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Ravens’ Call

THE TASMANIAN PAGAN ALLIANCE, INC. NEWSLETTER SUMMER/AUTUMN 2012 VOLUME 2

NUMBER 56


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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

Contents the Team State Coordinator Jess Steers taspainc@gmail.com

Regional Coordinator Mel Dolliver melsteers76@yahoo.com

Secretary Mandhi Allen

Treasurer Terri Baran thegeekwitch@gmail.com

Moot Convenors

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Editorial

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Eye of Newt

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Luna Journey

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Silver Broomstick Awards

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What is The Trading Table?

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St Helens Mind & Body Fest

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Compost Heap

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Living The Goddess Workshop

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Familiar Friends

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Green Practical Magic

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Profiling Tassie Pagans

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State Coordinator‘s Report Secretary / Treasurer Reports

Ravens’ Call

Editor - Mel Dolliver Hobart - Allannah Turner Launceston - Rose Dragonwulf Proof-reader - Heather Jensen North-West - Irene/Jo Corvinus Graphic Designer - Terri Baran Printer - Mandhi Allen St Helens - Debbie

Postal Address PO Box 1127 Launceston TAS 7250

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Moot Reports

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Never to Be Lent Swapped or Sold

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What‘s On

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Alternative Retail Therapies

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Folk Magic & Sigils Pagan Parenting

Disclaimer: The views contained within the Ravens’ Call newsletter are personal opinions and do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or members of the Tasmanian Pagan Alliance, Inc. Likewise, the advertisements are placed in good faith and do not signify endorsement by the editor or members of the Tasmanian Pagan Alliance, Inc.

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Colouring Pages

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Autumn Equinox Info

Back Page - Membership Renewal Form

© Copyright 2011-12 Tasmanian Pagan Alliance, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

The Pagan Alliance Ethic    

Love & Kinship with nature. Reverence for the life force & its ever-renewing cycles of life & death. Each individual is responsible for discovering & developing his/her own true nature in harmony with the greater world, & takes full responsibility for his/her actions. Acceptance of the many-faceted nature of Divinity: Acceptance that divinity exists in many forms, & can be worshipped/respected as male, female, androgynous, or in a form beyond human definition.

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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

Mel Dolliver - Editor

It‘s all very good to pick away at past experiences, to rake over long dead coals, remembering sparks and ash that have flown up and out into the universe - it can cause anxiety or amusement to consider possible future challenges, an abundance of opportunity without boundaries. But I am, at the moment gloriously devoid of pass fumbles or future concerns, living richly in present time. Aware of every bliss filled summer afternoon, to view the sky extend to its full potential unencumbered by cloud cover, swamp hawks swoop with glee above golden barley fields with fat bellies and glossy plumage.

I‘d also like to mention a passing of the torch at the Northwest moots, the fabulous Irene who has single handily resurrected the Burnie Pagans in the Pub like a phoenix from the ashes – has given the mantle of ‗Queen Awesome‘ to the lovely Jo (to hear more about Jo read the Pagan Profile) who is cutting her own style nicely with lively discussion topics, guest speakers and demonstrations of epicness! Thank you so much Irene and welcome into the fold Jo. Thanx again to all those wonderful contributors of this issue, we couldn‘t do it without you xx

I‘ve watched Midsummer close in upon the last divine long day, while twilight meanders at length prolonging full darkness, such moments fill only a small span each year – my heart aches for those who in their ignorance fail to enjoy such intense seasonal occurrences.

I‘m taking submissions already for the next Ravens‘ Call – due date 14th April. If you‘ve never written a report or review for this fine newsletter maybe it‘s time to ring my bell? melsteers76@yahoo.com I‘ll print anything you send me  Make sure the phalluses are large.

This edition finds us hurriedly packing our bags, flinging down a Berocca and bracing ourselves for an onslaught of Pagan events! Momentarily we‘re enjoying the harvest festival of Lammas held in the states Northwest coast, on the cards swiftly following is our annual camping event in March for the Autumn Equinox – held this year at the Bay of Fires in St Helens.

Goddess Bless,

Rumours abound of Samhain and Yule events to be held in the South, tales of Imbolc celebrations held in the North and factual reports of AWC 2012 abroad upon the fair shores of Sydney. Gosh, I‘ll need some new outfits!

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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

WHOLEMEAL HONEY CAKE This delicious recipe was begged (by me) from Jo who made it for a Full Moon supper. Oh, I just died upon the first moist mouthful *bliss* Jo cut me a massive slice and as you can imagine there was little remaining! Perfect for a Summer Solstice party or Moonish occasion! Ingredients: 

225g clotted cream

120g soft brown sugar

1 large egg, beaten

250g wholemeal flour (recipe doesn‘t stipulate plain or SR—I have tried with both but remember

stirring well into the mixture. 

to put baking powder in with the plain to make it

Turn into a well-greased cake tin, 18cm in diameter.

rise.)

Bake at 150°C for about 1.5 hours.

3 tablespoons warmed honey

Cool on a wire rack and enjoy with a nice cup of

50g almonds or walnuts chopped

1tsp bicarbonate of soda

tea! Recipe from Brideson, J., & Moorey, T. (1997). Wheel of The Year: Myth and magic through the seasons. London, Great Britain: Hodder & Stoughton Educational.

Method: 

Beat the egg together with the cream and sugar.

Sift

the flour, and

add

to the mixture.

The bran will stay in the sieve—turn that into the mixture when the rest has gone through. 

Mix this thoroughly and then add the honey and nuts.

Beat again and add the bicarbonate of soda,

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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

We feel powerful tides ebb and flow in our emotions, our bodies, depending on the phases of the moon. We feel her push us and then tighten the pull. The energy of the moon is a personal journey...

The Chinese Moon Festival The Chinese Moon Festival is on the 15th day of the 8th lunar month. It is also known as the Mid-autumn Festival. Chinese culture is deeply imbedded in traditional festivals. Just like Christmas and Thanksgiving in the West, the Moon Festival is one of the most important traditional events for the Chinese. The Moon Festival is full of legendary stories. Legend says that Chang Er flew to the moon, where she has lived ever since. You might see her dancing on the moon during the Moon Festival or you may see the face of the Jade Bunny, an ancient tale of sacrifice. The Moon Festival is also an occasion for family reunions. When the full moon rises, families get together to watch the full moon, eat moon cakes and sing moon poems. With the full moon, the legend, the family and the poems, you can‘t help thinking that this is really a perfect celebration, the Chinese are certainly fond of the Moon Festival. The Moon Festival is also a romantic one. A perfect night for a festival is if it is a quiet night without a silk of cloud and with a little mild breeze from the sea. Lovers spend such a romantic night together tasting the delicious moon cake with some wine while watching the full moon. Even for a couple who can't be together, they can still enjoy the night by watching the moon at the same time so it seems that they are together at that hour. A great number of poetry has been devoted to this romantic festival. Eating Moon Cakes As with every Chinese holiday, the Mid-Autumn Festival has its own special food. People eat moon cakes at Mid-Autumn Festival. The moon cake is a kind of cookie with various fillings and on the surface are printed different artistic patterns depicting the story of

Chang E flying to the moon. People treated this kind of food as one of the sacrificial offerings to the moon in the old days. Today, it has become an indispensable food while appreciating the bright moon for every family. Moon cakes come in various flavours which change according to the region but common fillings are nuts, sugar, sesame, ham and egg yolk. As the moon cake is round in shape, it symbolizes the reunion of a family, so it is easy to understand how the eating of moon cakes under the round moon can inspire the missing of distant relatives. Nowadays, people present the moon cakes to relatives and friends to demonstrate that they wish them a long and happy life. The Lady - Chang Er The time of this story is around 2170 B.C. The earth once had ten suns circling over it, each took its turn to illuminate to the earth. But one day all ten suns appeared together, scorching the earth with their heat. The earth was saved by a strong and tyrannical archer Hou Yi. He succeeded in shooting down nine of the suns. One day, Hou Yi stole the elixir of life from a goddess. However his beautiful wife Chang Er drank the elixir of life in order to save the people from her husband's tyrannical rule. After drinking it, she found herself floating and flew to the moon. Hou Yi loved his divinely beautiful wife so much, he didn't shoot down the moon. The Hare - Jade Rabbit In this legend, three fairy sages transformed themselves into pitiful old men and begged for something to eat from a fox, a monkey and a rabbit. The fox and the monkey both had food to give to the old men, but the rabbit, empty-handed, offered his own flesh instead, jumping into a blazing fire to cook himself. The sages were so touched by the rabbit's sacrifice that they let him live in the Moon Palace where he became the "Jade Rabbit."

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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

The Silver Broomstick Awards went off without a hitch in 2011. The event was held in Hobart, at Risdon Vale Park, and was organised by the amazing Avril and Ally - thanks girls! We started off with a lovely lunch and our own prayer flag-making workshop, followed by some quick housekeeping and then the all-important awards. The winners this year were: North-West Moot Attendee - Rebecca Clarke North Moot Attendee - Mel Ell St Helens Moot Attendee - TBA Hobart Moot Attendee - TBA Green Man Award - Chris Riley Maiden Mother Crone Award - Zahira Ravens‘ Call Award - Lisa Bolton Up & Comin‘ Youngen Award - Danielle McCarthy The Silver Broomstick Award - Chris Riley & Cindy Watkins We also had appreciation awards to those who assisted with the preparation for the AWC, including those who helped at our epic sewing bee. Thanks to all for their assistance in the last twelve months, and we appreciate your continued support! ~ Terri

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This annual event was created by a few PA members over a bottle of red way back in 2001. The Silver Broomstick Awards is firstly an annual appreciation ceremony for all the fantastic Tasmanian Pagan Alliance members who have contributed in any capacity during the year – helping with Sabbat events, moots, holding workshops or discussion topics, brainstorming ideas, volunteering articles for the Ravens‘ Call, and behind the scenes tasks or donating time and effort all for our spiritual community. It was decided that this event would become our Summer Solstice celebration – December is a busy time for most, usually with good weather, so a BBQ, rather than a whole weekend event, is perfect for the Awards. It‘s a great opportunity to enjoy a light hearted Summer Solstice gathering of friends and possibly family – to enjoy each other‘s company in a relaxed picnic style environment. This day is without ritual so it‘s a great time to introduce family, friends or any other interested parties to the Tas Pagan Alliance. The Silver Broomstick Awards is a free event for all members, and the Tas Pagan Alliance foots the bill for an all you can eat BBQ lunch, so you simply need to bring a camping chair and sunscreen, the rest is provided! As the Pagan Alliance in Tasmania has many members spread far and wide though out, this event is held in a different location every year, so even if you‘re not a big traveller at least one Silver Broomstick Awards every few years should be held local to you (but don‘t forget that just like all our events, people do travel from far and wide, so there‘s often opportunity to car pool if you want!) Nominations for all our categories as well as the Silver Broomstick Awards can be filled in on-line at our website, found in your Ravens‘ Call closer to the date and at all pub moots. It‘s important to keep an eye out for those special members who contribute throughout the year, we need to let them know just how fantastic they are and that we appreciate all their efforts. Although it would be tempting to vote for one of our faithful administration team – each of those members put their hand up for committee roles and therefore all the hard work too, we encourage members to look around at regular members being wonderful contributors when it‘s time for you to nominate – however the choice is always yours. Awards and eating (as great as those two things are!) aren‘t the only things happening at the Silver Broomstick Awards. Workshops, games, and more are often added to the day, so be sure to come along and celebrate the Summer Solstice with us at the next Silver Broomstick Awards.

Past Silver Broomstick Award Winners! 2001 - Heather Jensen & Bob Cox 2002 - Mel Steers & Jess Steers 2003 - Sabian Popow 2005 - Allannah Turner-Hughes 2006 - Mel Dolliver 2008 - Rose Dragonwulf 2010 - Terri Baran

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What is...

The Trading Table? The Trading Table is a familiar fixture at our gatherings; a self made tradition which has been embraced by all members for years now. For those who weren‘t around when it was first created, we thought to give you a short explanation and history on the much loved Tasmanian Pagan Alliance Trade Table. Almost 10 years ago, it wasn‘t unusual to have our small membership base dashing across the state for weekend long Sabbat celebrations, camping weekends and house events. It was only $8 a year to join the Alliance back then, and needless to say after posting the Raven‘s Call out 4 times of year this left very little in the bank for anything else. We were always on the hunt for new ways to make a little extra to cover costs and give a little bit extra to the membership – this is how the Trade Table was born. Reharn (unfortunately no longer a member), from Devonport, office lady, internet user and mum, was quite the ideas woman, and like most Pagans, a collector of stuff! But what to do with all the unwanted or unused Pagan paraphernalia filling up her cupboards, too good for Vinnies but not quite worth listing on eBay? Reharn soon realised the rest of us were the same, and came up with the idea of the Trade Table. The way it works? Spring clean your cupboards, bookshelf and garden, and gather anything you no longer want – a crystal that‘s done its job, a book that is no longer relevant, a candle holder you replaced, or a chalice that you never quite meshed with. Or perhaps your plum tree has had a good crop, or you‘ve got a few hemlock seeds to spare, and the lemon balm is springing up babies perfect for potting – all these items are perfect for the Trade Table! One witch‘s trash is another witch‘s treasure, and how better to get some new stuff than swap for your old stuff? Not only do you clean out your cupboards, but these are cash free transactions too! So how does this raise money for the Alliance? Instead of paying each other for the items, you give a coin donation for each item you place on the table to Alliance. Items are usually placed on the table, with a label attached saying who the owner of that object is. This gives everyone time to look at the items throughout the weekend, admiring other‘s collections and spying what they would like to trade for. Trading usually occurs on the last day of the event. The rules of trading have always been very relaxed (remember, you were probably going to throw this stuff out or give it away anyway) – the idea is to be very negotiable. Don‘t have anything to trade, but something on the table you really like? Don‘t worry! Offering to make a cuppa, provide a compliment, or even give a nice big hug are considered things definitely worth trading! To trade, you simply ask the person who has the item you want what of yours they would like to trade, or offer to trade this for that. Any items remaining on the table are usually auctioned off, or returned to their owners for trading next time. It‘s not unusual for some items, such as books, to be regular Trade Table items – after being read by one person, bought along to the next event to be traded again. For those who have been around a while, yes, the ―When I say no, I feel guilty‖ book is still doing the rounds… Focused on cash free transactions, recycling, spring cleaning, and a bit of fundraising on the side, the Trade Table is as successful now as it was when Reharn first invented it all those years ago – so clean out your cupboards, find a sturdy box, and bring your items along to the next event to trade!

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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

St Helens Mind & Body Fest! by Mikel Shang An overcast, yet warm weekend of the 21st & 22nd of January, saw the first Mind & Body Festival held in St Helens. It coincided with the area's annual Athletic Carnival and provided the people of the North East with a wondrous display of natural therapists, aura photos, crystal sales, energy healings, clothing, massages, crystal light healing, sound therapy, psychic readings, face painting, drumming & various workshops. Jo Kelly, a local resident & purveyor of crystal heart wands, was the instigator and organiser. Jo has been a resident of St Helens for many years and runs her own home decorating business called KAANDOO! The idea came about from various avenues of the local community, looking for information, support & choices for their own lives and that of their families! My own experience of being a stall holder was a very pleasant & joyful one, as I introduced myself and my own business, Healing Hands Massage, to the people of St Helens . My stall consisted of crystal sales, jewellery & psychic readings. I found the people to be quiet open to new ideas & eager to chat about the products for sale & about the energies of 2012 & what that means to them! It is anticipated that this will become an annual event and can only become stronger & more informative. I am certainly going to avail myself & Healing Hands again to this event and I encourage all others with products, information to share or healing of any sort, to join us for next year's event!

RIP My Little Crone Tree by Rose DragonWulf ©2012 RIP my little Crone tree I'm sorry I never got to say goodbye. I still saw your strength and beauty, And I guess that's why I cry. When people commented on the dead tree out front I'd say there's life in that old girl yet, And every year you'd prove me right, As a little green would grow, Among the mossed and gnarly branches Some life, just on one side, would show. And when I heard the chainsaw today, And heard the chipper scream, I knew they had decided your final day was deemed. I'm sorry I couldn't stop them, And I couldn't bare to look, As I knew you screamed and as I shook. And when they left, I went outside and collected what of you I could Some chips, sawdust, some tiny branches, All over the verge were little bits of wood. And if my tears could bring back life, You'd be a strong sapling now. As I gathered you, through my tears I touched where they had sliced you from the ground. And saw that I was always right Your trunk wasn't dead at all, but alive and green wood, Where you had once strongly stood. Jean (Vincent) http://thinking-about-art.blogspot.com

Rest In Peace my little Crone tree I hope you will forgive And unless they come back and take your roots too, We may not have seen the end of you for good.

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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

The Compost Heap suggests a venture out into the garden. Something earthy, seasonal and full of worms… Isis-made Basic COMPOST This edition, we are borrowing a blog post from Launceston local, Isis. On her blog, Isis describes herself as “a 20-something creative living on 'the apple isle', exploring the grey area between art, craft & design, and trying to lead a simple life. I'm all about vintage, nana naps, sewing, food, meeting people from foreign lands (hopefully in foreign land), music festivals and all things indie.”. Although Isis does not follow any pagan tradition, her ideals are very much in line with pagan thinking. If you enjoy this article, please visit Isis’ blog at www.isismade.blogspot.com – I’m sure you will enjoy her dreamy photography, outside of the box thinking, and fantastic personal endeavours as much as I do! Jess Composting This post is for my dear friend Lizzi, who wants some tips on composting, and anyone else who might find this interesting. I am by no means an expert on composting, but I'll sum up what I know. The Super Simple Version: put all natural things you don't want in a big pile and let them rot, nature will take care of everything for you. Come back in anywhere from 2 months to 2 years and you could have dirt. And probably a tomato plant. The Slightly Longer Version: 

Don't go read a tonne of books about what and what not to do. You will be overwhelmed and most likely walk away without trying. Everyone's got their ideas about what is best, but in the end it's pretty much impossible for your compost not to work, it's just a matter of how long it will take.

How it works: Composting is just replicating a natural process that happens in vegetation every second of the day. When we talk about something composting, we're really talking about it decomposing, so I wonder why we don't call it 'decomposting' or something. All natural things decompose - they rot - and when they do they make the perfect meal for all sorts of creepy crawly things living on or in the ground. When these bugs/beetles/worms/insects/ microscopic weird things eat the rotting thing, they poop out what ever they don't need and some other fella comes along and eats his poop. All these little fellas are going 'round eating rotting stuff/each other/each others' poop (I dare you to get your kids to draw a picture of that scene), and this whole process starts to break everything up smaller and smaller. And don't forget that all these fellas have got a pretty short life span so they are making the most of it all by eatin up, makin babies, and generally just partying it up before they die; cos when they die, they also start to decompose and are broken up in to little pieces... and so it continues.

Now, for this whole process to work you need to create the right environment in your compost pile. You need to set the scene for the party! Your little fellas aren't too picky, but they like it moist. They won't really want to come and party if

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they are drowned out or if it's too dry. Now, don't worry about this too much. Think about this in the natural environment. Rain comes and it goes. Places flood and places are in drought. It's nature and it's hard to control. Likewise your compost bin will be hard to get perfect. Generally I'd say let the rain do the watering and you'll be fine. But if you want you could add some dry content if it seems too wet, or some water if it seems too dry. Ok the next important thing is that there is heat. You need heat to 1) make it cosy for the little guys, 2) to help rot stuff, 3) to kill off anything that wants to start growing again. This last point is very important. You want your compost to be so hot that it doesn't allow seeds to germinate and grow (lack of sunlight is also helping with this too). Generally if you make sure your compost is no less than a metre wide and deep, it should stay hot enough. It isn't all bad if some stuff regrows, this year I got silver beet and pumpkin growing out of my compost! So, keep your compost bin in a sunny spot. An added bonus of this combination of heat and moisture is it encourages mould and fungi to grow. This is good because it encourages more and varied little fellas to come and join the party. And this brings me to another good point: Just like any good party, you want your compost to be alive with a big mix of characters. The more dynamic your compost pile is, the wilder the party, and the faster it will compost. The wider the range of food and drinks served at your compost party, the wider the range of little fellas wanna check it out, and the more dynamic it gets. So what can you add to the mix? Well basically anything natural that would normally decompose, such as garden clippings, food scraps, leaf litter etc. Simply, the softer and more delicate it is, the quicker it will compost. The older and tougher it is, the longer it will take. The more variation of soft and tough, the better. Here is a list (http:// tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/surprising-compost-items.htm) of things you can add to your compost that you probably thought you couldn't. There are arguments against not putting some things in your compost, particularly onion, citrus, meat, and cooked foods; you could research this further online. Meats and other animal products most people tend to avoid, as these can attract rodents and other pest. It's up to you how much you want to bother with this. Personally, I put it all in, including dead mice. You may have noticed that compost piles come in many shapes and forms. Your compost pile could be anything from simply just a pile on the ground with a piece of black plastic over it (I have found that sometimes this is the most effective), to an old garbage bin, to a wooden crate or two, to a plastic tumbler. These all suit different needs and budgets. The general set up is some form of container that you can put stuff in from the top, and get the end result (dirt) from the bottom. They may or may not have lids, doors, and rodent proofing. If you are reading this you probably want something simple and maybe cheap. I would recommend you make a small and simple compost bin from an old storage tub or garbage bin or wooden crates. Mine is in a large outdoor toy storage box that cost only $30 cos it got busted up while shipping. I just took the bottom off so it was easy for the bugs and worms to make their way up from the ground underneath. You may have picked up on the idea that most people want this process to happen quickly. That is because a fast moving compost is less likely to smell, is less likely to attract pests and will give your free dirt sooner. One way to encourage rapid composting is to turn your compost pile. By 'turn' I mean move and aerate it, this is usually done with a pitch fork or shovel. This moves everything and everyone about, making it all a bit more exciting. A bit like playing musical chairs at your party; you were sitting in front of the rice crisps all morning, then you got moved in front of the birthday cake - hell yeah, dig in! Again, it's your choice as to how much effort you want to put into your compost. Some die-hard composters turn their pile everyday! I am the extreme opposite; I have turned my pile about twice in two years. Bad composter, Isis! But it was my choice to be a lazy composter, and the result is that my compost does it's thing much more slowly (I didn't get any compost in the whole first year!), but it still gets there eventually. How about you aim to turn your pile: whenever you feel like it! And that my friends is all I've got to say, I hope someone found it useful! have fun x isis

Written by Isis St Pierre, owner of Milkbar, a fresh new cafe in Launceston that composts all of it's food scraps! www.themilkbarcafe.com.au

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An afternoon workshop exploring the many faces of t he Go d d es s , w it h Z a hira a nd Jo . Held at Gravely Beach on the states Northern coast, the first ‗Living the Goddess‘ workshop was a huge success! We began the afternoon receiving our information packs swiftly followed by singing Goddess style introductions, it was fantastic to see familiar faces and to meet new friends – I love that people are willing to travel for these kinds of events, worshiping the Goddess by connecting energies, listening and sharing. Our Goddess journey began with Aphrodite – Greek Goddess of beauty and love. Each attendee was asked to wear the colour magenta, to represent compassion, connection to the source and divine love. Soft pink scarves, hot pink skirts, vivid magenta wraps and blouses – a uniform of healing, gentleness and hidden possibilities - we did indeed look bright! Aphrodite taught us to celebrate our own inner and outer beauty, to look beyond the stereotype of female vanity and the importance of spending time enjoying an activity that directly benefits ourselves. Simple pleasures nourishing the body and soul, nature walks, bubble baths, building a beautiful sacred space, reading, taking photos, creative projects and personal beauty treatments - only when first care for ourselves can we expend energy towards others. Next ‗Living the Goddess‘ workshop will be held on February 18 th For Further details please turn to our ‗Whats On‘ page (Pg 17)

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my.leukaemiafoundation.org.au/cassiewighton I'm being brave and doing the Worlds Greatest Shave! Please sponsor me now! What made you decide to be a part of The Worlds Greatest Shave 2012? I was blessed in 2008 to give birth to a healthy baby girl. As the months went on, I started to become aware that some kids weren‘t so lucky. Watching shows on TV and hearing stories about children having to go through medical treatment for horrible diseases that have no cure, I decided I wanted to do something to help find a cure. Have you gone in this before - or raised money for leukaemia in the past? I haven‘t been in Worlds Greatest Shave before, but in 2010 I raised over $500 for The Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund through 'Walk For A Cure'. In 2011 I raised nearly $200 for St Giles through 'Walk With Me'. This year I‘ve decided to help The Leukaemia Foundation through "Worlds Greatest Shave". I am hoping by shaving my hair it will encourage more people to dig deep and donate more. I‘m aiming for $1500, which is triple what I made in 2010 for JDRF. How do you think the sacrifice of your hair will feel? The thought of sacrificing my hair does make me nervous. I‘ve never had short hair before. But when you think of what those poor children who go through not just losing their hair, but all the pain and medical treatment they endure, being stuck in hospital away from family and friends, my hair doesn‘t seem that important anymore. Some people get body or facial piercings or tattoos at a significant corner stone of their life, some bodily reminder of a new beginning - do you think this is, or will become one for you? I don‘t think this will really be a corner stone in my life, or a new beginning. I just really want to do something to help those kids less fortunate. And if shaving my head will encourage more people to give, I think that‘s a small sacrifice to pay 

Thanx heaps Cassie – I’m sure our readers will support your journey – even a small amount like $5 helps – every donation leads to the desired goal. Just follow the above web link to support Cassie. I’m sure she’ll look fab as a baldy!!

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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

Would we say these wacky stick insects are our familiars? Probably not, it‘s hard to say in our family what critter is a favourite at any given time, let alone holds the special bonding energy required to make a familiar relationship. However they are very cool and can teach some handy aspects, if you‘re willing to be silent, patient and gentle. Spiny leaf insect Extatosoma tiaratum Identification: The Spiny Leaf Insect is not a true Leaf Insect, but a species of Stick Insect. It is variable in colour and can be green, light brown or reddish brown. It is covered in sharp spines and the legs have flattened leaf-like projections. The head has an odd pointed cone shape and looks like it is on back to front. Males have much slimmer bodies, and two pairs of fully developed wings and can fly. Females have stout abdomens, a single pair of tiny wings and cannot fly. They rely on camouflage to avoid predators, looking like a stick with leaves. When disturbed they can strike out with their spiny legs. They often curl the end of their abdomen over their back like a scorpion. The Spiny Leaf Insect is a popular insect pet. Size: Body length: females to 20cm; males to 11cm Food: Spiny Leaf Insects feed mainly on Eucalyptus trees, but will also feed on other plants such as Hawthorn, Raspberry and Rose bushes. Range: Found in coastal regions of Queensland and northern New South Wales. Symbolism of the stick insect : Walking Stick Bug tells you that this is the time to keep your plans close to your heart & to reveal them to no one just yet. Silence & stillness are the watchwords for the moment, since there's a danger that someone or something may be about to undermine or sabotage your intentions. On the other hand, there's the possibility that you're holding too tightly to those plans & are thinking them to death without ever taking the steps that are needed to bring them into fruition. Unfulfilled dreams can undermine your energy & self-esteem as they demand to be brought into manifestation, so take time now to consciously free those plans & make a list of the first steps you can take to begin the process. Later, when the energy favours more aggressive action, you'll be ready to go. Meditation & dream work are very helpful now as you solidify your ideas. It's not a time for action, but is perfect for refining what you have already begun, as well as for asking for inspiration from the deepest parts of your psyche. Rest can be important no w as the seasons change & our bodies require more sleep as well as warm, nourishing foods, especially those that take awhile to cook - stews, breads & casseroles. You may not feel so much like socializing, but are drawn to the home hearth, quiet music & good books. Walking Stick Bug will wait in perfect stillness for his meal to come along, or will freeze in place as a predator passes by, & we could benefit from these behaviours during this week. Pay close attention to what's going on around you, listen to your intuition about the people you think you can trust, & as you wait, nourish yourself & build your dreams. Resources: http://sunmountaininsight.blogspot.com/2010/11/animal-totem-energy-for-week-of-nov-7.html http://www.ozanimals.com/Insect/Spiny-Leaf-Insect/Extatosoma/tiaratum.html

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Let your creative juices flow, while tackling a simple crafty project that can transform your front door into a vertical altar. Don‘t let Christmas time steal the thunder of door decorations, change your wreath with every Sabbat celebration. All you need is a basic structure like – grape vines, raffia or any flexible green sticks, which will bend into a nice round shape. This forms your base and it‘s easy to tie – just about anything onto it. This activity is inexpensive and fun, especially if you don‘t have the space for an altar – it‘s lovely to have a beautiful seasonal token to welcome you home. An excellent source book to making wreaths is – 30 Wreaths and Garlands, enchanting displays with fresh and dried flowers, ISBN 1 86035 196 4

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What spiritual path do you follow? I work mainly with the energies of the earth and the higher realms. Pagan is the word I have been using to encompass this but maybe Eclectic is a better word. Favourite Sabbat? Why? Spring Equinox; I like to watch the new life emerging around me in the form of plants in the garden and baby animals in the paddocks. Which moot do you most regularly attend? Burnie, as it is closer and somehow I‘ve ended up organising them Favourite ritual tool? Why? Candles as they are great for setting the mood, focusing intent and sending energy out to the universe. Mead or Mulled wine? Mulled wine as it tastes different every time but always warms me up. The most used crystal in your collection is…and why? When I first started to journey with the crystals my most used crystal would have been Amethyst for its calming and cleansing energies. These days I use a variety of crystals for different purposes, but the most common would be Rose Quartz; to bring in the energies of unconditional love, Moonstone; for its connection to the moon and the feminine and Clear Quartz as it is a master healer and energiser.

Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

Each month we will explore a different Goddess and her qualities and how they can be applied to our everyday lives. Favourite movie? I still believe in fairytales so my favourite movie, at the moment, is Tangled. First Pagan book ever brought? Issue 7 of Witchcraft magazine. If you could meet a famous Pagan person (author, singer or other) who would it be? Why? I would love to meet Lucy Cavendish and have a chat about her oracle cards, particularly the Dragonfae and their energies. Favourite Ravens’ Call article? I love the practical ideas and recipes in the Eye of Newt and Green Practical magic articles. Skyclad, robed or casual? Depends on the intent. How would you liked to be remembered? As someone who had a positive influence on the lives of those around me. Thankyou Jo for answering the 13 Pagan Profile questions xx ED

Next Issue WINTER/ SPRING

Do you have a recent pagan interest/activity? Or an event or workshop attended? I have recently started to facilitate a monthly workshop with Zahira called Living the Goddess.

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Despite the days being longer this time of year, I think time seems to fly so much more in the warmer months. It feels like it wasn‘t that long ago I was writing my last State Coordinator‘s report! Just like everyone else, I have been flat out (I‘m writing this from the shade of my apricot tree, taking a break from sanding plaster, and admiring a brilliant summer sunset over Mount Wellington – yes, MY apricot tree, in MY garden – to give you a bit of a hint of what I‘ve been doing this last month!) and the Tasmanian Pagan Alliance has been the same! Lammas is just around the corner, and once again we‘re hosting a weekend long event in the North West of the State at the beloved Fulton Park. We‘re extra excited to check out the brand new bunk houses recently completed at the Park, and I hope to see you there to celebrate the harvest. All 4 pub moots have also been going well – new people and regulars alike, enjoying group discussion in the North, goddess talks in the North East, presentations by community members such as Julia Phillips in the South, and chats about elementals and crystals in the North West! I hope you all find the time to come along to a moot in your area at least a few times a year, they really are such a great night of pagan socialising, and all our moot conveners do such a great job! As mentioned in Mel‘s editors note, we now officially farewell Irene as our North West Moot Convener. Irene has held the post for a few years now, revived the North West moots and done an absolutely fantastic job! Irene is overdue for a rest, and I hear on the grape vine she is busy with local animal rescue, and her own artistic projects. Irene, I hope you have a great time attending the moots without the worry of organising them, and we thank you so much for your work over the last few years (and I hope to meet some of your lovely feathered friends soon!). Long time member Jo is now our North West Moot Convener – welcome Jo! If you are from the North West, or visiting at the right time, be sure to head along to the RSL for a great home cooked meal, and support Jo in her new role as Moot Convener! I hope you all have a wonderful summer harvest time, Jess taspainc@gmail.com

(by Jess for Mandhi)

In the Quarter October - December 2011, total revenue was $320.00, consisting completely of renewing and new memberships.

The Wiccan Conference has boosted membership numbers, and we are starting the year with 61 members – 23 from the South, 21 from the North, 16 in the North West and 1 in the North East. Thank you to everyone who renewed their memberships for another financial year.

Total expenses were $619.70, consisting of website hosting, postage and reimbursements of expenses following the AWC 2011.

After membership renewals, we now have 21 members receiving the Raven‘s Call online (that‘s 34% of our members) – this saves us a whopping $67.20 a quarter in copying and posting costs! These members also receive the Raven‘s Call first, without delay, and can view the edition in colour also – and save 357 pieces of paper! If you would like to receive your Raven‘s Call online also, please let us know.

Not a terrible quarter - we did have quite a bit of money coming in in the months before this quarter because of AWC registrations, but of course the majority of those funds went towards accommodation, catering, entertainment and the costs of producing t-shirts and showbags, amongst other things. It would be great to see some more memberships coming in so that we can have the funds to continue to hold fun and exciting events for everyone!

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North-West Moots When: 2nd Thursday of every month Where: Burnie RSL, 36 Alexander St Start Time: 6:00pm Contact: Jo on 0437 366 711 or jo.corvinus@yahoo.com.au December A big thank you goes to the Burnie RSL manager Brendan for offering us the large projector screen to give us (and members of the public) a clear view of Zahira‘s pictures of the Goddess Conference. As beautiful images of the Venus of Willendorf statue and the conference altar filled the screen Zahira shared her experiences of the workshops, talks, book launches and rituals she attended at the conference in October. Among the images were a few well known Pagan identities such as Lucy Cavendish and Wendy Rule. There were also some interesting speakers at the conference including Kathy Jones who is a Priestess from the Glastonbury Goddess Temple in the UK. The conference was held on the Gold Coast in Queensland and the event will repeat again in 2012. Thank you Zahira, for sharing your experiences and knowledge with us. January The Fay Folk and Elementals was the topic up for discussion at this month‘s moot. This topic proved quite interesting as we first delved into our combined understandings of the Fay Folk and our personal experiences of them. While it seems that most people acknowledge and respect the Fay Folk by leaving out milk and food for them at different times of the year or leaving parts of the garden wild just for their use. All held the consensus that the Fay would not be beneficial magical partners due to their unpredictable nature and lack of love for humans in general. Elementals on the other hand were sought out by the majority of the moot participants, in ritual, but as their pure elemental energies not necessarily in the stylised versions (sylphs, salamanders, undines and gnomes) that are often portrayed in books. ~*~ Launceston Moots When: Last Tuesday of every month (except Dec) Where: Alchemy Bar, 90 George St Launceston Time: 7:00pm onwards Contact: Rose - rosiesgrove@gmail.com

The Launceston Pagan Moots ended on a high note for 2011 by an increased in members attending the moots no doubt due a lot due to the hard work of the AWC, offering a night on 'Dispelling the Myths & Misconceptions of Paganism'. While aimed at those who've never attended a public event before, or weren't sure if Paganism is for them or wanting to learn more about the interests of their friends or family, it created a LOT of discussion from all attendees. It was so popular I am looking at make sure we hold a night like this at least every 6 months, not just for newcomers but we all at time have questions or like to learn new things. With this in mind I am going to offer topics covering different basic Pagan practices over 2012 with our first one occurring in January about altars-where to put it, what to include, different correspondences and can any choices be 'wrong'. The February Moot will see Tasmania‘s longest running ghost finding team 'Team Strigoi' discussing their personal experiences and team investigations around Tasmania and there may even be an extra treat for those that can stay after the talk. Other topics for 2012 include Anglo-Saxon practice from a personal perspective, PhD research into hidden objects and symbols found in homes and buildings in Tasmania and around Australia, dowsing and maybe even zen doodling, candle making, balm making and making your own journal/Book of Shadows. As many members are aware I have been convening the moots for over 3 1/2 years now and have asked if anyone would like to take over this position now or at least be able to assist in tasks needed to run the moots successfully as I am no longer able to attend every monthplease contact me if you are interested via rosiesgrove@gmail.com Launceston Pagan moots run on the last Tuesday of the month from 7pm and offer a casual atmosphere to join others for dinner and lively discussion on Pagan interests. If you would be interested in presenting a topic or know someone who would, please let me know. May 2012 be your best year so far. Blessings Rose ~*~

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Southern Moots When: First Thursday of every month Where: New Sydney Hotel - 87 Bathurst St Time: 6:30pm onwards Contact: Allannah - taspalliance@hotmail.com

ENGLAND, CV37 6NT info@rollrightstones.co.uk

January There were twenty-one attendees, some regulars, some not so much, and it was lovely to see all of them. We mixed things up a bit with Morgan as moot convener for the evening :)

Duke asked a great question that Allannah suggested become a question for the February moots: Should non UK Pagans raise funds for the UK sacred sites? What do you think? :) Blessings, Avril ~*~

Allannah avoided receiving the Tas. Pagan Alliance Wooden Spoon award (there's always February hehe) and we were all lucky enough to experience Julie Phillips' presentation on the English Roll right Stones, 'Hrolla-landriht - A local perspective'.

St Helens Moot When: First Sunday of every month Where: ‗Something Fabulous‘, Shop 1/7 Pendrigh Place Start Time: 3:00pm onwards Contact: Debbie - greb2@bigpond.com

Julie is more than qualified to present on this topic, having lived near the site and attended rituals there for many years. She was also the Roll right Trust Site Manager for just over a year.

Our last moot was going to be our annual Solstice beach party for family and friends, but due to inclement weather was held at my place, under-cover and indoors! But fun was still had for all.

The presentation is great so, if you have the opportunity, come along next time Julie offers it. Highlights included... *The site stands on a prehistoric track way surrounded by Neolithic and Bronze Age stones and is in three main parts. *The parts are the King's Men (C2500-2000BCE), the King's Stone (C1800-1500BCE) and the Whispering Knights (C3800-3000BCE). *The oldest part, the Whispering Knights, dates back to 3800-3000BCE. Considering that Stone Henge is only from circa 2500BCE, that is pretty old! *The site has always been a focal point for spiritual energy, and has three identified ley lines. *Some of the lichen at the site is over eight-hundred years old! *For some lovely art of the site, check out the artist Underhill, from the late 1800s. *There are some interesting legends and creepy stories regarding the site - ask Julie! *There are rituals held there regularly, including Beltane and Litha. If you would like information on the site, contact the Rollright Trust: Suite 3 Arden Crt, Arden Street, Stratford Upon Avon,

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2012 moots we have decided to have our own Goddess Workshops, and every month will be looking at a different Goddess drawn out of a hat the month before, and we will each do a bit of research and share the info. Starts 1st Sunday in Feb, we will then choose the first of our Goddesses to study. Blessings Debbie


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Ravens‘ Call—Summer/Autumn 2012 (Vol. 2)

The Real Witches' Garden: Spells, Herbs, Plants and Magical Spaces Outdoors Kate West Publisher - Element ISBN 0 00 716322 3

..."the Witch as herbalist and healer"... ..."the garden can enhance the Craft and the Craft can enhance the garden"...

Maybe it is because my memory is failing me in my old age ;) Or maybe is it because I went on somewhat of a Pagan book-buying spree in my early years, but I cannot for the life of me recall the first Pagan book I bought, borrowed or was given. I don't have a favourite book either; there are far too many! I would have to admit that, being a child of the nineties, I used the internet for some of the first information I received about the Craft, until I got sick of the flashing-goth-fairies and sparkling moon images everywhere.. So then I thought, "I was a complete beginner not so long ago, and I wish I had been introduced to a helpful book, rather than have to wade through piles of dodgy publications first." Which is why I shall now review a somewhat commercial, but rather lovely book by Kate West, author of - The Real Witches' Kitchen, The Real Witches' Coven, Pagan Rites of Passage and several others. What first drew me to the book was the cover (yes I know, I am such a sucker for a pretty picture) which is a photo of a rather enchanting looking garden. It contains a dodgy pumpkin, lavender, fennel (growing inside a rusty cauldron), buttercups, more plants and a besom standing against the wall. The tree partially shading said garden has sun catchers dangling from its branches, catching the light. Most importantly, to seventeen year old Av, it looked like a garden that might be recreated in the tiny patch of dirt outside my bedroom window. Kate starts with the basics... ...'a basic ritual goes something like'... ..."A nature-based belief system"... ..."Wheel of the Year"... ..."the Elements"... ..."The Goddess and the God"...

West encourages the reader to consider climate, wildlife, space and co-habitants when planning a garden. She goes on to introduce some ideas for those, like me, who are yet to develop their creativity ;) For example: * Planting flower beds in a shape, like the Triple Moon. * Placing plants that correspond with the elements in the appropriate directions of the garden, for example: Earth honeysuckle/bulbs/tulips, Air - borage/dandelion/sage Fire - basil/fennel/marigold, Water - chamomile/jasmine/ poppies, Spirit - skullcap/wormwood/damiana. * West also suggests having permanent features for each Element, such as a pond for Water, fire pit for fire and so on. Throughout her book, West provides handy lists which include: deities and their associated plants, plants for the Elements, plants for each festival and how to use them and general botanicals and their uses. Also included are a step by step guide to blessing, dedicating and consecrating sacred space and spell ideas for healing plants, security and privacy etcetera. There is a guide to gardening during the moon phases and a nice section on planning a vertical garden if you're low on space. West also discusses medicinal and spell gardens. This book is good for those new to the Craft, and may bore the more experienced Pagans out there. But it DOES have some handy references for those wanting to double-check correspondences and so on. Re-flicking through the book now with its lists and lovely illustrations, has led to me potting up another eight plants, and I *may* have raided the neighbourhood Mugwort bush ;) And really, who doesn't like getting their hands dirty in the garden?! Blessings, Av

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LIVING THE GODDESS WORKSHOPS with Jo & Zahira

SPIRITUAL BOOTCAMP Back to Basics in a serene natural environment. Attunement to the Elements, becoming one with the Universe ―For as above, so below, as about so within‖ A chance to heal, to grow, to become.

Learn about a different Goddess each month and explore practical ways to incorporate her qualities into your daily life. Jo and Zahira will be your hostesses. Light afternoon tea will be provided. February Workshop Date: Saturday, February 18th 2012 Time: 1:45pm for a 2:00pm start. Ends at 5:00pm. Cost: Adults $30 / Children $20 (must be accompanied by an adult). 10% discount if paid by February 9th. All other enrolments must be received by February 14th. Venue: Port Sorell. Full details on enrolment. Bring: A cushion. If you have a drum, feel free to bring it too. There will be a sales/trade table so bring anything you want to sell. Your surplus item might be someone else‘s treasure. Wear: Something gold coloured. It could be a hat, a top, or come completely in gold! Payment Options: Paypal, cheque, money order or direct deposit. Both women and men are invited, as long as you genuinely want to learn!

Meditate your way through the corridors of your mind, awakening your ESP. Understand and develop you psychic abilities using easy to follow exercises and tools. Bring back to your life your inherited gift of magick within and take control of your journey. What you get: Personal Tutoring Self-Development Rituals All accommodation and meals paid in full. Starts: Sunday afternoon between 2.00pm and 4.00pm Finish: Tuesday afternoon at 4.00pm Where: The Purple Shack – Lake Leake (North East) Fee: $450.00 per person Special weekend sessions available for your convenience. Weekend rate: $550.00 per person We accept more than one person per session, but no more than 2 people. Call Delaila on 0404 463 559 for a booking or contact Delaila via email at templeofthepentagon@hotmail.com for more information.

For more details and to book your spot, contact Zahira on 0418 139 826 / zahira1au@yahoo.com.au

To submit your event, contact Mel on melsteers76@yahoo.com The above events are submitted by our readers and are placed in good faith. They do not signify endorsement by the editor or members of the Tasmanian Pagan Alliance, Inc.

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Kindred Drums Cheryl & Mike Maddock Dodges Ferry

By Jess When Cheryl and Mike contacted me about coming along to the Australian Wiccan Conference last year, I was very excited to finally meet two people I had heard so much about over the years. Cheryl and Mike, and their beautiful drums, were well received at the Conference and I was thrilled when Cheryl said they would love to join the Tasmanian Pagan Alliance, become involved and also share their amazing works with our membership. By way of welcome and introduction, I interviewed Cheryl and Mike about what they do. Welcome to the Tasmanian Pagan Alliance Cheryl and Mike! Over the years I have been to plenty of pagan and spiritual events in Tasmania where I have spied many of your beautiful drums. Can you tell us about how you become Kindred Drums? CHERYL:- Thank you for your lovely introduction Jess. When I began taking Shamanic circle many years ago I used a drum that we had bought. People loved the sound of it and what it did for them and asked me if my Mike could make them a drum the same. Mike had been a wood turner for many years, using our beautiful Tasmanian timbers and, over some months developed the methods he now uses to make his drums. The more drums Mike made the more people wanted them and also to learn how to use them in a Shamanic way, so ―Kindred Drums‖ was born. Some people wanted to create their own Kindred Drum so Mike worked out a way to run a workshop so that people could make their own Shamanic Drum. What do you think it is that draws so many people to drumming? MIKE:- As some of you know, I was born in Ireland and came to live in Tasmania when I was sixteen. I grew up in an environment of music and entertainment so I have always had a sense of rhythm. And I believe that rhythm, someone beating a log with a stick or playing on a drum skin or even our heartbeat, is something basic that we all respond to. People can be absorbed by a steady pulse, it takes them away from everyday life and problems to a place that is peaceful and where they can feel safe. Cheryl and I have drummed in many interesting places, deep in Wielangta forest, on top of Mt. Wellington and on remote beaches around Tasmania. A wonderful experience for us and our friends. Sounds amazing Mike! Makes me want to reach for my drum right away. If someone has never drummed before, and would like to, how would you recommend they start? MIKE:- Find a nice quiet place away from distraction, somewhere in nature is the best but not always practical. Look at your drum and beater see what patterns there are in it and then listen as to how it speaks to you. Then softly begin to beat you drum either with your hand or using your beater, keep this rhythm flowing and allow it to build. Sometimes very soft and other times with some energy, a nice gentle rhythm and slowly allow your own personal beat to come through so it becomes an extension of you and your heart beat. An alternative would be to talk to Cheryl about sitting in circle with a group of drummers, make up your own group or organize a private drumming session with Cheryl. And finally, how do our members get in contact with you if they would like to participate in a workshop or purchase one of your beautiful drums? What have you got coming up that might interest members? You can make contact with us by phoning or email to discuss personal needs and special requests. You can also look at the Kindred Drum web site. Just contact Mike or Cheryl and have a talk about the possibilities and have them answer any questions you have. Home: 03 6265 9405 - Mobile: 0437 379 056 Cherylandmike@bigpond.com - www.wix.com/mikemaddock/kindred-drums Thanks Mike and Cheryl, and once again welcome to the Tasmanian Pagan Alliance Inc!

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Folk Magic & Sigils in Australia Recently a story was featured on ABC's Stateline show about hidden objects found in houses in Tasmania. Firstly here is the clip for the ABC story http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-11-28/ritualmagic/3698948 A search is underway throughout Australia for evidence of the material culture of folk magic in the period 1788 – circa 1935. Anyone who can help is invited to contact Ian Evans. He is looking in particular for sigils of the type commonly found in British buildings and which were intended to ward off evil spiritual forces. Marks which he has found in Australia so far include hexafoils (commonly known as daisy wheels) and concentric circles. Evans, who recently completed a PhD thesis at the University of Newcastle, NSW, has found marks in Tasmania and Victoria and hopes to find more in those states and elsewhere throughout Australia. His thesis is available for download from the following DropBox links: Vol 1 http://db.tt/GrJetPR Vol 2 http://db.tt/0aH5TsA Other tangible evidence of the practice of folk magic in Australia includes concealed objects such as shoes, garments, dead cats and children’s toys and trinkets. To be accepted as deliberate concealments, these objects have to be found in sealed voids or ex tremely inaccessible places within buildings. Dr. Evans says there is a chance that a witch bottle dating from before the 20th century may be found in Australia. I have been in contact with Dr Evans about a property my family used to own in Hobart and found he has written a thesis on this topic about houses all over Australia. Ian stated "I will let you know if any interesting responses are received as a result of your help. Why did I choose concealed objects as the topic for my thesis? It really seems as if they chose me, rather than the other way around. I've written a number of books on the history and conservation of old houses (www.oldhouses.com.au) and eventually discovered, after years of visiting old houses, that there was something going on there of which I, and everyone else, had been totally unaware. As a research topic it was simply too good to pass over!" His next area of interest is now researching symbols/sigils carved in older Australian homes. These are sigils from the mantelpiece in the clerk's room at the Courthouse at Richmond which dates from 1825. I'm sure there are more out there just waiting to be found --- both in Tasmania and elsewhere in Australia. This research is applicable throughout Australia. Ian has given me permission to share the links to his thesis, the photos of the sigils and has asked for his request to be forwarded on to anyone who may be able to assist. And of course lets not just limit this to our Pagan friends, anyone may have spotted them over the years. If you do have anything to share with him, please mention my name - Rose- as I'm keen to read any info he receives also. More info below in his original email. Ian can be contacted via evansthebook@hotmail.com By Rose

On the next couple of pages, you will find two Celtic themed coloring pages. These colouring-in pages are free to download, an extensive variety of titles include; Celtic butterflies, Autumn leaves and poem, Lil Witch book, Celtic Colouring and my personal favourite - The Pagan Alien – crop circles to colour! A perfect pass time for rainy afternoons or craft activities - just add glitter! http://wheeloftheyear.org/Cbooks/pagan_coloring_books.htm

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