3%

-2.4

63.9%

46.2%

17.7

84.8% 81.4%

3.4

85.8% 78.0%

7.8

84.8% 83.2%

1.6

84.0% 84.7%

-0.7

82.6%

87.5%

-4.9

536/1296 (41.3%)

219/605 (36.2%)

104/274 (38.0%)

165/325 (50.8%)

3.0

48/92 (52.2%)

Caution should be exercised when interpreting the results at sectional level due to the small sub-sample sizes. First Contact - Improvement in satisfaction with service at first contact from 91.7% to 96.2%, the highest result across the force. This result well exceeds the force target set at 91.5%. - Improvement in identifying the person dealing with the enquiry from 83.8% to 87.2%, the highest result across the force. This result again well exceeds the force target set at 80.0%. Updating the Public - Improvement in updating the public from 64.1% to 64.2%, the highest result across the force. Customer Experience - Improvement in overall customer experience from 81.4% to 84.8%, the highest result across the force.

Policing Perth & Kinross: Standards of Service ~ April - March

SECTION 3 Perth City

POLICING PERTH & KINROSS


DIVISIONAL SCORECARD - PUBLIC PERCEPTION - APRIL - MARCH 2012 SECTION 5 East Perthshire

SECTION 6 South Perthshire

SECTION 7 North & West Perthshire

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

% / pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

2011-12 Result

2010-11 Result

%/pp Change

Crime in neighbourhood % of residents who thought that the crime rate in their neighbourhood had remained the same or improved over the past year

69.8%

76.9%

-7.1

68.6%

66.7%

1.9

78.4%

82.5%

-4.1

64.3%

79.7%

-15.4

72.7%

80.7%

-8.0

Feelings of safety after dark % of residents who felt safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark

69.2%

68.1%

1.1

56.8%

45.2%

11.6

72.9%

73.7%

-0.8

75.0%

76.1%

-1.1

74.4%

78.8%

-4.4

Concerns at becoming a victim of crime % of residents concerned at becoming a victim of crime in their neighbourhood

29.7%

28.3%

1.4

33.0%

44.3%

-11.3

35.5%

22.3%

13.2

27.7%

24.9%

2.8

12.2%

14.7%

-2.5

Public Perception

32

Issues that cause most concern in neighbourhoods *Other includes: Litter, Dog Fouling, Fly tipping etc

Response Rate

Antisocial behaviour Dangerous/careless driving Housebreaking Other* Drug dealing/drug abuse Alcohol related crime Vandalism/graffiti Motor vehicle crime Assault Cause no concern: Robbery 432/1296 (33.3%)

Antisocial behaviour Drug dealing/drug abuse Other Alcohol related crime Housebreaking Dangerous/careless driving Vandalism/graffiti Motor vehicle crime Assault Cause no concern: Robbery

Dangerous/careless driving Antisocial behaviour Housebreaking Alcohol related crime Other Vandalism/graffiti Drug dealing/drug abuse Assault Cause no concern: Robbery Motor vehicle crime

Dangerous/careless driving Antisocial behaviour Housebreaking Vandalism/graffiti Other Alcohol related crime Drug dealing/drug abuse Motor vehicle crime Cause no concern: Assault Robbery

Antisocial behaviour Other Dangerous/careless driving Vandalism/graffiti Housebreaking Drug dealing/drug abuse Alcohol related crime Cause no concern: Assault Robbery Motor vehicle crime

119/396 (30.1%)

110/333 (33.0%)

161/435 (37.0%)

42/132 (31.8%)

Policing Perth & Kinross: Public Perception ~ April - March 2012

SECTION 3 Perth City

POLICING PERTH & KINROSS


Policing Perth & Kinross: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 Alcohol patrols played a large part in this and clearly the hard work put in by our officers and Special Constable volunteers every weekend in partnership with Community Wardens and our own staff has paid, and will continue to pay, dividends."

SECTION 3: PERTH CITY Main areas of public concern: antisocial behaviour and drug dealing/drug abuse Crime • Reduction of 11.1% in robbery (4 crimes) • Reduction of 5.3% for domestic HB, only section to evidence a reduction.

SECTION 5: EAST PERTHSHIRE Main areas of public concern: dangerous/ careless driving and antisocial behaviour

Detection rate • Best detection rate across the Division for groups 1-4 at 52.7% • Best detection rate across the division for crimes of dishonesty at 57.6%

Crime • Reduction in violent crime, 28 recorded last year, down to 15, mainly attributable to a reduction in serious assault (10 fewer) • No robberies recorded since the beginning of the year • Vandalism down by 17.5% (41 crimes).

Standards of Service • High rating from residents in Perth City for service provided at first contact (as with all other sections) - 96.1% against a target of 91.5% • Lowest result for updating the public on the progress of their enquiry - 61.4% • Substantial improvement in overall customer satisfaction from 78.0% to 85.8% - best result in division.

Detection rate Best detection rate across the Division for violent crime at 93.3% • Best detection rate across the Division for vandalism at 38.3% • Best detection rate across the Division for domestic housebreaking at 42.9%. •

Public Perception* • An 11.6 percentage point improvement in people feeling safe after dark, from 45.2% to 56.8% • Marked reduction in people concerned about becoming a victim of crime, from 44.3% to 33.0%.

Standards of Service • Above divisional target for all areas with the exception of overall satisfaction which, at 84.8%, was only 0.2 percentage points away from target • Best result in Division for keeping customers updated on the progress of their enquiries (70.5%).

Targeted Community Activity Inspector Martin said: "96.1% of people asked were satisfied with their first contact with the City's officers ~ an improvement of over 8 percentage points on the result at the end of March 2011. There was also a huge increase in the number of people who felt safe walking alone after dark and a big drop -11 percentage points- in the number of people who were concerned about becoming a victim of crime.

Public Perception* • Best result in the Division for the proportion of people who thought the crime rate in their neighbourhood had remained the same or improved over the past year (78.4%) • A substantial increase in the proportion of people who were concerned about becoming a victim of crime, from 22.3% to 35.5%.

In addition the section evidenced a 5.3% drop in the number of domestic housebreakings, a detection rate for violent crime of over 90% and the 57.6% detection rate for dishonesty was the best in division. Our high visibility patrols ensured that we remained present and visible in the community, reassuring and keeping in touch with our residents. Our Youth (* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

33


Policing Perth & Kinross: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 tomer focus, for being vigilant in providing victims of crime with a named point of contact and with regular updates, all of which were reflected in the results.

SECTION 6: SOUTH PERTHSHIRE Main areas of public concern: dangerous/ careless driving and antisocial behaviour

There was a large amount of high profile media surrounding the murder in Forteviot and a series of Wilful Fire Raisings in Kinross. The necessary media interest was crucial to both enquiries and both were subsequently detected. These incidents will, no doubt, have a negative impact on public perceptions of crime in South Section and it will be interesting to note any significant differences in results in the coming months with both incidents receiving positive press coverage after detection.”

Crime • Reduction of 23.3% in vandalism (49 crimes) • Increase in domestic housebreaking, up by 19.4% from 31 recorded last year to 37 for the current year. At the end of last month the differential was 34.6%. Detection rate • Improvement in detection rate for overall crime, up from 35.9% to 44.4% • Crimes of dishonesty detection rate of 45.2%, a 14.4 percentage point improvement over the previous year.

SECTION 7: PERTHSHIRE

NORTH

AND

WEST

Main areas of public concern: antisocial behaviour and dangerous/careless driving

Standards of Service • High rating from residents in South Perthshire for service provided at first contact (as with all other sections) - 95.3% against a target of 91.5% • 85.2% of respondents stated that they were provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry against a target of 80.0%.

Crime • Best result across the Division for reduction in groups 1 to 4 - 32.3% (122 crimes) • Best result across the Division for reduction in crimes of dishonesty - 27.1% (68 crimes) • Best result across the Division for reduction in vandalism - 50.0% (54 crimes).

Public Perception* • Drop in the proportion of people who thought crime in the neighbourhood had decreased or remained the same, from 79.7% recorded last year to 64.3%. • Best result across the Division with respect to people feeling safe after dark, 75.0%.

Detection rate • Best result across the Division for reduction in crimes of dishonesty - 27.1% (68 crimes) • Best detection rate across the Division for crimes of indecency 80.0%. Standards of Service • 100% rating from residents in North & West Perthshire for service provided at first contact best result across the Division • 63.9% of customers received an updated on the progress of their enquiry this year compared to only 46.2% last year.

Targeted Community Activity Inspector Iain Ward says: “South Section officers worked hard to support diversionary activities throughout the year. Supervisors focussed on crime management and early intervention to exploit opportunities to detect and reduce crime and this resulted in a large reduction of vandalisms and overall detection rates improving by over eight percentage points. There was a significant increase in the number of domestic housebreaking which was a division wide problem.

Public Perception* • Best result across the Division with just 12.2% of the population concerned about becoming a victim of crime - a further improvement on the 14.7% recorded at the same time last year.

We continued to perform well in our Standard of Service delivery especially at the first point of contact. Officers should be commended on their cus(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

34


Policing Perth & Kinross: Community Summaries ~ April - March 2012 Targeted Community Activity Inspector Maggie Pettigrew says: “The 2011-12 results are testament to the hard work of officers and staff in the section not only in recent months but throughout the whole year. High profile patrols had a positive effect with crimes of vandalism being reduced by 50% and we will continue to commit resources to visible patrols. Although staff were committed to a major missing person enquiry they remained focus on standards of service, with customers giving 100% satisfaction with the service they received at first point of contact. However, we will not become complacent; although we have increased the percentage of customers updated on the progress of their enquiry by 17.7% to 63.9% in the past year we recognise that this can still be improved. The strong community spirit in the area is reflected in the positive way that the public respond to officers. People perceived this to be a safe place in which to live with just 12.2% of residents being concerned about becoming a victim of crime.

COMMUNITY SAFETY DEPARTMENT Inspector Ian Scott said: “Once again, Western Division’s performance exceeded expectations with an almost 8% drop in overall crime numbers combined with an improvement in the detection rate. In individual crime types there were improvements almost across the board. Suffice to say that, despite the financial and staffing constraints, we still performed beyond expectations. Again, it is the dedication of officers on the beat, in specialist departments and police staff who all contributed to this success. Constant supervision and monitoring of crimes continues to ensure that no stone is left unturned. The people and communities of Perthshire deserve and receive the quality of policing expected.”

(* Results should be viewed in conjunction with sample size. Changes in results may appear inflated due to the small number of respondents involved.)

35


POLICING PERTH & KINROSS: Crime in more detail PERIOD APRIL to MARCH CRIME CLASSIFICATION

2010/2011 Made known

2011/2012

DETECTIONS number %

Made known

DETECTIONS number %

INC./DEC. number %

GROUP 1 Murder Attempted Murder Culpable Homicide Serious Assault Robbery (Incl attempts) Child Cruelty/Neglect Pos of Firearm with intent to endanger life Abduction Threats Others

0 23 0 64 43 16 1 7 7 1

0 23 0 63 39 17 1 6 7 1

100.0% 98.4% 90.7% 106.3% 100.0% 85.7% 100.0% 100.0%

5 29 0 38 36 24 0 1 7 0

4 29 0 34 29 24 0 1 5 0

80.0% 100.0% 89.5% 80.6% 100.0% 100.0% 71.4% -

5 6 26.1% 0 -26 -40.6% -7 -16.3% 8 50.0% -1 -100.0% -6 -85.7% 0 0.0% -1 -100.0%

162

157

96.9%

140

126

90.0%

-22

-13.6%

15 4 41 26 9 7

11 1 32 20 6 7

73.3% 25.0% 78.0% 76.9% 66.7% 100.0%

19 1 51 6 16 8

14 1 37 3 7 6

73.7% 100.0% 72.5% 50.0% 43.8% 75.0%

4 -3 10 -20 7 1

26.7% -75.0% 24.4% -76.9% 77.8% 14.3%

102

77

75.5%

101

68

67.3%

-1

-1.0%

162 64 213 87 136 119 3 82 1689 101 7 10 174 26

57 10 80 33 34 70 3 66 905 18 7 10 104 22

35.2% 15.6% 37.6% 37.9% 25.0% 58.8% 100.0% 80.5% 53.6% 17.8% 100.0% 100.0% 59.8% 84.6%

169 68 116 72 109 83 2 81 1638 115 17 8 213 36

56 17 56 24 44 47 2 60 868 49 16 7 130 10

33.1% 25.0% 48.3% 33.3% 40.4% 56.6% 100.0% 74.1% 53.0% 42.6% 94.1% 87.5% 61.0% 27.8%

7 4 -97 -15 -27 -36 -1 -1 -51 14 10 -2 39 10

4.3% 6.3% -45.5% -17.2% -19.9% -30.3% -33.3% -1.2% -3.0% 13.9% 142.9% -20.0% 22.4% 38.5%

2873

1419

49.4%

2727

1386

50.8%

-146

-5.1%

33 1148 40

15 392 34

45.5% 34.1% 85.0%

67 961 32

26 315 23

38.8% 32.8% 71.9%

34 -187 -8

103.0% -16.3% -20.0%

GROUP 4 - TOTAL

1221

441

36.1%

1060

364

34.3%

-161

-13.2%

SUB-TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 4

4358

2094

48.0%

4028

1944

48.3%

-330

-7.6%

49 3 117 19 1 219 87 122 614 11 11

50 3 116 20 1 219 82 128 620 11 11

102.0% 100.0% 99.1% 105.3% 100.0% 100.0% 94.3% 104.9% 101.0% 100.0% 100.0%

27 5 79 35 0 195 76 65 772 17 17

26 5 80 34 0 195 74 64 771 18 14

96.3% 100.0% 101.3% 97.1% 100.0% 97.4% 98.5% 99.9% 105.9% 82.4%

GROUP 1 - TOTAL

GROUP 2 Rape Assault with intent to ravish Indecent assault Lewd & Libidinous practices Public Indecency Others GROUP 2 - TOTAL

GROUP 3 Housebreaking ~ domestic dwelling Housebreaking ~ domestic non-dwelling Housebreaking ~ commercial Theft, attempt theft from locked premises/property Theft, attempt theft from locked motor vehicle Theft, attempted theft of a motor vehicle Convicted thief in poss.of tools etc. w.i. to steal In building with intent to steal Theft Theft from motor vehicle Reset Embezzlement Fraud Others GROUP 3 - TOTAL

GROUP 4 Fireraising Malicious Damage/Vandalism Others

GROUP 5 Public mischief & wasting police time Escape or rescue from police custody or prison Resisting arrest or obstructing police officer General attempts to pervert the course of justice Sex Offenders' register offences Bail - Fail to keep conditions Possession of offensive weapons Drugs - supply, with intent to supply etc Drugs - personal possession Drugs - manufacture etc Others

-22 -44.9% 2 66.7% -38 -32.5% 16 84.2% -1 -100.0% -24 -11.0% -11 -12.6% -57 -46.7% 158 25.7% 6 54.5% 6 54.5%

GROUP 5 - TOTAL

1253

1261 100.6%

1288

1281

99.5%

35

2.8%

TOTAL OF GROUPS 1 TO 5

5611

3355

5316

3225

60.7%

-295

-5.3%

36

59.8%


DELIVERING LOCAL POLICING

B

uilding public confidence and trust is how Tayside Police aims to improve satisfaction with the quality of service provided to its communities. This is achieved through the effective delivery of policing services which meet the needs of local communities. It is about ease of access to services, giving the public a voice in order to influence how the force responds to issues that matter to them, delivering appropriate and robust interventions, working with partners, providing feedback to the public and keeping them informed of progress and improvement. The force uses performance indicators to gather information about performance, quality of service and public perception. These are illustrated below. Those marked with a tick also contribute to the following:  The Scottish Policing Performance Framework  ‘Scotland Performs’ - the National Government Framework (Single Outcome Agreements)  The Force Control Strategy

INDICATORS 1.

PUBLIC PROTECTION





2.

SERIOUS AND ORGANISED CRIME





3.

COUNTER TERRORISM





4.

FIREARMS

5.

ANTISOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

6.

CRIME

7.

ROAD POLICING/SAFETY

8.

SERVICE RESPONSE

   

37

   

   


PUBLIC PROTECTION Tayside Police uses its crime recording system to manage information gathered by operational police officers in respect of all facets of the Public Protection portfolio, including Domestic Abuse, Child Protection and Vulnerable Adult Protection.

In addition to working with our partners, when a crime has also been committed, Tayside Police will carry out a thorough investigation and, where there is a sufficiency of evidence, the perpetrator will be reported to the Procurator Fiscal.

Where substantive crimes are being investigated, reports will have relevant markers added to them which allows officers and staff from support functions and specialist teams to search and identify relevant records.

The graph below illustrates that during the first four months of 2011/12 the number of Domestic Abuse incidents recorded each month was lower than the number recorded at the same time last year. However this pattern was reversed in August and, since then, the number of domestic abuse incidents recorded each month has been higher than last year. Taking all months into consideration, at the end of 2011-12 the total of 4828 incidents was 9% higher than the 4425 incidents reported during the previous year.

Where no substantive crimes are being investigated, the system allows officers to file CONCERN reports which, as the title suggests, allows officers to record any anxiety they have regarding a situation they have either attended or witnessed during the course of their duties. These domestic, child and adult concern reports are, in due course, assessed by specialist departments and, where appropriate, information is shared with partner agencies under Information Sharing Protocols.

2010-11

Tayside ~ Domestic Abuse Incidents

2011-12

500 450 400 350 300

Domestic Abuse

250

Tayside Police respond to many instances of a domestic nature throughout the course of a year. All domestic abuse incidents are recorded to ensure an appropriate response is initiated.

200 150 100 50

By recording all incidents of domestic abuse, Tayside Police can, in the first instance, assess risk to those who are subjected to the abuse and the impact on any children involved. Secondly, they can put protective measures in place, and lastly, target repeat offenders.

0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Of the 4828 incidents reported during 2011-12, 2463 involved one or more substantiated crimes. In 57% of incidents where a crime had occurred the perpetrator was charged and a report was sent to the Procurator Fiscal. Victims stated that 39% of reported incidents resulting in a substantive crime were repeat episodes.

Domestic abuse is not a crime in itself and can be either one form of, or a combination of, non-criminal behaviour or criminal behaviour. Examples of noncriminal behaviour would be isolation, withholding money and psychological abuse etc which can have a substantial impact on a person’s health and wellbeing and that of their children. Examples of criminal behaviour would be assaults, vandalism, threatening or abusive behaviour, fire-raising etc.

Throughout the Tayside area there were 120 Domestic Abuse Incidents per 10,000 population. In 25% of incidents either the victim, the perpetrator or both were under the influence of alcohol at the time of the incident.

When domestic abuse is reported to the police we will work in partnership with specialist agencies including Barnardos, Women’s Aid and the Violence against Women partnerships to ensure that those at risk from abuse, and their families, are given appropriate support and advice which will enable them to make an informed decision about their future.

The following table provides details of the number of incidents per month and the number per 10,000 population. It also includes the number of incidents resulting in a substantive crime and the percentage of those where a victim reported a repeat episode.

38


PUBLIC PROTECTION The last column contains the number of all incidents where alcohol was an influencing factor.

Tayside Police Force

Domestic Incidents

Incidents per 10,000 population

Incidents resulting in a substantive crime

% of crimes w ith repeat victims

Crimes against Children There were 1036 crimes recorded throughout Tayside between April and the end of March 2012 where a child was recorded as the victim. However, this total does include crimes of theft where an item belonging to a child (most commonly a bicycle or a mobile phone) was stolen. The graph below illustrates the geographical distribution per 1,000 children under 16 population with 30 such crimes in the Dundee area, 29 in Angus and 19 in Perth & Kinross.

% incidents involving alcohol

Apr

326

8.10

198

33%

17%

May

374

9.29

205

40%

20%

Jun

336

8.35

175

41%

22%

Jul

415

10.31

220

36%

24%

Aug

441

10.95

225

36%

22%

Sep

402

9.99

214

35%

23%

Oct

444

11.03

243

49%

30%

Nov

385

9.56

191

36%

24%

Dec

461

11.45

226

40%

24%

Jan

445

11.05

207

44%

29%

Feb

407

10.11

173

32%

27%

Mar

392

9.74

0.00

40%

29%

Total

4828

120

2463

39%

25%

Tayside Crim es against Children per 1,000 (CHILDREN UNDER 16) population) 11

Perth & Kinross

16

Angus

During 2011-12 there were 512 crimes of violence recorded in Tayside of which 10% were recorded with a domestic marker.

18

Dundee 0

5

10

15

20

Adult Concern Reports Throughout Tayside, between April and the end of March 2012 there were 2867 adult concern reports recorded. This equated to 71 per 10,000 population.

Of great concern is the fact that in 12% of crimes against children (121) the offender was under the influence of alcohol, putting the child in question at risk. 34 such crimes were recorded in Dundee, 35 in Perth & Kinross whilst the total in Angus was 52. In 35 crimes across Tayside the child was also under the influence of alcohol.

The following table shows the divisional distribution with 693 recorded in Dundee, 1149 in Angus and 1025 in Perth & Kinross. The highest number recorded per 10,000 population was in Angus at 104.

ADULT CONCERN REPORTS

Dundee Concern Reports

Angus

No. per 10,000 population

Concern Reports

12 crimes were recorded where the offender was under the influence of drugs and in 1 case the child had also been given drugs.

Perth & Kinross

No. per 10,000 population

Concern Reports

No. per 10,000 population

Apr

42

2.91

62

5.61

52

3.52

May

44

3.05

89

8.05

71

4.80

Jun

40

2.77

84

7.59

67

4.53

Jul

55

3.81

101

9.13

69

4.67

Aug

66

4.57

99

8.95

94

6.36

Sep

58

4.02

106

9.58

83

5.62

Oct

70

4.85

90

8.14

97

6.56

Nov

57

3.95

109

9.86

83

5.62

Dec

55

3.81

94

8.50

114

7.71

Jan

73

5.06

105

9.49

99

6.70

Feb

70

4.85

123

11.12

96

6.50

Mar

63

4.37

87

7.87

100

6.77

TOTAL

693

48

1149

104

1025

69

Source of information: Tayside Police Crime Recording System

39


PUBLIC PROTECTION Registered Sex Offenders in the community are those who have either completed their prison sentence and have been released into the community or are serving their sentence within the community. These people required to be monitored as registered sex offenders.

Child Concern Reports Throughout Tayside, between April 2011 and the end of March 2012 there were 8940 child concern reports recorded. This equated to 131 per 1,000 children under 16 population.

Registered Sex Offenders in custody are those who are currently serving their sentence. The length of time people spend on the sex offenders register will depend on the sentence they received. The number of sex offenders at risk of doing serious harm to another individual (should they commit another crime) is also broken down into those at very high risk, high risk, medium risk, low risk or not assessed.

The following table shows the divisional distribution with 4515 recorded in Dundee, 2392 in Angus and 2033 in Perth & Kinross. The highest number recorded per 1,000 population of children was in Dundee at 189.

Dundee CHILD CONCERN REPORTS

Concern Reports

No. per 1,000 CHILDREN population

Angus

Concern Reports

Perth & Kinross

No. per 1,000 CHILDREN population

Concern Reports

No. per 1,000 CHILDREN population

Apr

361

15.1

172

8.8

139

5.6

May

395

16.5

210

10.7

181

7.3 7.3

Jun

383

16.0

202

10.3

182

Jul

395

16.5

190

9.7

162

6.5

Aug

414

17.3

218

11.1

156

6.3

Sep

409

17.1

242

12.3

176

7.1

Oct

359

15.0

189

9.6

194

7.8

Nov

344

14.4

177

9.0

187

7.5

Dec

356

14.9

187

9.5

159

6.4

Jan

393

16.4

209

10.7

171

6.9

Feb

349

14.6

199

10.2

136

5.5

Mar

357

14.9

197

10.1

190

7.6

TOTAL

4515

189

2392

122

2033

82

The chart below shows that there were 407 registered Sex Offenders in Tayside as at the end of March 2012. Of these, 341 were living in the community and were mainly assessed as medium (147) or low risk (149) of causing serious harm to another individual. There were however 33 people who were considered a high risk, should they re-offend and a further 2 who were assessed as a very high risk. There were 13 very high risk offenders in custody and, in addition, there were 17 high risk offenders, 16 medium risk and 4 low risk offenders also in custody. Tayside Registered Sex Offenders

V. High Risk

High risk

Medium Risk

Low Risk

Not Assessed

400

Crimes of Indecency

350

This crime group (referred to as Group 2) involves sexual offences. Some of these crimes have been committed prior to the current reporting period although all offences are recorded at the time they are reported. This can mean that some of the data reported each month could contain historical crimes. In addition, as evidence is discovered during investigations multiple crimes can be detected. As such, the level of crime recorded each month is variable. Between April 2011 and the end of March 2012, in Dundee, 230 crimes were recorded and a detection rate of 62.6% was achieved. In Angus 120 crimes were recorded together with a detection rate of 65.8% and 101 crimes were recorded in Perth and Kinross where the detection rate was 67.3%. The figures for the whole of Tayside were 451 crimes recorded and 64.5% detected.

10

300 250

149

200 150 100

147

33 2

16 4 16 17 13

RSOs in the Community

RSOs in Custody

50 0

Failure to notify police/provide false information It is a requirement of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 that a Sex Offender must provide to the police, and keep updated, various personal details including change of address and holiday arrangements, if these involve leaving the United Kingdom. Failure to do so results in the person being changed with the

Registered Sex Offenders The list of Registered Sex Offenders is broken down into the number of those in the community and the number of those in custody.

Source: Tayside Police Public Protection Unit/ Management Information System 40


PUBLIC PROTECTION offence of ’Failure to notify the police or provide false 39% of drugs involved in crimes of supplying drugs information’. were Class A and the remaining 61% was attributable to other classes of drugs. Between April 2011 and March 2012, 4 people were charged with this offence.

Drugs Deaths

Drugs Supply of Class A Drugs The chart below shows the number of crimes involved in the supplying of Class A drugs. This can be actual supply of drugs, possession with intent to supply drugs, importing or manufacturing of drugs, but does not include the charge of possession (for personal use) of drugs.

There were 54 drug related deaths in Tayside from April 2011 to March 2012, an increase of 69% from the 32 recorded at the same time last year. Tayside 2010-11 2011-12 8

Drug Related Deaths

7 6 5 4

Tayside

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Class A Drugs Recorded 90

3

Class A 2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD)

2 1

80

0

70

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

60 50 40

A higher proportion of deaths has been in evidence over the winter months as more have occurred during this year compared to last, every month since October, as the chart above clearly illustrates.

30 20 10 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

There were 136 crimes recorded to date throughout Tayside, 14.5% fewer than at the same time last year as each month the number of crimes recorded has hovered around the lower control limit. This is a volatile area on which to report. In some months there may appear to be very little activity and then there may be a large number of crimes reported at the one time. The nature of this area of business often involves many months of preparation, surveillance and co-operation with other forces, perhaps leading to a successful operation where several perpetrators are charged with numerous offences. The results are not a reflection on divisional performance as these arrests are often as a result of a headquarters drugs operation carried out in conjunction with the pertinent division and are recorded to reflect the geographical area in which the perpetrators were apprehended. Source of information: Tayside Police Management Information System 41


PUBLIC PROTECTION Alcohol Related Violent Crime

Racist and Other Hate Crime

Violent Crime includes crimes of Murder, Attempted Murder, Serious Assault, Robbery, Child Cruelty, Threats, Abduction etc. These crimes are all ‘Victim Based’ which means a crime is recorded for each victim of violent crime even if there are multiple victims involved in the same incident.

‘Racist Crime’ includes: racist element

any crime which has a

‘Hate Crime’ includes: any crime which has occurred due to the victim being targeted because of their disability, or through a transphobic/transgender or a sectarian/religious nature.

The following graph above illustrates the number of crimes where either the offender and/or the victim were under the influence of alcohol per month as part of the total number of violent crimes.

Tayside Racist & Other Hate Crimes 50

Racist Crime 2011/12

Other Hate Crime 2011/12

Racist Crime 2010/11

Other Hate Crime 2010/11

45 40 35

All Violent Crime

Policing Tayside

Alcohol Related Violent Crime

30

Alcohol Related Violent Crime 2011-12 25

90 80

20

70 60

25 24

50

21

24

24

15 26

15

20

40 30 20

45

44

55 42

20

10

15

59 44

41

16

18

34

39

5 42

40

0

27

10

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

0

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

There were 310 racist crimes recorded during 2001/12, 5.2% below the 327 recorded last year.

16 violent crimes recorded during March 2012 involved alcohol, bringing the cumulative total for 2011-12 to 248 crimes. This is a decrease of 0.8% on the 250 recorded at the same time last year. During the same period 512 violent crimes were recorded, a decrease of 9.7% when compared to the 567 recorded the previous year.

There was a slight increase in the number of hate crimes recorded this year (92), which was up by 4.5% on the 88 recorded during 2010/11.

The total of alcohol related minor assaults recorded between April 2011 to March 2012 was 1765, 16.6% fewer than the 2116 recorded at the same time last year. At the end of March 2011 the number of alcohol related minor assaults accounted for 43.9% of all minor assaults. During the same period this year the commensurate figure was just over 46%.

Source of information: Tayside Police Management Information System

42


COUNTER TERRORISM UK Threat Levels The Home Office is responsible for announcing the UK threat level at any time and in advising the public when that level changes. There are five levels of threat: ♦

Critical ~ an attack is expected imminently

Severe ~ an attack is likely

Substantial ~ an attack is a strong possibility

Moderate ~ an attack is possible but not likely

Low ~ an attack is unlikely

On 11 July 2011 the Home Secretary announced that the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre had changed the threat level from international terrorism from severe to substantial. That means there is a strong possibility of a terrorist attack. The current level remains at SUBSTANTIAL.

Tayside In Tayside Police, Special Branch constantly review threat assessments. In addition, Counter Terrorist Security Advisors continue to raise the level of awareness about terrorist related matters within the Force and partner agencies. During 2011-12, 84 Counter Terrorism briefings were delivered across Tayside and a total of 1,333 nonpolice personnel were in attendance. During the month of March 2012, 450 members of the public attended one *PREVENT event and, in total during the month, 10 events were held where 604 people were briefed, substantially more than during any other month in the year. *The Home Office PREVENT Strategy was re-focussed in 2011 and now contains three objectives: to respond to the ideological challenge of terrorism and the threat from those who promote it; to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism and ensure that they are given appropriate advice and support; and to work with sectors and institutions where there are risks of radicalisation that we need to address.

Source of information: The Home Office web-site Tayside Police Special Branch

43


GROUPS 1-4 RECORDED CRIME Policing Tayside

Tayside

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Groups 1-4 2400

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

2200

Groups 1 to 4 includes: - Group 1 ~ Violence - Group 2 ~ Indecency - Group 3 ~ Dishonesty - Group 4 ~ Vandalism, Fire-raising etc.

The chart to the left illustrates that the level of crime each month between April 2011 and March 2012 was much lower than the previous year. The pattern, however, was very similar. The final total of 14748 not only achieved target but also was representative of an 18% decrease on crime recorded at the same time last year. Please see the table below for further details.

2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Note: All projections are based on the previous 60 months’ worth of data and take seasonal variations into consideration. These are calculated every three months and illustrated on the graphs by a red-ringed yellow circle. The table below, and the ones on the following crime category pages, show the monthly totals of crime for the year 2010-2011 and for the months which have elapsed in 2011-12. The total column compares the cumulative result at the end of the most recent month in 2011-12 with the commensurate result last year and the last column displays the percentage difference. The colour coding indicates where a cumulative result has achieved target (green) or not achieved target (red).

Groups 1-4 Recorded Crime Tayside Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Total % Diff 2011-12 1249 1298 1198 1352 1407 1351 1266 1099 1008 1169 1094 1257 14748 -18% 2010-11 1478 1505 1674 1629 1816 1524 1585 1508 1126 1388 1330 1433 17996 Dundee 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 696 822

May 699 818

Jun 563 962

Jul 665 868

Aug Sep 745 675 1042 811

Oct 664 930

Nov 569 808

Dec 498 652

Jan 659 792

Feb 554 684

Mar 623 749

Total % Diff 7610 -23% 9938

Angus 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 231 315

May 277 337

Jun 278 368

Jul 299 324

Aug 310 345

Sep 269 313

Oct 253 326

Nov 227 298

Dec 251 219

Jan 244 275

Feb 237 294

Mar 234 286

Total % Diff 3110 -16% 3700

Perth & 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 322 341

May 322 350

Jun 357 344

Jul 388 437

Aug 352 429

Sep 407 400

Oct 349 329

Nov 303 402

Dec 259 255

Jan 266 321

Feb 303 352

Mar 400 398

Total % Diff 4028 -8% 4358

Detection Rate The detection rate at the end of March was 46.7% which achieved the target (46.5%). Source: Tayside Police Management Information System

44


GROUPS 1-4 RECORDED CRIME

Dundee Groups 1-4

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

1100

Policing Dundee Crime: The level of crime recorded each month during the current year has been much lower than during 2010-2011 and produced a downward facing trendline at the end of March. Although the number of crimes recorded increased in January, this was expected following last year’s trend. The similar pattern continued to the end of the year when the 7610 crimes recorded achieved target.

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

1000 900 800 700 600

Detection Rate: The detection rate of 46.0%

500 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Angus

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Groups 1-4 700

Feb

achieved the target of 45.5%.

Mar

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

Policing Angus

Crime: The levels of crime recorded month by month during 2011-12 were relatively stable. At the end of the year 3110 crimes recorded was 590 fewer than the previous year and achieved target.

600 500 400

Detection Rate: The detection rate in Angus fell steadily after June 2011 but did stabilise in February at 45.1%. There was a further improvement at the end of March to 46.3% but this was not sufficient to achieve the target of 49.0%.

300 200 100 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Perth & Kinross Groups 1-4

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

700

Feb

Mar

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

Policing Perth & Kinross

Crime: The pattern of crime recorded during the year was very similar to last year and the three year average, with one or two differences. By the end of the year 4028 crimes had been recorded which achieved target and was 8% fewer than recorded in 2010-11.

600 500 400 300

Detection Rate: The detection rate at the end of

200

March (48.3%) achieved the target of 48.0%.

100 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Source of information:Tayside Police Management Information System

45


VIOLENT CRIME Tayside Violent Crime

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

100

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

90 80 70 60

Policing Tayside Violent Crime includes crimes such as Murder, Attempted Murder, Serious Assault, Robbery, Child Cruelty, Threats, Abduction etc. These crimes are all ‘Victim Based’ which means a crime is recorded for each victim of violent crime even if there are multiple victims involved in the same incident.

50 40 30 20 10 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Between April 2011 and March 2012, 512 violent crimes were recorded across the Tayside area. This total was 10% fewer than in the previous year and was 28 crimes within the target of 540.

Crimes of Violence Recorded Force Apr May Jun 2011-12 45 44 42 2010-11 44 54 45

Jul 41 50

Aug 55 43

Sep 59 33

Oct 44 43

Nov 34 61

Dec 39 47

Jan 40 52

Feb 27 42

Mar 42 53

Total % Diff 512 -10% 567

Central 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 27 19

May 28 29

Jun 20 22

Jul 16 25

Aug 36 19

Sep 33 19

Oct 23 29

Nov 20 38

Dec 14 26

Jan 21 29

Feb 13 22

Mar 25 24

Total % Diff 276 -8% 301

Eastern 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 3 10

May 3 11

Jun 8 7

Jul 9 8

Aug 6 5

Sep 16 6

Oct 7 8

Nov 6 9

Dec 17 10

Jan 8 8

Feb 5 11

Mar 8 11

Total % Diff 96 -8% 104

Western 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 15 15

May 13 14

Jun 14 16

Jul 16 17

Aug 13 19

Sep 10 8

Oct 14 6

Nov 8 14

Dec 8 11

Jan 11 15

Feb 9 9

Mar 9 18

Total % Diff 140 -14% 162

Detection Rate 85.4% of all crimes had been detected at the end of March and achieved the target of 85.0% by a slight margin.

Source: Tayside Police Management Information System

46


VIOLENT CRIME Dundee Violent crime

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

60

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

Policing Dundee Crime: An erratic pattern of crime was recorded during 2011-12 but the resulting trendline was downward facing At the end of the year, the number of crimes recorded (276) was 25 crimes fewer than recorded during the previous year and achieved target.

50 40 30 20

Detection Rate: At the end of March, 81.2% of all crimes had been detected against a target of 75.0%.

10 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Angus Violent Crime

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

30

Feb

Mar

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

Policing Angus Crime: The graph to the left illustrates the rises and falls in the numbers of crime recorded this year which has been fairly erratic in comparison to last year but which overall produced a trendline with an upward trajectory. Despite this, at the end of March, 96 crimes had been recorded which was 4 within the target of 100 and 8% fewer than the 104 recorded at the same tome last year.

25 20 15 10 5

Detection Rate: 90.6% of all crimes had been detected against a target of 96.0%. Therefore, the target was not achieved.

0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Perth & Kinross Violent crime

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

30

Feb

Mar

Policing Perth & Kinross Crime: High monthly results recorded between April to November were responsible for on target results being eluded. However, during the last 4 months of the year the number of incidents of violent crime fell below the lower control limit. This enabled target results to be achieved during the last four months. At the end of March, the 140 crimes recorded was within the target of 155 and 22 crimes fewer than the 162 recorded at the end of March 2011.

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

25 20 15 10 5

Detection Rate: The detection finalised at 90.0%. Unfortunately this was below the target of 92.0%. Relatively small numbers in this category of crimes means that only 3 further detections would have been required in order for target to be achieved.

0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Source of information:Tayside Police Management Information System

47


ROBBERY

Tayside

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Robbery 40

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD)

Policing Tayside Robbery includes crimes of Robbery and Assault with intent to Rob.

35 30 25 20

At the end of March, 124 robberies had been recorded, 33 fewer than during the previous year. This was despite a surge in March when 17 crimes were recorded, the highest monthly total of 2011-12.

15 10 5 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Robbery Crimes Recorded Force Apr May Jun 2011-12 10 9 11 2010-11 13 9 13

Jul 9 9

Aug 10 9

Sep 15 7

Oct 8 8

Nov 5 22

Dec 9 13

Jan 13 20

Feb 8 19

Mar 17 15

Total 124 157

% Diff

Central 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 6 7

May 7 7

Jun 7 8

Jul 2 5

Aug 6 6

Sep 11 4

Oct 5 7

Nov 3 14

Dec 4 11

Jan 8 14

Feb 4 13

Mar 14 8

Total 77 104

% Diff

Eastern 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 0 2

May 0 0

Jun 0 0

Jul 2 0

Aug 1 0

Sep 2 0

Oct 0 1

Nov 0 2

Dec 4 0

Jan 1 0

Feb 0 2

Mar 1 3

Total 11 10

% Diff

Western 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 4 4

May 2 2

Jun 4 5

Jul 5 4

Aug 3 3

Sep 2 3

Oct 3 0

Nov 2 6

Dec 1 2

Jan 4 6

Feb 4 4

Mar 2 4

Total 36 43

% Diff

-21%

-26%

10%

-16%

Detection Rate A detection rate of 71.0% was achieved at the end of March. This result was 1 percentage point above the target of 70.0%.

48


ROBBERY

Dundee

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Robbery

35

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD)

Policing Dundee

Crime: 14 crimes were recorded in March; this result breached the upper control limit and represented the highest monthly total during the year. However, the total at the end of March of 77 achieved target and was a 26% improvement on the 104 crimes recorded during 2010-11.

30 25 20 15

Detection Rate: The end of year result of 64.9%

10

achieved target (62%) and was 3.4 percentage points higher than the 61.5% recorded at the same time last year.

5 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Angus

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Feb

Mar

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD)

3

Policing Angus Crime: Very small numbers of crimes recorded in Eastern division make the chart look more alarming than it actually is. Unfortunately, 11 crimes recorded at the end of March exceeded the year end target of 8 crimes. Target was not achieved.

2

Detection Rate: 11 crimes recorded and 9

Robbery 5

4

crimes detected produced a detection rate of 81.8% against a target of 85%. Small numbers of crimes (and detections) lead to large fluctuations in results in this area. 1 detection more would have produced a result of 91.0% and target would have been achieved.

1

0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Perth & Kinross

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Robbery 12

Feb

Mar

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD)

Policing Perth & Kinross 36 crimes recorded during 2011-12 achieved the target of 38 and was 16.3% fewer crimes than had been recorded during 2010-11 (43).

Crime:

10 8 6

Detection Rate: 80.6% of crimes were detected

4

which just achieved the target of 80.0%. 2 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Source of information:Tayside Police Management Information System

49


VANDALISM Tayside

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Vandalism 700

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

600

Policing Tayside This category includes acts of Vandalism and Malicious Mischief.

The chart to the left illustrates the low levels of crime recorded during 2011-12 compared to the previous year and to the three year average.

500 400 300

At the end of March recorded crime for vandalism in Tayside (4092) was 25% lower than at the same time last year (5426) resulting in ’on target’ results for Tayside and the three divisions.

200 100 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Vandalism Crimes Recorded

Force Apr 2011-12 435 2010-11 424

May 413 468

Jun 290 510

Jul 356 421

Aug 382 507

Sep 343 446

Oct 365 565

Nov 316 412

Dec 273 351

Jan 332 440

Feb 290 468

Mar 297 414

Total % Diff 4092 -25% 5426

Central Apr 2011-12 239 2010-11 209

May 219 237

Jun 133 292

Jul 178 233

Aug 177 282

Sep 162 230

Oct 186 338

Nov 155 226

Dec 115 225

Jan 179 241

Feb 153 258

Mar 124 227

Total % Diff 2020 -33% 2998

Eastern Apr 2011-12 96 2010-11 120

May 109 107

Jun 71 124

Jul 104 91

Aug 120 110

Sep 84 107

Oct 95 137

Nov 86 91

Dec 98 75

Jan 103 106

Feb 70 120

Mar 75 92

Total % Diff 1111 -13% 1280

Western Apr 2011-12 100 2010-11 95

May 85 124

Jun 86 94

Jul 74 97

Aug 85 115

Sep 97 109

Oct 84 90

Nov 75 95

Dec 60 51

Jan 50 93

Feb 67 90

Mar 98 95

Total % Diff 961 -16% 1148

Detection Rate 30.4% of all crimes of vandalism had been detected at the end of March against a target figure of 32.0%. Target was only achieved once during the year (in June). The detection rate for vandalism was the only Key Performance Indicator target not to be achieved for Tayside. Source of information:Tayside Police Management Information System

50


VANDALISM Dundee

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Vandalism 400

Policing Dundee Crime: The lower results in recent months were followed by a rise in numbers in January (179) but this fell again in February and March. The total of 2020 crimes recorded at the end of March was well within the target of 3000.

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

350 300 250 200

Detection Rate: 28.5% of crime was detected against the target of 27.5% and, therefore, target was achieved.

150 100 50 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Angus

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Vandalism 250

Feb

Mar

Policing Angus Crime: The monthly totals this year between April and January fluctuated between 71 and 120, interleaved last year’s line, as illustrated on the adjacent graph and showed very little similarity in pattern. The trend line for the year, at the end of January was on a slight incline but the lower monthly result recorded in February reversed that trend and this was consolidated by a similar, lower result in March. At the end of the year 1111 crimes had been recorded against the target of 1260 and target was achieved.

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

200

150

100

50

Detection Rate: 31.7% of crime was detected at

0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Perth & Kinross

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Vandalism 180

Feb

the end of March, 5.3 percentage points below target.

Mar

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

Policing Perth & Kinross

Crime: The expected rise in crime in January did not materialise and the 50 crimes recorded was the lowest monthly total this year to date. However, there was a rise in February to 67 and a further one in March (98). However, the total at the end of 2011-12 was 961 which was well within the target figure of 1140 and 16.3% below the 1148 crimes recorded at the end of March 2011.

160 140 120 100 80 60 40

Detection Rate: 32.8% of crime was detected, 3.2 percentage points below target. An on-target result was not achieved at all during the year.

20 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Source of information:Tayside Police Management Information System

51


DOMESTIC HOUSEBREAKING Tayside

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Domestic Housebreaking

140

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Policing Tayside ‘Domestic Housebreaking’ includes those crimes pertaining to residential dwellings. Included are: - Theft by Housebreaking - Housebreaking with intent to Steal - Attempted Housebreaking with intent to enter and steal.

The chart to the left shows the rise in the numbers of crimes recorded in recent months contributing to an upward facing trend line. However, 662 crimes had been recorded at the end of March, 24% fewer than at the same time last year. The end of year target was 775 and target was, therefore, achieved.

Domestic Housebreaking

Force 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 46 80

May 39 78

Jun 63 96

Jul 60 81

Aug 57 101

Sep 61 69

Oct 78 69

Nov 40 61

Dec 47 51

Jan 50 76

Feb 58 68

Mar 63 40

Total % Diff 662 -24% 870

Central 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 32 57

May 22 56

Jun 36 71

Jul 36 60

Aug 39 72

Sep 32 44

Oct 43 53

Nov 17 38

Dec 35 37

Jan 34 55

Feb 37 39

Mar 40 29

Total % Diff 403 -34% 611

Eastern 2011-12 2010-11

Apr 9 8

May 9 10

Jun 7 16

Jul 5 7

Aug 10 10

Sep 12 8

Oct 11 8

Nov 7 11

Dec 5 4

Jan 4 4

Feb 8 8

Mar 3 3

Total % Diff 90 -7% 97

Western Apr 2011-12 5 2010-11 15

May 8 12

Jun 20 9

Jul 19 14

Aug 8 19

Sep 17 17

Oct 24 8

Nov 16 12

Dec 7 10

Jan 12 17

Feb 13 21

Mar 20 8

Total % Diff 169 4% 162

Detection Rate 33.5% of crime had been detected against the target of 30%. This was a 3.8 percentage point improvement on the 29.7% detection rate recorded at the same time last year. Source of information:Tayside Police Management Information System

52


DOMESTIC HOUSEBREAKING

Dundee Domestic Housebreaking

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

90

Policing Dundee Crime: the level of crime, after plateauing in January, rose slightly in February and March. The trend line was, therefore, still on a slight upward incline. At the end of March 403 crimes had been recorded against a target of 545 and target was achieved.

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

80 70 60 50 40 30

Detection Rate: 32.5% of crime was detected

20

against the target of 26.0%. Target was achieved every month throughout 2011-12.

10 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Angus Domestic Housebreaking

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

30

Feb

Mar

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

Policing Angus

Crime: 90 crimes were recorded between April 2011 and March 2012—a result which was on target exactly! Last year at the same time 97 crimes had been committed.

25 20 15

Detection Rate: 38.9% of crime was detected against the target of 40.0%. Frustratingly, one more detection would have secured an on target result.

10 5 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Perth & Kinross

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

2010-11 UCL (Av. +2SD) 3 Year Average

Domestic Housebreaking

Feb

Mar

2011-12 LCL (Av. -2SD) Forecast

Policing Perth & Kinross Crime: After the reduction in monthly totals of crime recorded in November and December, the January to March results escalated to above and beyond the 3 year average level. 169 crimes were recorded during 2011-12, 29 more than the target of 140.

30 25 20 15 10

Detection Rate: 33.1% of crime was detected against the target of 40.0%. Target was not achieved.

5 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Source of information:Tayside Police Management Information System

53


ROAD CASUALTIES The dotted line indicates the most recent 3 year average.

2011 saw the start of the Scottish Government’s Road Safety Framework which will run until 2020. The improvements set under the Framework are: 30% reduction in people* killed 43% reduction in people seriously injured 35% reduction in children killed 50% reduction in children seriously injured 10% reduction in people slightly injured

Tayside People Seriously Injured

2010-11

2011-12

3 Year Average

30 25

(* people includes children).

20

All percentage reductions are against a baseline of the 5 year average of years 2004-2008 inclusive.

15 10 5

Number of People killed Between April 2011 and March 2012, 18 people had been killed on the roads of Tayside, 47% fewer than the 34 killed during the same period last year.

0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Slight Injuries 756 people received slight injuries as a result of a road collision during 2011-12, compared to 714 the previous year.

The graph below illustrates that October 2010 was the highest month of that year when 6 people lost their lives because of a collision. The highest result to date this year was November 2011 with 4 fatalities.

The graph below illustrates the number of slight casualties by month.

7

Tayside People Killed

2010-11

2011-12

3 Year Average

Tayside Slight Injuries

6

2010-11

2011-12

3 Year Average

90 5

80

4

70 60

3

50 2

40

1

30 20

0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

10 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Number of People seriously injured 200 people had been seriously injured by the end of March 2012, in contrast to 178 the previous year. At the end of 2011-12, despite increases in some categories, Tayside achieved all interim targets, based on the national criteria.

Included in the 200 people seriously injured were 22 children. During the same period last year 21 children were seriously injured. The graph below details the number of people seriously injured each month during 2010 and 2011. 54


ROAD CASUALTIES Collisions There were 737 injury collisions recorded on the roads of Tayside between April 2011 and the end of March 2012, 15 more than the result at the end of 2010-11 (722). The graph below allows for month-on-month comparison between the two years.

Tayside Collisions

2010-11

2011-12

3 Year Average

350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Collisions involving a Police Vehicle During 2011-12 there were 63 collisions throughout Tayside involving a Police vehicle.

Source of information:Roads Policing Unit

55


ROAD SAFETY Background Delivery of Road Safety in the Tayside area is undertaken by two Road Safety Officers, based in Angus and Perth & Kinross, and the Road Safety Coordinator.

this very popular training is local and national Road Safety resources. Teachers attend a half day session where they are shown a short Power Point presentation, detailing the resources which are free to all Primary schools. This is followed by an interactive session looking at all the supporting websites which are developed and maintained by Road Safety Scotland. Evaluation of this initiative is almost complete and the early indications are showing that the training is worthwhile and appreciated.

The remit for Road Safety staff is wide-reaching and encompasses a variety of themes as prescribed in the Scottish Government Road Safety Framework to 2020 where specific casualty reduction targets for Scotland are laid out.

JUNE In June, “Driving Ambition” took place in Perth & Kinross area. This is a local initiative which gives S5 pupils the opportunity to investigate driving from various angles. Developed and organised by the Perth & Kinross Road Safety Officer this event takes place in all Local Authority Secondary schools within Perth & Kinross and in 2011 two of the four ‘private’ schools also attended the event. Driving Ambition events also took place in Angus. These events are held throughout the year at the request of the secondary schools.

Road Safety Staff deliver Road Safety Education using national and local resources to communities across Tayside and far from dealing solely with educational establishments also undertake work with a variety of community groups, ethnic minority groups, seasonal workers and others who request assistance. The Road Safety Co-ordinator ensures that appropriate support is given to relevant local and national campaigns and initiatives. Working with partners allows Road Safety Staff to disseminate pertinent Road Safety information to specific groups and there are very good long–term working relationships with NHS Tayside, Tayside Fire and Rescue and the constituent Local Authorities Social Work, Education and Roads and Transport departments.

For the first time, Road Safety Officers joined RPU Officers across the Force to undertake child car seat checks during “Operation Bandit” days. This proved extremely worthwhile as people who would not normally attend car seat checking days were being stopped and appropriate advice given. In three cases it was found that the child passengers should have been in car seats as they were under the legal height and /or age for using the seat belt without being in a car seat. Other issues in respect of transporting children also came to light.

2011-2012 Update

APRIL Road Safety Officers promoted a local child pedestrian training scheme to primary schools. This resulted in several schools who had not undertaken the scheme before coming on board.

JULY With local Road Safety Officers, the Road Safety Coordinator met with Health Visitor managers to highlight issues which had been raised during the “Operation Bandit” events where members of the public claimed that the reason their child was being carried incorrectly was due to information given to them by their Health Visitor. Health Visitor managers welcomed our approach and new partnership working was instigated.

MAY May 11TH saw the launch of the United Nations Decade of Road Safety. The Scottish and UK Government pledged to reduce the number of road traffic casualties in their own country and assist countries, particularly those developing nations where road traffic casualty numbers are extremely high, in reducing casualties through offering practical advice and assistance where possible.

AUGUST Road Safety Officers undertook General Road Safety Awareness Days in Arbroath and Perth City. These events are as interactive as possible using various road safety resources to illustrate drink/ drug driving, stopping distances, in-car safety, and safe pedestrian and cycling reminders etc.

During May and June, Road Safety Officers undertook Primary School Teacher Continuous Professional Development (CPD) training. The theme for 56


ROAD SAFETY to be considered for best practice and potential suitability for consideration of use across neighbouring local authority areas.’

SEPTEMBER In September over 300 P6 pupils and their adult assistants underwent national Junior Road Safety Officer induction days across the Force area. Developed by Road Safety Officers and organised locally, every school in Tayside was invited to send two P6 pupils and an adult assistant to attend a half day event where they would learn about the role they will play in promoting Road Safety in their school and community. The children received resources and prizes for the competitions they were encouraged to hold in schools to highlight local and national issues.

JANUARY There is a national general increase in child casualties when school pupils undertake the transition between primary and secondary schools. In Angus and Perth and Kinross, the Road Safety Officers undertook presentations to S1 classes in respect of the national resource ‘Your Call’ which aims to encourage safe roadside behaviour and builds on work undertaken in primary schools with the ‘Streetsense’ resource. The presentation accompanies a DVD and encourages active learning in respect of the responsibilities pupils now have for their own safety. Teachers are encouraged to continue working with the resource for at least one more session and then pick up the resource again with S2 classes.

OCTOBER Baldy Bane Theatre Company performed ‘The Nine Lives of Roddy Hogg’ and ‘Friend’s Disunited’ plays for S1 and S5/6 respectively, at selected secondary schools across Tayside. These plays were funded by Road Safety Scotland.

FEBRUARY Along with regular Road Safety work, February saw Road Safety staff come together to deliver CPD training for Early Years and Primary Level teaching staff in Perth & Kinross and Dundee. The aims of the training are to enhance teachers’ knowledge and subsequent use of the incremental local and national Road Safety Educational resources which are available in Tayside schools thereby contributing to casualty reduction through improving road user attitude. behaviour and skills. The training took an hour and a half and was delivered through a power point presentation highlighting all the resources available for specific age groups. This then led into an interactive session using the hard resources and the web based support materials.

NOVEMBER The annual ‘Safe Drive Stay Alive’ events took place across the Force during November. Organised by Tayside Fire and Rescue, Road Safety Officers and the Road Policing Officer play a pivotal part in imparting the pertinent information which the S5 pupils receive at the events. DECEMBER December saw the second of the 2011 bi-annual Tayside Road Safety Forum meetings. Chaired by the Road safety Co-ordinator and attended by head of Road Policing, with representatives from constituent Local Authority Roads, transport and infrastructure departments, NHS Tayside, Tayside Fire and Rescue, Tayside Safety Camera Partnership and TACTRAN, the remit of the group states:

MARCH The inaugural Angus Council Road Safety forum took place in March which the local Road Safety Officer attended. It is intended that information from this forum will be fed into the Tayside bi-annual Road Safety Forum.

‘The Tayside Road Safety Forum is designed to offer the opportunity to all parties in Tayside who have an interest in road safety and casualty reduction to meet, share and discuss road safety topics of mutual interest.

A new initiative ‘Driving On’ took place at Angus Training Group. This half day event was organised by the local Road Safety Officer and brought Road Safety Officers together with internal and external partners to deliver separate ‘workshops’ covering a variety of issues relating to pre / new and young drivers. Evaluation of the event, both on the day and six weeks later, showed that the apprentices found the event to be worthwhile and the majority reported a

Forum members are encouraged to link specific topics to constituent Community Planning Partnerships single outcome agreements where possible, with particular emphasis on the road safety element of the aforementioned plans or agreements. The Forum will consider the ongoing development of pertinent local and regional initiatives and campaigns

57


change in their own behaviour in respect of checking their vehicles, seatbelt wearing and speed. March also saw the Angus Road Safety Officer deliver an input at Angus College to the ‘School Link’ group which is a supported education transition group for students with additional support needs who attend Angus College from their schools one day a week prior to finishing secondary school and moving on to further education or into work placements.

Source of Information:Road Safety Co-ordinator, Roads Policing Unit

58


SERVICE SATISFACTION The following paragraphs provide an overview of consultation activity being undertaken across the force and summarises the results for both the Service Satisfaction and Public Perception surveys for the year April 2011 to March 2012.

The percentage of respondents who were provided with the name of the person dealing with their enquiry rose 2.9 percentage points between 2010 and 2011 from 80.8% to 83.7% and exceeded the force target set at 80.0% by some margin.

Results from Service Satisfaction surveys are used to monitor the extent to which Tayside Police is achieving its published standards of service. The information detailed below includes the indicators, targets and results with additional relevant results interspersed. Comparative figures for the commensurate period in 2010, where available, are included in parenthesis or commented on in the narrative.

In relation to satisfaction with the way in which respondents were treated at first contact, 93.3% confirmed that they were either ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ with this treatment. This represents an improvement of 2.8 percentage points compared to the 90.5% who provided the same response in the commensurate period in 2010. Overall satisfaction at first contact evidenced a statistically significant 2.9 percentage point improvement compared to the same period the previous year rising from 90.7% to 93.6% and exceeded the 2011/12 target of 91.5% by 2.1 percentage points. Further analysis indicated no statistically significant differences in satisfaction at first contact between those reporting a crime and those in contact for reasons other than to report a crime with 94.6% and 92.6% satisfaction reported respectively.

Response rate: 3600 questionnaires were distributed by post to service users between April 2011 and March 2012. 1259 completed forms were returned for analysis thus yielding an overall response rate of 35.0%. First contact: The majority of respondents perceived that their contact with the force was to report a crime, 66.6% with the remaining 33.4% in contact for reasons other than to report a crime as recorded on the force command and control system. When analysed by crime type, however, it emerged that only 50.7% of contact related to the reporting of crime with the other 49.3% for reasons other than to report a crime. The breakdown of the responses by crime type comprised 29.5% for Group 3 crimes (crimes of dishonesty), 18.4% for Group 4 (crimes of vandalism, fire-raising etc), 2.5% for Group 6 (miscellaneous offences) and 0.2% for Group 7 (offences relating to motor vehicles).

The following chart demonstrates how this indicator has performed throughout the past year. The previous year’s results have also been included in the chart for comparison purposes. % of respondents satisfied with first contact

2011 2010 Target 2011 (91.5%)

100.0 95.0

90.4

92.1 92.6

93.7 93.4 94.0 94.0 93.9 94.1 93.9 93.6

90.0

Telephone was the preferred method of contact for service users with 13.1% (9.9%) dialling 999 and 66.9% (70.1%) the non-emergency number. Whilst satisfaction with the time taken to answer the nonemergency number improved from 90.8% in 2010 to 92.7% in 2011, satisfaction with the response to 999 calls dipped slightly from 96.9% to 95.3%.

85.0

Agreement with staff attributes and the level of service they provided at first contact proved very high with the courteous and attentive manner of the person dealing with the initial enquiry rising from 97.6% in 2010 to 98.2% in 2011. In addition, knowledge about how to deal with the enquiry and an explanation of what would be done as a result of the enquiry both achieved very high agreement ratings, improving 2.3 and 1.6 percentage points and finalising at 95.8% and 91.5% respectively.

Mar

Feb

Jan

Dec

Nov

Oct

Sep

Aug

Jul

Jun

May

80.0

Further analysis undertaken to identify key determinants of overall satisfaction at first contact established that a courteous and attentive manner (46%) appeared to have a stronger effect on satisfaction than either knowledge about how to deal with the enquiry (44%), an explanation of what would be done as a result of the enquiry (38%), help or advice given (37%) or the provision of a name at first contact (31%).

59


SERVICE SATISFACTION Officer contact: 77.2% (74.7%) of contact made subsequently resulted in a visit from an officer. The majority of visits related to incidents rather than crimes, 41.0%, followed by crimes of dishonesty (group 3), 35.1%, group 4, 20.8%, group 6, 3.1%, and one visit (0.1%) for a group 7 offence. Of those respondents who received a visit, 97.6% (98.6%) deemed the attending officer courteous and attentive and 95.4% (95.7%) knowledgeable about how to deal with the enquiry.

% of service users who received an update

3

72.0% (244 respondents)

4

76.2% (163 respondents)

6

60.7% (17 respondents)

7

100.0% (2 respondents)

Reasons other than to report a crime

45.6% (207 respondents)

89.9% (87.5%) of service users who received an update confirmed that they were satisfied with the update they received, albeit some respondents did complain that they had to request an update when nothing was forthcoming. Of those respondents who did not receive an update, 60.0% (59.5%) felt that they should have been updated regarding the outcome of the enquiry/incident they reported. It is worth noting, however, that these were twice as likely to be in relation to incidents recorded on the force command and control system rather than actual recorded crimes.

The personal appearance of officers also returned a very high satisfaction rating with 96.8% of service users ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ that the attending officer presented a smart and professional image. This represents a minimal 0.4 percentage point improvement when compared to the results for the same period the previous year. Over two thirds of respondents, 69.2% (69.0%) confirmed that they received details of how to contact the officer should they have any further queries.

Satisfaction overall: Overall satisfaction for the customer experience with the service provided by Tayside Police failed to achieve the target set at 85.0% but returned an improvement of 0.2 percentage points compared to the same period the previous year rising from 82.3% to 82.5%. Further analysis also highlighted that satisfaction with overall service was statistically significantly higher for those service users who had reported a crime than those who had made contact for other reasons (87.2% compared to 77.5%).

Whilst treatment by the attending officer and overall satisfaction with the officer both reported very high satisfaction levels of 93.7%, treatment by the officer evidenced a minimal downturn in satisfaction from 94.0% in 2010 to 93.7% in 2011. This result however was tempered with the fact that overall satisfaction with officer contact improved by 0.5 percentage points rising from 93.2% to 93.7%. Further analysis undertaken to establish the main determinants of satisfaction with officer contact concluded that both a courteous and attentive manner and knowledge about how to deal with the enquiry (48%) equally appeared to have a stronger effect on satisfaction with officer contact than any help or advice given by the officer (43%).

The following chart illustrates how the force has performed in relation to this indicator throughout the past year. Results for 2010 are also included in the chart for comparison purposes. % of respondents satisfied with overall service

2011 2010 Target 2011 (85.0%)

100.0

82.7

82.7

83.2

83.5

82.8

83.1

82.6

82.5

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

81.2

Oct

80.4

Sep

79.3

Jul

85.0

Jun

90.0

Aug

95.0

May

Response and ongoing enquiries: The percentage of service users who received an update on the progress of their enquiry returned a 0.2 percentage point reduction compared to the previous year falling marginally from 61.2% to 61.0%. Further examination of this indicator, however, encouragingly suggested that those service users who had reported a crime were statistically significantly more likely to have received an update on the progress of their enquiry than those who had made contact for reasons other than to report a crime (73.1% compared to 45.6%). The table below shows how this result was further broken down by actual crime groups:

Crime Group

80.0 75.0 70.0

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SERVICE SATISFACTION Further investigation of this question also concluded that officer knowledge about how to deal with the enquiry (46%) appeared to have a stronger effect on overall satisfaction than the provision of an update (38%) etc. The full breakdown of analysis is set out in the table below:

• Element of service First Contact: Courteous and attentive manner Knowledge about how to deal with enquiry Help or advice given Able to explain what would be done as a result of enquiry Provision of a name

Effect on overall satisfaction

44% 40% 38% 33% 30%

Response and Ongoing Enquiries: Provision of an update

38%

Officer Contact: Knowledge about how to deal with enquiry Courteous and attentive manner Help or advice given

46% 45% 44%

Community policing: A ‘community policing’ section has been included in the Service Satisfaction survey since the beginning of October and the following paragraphs summarise the findings. Caution should be exercised when interpreting the results due to the sample size (n=638). It should be noted that these questions have also been replicated in the Public Perception survey with the results reported later in this document. •

50.8% of service users thought that the current level of police patrols in their neighbourhood was ‘about right’ for their community needs. Conversely, 48.6% felt it was ‘too little’ and a minimal 0.6% that it was ‘too much’. The majority of respondents, 71.3%, felt reassured when they witnessed an officer on patrol in their neighbourhood. Over half of the respondents confirmed that they did not know anything about the community officers who looked after their neighbourhood, 55.9%, whilst a further 22.2%, although unable to identify their local officer by sight or name, knew how to contact them should the need arise. 22.1% of residents were able to recognise their community officer either by name, sight or both. ‘Local newspapers’ were the preferred medium for respondents to be kept informed about actions being taken by officers in their communities.

61

62.8% of service users agreed that officers understood the issues that mattered in their neighbourhoods and 57.6% felt that officers were dealing with such matters. Overall, 65.0% of respondents had confidence in the police in their neighbourhood. Taking everything into account, 68.8% of service users thought that community officers were doing a ‘good’ or ‘very good’ job in their area.


PUBLIC PERCEPTION Results from the Public Perception survey provide an insight into the types of crimes/offences and antisocial behaviour that cause the public concern in their neighbourhoods and also their expectations of Tayside Police in relation to its service delivery.

As can be seen from the chart, the three main issues of concern to residents in their neighbourhood, without being prompted, were ‘antisocial behaviour (including youths causing annoyance)’, 22.2% (20.0%), ‘dangerous/careless driving’, 19.7% (21.7%), and ‘housebreaking’, 13.6% (12.7%). These results provide a fairly similar representation of main concerns as in the previous year with a few concerns changing position: ‘antisocial behaviour substituting for ‘dangerous/careless driving’ as the number one concern and ‘housebreaking’ overtaking ‘drug dealing/drug abuse’ as the number three concern.

3600 questionnaires were distributed by post to members of the public between April 2011 and March 2012. 1066 completed forms were returned for analysis thus yielding an overall response rate of 29.6%. The following paragraphs provide results for the period April 2011 to March 2012 with comparisons made with the same period the previous year either indicated in parenthesis or commented on in the narrative.

Prevalence of crimes/offences in neighbourhood: Respondents were asked to report up to three crimes/offences they perceived to be most prevalent in their neighbourhoods. The responses have been analysed as a multiple choice question and will therefore not total 100%.

Neighbourhood as a safe place to live: The majority of respondents, perceived their neighbourhood to be a safe place to live, 91.1%. This indicates a minimal improvement of 0.9 percentage points compared to the previous year when 90.2% of respondents were of the same opinion.

The top three issues thought to be most common in neighbourhoods were: • ‘Antisocial behaviour’ - 46.4% • ‘Vandalism/graffiti’ - 36.6% • ‘Dangerous/careless driving’ - 33.6%

Perception about the level of crime in neighbourhood: Respondents were asked to what extent they thought that levels of crime had increased or decreased in their neighbourhood during the past year. Seven out of ten respondents, 71.1% (71.2%) felt that crime levels had remained the same or decreased in the past year with the remaining 28.8% (28.8%) of the opinion that crime had increased.

Interestingly, an increased proportion of respondents, compared to the previous year, stated that there was ‘no crime’ in their neighbourhood. The following chart illustrates the full results for this question: 46.4 44.9

Antisocial behaviour 36.6 36.7 33.6 36.2

Vandalism/graffiti

It is important to note that for this question, 25.2% of all respondents answered ‘don’t know’ and these have been eliminated from the results.

Dangerous/careless driving 26.6 26.5 25.5 24.3

Drug dealing or drug abuse Alcohol related crime

Main issue of concern in neighbourhood:

17.0 19.2

Housebreaking 13.2 11.4 13.1 12.4

Motor vehicle crime Antisocial behaviour

20.0

Dangerous/careless driving

19.7

13.2

Drug dealing or drug abuse

12.2

Other Vandalism/graffiti

6.9

21.7

Assault Other

15.9

Mar-12 Mar-11

2.0 2.4

14.4

Concerns at becoming a victim of crime in neighbourhood: A 1.2 percentage point increase was noted in respect of respondents being concerned at becoming a victim of crime in their area whereby 37.4% stated that they were either ‘fairly’ or ‘very concerned’ compared to 36.2% in 2010.

9.0

1.2 0.8 0.8 0.5

8.6 8.8 6.1 5.6

Robbery

8.1 7.1

Alcohol related crime

Motor vehicle crime

No crime

13.6 12.7

Housebreaking

Assault

22.2

Mar-12 Mar-11

0.0 Robbery 0.0

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PUBLIC PERCEPTION Those respondents who recorded their concerns at becoming a victim of crime were then asked to report on the issues they feared they could become a victim of. The following chart depicts the findings: 48.5

Housebreaking

42.2 45.4 43.2

Antisocial behaviour

Community policing: A ‘community policing’ section has been included in the Public Perception survey since the beginning of October and the following paragraphs summarise the findings. Caution should be exercised when interpreting the results due to the small sample size (n=515). Results for the corresponding questions in the Service Satisfaction survey have been included in parenthesis for comparison purposes.

24.5 27.7

Vandalism/graffiti

24.2 25.2 23.2 21.0

Dangerous/careless driving Robbery

18.6 19.2

Motor vehicle crime

16.6 16.1 15.7 16.2 14.6 16.7

Assault Alcohol related crime Drug dealing or drug abuse Other

prevented them from taking part in their everyday activities. This represents a 0.9 percentage point rise compared to the 3.8% reported for the same period in 2010. When asked to elaborate on why they felt fearful about participating in their normal activities, ‘fear of being mugged’ was the main comment quoted.

Mar-12 Mar-11

0.9 0.9

The above chart indicates a similar representation of concerns as in the previous year although a marked increase is evident in the percentage of respondents who were concerned at becoming the victim of a break-in compared to the equivalent period in 2010.

Feelings of safety in neighbourhood: Perhaps not unexpectedly, results for feelings of safety walking alone in the neighbourhood proved higher during the day than after dark. Results for feelings of safety walking alone in the neighbourhood during the day did, however, return a very slight downturn in confidence falling to 95.4% in 2011 compared to 95.5% in 2010. Conversely, feelings of safety after dark evidenced an improvement, rising 2.1 percentage points from 60.7% to 62.8%. The chart below illustrates how this question has performed over the past year. Fe e lings of s afe ty during the day and afte r dar k

100.0

During the day

After dark

97.2 95.8 95.1 95.0 94.8 95.3 95.1 94.8 95.1 95.4 95.4

90.0 80.0 70.0

62.1 62.4 63.8 64.5 63.3 63.4 64.0 62.9 62.6 62.6 62.8

• 60.0 Mar

Feb

Jan

Dec

Nov

Oct

Sep

Aug

Jul

Jun

May

50.0

46.4% (50.8%) of residents thought that the current level of police patrols in their neighbourhood was ‘about right’ for their community needs. Conversely, 53.3% (48.6%) felt it was ‘too little’. 67.8% (71.3%) of respondents felt reassured when they witnessed an officer on patrol in their neighbourhood. Almost three quarters of respondents confirmed that they did not know anything about the community officers who looked after their neighbourhood, 72.9% (55.9%), whilst a further 13.6% (22.2%), although not able to identify their local officer by sight or name, knew how to contact them should the need arise. 13.4% (22.1%) of residents were able to recognise their community officer either by name, sight or both. Similar to the results for the Service Satisfaction survey, ‘local newspapers’ were deemed the preferred medium for respondents to be kept informed about actions being taken by officers in their communities. 55.8% (62.8%) of respondents agreed that officers understood the issues that mattered in their neighbourhoods and 47.6% (57.6%) felt that officers were dealing with such matters. Overall, almost two thirds of residents had confidence in the police in their neighbourhood, 58.9% (65.0%). Taking everything into account, 59.3% (68.8%) of residents thought that community officers were doing a ‘good’ or ‘very good’ job in their area.

It can be seen from the above information that service users (Service Satisfaction survey) appear to

4.7% of respondents confirmed that a fear of crime

63


PUBLIC PERCEPTION Additional information: Further examination of the data in the form of key driver analysis was undertaken to explore the factors which correlated most highly with public confidence in the police (Q. I have confidence in the police in my neighbourhood). The results are illustrated in the table below with green representing a large correlation (most impact) and red (small correlation—least impact).

have a greater awareness than randomly selected members of the general public (Public Perception survey), of the community officers who look after their neighbourhood and also an increased confidence in the officers’ abilities to deal with the issues that matter to them in their communities. Respondents were invited to comment on the ways they preferred to be kept informed about actions being taken by community officers in their neighbourhood and the chart below illustrates the findings. 60.8 62.1

Local newspapers Information at shops

27.0

Public meetings

21.9 19.3

Information at libraries

21.9

15.8

I have confidence in the police in my neighbourhood

41.6 Public Perception Service Satisfaction

20.5 22.0

Local radio

19.7

Face to face updates Tayside Police website

12.0

Community surgeries

11.6 12.6

Social networking

Agree that police are doing a good job in neighbourhood

7.2 4.9

Text messaging

4.4 7.6

Agree that officers are dealing 0.718 with the issues that matter in neighbourhood Agree that officers understand 0.608 the issues that matter in neighbourhood Agree that the neighbourhood 0.238 is a safe place to live

25.5

Feel safe walking alone in the 0.213 neighbourhood after dark

18.8

7.8 9.7

Other

0.761

Each correlation was significant at the 0.01 level (this means that there is a one percent chance that the result was accidental)

From the top 5 factors which correlated most highly with public confidence in the police, it can be seen that three out of the five have a large correlation and two have a small correlation. It is interesting to note that the large correlations can be linked to the theme of police effectiveness in dealing with crime and the small correlations with feelings of safety in the neighbourhood.

The above chart clearly shows that respondents from both the Public Perception and Service Satisfaction surveys overwhelmingly preferred articles in ‘local newspapers’ and ‘information at shops’ as a means of keeping them informed about community officer activity in their neighbourhoods. Service delivery: When asked to provide views on the force’s service delivery, first in terms of importance of certain activities and then how well those activities were performed, the greatest disparity in opinion between importance and effectiveness related to police visibility. This suggests that ‘providing a visible presence’ is the main area of policing which the public perceive Tayside Police should improve going forward.

64


SUPPORTING DELIVERY

C

orporate support forms an important role in ensuring that appropriate resources are in place to deliver an efficient and effective service to the public.

The challenging economic climate means that robust monitoring and reporting processes are instrumental in ensuring that the force is on track to deliver its objectives within the resources available. At the same time, the Scottish Government has set stretching environmental and energy reduction targets for Scotland. As a major employer in Tayside, Tayside Police is committed to demonstrating its contribution to this aim.

MEASURES 9.

CORPORATE SUPPORT

10.

PARTNERSHIP - SCOTTISH POLICE SERVICES AUTHORITY

65


PERSONNEL SICKNESS ABSENCE Police Officers

Police Staff

At the end of 2011-12, sickness absence accounted for 9897 days lost. This resulted in an on-target sickness absence rate for Tayside of 3.8%, a considerable improvement on the March 2011 result of 4.2%. The graph below illustrates clearly the high level of days lost in the month of January last year (1159) and the much improved level of 767 this year.

At the end of March, 4.1% of available working days had been lost to sickness absence, exactly the same result as at the end of January and February. Last year at the same time the sickness absence rate was higher at 4.6%. Whilst still within target (4.5%), most recent results were the highest recorded this year and exceeded 4.0% for the first time. At the end of March 2011 there were 613 staff and the number of days sickness absence taken was 6289 (average 10 days per person). At the end of March 2012, 4947 days were lost but the number of staff had reduced to 543 (an average of 9 days per person).

Tayside Police OFFICERS

2010-11

2011-12

Working Days Lost/Sickness Absence 1400.0 1200.0 1000.0

In terms of length of time staff were off sick, 49% of days lost was accounted for by 59 periods of longterm absence, 30% through 621 periods of shortterm absence and the remaining 22% was due to 76 periods of medium-term absence.

800.0 600.0 400.0 200.0

The following graph illustrates clearly the reductions in days lost by Tayside Police Staff since the beginning of April 2011. The reductions in staff numbers began at the end of calendar year 2010 and the graph does illustrate the dramatic changes between April and October. From November onwards the results are, therefore, more comparable.

0.0 Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Over half the days lost (51%) were lost through 105 periods of long-term sickness absence (29 days or over), a further 30% were lost through 1290 periods of short-term sickness absence (under 7 days) and the remaining 19% was accounted for by 105 periods of medium-term absence of between 8 and 28 days.

Tayside Police STAFF

2010-11

2011-12

Working Days Lost/Sickness Absence 700.0

Central Division: lost 3445 days to the end of March, an average of almost 8 days per officer. This resulted in a sickness absence rate of 3.7% (within the 4% target) compared to 4% recorded at the same time last year.

600.0 500.0 400.0 300.0

Eastern Division: lost 2789 days and the sickness absence rate was 5.1%. This result failed to achieve target (4.0%) despite improving month-onmonth since September (5.9%) and being 0.9 percentage points better than at the same time last year.

200.0 100.0 0.0 Apr

Western Division: recorded a sickness absence rate of 4.1%, marginally lower than the 4.3% recorded at the end of March 2011. The results was representative of an average of 8.7 days per officer. and failed to achieve target (4.0%). Although the end of year result did not achieve target, it was an improvement on the results in the earlier months of the year which peaked at 5.5% in May.

May

Jun

Jul

Central Division:

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

sickness absence rose from 3.8% at the end of March 2011 to 4.1% at the end of March this year, static since January and the highest since July 2011. This was accounted for by 687 days lost through sickness absence – an average of 9.8 days per member of staff. This result was, however, within the target of 4.5%.

66


PERSONNEL Eastern Division:

RANDOM DRUG TESTING

652 days were lost through sickness absence which produced a below target (4.5%) result of 5.5% and averaged out at over 12 days per member of staff. At the same time last year the sickness absence rate of 4.1% achieved target.

Random drug testing is regularly carried out on Police Officers and Police Staff in order to ensure that employees performance, and public safety, is not put at risk by the influence of drugs.

Western Division: only 2.8% of available working A programme of testing both police officers and police staff is carried out. This supports the prevention and management of substance misuse within Tayside Police in order to create and maintain healthy staff and enhance public trust in services delivered by the Force. This programme does not prevent staff reporting concerns about suspected illegal activity by colleagues, which is acted upon.

days were lost through sickness absence; 363 days were lost, an average of just over 6 per member of staff. This year’s result is a dramatic improvement on the result at the same time last year ~ 5.1%

During 2011-12 130 such tests were carried out. No Police officers, or Police Staff tested positive for drugs.

MODIFIED DUTIES AND TIME OFF IN LIEU Modified Duties

Source of Data: Professional Standards Dept.

Modified duties are defined as temporary short term rehabilitation duties or working conditions approved to assist an individual’s return to the full extent of their duties following illness or injury by permitting return to work of a less demanding capacity. There were 67 officers were on modified duties as at 31 March 2012. This accounted for 5.4% of overall police officer strength. Of the 67 modified duty officers, 14 were on modified protected duties (for example, pregnancy related).

Time Off In Lieu (TOIL) In line with Police Regulations, officers are compensated in respect of time spent on duty after normal tour ends or where they have been recalled to duty etc. These additional hours can be taken as payment or accrued as time off in lieu of payment. A record is kept of the number of TOIL hours accrued by officers. As at 31 March 2012, 40,864 TOIL hours had been accrued by police officers, 11,334 in Central Division, 9,677 in Eastern Division, 11,361 in Western Division and the remaining 8,492 in other areas of the force.

Source of Information: Personnel and Training Dept.

67


FREEDOM OF INFORMATION The Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002 came into effect on 1 January 2005 and provides a general right of access to all types of recorded information held by public authorities. The Act also sets out exemptions to that right and places a number of related obligations on public authorities, particularly in relation to Records Management and Publication Schemes. Tayside Police maintains a Publication Scheme which sets out the classes of information available, the manner in which the information will be published, and whether a charge will be made for the information. If information is not available through the Publication Scheme then a Freedom of Information request can be submitted. The deadline for a public authority to respond to Freedom of Information requests is 20 working days. There are times, however, when it will not be appropriate for certain types of information to be released into the public domain. As such, the Act allows authorities to withhold information in certain, limited, circumstances e.g. the information is not held by Tayside Police, the information is otherwise available, retrieval of the information sought would exceed the statutory cost limit, the applicant has requested information about themselves, the applicant has requested information about a third party, or information concerning police investigations

The time spent issuing responses takes account of the number of hours members of staff have spent answering FOI questions (when requests have been allocated to departments) but does not include FOI officer time. The cost of responses issued is based on a £15 per hour average. For a full list of charges please see h t t p : / / w w w . t a ys i d e . p o l i c e . u k / A b o u t - U s / F O I / Publication-Scheme/Charging-Regime.htm

Compliance w ith 20 day deadline (%) 70

Number of Number of Time spent QUESTIONS RESPONSES issuing received issued responses

110.0% 100.0%

60

90.0% 80.0%

50

70.0% 40

60.0% 50.0%

30

40.0% 20

30.0% 20.0%

10

10.0% 0

0.0% Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

As can be seen from the graph, Tayside Police comply with the national 20 working day deadline on almost 100% of requests every month.

The following table contains data regarding the FOI requests Tayside Police has received during 2011-12 Number of REQUESTS received

Number of REQUESTS received

Freedom of Information

Cost of responses issued

Apr

40

228

36

40

£600.00

May

60

335

49

58.25

£873.75

Jun

58

228

63

59.75

£896.25

Jul

54

213

50

65.25

£978.75

Aug

61

300

54

72.5

£1,087.50

Sep

52

285

63

74

£1,110.00

Oct

47

263

52

59

£885.00

Nov

52

245

40

60.5

£907.50

Dec

45

192

52

50.5

£757.50

Jan

53

211

51

62.25

£933.75

Feb

45

228

38

30.5

£457.50

Mar

42

238

49

87.5

£1,312.50

Total

609

2966

597

720

£10,800.00

Please note: The number of responses issued per month is irrespective of when the request the is received. For example, a request submitted at the end of February would not be responded to until March (following the 20 working days deadline). Therefore, the number of responses which appear in each row of the table do not necessarily correspond to the number of requests submitted for that month.

Source of information: Tayside Police Freedom of Information Department

68


STAFF DEVELOPMENT Staff Development

Training Course Evaluation

The Staff Development Unit at Tayside Police consists of a team of training professionals, Police Officers, Administration Support, Special Constable Coordinator and a Staff Support Adviser. They work together with colleagues from across the force, as well as the Scottish Police College, to ensure that the officers and staff of Tayside Police have the skills and knowledge to deliver a high quality service to our local communities.

Three questions were asked as detailed in the table above. 4757 students completed the survey and, as illustrated , 99% of all respondents said that the course they attended had met with their expectations.

Training Course Utilisation Rate Between April 2011 and the end of March 2012, the Staff Development Unit offered a total of 1558 courses to officers and staff of Tayside Police. There was a total of 11,621 student places available on these courses and 10,427 students were able to take advantage of these opportunities, producing a cumulative utilisation rate of 90%

To what extent do you agree with each of the following statements

The pre-course information was ‌ received in sufficient time appropriate and with necessary detail clear and easily understood

Aug 2011Mar 2012 4757 responses

94.8% 94.8% 96.8%

The content of the course was‌ well structured easy to follow delivered effectively

98.8% 99.0% 99.1%

well organised the correct length sufficient for my objectives relevant to m objectives Taking everything into consideration, the course met my expectations

98.9% 92.8% 97.9% 98.2%

The course itself was MONTHLY TRAINING COURSE UTILISATION 2011/12 Courses Held

Utilisation Rate

250

98.0%

200

96.0% 95.4% 94.0%

91.4%

91.7%

92.5% 91.2%

89.1% 150

87.0%

91.4%

99.0%

92.0% 90.0%

88.7%

88.0%

87.5%

86.6%

The above table shows the results of analysis of course evaluation forms completed by officers and staff who attended training courses run by the Staff Development .

86.0%

100

84.0% 82.8%

82.0%

50

80.0% 111

170

192

75

104

164

135

168

83

103

121

132

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

0

78.0% 76.0%

The graph above illustrates the monthly courses held and the monthly utilisation rate. In total, 13,496 training days were delivered during 2011-12.

Source of information: Performance & Planning Department

Source of information: Staff Development Unit

69


HEALTH AND SAFETY Health & Safety The Force Safety Adviser is responsible for provision of professional advice on all occupational health and safety matters to ensure the safety of all employees and public who work in or visit police buildings and to ensure in the force meets its statutory obligations.

Overall, performance was better than the corresponding period last year and areas of noteworthy attention were:

On a monthly basis the number of accidents that have occurred during the year will be published together with the causation factors.

• Lowest training injuries on record. • Lowest number of injuries during arrests on re-

• Lowest number of accidents resulting in lost time

in over 10 years, 29% decrease on previous year. cord. • Lowest number of injuries caused by sharp ob-

jects on record.

The table below shows the data for 2010-11 and 2011-12 and includes accidents & violence to Police Officers and Staff, violent incidents to Police Officers resulting in lost time and the total number of incidents resulting in lost time. The table also details the number of days lost and those incidents reported to the Health & Safety Executive.

Causation factors:

Road Traffic collisions Manual handling Slips, trips, falls Training ~ in house and at the Scottish Police College Exposure to violence Assaults Injuries caused by sharp objects Injuries during arrests Others Total

Apr Apr 2010 - % of 2011 - % of Mar Total Mar Total 2011 2012 9 6 40 9 241 99 16 84 58 562

2% 1% 7% 2% 43% 18% 3% 15% 10%

10 3 23 5 200 80 5 71 45 442

2% 1% 4% 1% 36% 14% 1% 13% 8%

The above table provides the reason for accident/ injury for this year and last year. Exposure to violence was the main cause (43%). Assaults accounted for 18% of the total and 15% of injuries were sustained during arrests.

During 2011-12 there had been 89 accidents to Police Officers and Staff. However, there were no accidents at all in the month of January - the first time this had occurred in at least 10 years. 7 violent incidents during the year resulted in Police Officers having to take time off work and the total number of incidents resulting in lost time was 20. 14 of these incidents required to be reported to the Health & Safety Executive. Many of the figures relating to Health & Safety were the best ever year-end results with two exceptions: the number of days lost, exacerbated this year by four people who sustained injuries resulting in long periods of sickness absence (all of whom had returned to work by the end of March) , and injuries sustained as a result of a road traffic collision . This year’s figure included three officers who were injured in one road traffic collision.

70


APPENDIX A: TAYSIDE POLICE PERFORMANCE FRAME-

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72


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March 2012 - Performance Report