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68

YEARS

The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas

Texas School Business

SEPT / OCT

2021

Back on Track

School districts help students catch up after an unusual year

Also in this issue:

TASA President Doug Williams TALAS President Rick Lopez


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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

12 Cover Story

16

Back on track School districts help students catch up after an unusual year

TASA President Profile Doug Williams leads TASA onward

by Dacia Rivers

by James Golsan

18 TALAS President Profile Rick Lopez works to advance student achievement in his district and across the state by James Golsan

Departments 6 Who’s News 20 Calendar 30 Ad Index

Photo Feature 14 TASPA

Columns

5 From the Editor by Dacia Rivers 9 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 11 Digital Frontier by Alice Owen 30 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.


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From the editor

E

ach new school year brings with it a unique set of circumstances, and right now, that feels truer than ever. School administrators across Texas are getting good at staying on their toes, being nimble and changing course on a dime. While no one hopes the current situation lasts forever, administrators are juggling many balls in the air with aplomb, navigating between statewide orders that contradict county or city orders, all with a tsunami of parental input pouring into their inboxes daily. Above all, public school staff are keeping their students’ best interests at heart. During the 2020-21 school year, students across the country faced unavoidable setbacks. Between quarantines and isolations, remote learning and personal challenges, no one came away unaffected. This year, schools everywhere are working to get everybody back on track. Starting on page 12, you’ll find our cover story, touching on the unique programs some Texas districts are using to get their students up to speed. You won’t want to miss this issue’s Law Dawg column on page 9. With the recent passage of HB 3979, the topic of what educators can or can’t teach in their classrooms is on everyone’s mind. Jim Walsh offers his insight, explaining a related past court case that serves as the highest authority on the matter, for now. It’s one every administrator should get familiar with, posthaste. Thank you for the work you do to take care of Texas’ schoolchildren in these unprecedented times. I hope that smoother sailing is on the horizon for all of us.

Texas School Business

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021 Volume LXVIII, Issue 5 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 • Fax: 512-482-8658 www.texasschoolbusiness.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Dacia Rivers DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher COLUMNISTS

Riney Jordan Alice Owen Jim Walsh

Dacia Rivers Editorial Director

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Jennifer Garrido

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

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Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published online bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators. © Copyright 2021 Texas Association of School Administrators

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

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Marcie Thompson, newly appointed principal of Alba-Golden High School, was most recently associate director of curriculum and instruction in Lindale ISD. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University.

Who’s News Abilene ISD Brenda Andress has accepted

the position of head girls’ basketball coach at Abilene High School. The Abilene Christian University graduate served as a volleyball coach in Colorado before working as an assistant basketball, volleyball, track and golf coach in Fort Worth and as a basketball and cross country coach in Richland.

Two new assistant principal assignments have been made. They are: • Brittany Hall, Alba-Golden High School; • Mike Moore, Alba-Golden High School.

Jenna Bane, newly appointed

Abilene High School head girls’ softball coach, comes to her new job from two years as a coach in Caddo Mills ISD and three in Navasota ISD. She attended Temple College and the University of Central Arkansas and is a graduate of Texas A&M University. Jeffrey Brokovich, former principal of Johnston Elementary School, has taken his first central office administrative job as human capital coordinator.

Abilene High School’s new head boys’ soccer coach is Roy Castillo, who spent the past six years as a teacher and coach at Mann Middle School. He is a graduate of McMurry University. Now serving as head coach of Abilene High School’s boys’ cross country is Jonathan Graschel, coming to his new job from Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe ISD. He is a graduate of Sam Houston State University. Matilda Jimenez is now

principal of the newly named Purcell Elementary School, formerly Johnston Elementary. The 30-year veteran educator, who was recently named ESC Region 14’s Assistant Principal of the Year, comes to her new assignment from Austin Elementary.

Alba-Golden ISD The new director of curriculum, instruction and assessment is Megan Smith, who joins the district from Rockwall ISD, where she was principal of Hamm Elementary School. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University at Commerce.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

Aldine ISD Aldine ISD has announced the following leadership appointments: • Autumn Boyd, postsecondary outcomes executive director; • Sandra Doria, director of mathematics and science; • Todd Lindeman, executive director of school administration; • Ray Mondragon, executive director of early childhood learning; • Sheleah Reed, chief of staff; • Xóchitl Rodríguez, associate superintendent of schools; • Alexia Rogers, assistant superintendent of business and finance; • Kimberly Sinclair, director of interventions; • Kappelle Traylor, director of testinglocal assessments; • Stephen Warford, assistant superintendent of teaching and learning; • Michael Williams, emergency operations manager.

Aledo ISD A newly created position, fine arts coordinator, has been filled by Missey Head, who retired as Lewisville ISD’s assistant fine arts director and has been serving as a consultant for area districts. Prior to that, she was a theatre and speech teacher in Carrollton-Farmers Branch, Ector County, Industrial and Victoria ISDs. Stefanie Mathews has

accepted the role of assistant principal of Daniel Ninth Grade Campus. She previously taught in Waxahachie, Eagle MountainSaginaw and Castleberry ISDs.

Amarillo ISD Patrick Miller has accepted the position of assistant principal of Eastridge Elementary School. Previously an instructional assistant, teacher and curriculum assessment specialist, he is a graduate of West Texas A&M University, where he also earned two master’s degrees, in teaching and educational leadership.

Banquete ISD Stacy Johnson, former

executive director of leadership for Ector County ISD, is Banquete ISD’s new superintendent. She has also served as a curriculum specialist, assistant principal and principal in Denton and Ector County ISDs.

Bastrop ISD Now serving as director of finance is June Crawford, who comes to her new position from Copperas Cove ISD, where she was chief financial officer. With more than 20 years of school finance experience, Crawford previously worked in Waller, Paint Rock, Crowley and Waxahachie ISDs. She holds degrees in accounting and management from the University of Texas at Arlington. Kendra Monk has filled the

position of director of school improvement and federal/ state programs. She comes to her new job from ESC Region 18, where since 2016 she was a school improvement project coordinator. She is a graduate of Azusa Pacific University and earned her master’s degree in education administration from the University of Scranton.

Beaumont ISD Beaumont ISD announces the appointment of Julia Rich as principal of King Middle School. Now in her ninth year as an educator, she most recently was an assistant principal for KIPP Texas Public Schools.

Birdville ISD Former Stowe Elementary School principal Nathan Frymark now holds the top position at Green Valley Elementary. He previously served as an


assistant principal in the district and in Irving ISD. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Dallas Baptist University.

Brazos ISD Scott Rogers has been tapped to lead Brazos

ISD as superintendent. He comes to his new position from Red Oak ISD, where he was executive director of curriculum and instruction.

Brenham ISD The Brenham ISD board of trustees announces the appointment of Christine Johnson as director of special education services. She comes to Brenham from Magnolia ISD, where she was a special education facilitator, a program specialist in compliance and monitoring and, most recently, assistant director of special education.

Brock ISD Ron Holmgreen has

accepted the position of superintendent of Brock ISD, arriving in the district from Granbury ISD, where he was assistant superintendent for administrative services. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University.

Brownsville ISD The new principal of Brownsville Early College High School is Rachel Ayala. The 20-year educator previously served as principal of Hudson Elementary School. Edward Ude has assumed

the duties of principal of Brownsville Learning Academy High School. He previously was assistant administrator for the district’s media services department and, prior to that, principal of Canales Elementary School.

Bryan ISD Ron Clary brings more than 30 years of maintenance and operations experience to his new position of director of maintenance and operations. He comes to Bryan from San Antonio’s North East ISD, where he was associate superintendent for operations.

Daniela Garza-Ramirez has

been promoted from assistant principal of Henderson Elementary School to principal. She has spent her 14-year career in Bryan ISD, also serving as a teacher, master teacher and instructional coach. She holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in bilingual Hispanic education from Texas A&M University. Shannon McGehee, newly

appointed director of student services, is a longtime employee of the district, having served as a campus administrator for the past 17 years, most recently as principal of Davila Middle School. She received her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in education administration from Texas A&M University. The Bryan ISD board of trustees has chosen Kathy Riley to lead Navarro Elementary School as principal. Previously the school’s assistant principal, she is a 20-year educator who also worked in Fort Bend ISD. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Houston Downtown. Sara Rueda has been

approved to lead Davila Middle School as principal. She is a 21-year veteran educator and served as principal of Navarro Elementary since 2015. Her bachelor’s degree was awarded from Texas A&M University, as was her master’s degree in education administration.

Buna ISD Superintendent Donny Lee has been selected to represent ESC Region 5 on the executive committee of the Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA).

Burleson ISD Frazier Elementary School’s new principal, Tommy Neal, is a 16-year educator who was most recently assistant principal of Burleson High School. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Texas and his master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University.

Canutillo ISD (El Paso) Reyes Elementary School now has Maria Castillo as its assistant principal. She previously taught at Garcia Elementary and most recently was an at-risk teacher. The district announces the appointment of Maria Fuentes as its public health emergency manager. She holds a master’s degree in public health from the University of Texas at El Paso, where she is working on her doctorate in interdisciplinary health sciences.

Carroll ISD Gordon Butler is the district’s new assistant superintendent. An educator for 19 years, he was most recently principal of Lake Travis High School in Lake Travis ISD. He also served as an assistant principal and principal in McKinney ISD.

Now serving as the district’s executive communications director is Karen Fitzgerald. With more than 25 years of experience in communications, she was assistant superintendent of engagement and strategic initiatives for Midlothian ISD and worked in public relations in Clear Creek and Lewisville ISDs.

Cedar Hill ISD Cedar Hill High School began the new academic year with Shay Whittaker as principal. She has spent her career in the district, most recently as principal of High Pointe Elementary. She is a graduate of the University of Texas with a master’s degree in educational leadership from Lamar University.

Chapel Hill ISD Chapel Hill ISD announces the appointment of Daniel Pritchett as superintendent. He comes to his new position from Daingerfield ISD, where he was business manager.

Clear Creek ISD The new deputy superintendent for curriculum and instruction is Robert Bayard, who previously served as chief technology officer, executive director of assessment and accountability, and Clear Springs High School’s dean of instruction. After spending the last decade at Clear Lake High School as head girls’ basketball coach and campus coordinator for girls’ athletics, Kirby Killingsworth has been named Clear Creek ISD’s athletic director. > See Who’s News, page 8 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

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Who’s News > Continued from page 7

Other new administrative appointments include: • Mary Goldner, assistant director of visual and performing arts; • Sheridan Henley, executive director of assessment and evaluation; • Laura Mackay, curriculum coordinator for robotics and computational thinking.

Cleveland ISD The new executive director of operations is Stephen McCanless, an eightyear employee of the district who has worked as Cleveland High School principal, coordinator of student affairs and director of administrative services. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Houston Clear Lake.

Coldspring-Oakhurst CISD Now serving as district superintendent is Bryan Taulton, who formerly led Goodrich ISD.

College Station ISD Chris Southard has been named principal of Spring Creek Elementary School, a promotion from his most recent position as assistant principal of College Station High School. He previously taught in Bryan, Frisco and Carroll ISDs. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University. Jeremy Stewart has been

promoted from assistant principal to principal of Wellborn Middle School, where he has worked since 2018. He previously served as assistant principal of Timber Academy High School. He is a graduate of Midwestern State University and holds a master’s degree in education administration from Sam Houston State University.

Coppell ISD The former assistant principal of Coppell High School, Cindi Osborne, has been approved to serve as principal of Victory Place@Coppell. She previously worked in Frisco ISD as a teacher, technology integration facilitator and assistant principal.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

Dennis Womack, who was assistant

superintendent of operations for Lovejoy ISD, is now Coppell ISD’s chief operations officer. He has more than 25 years of experience as an educator, 22 of those as an administrator in McKinney and Lovejoy ISDs.

Corpus Christi ISD Robert Arredondo is the new principal of Carroll High School, having spent the past four years leading Dawson Elementary. He previously was an administrator at Veterans Memorial High and worked as a track and cross country coach.

The new director of the office of student support services, Delma Bernal, is the former assistant principal of Driscoll Middle School. The new principal of Berlanga Elementary School is Melissa Clearman, former assistant principal of Moody High and Adkins Middle School. Now serving as chief officer of school improvement and innovation is Sandra Clement. She was the district’s executive director of school leadership. David Crabtree, former principal of Schanen Estates Elementary School, now serves as principal of Metro Elementary School of Design.

Dawson Elementary School’s new principal, Kimberly Ellis, previously served the district as a special education teacher and assistant principal of Webb Elementary. Now leading King High School as principal is Prudence Farrell, who was principal of Hamlin Middle School since 2017. She holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in special education from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. The new principal of Schanen Estates Elementary School is Cori Gilbert, who previously led Metro Elementary School of Design. Christopher Hall has accepted the position of principal of Coles High School and Education Center. He is at work on his doctorate in curriculum and instruction at Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi.

Newly appointed Crockett Elementary School principal Amy Leos comes to Corpus Christi ISD from Robstown ISD, where she was an assistant principal. Zonia Lopez is the new

principal of Kolda Elementary School. The 25year employee of the district was previously principal of Houston Elementary School. Her bachelor’s degree was earned from Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University at Kingsville) and her master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. Kelsie Morris is the district’s new executive director for school leadership, elementary schools. She previously served as principal of Kolda and Kostoryz elementary schools. Rachel Neff, newly appointed principal of Cunningham Middle School at South Park, most recently was a principal in Robstown ISD. Kathy Ortiz has accepted the role of

principal of Hicks Elementary School, coming to her new assignment from serving in the top position at Woodlawn Elementary.

New executive director for school leadership, middle schools, Elizabeth Perez has been an employee of the district for 21 years, most recently as principal of King High School. Christa Rasche has been

named principal of Woodlawn Elementary School. She is the former assistant principal of Moody High and Adkins Middle School.

Now serving as principal of Miller High School is Sandy Salinas-DeLeon, who previously led Cunningham Middle School at South Park and Houston Elementary. Aurelio Tamayo, now serving as principal of Moore Elementary School, most recently worked as an administrator in the district’s office of student support services.

Evans Elementary School now has Patricia Tijerina as principal. She comes to her new job from Flour Bluff ISD, where she worked as an assistant principal.

> See Who’s News, page 10


THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

Vist TSB online!

Where is Janet Cooper today?

T

by Jim Walsh

he case that Janet Cooper won against Kingsville ISD is about to become relevant again. The case is an old one, decided by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in 1980. But it has never been overturned, and thus remains what the lawyers call “good law.” Here’s the key takeaway: “We thus join the First and Sixth Circuits in holding that classroom discussion is protected activity.” Constitutionally protected. Protected by the First Amendment. Someone needs to make sure that our legislators know about this. This past session they enacted HB 3979, which severely restricts what teachers can and cannot say in a social studies classroom. As I write this piece, 3979 is up for possible revision in the special session, but it appears that we will end up with something that restricts academic freedom for Texas teachers. That was the precise issue the 5th Circuit addressed in the Cooper case. Janet Cooper used a simulation technique, the Sunshine Project, to teach about American history during the Reconstruction era after the Civil War. According to the court’s opinion, “The technique involved role-playing by students,” and “evoked strong student feelings on racial issues.” Parents complained, and Cooper was twice called to the principal’s office. The HR director was present for the second meeting and instructed the teacher “not to discuss Blacks in American history,” and that “nothing controversial should be discussed in the classroom.” Importantly, though, no one gave Cooper a directive to cease using the Sunshine Project in her classroom. She completed the project. Contract renewal time came around and both the principal and the superintendent recommended that Cooper’s contract be renewed. They were aware of the complaints and the controversy, but they rated her as “outstanding” in her formal evaluation, noting

that she was “thoroughly satisfactory” in every category of performance. The school board disregarded those recommendations and voted not to offer Cooper a contract for the next school year. Litigation ensued. Deposition testimony from the board members made it clear — they did this because of the Sunshine Project. The 5th Circuit concluded that the district, through improperly motivated board action, had infringed on Cooper’s First Amendment rights. “Classroom discussion is protected activity.” The court held that the district could overcome this only if it presented evidence that her use of this simulation technique “overbalanced her usefulness as an instructor.” The district could not do that. Let’s remember: The direct supervisors rated her as “outstanding.” The U.S. Supreme Court restricted public employee First Amendment rights with its decision in Garcetti v. Ceballos in 2006. The court ruled in that case that public employees do not enjoy First Amendment protection when the words they utter are spoken as part of their job duties. That would seem to completely squash any claim of academic freedom for public school teachers, but the court anticipated that issue and offered a caveat: “We need not, and for that reason do not, decide whether the analysis we conduct today would apply in the same manner to a case involving speech related to scholarship or teaching.” That leaves Janet Cooper’s case as the highest authority we have on free speech as applied to classroom discussions. So it’s all teed up for an interesting piece of litigation. Somewhere in Texas this school year, some teacher is going to get in trouble for things said in the classroom that run afoul of the restrictions in HB 3979. That teacher’s lawyer is going to dust off Kingsville ISD v. Cooper. If you want to avoid being that test case, you might want to read and discuss this important case.

Check us out online at texasschoolbusiness.com for: ► recent issues ► how to submit articles ► Bragging Rights nomination info ► advertising information ► and more! Texas School Business THE NEWS MAGAZINE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION IN TEXAS

68 Years and Counting

JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

9


Who’s News

Ector County ISD

Georgetown ISD

> Continued from page 8

Daryton Ramsey has been approved as

executive director of student and school support. He comes to his new position from California, where he was the Ventura County Office of Education’s director of accountability and continuous improvement.

Former Purl Elementary School principal Denisse Baldwin has transitioned to a new assignment as coordinator of early childhood/Title I. She has been an educator for 16 years.

Crane ISD Former Ector County deputy superintendent Stephanie Howard has been appointed Crane ISD’s superintendent. An educator for 27 years, she formerly led Plains ISD and served Ector County ISD as executive director of curriculum and instruction. She is a graduate of Angelo State University with a master’s degree from the University of Texas Permian Basin and a doctorate from the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Dawson ISD Gary Jones, former principal

of Grady ISD, is now superintendent of Dawson ISD.

DeKalb ISD Christopher Galloway has been promoted

from director of technology and learning to district superintendent.

Denton ISD The district’s new director of transportation, Sheryl Alden, served as assistant director of transportation since 2011. She joined DISD in 2004 and previously worked as a driver trainer and student safety coordinator. She is a graduate of New Mexico State University and earned her master’s and doctoral degrees from Texas Woman’s University. Emily McLarty, former principal of Borman Elementary School, has taken on the role of director of human resources for staff engagement. She has been with the district since 2001, working as a teacher, assistant principal and principal.

The following principal assignments have been confirmed: • Claudia Calvo-Montes, Ginnings Elementary School; • Jesús Luján, Borman Elementary School; • Matt Preston, Schultz Elementary School; • Jacqueline San Miguel-Lozano, Calhoun Middle School; • Fred Younkman, Moore High School.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

In addition, five new principal assignments are announced. They are: • Margarita Acosta, Cameron Elementary School; • Priscilla Aguilar, Carver Early Education Center; • Micah Arrott, Pease Elementary School; • Fallon McLane, San Jacinto Elementary School; • Noe Ortiz, Ireland Elementary School.

Elysian Fields ISD The district announces the following administrative assignments: • Jacqueline Hill, principal, Elysian Fields Middle School; • Dale Hoskins, assistant principal, Elysian Fields High School.

Frenship ISD Scott Sims is the new principal of the Reese Education Center. An employee of the district since 2008, he has been a teacher and assistant principal at Frenship High School. He is a graduate of Texas Tech University with a master’s degree in education administration from Lubbock Christian University.

Galveston ISD Michael Le has arrived in Galveston ISD as the director of the management of information systems department. He has worked in the technology field for almost two decades, most recently as director of technology and facilities management for the North Orange County (Cal.) Occupational Program.

The district’s Collegiate Academy is now led by Bobby Temple as principal. The Ball High School graduate went on to receive a bachelor’s degree from Lamar University and a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Houston Clear Lake. He has been Ball High’s director of media arts and innovation communities for the past three years.

Now leading Ford Elementary School as principal is Meredith Gandy, who since 2017 has served as Mitchell Elementary principal. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University and holds a master’s degree in educational leadership from Concordia University. Tosha VanMetre has been hired to lead Carver Elementary School as principal. She previously worked in Manor ISD as a teacher, instructional coach and associate principal and as an assistant principal at Georgetown ISD’s Forbes Middle School.

Granbury ISD Former Granbury Middle School principal Tammy Clark is now an assistant superintendent. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Universite de Bordeaux in France and her master’s degree in secondary education from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. The district’s second new assistant superintendent is Jimmy Dawson, who was GISD’s CTE (career and technical education) director since 2020. He previously served as principal of Acton and Granbury middle schools. His bachelor’s degree was awarded from Abilene Christian University and his master’s degree from West Texas A&M University. Chelsey Gibson now leads Oak Woods School as principal, having served as its assistant principal since 2013. The Texas Tech University graduate earned her master’s degree in educational leadership from Lamar University.

Now serving as CTE (career and technical education) director is Todd Gibson, who began his career as a math teacher and coach at Granbury Middle School in 2006. He has taught engineering courses and helped start the Project Lead the Way program. After graduating Texas Tech University, he earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston. Granbury Middle School’s new principal, Andy Smith, comes to Granbury from Fort Worth ISD’s Texas Academy for Biomedical Sciences, where he was assistant principal. He holds a bachelor’s degree from West Texas A&M University, a master’s degree in educational administration from Tarleton State University, and a doctorate in educational leadership from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

> See Who’s News, page 15


DIGITAL FRONTIER

Future of innovation by Alice Owen

W

ell, I think all of us are ready to put this last school year behind us. The pandemic shone a bright light on many the many difficulties that face K-12 school districts in Texas: challenging remote learning environments, gaping inequities in resources for students, no extra staffing budgets to provide 24/7 technology support — and all the while dealing with the additional emotional needs of both staff and students precipitated by such a crisis. And now, as we take stock of what we’ve learned and prepare to move forward, despite even more challenges, I am optimistic for the future. With the TX CTO Council just coming off our successful, first face-to-face conference — with the theme of “EdTech Superheroes!” — the sessions reflected the extraordinary work done by technology staff across the state. Our keynote examined numerous ideas for bringing social/emotional learning to the forefront of education, and also encouraged those conversations among our staff, acknowledging that we have all been through an extremely difficult year and a half. Another panel presented ideas about what we learned from the pandemic shutdowns and how we might save some of the lessons learned to promote innovation in schools in the future. Our members shared ideas on digital citizenship and how we need to help students scrutinize what they read online. Other sessions helped leaders improve their communication and leadership skills, shared ideas about flexible staffing, improving security, and even gave a glimpse of the “future is now” with a presentation on SpaceX in public schools. We had a great panel of district leaders who talked about their fully virtual schools and the successes they had during the pandemic.

We can all learn from these valuable lessons and not have a knee-jerk reaction to throw out everything that we accomplished from last year’s remote learning. Yes, it was challenging, but remote learning might just be the option that some of our students and parents need.

A powerful network to connect with ideas and like-minded professionals

Targeted professional development to help lead with confidence

Trends and best practices to problem solve technology challenges

Remote work certainly seems to be here to stay in some form in the business world, and our education system needs to help prepare students for a future in which virtual workplaces are a reality. We also need to remember — and implement — valuable lessons learned about flexible staffing, flexible work hours, remote technical support for students and families, unique ways to provide broadband support, and that equity should be at the forefront of learning.

Trusted guidance on privacy, security and compliance policies

As tech leaders have grown to face new challenges in our field over the past few years, so too has our association grown and changed to better serve our tech leaders in the critical role they play supporting millions of students across our state. After two years of focus groups, research, reflection, strategic planning and design work, our organization has evolved to better reflect and support the work they do as education technology leaders in Texas. As such, the Texas K-12 CTO Council has a new look and a new name: Texas Education Technology Leaders (TETL). We know that being a leader in the field of education technology depends on having strong peer support and professional guidance. We believe this refreshed identity and more inclusive mission will help us better serve technology leaders at all levels across the state and provide services and targeted offerings to help tech leaders and their teams stay one step ahead of an everchanging technology environment. Here is the value TETL provides to ed tech leaders:

As we come out of this pandemic, now more than ever it’s time to reconnect with colleagues to share challenges and successes. Beginning this year, we plan to have all our events in person again, with some virtual support as well. If your ed tech leader is not already a part of our group, ask them to join their colleagues at one of our events. They will find answers to their questions in a community of innovators who are always working together to solve the challenges of K-12 education technology now and in the future.

Put TETL at the center of your professional learning strategy! Come join us at our face-to-face events: FALL SUMMIT Friday, October 22, 2021 Lewisville ISD - Lewisville, TX WINTER SUMMIT Sunday, January 30, 2022 Hilton Hotel, Convention Center – Austin, TX SUMMER CONFERENCE Wed./Thurs. June 22-23 2022 Kalahari Resort - Round Rock, TX

ALICE OWEN, Ph.D., CAE, CETL, is executive director of Texas Education Technology Leaders. Contact her at ExDir@TETL.org.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

11


Back on track School districts help students catch up after an unusual year by Dacia Rivers

S

ummer slide is a phenomenon with which educators are all too familiar. Students return from a few months off having regressed academically from where they were when last they set foot on campus. This year, that slide was compounded by the many setbacks schools and students suffered in the 2019-20 and 2020-21 school years, courtesy of COVID-19. According to the TEA, the pandemic set students’ math and reading achievements back, causing STAAR test scores to drop across the state. This was especially true among students who spent time in remote learning, along with students of color and lower-income students. And who can blame them? COVID-19 upset their routines. It brought about health and financial issues for countless families.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

As the 2021-22 school year kicks off, school administrators across Texas are implementing new programs designed to address this unique backslide and get their students back on track to meet their achievement goals and stay on a path toward on-time graduation. Many districts are making bold moves, changing up school schedules and calling for all hands on deck to help students recover from a year of constant change.

Night school In El Paso’s Ysleta ISD, superintendent Xavier De La Torre says administrators have seen learning loss in students across the district. Students who had previously excelled had less success during distance learning, especially those who were English

learners, had special needs or came from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Many high school students were no longer on track to graduate with their cohorts, so the district got to work brainstorming new ways to help those students catch up. In August, the district kicked off a night school program, with four high schools offering after-hours core classes to 10th through 12th graders to help them get the credits they need to graduate on time. Night school classes are held two nights a week and will allow students to receive 65 extra instructional hours per semester, if they attend regularly. The night school program is the brainchild of Dr. Brenda Chacon, Ysleta ISD’s chief academic officer, and her team. The administrators spent the summer trying to


come up with a way to help their students be successful and stay on schedule. “For high school students, their schedule is tight and we didn’t want to take them away from their pathways, their electives, the things that keep them well rounded,” Chacon says. “So the idea was to say, ‘OK, if this doesn’t fit in your schedule, let’s offer it in the evenings so they can continue to do the things we know they love.’” Night school classes are separate and distinct from classes students take during the day, and focus on core graduation requirements such as English, math and science. Each course is a semester long and is worth three credits. If a student needs a certain night class that isn’t offered at his or her campus, the district will make arrangements for that student to take the needed class at a different campus. Chacon says the response to the program has been positive. “A lot of parents are grateful for the opportunity. For our seniors, it’ll allow them to graduate right on time and make sure they have everything they need. And for our underclassmen, it allows them an opportunity to still be able to fit everything in their schedule.” Students enrolled in the night school program do not have to find their own transportation to and from evening classes — the district provides buses and evening meal service to night school students just as it does during the regular school day. De La Torre says recruiting teachers for the night school classes has gone well. Administrators seek out only those teachers who are having success in their regular classrooms, inviting them to teach extra evening classes for additional pay. “To attract those teachers, we are offering a $50 an hour compensation program,” he says. “It seems to have worked. We’ve gotten a lot of interest from teachers across the district.” The district has covered the bulk of the night school costs using ESSER money, along with some Title I federal funding and operating budget funds. De La Torre says the district plans to continue the night school program in the spring, though administrators are watching the program closely to determine its efficacy. If attendance is strong and students are earning additional credit hours and showing progress, he expects that the program will continue. “The ESSER funds, they’re not ongoing monies,” he says. “We’ve got a short window of opportunity — two, three years — to really get back to where we were pre-pandemic.

This has to be effective and optimal, or else we’ll look for another way of helping these students.” In addition to the night school, Ysleta has saturated its campuses with tutors, calling on retired teachers, college students and aspiring teachers to come to campus to help students in need. “There’s been a great response from retired teachers who can come back now without jeopardizing their pension or their retirement,” De La Torre says. “It’s all hands on board, and it’s too early to tell, but I’m very optimistic.”

Additional days school year Back before COVID-19 was on the tips of everyone’s tongues, Alief ISD made a plan to combat the summer slide. The 86th Legislature had just authorized the Additional Days School Year (ADSY) program, and the district opted in. Through the TEA-led program, districts can choose from a variety of program levels, extending or rearranging the school year in different ways to offer the most benefit. Alief administrators decided to go with a full school year redesign, kicking things off this summer at Bush Elementary as a pilot campus. “We were already well into the planning and had gotten board authorization to move forward when the pandemic hit,” says Patrick Cherry, area superintendent for innovation in the district. “It wasn’t related to the pandemic when we started it, but now it’s fortunate that we have it.” Through the redesign, the district added 34 days to the school calendar, with classes now starting in July, to bring the total number of instructional days up to 210. Teachers come back in early July, with students arriving on campus about a week later. Cherry says that parents at Bush Elementary were overwhelmingly on board with the extended calendar. Out of nearly 800 students at the school, only about 30 families initially expressed a desire to opt out of the new schedule and transfer to a different school, though Cherry says the majority of those families decided to stay at Bush after all. “Overall the parents really bought into it,” he says. “We explained the benefits, that you don’t have to worry about childcare, they’re going to be back on the lunch and breakfast program, and then we talked about the academic benefits and said that the goal is to help these kids be more successful.” The majority of teachers at Bush decided to stick with the new program as well. Out of

some 80 staff members, only a handful opted out, mostly those with younger children who didn’t want to miss summertime with their little ones. Alief Superintendent HD Chambers insisted that staff at Bush be paid for these extra days at no less than their regular daily rate, as opposed to paying a lower hourly rate, which is typical for staff members who work during traditional summer school. This has provided additional income for staff at the school, who also receive more built-in planning time during the day, thanks to the ADSY schedule, which allows for a little more breathing room. The redesigned school day allows more opportunity for students to participate in activities of their choice, such as arts or sports programs. In the past, a student might only rotate into an art class once every six days or so, but now they are able to spend more time enjoying more hands-on activities. “The kids so far have loved it,” Cherry says. “You would think kids would be like, ‘Oh, that’s more school,’ but they took to it. And when you talk to the kids, it’s great to hear them because they really like being with their friends. The social aspect was a big selling point.” The ADSY program includes a TEA grant that covers half of the funding for the additional days. Alief is funding the other half, but Cherry says that due to COVID-19, the district was able to reapply for additional ADSY money to continue the program. And the district does plan on continuing. “The program gives teachers more time to cover the same amount of material, but to cover it more thoroughly or to circle back if the kids don’t get something,” Cherry says. “It’s funny looking at all the different activities offered to kids. One was sciencerelated and dealt with bugs, and they were actually doing hands-on stuff with different bugs. That’s something you wouldn’t normally see — elementary kids getting exposed to that depth of science.”

Find more information on the ADSY program on the TEA website at tea.texas.gov.

DACIA RIVERS is editorial director of Texas School Business. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

13


Photo Feature

TASPA SUMMER CONFERENCE HELD IN ROUND ROCK The Texas Association of School Personnel Administrators returned to an in-person summer conference this year, meeting for three days in July with a theme of “Resilience & Reinvention.”

▲ The TASPA summer conference

included a half-day law conference designed to provide superintendents, school board members, school business and human resources officers and other district and campus administrators with timely information.

▲ Conference attendees mingled

▲ School personnel administrators

▲ TASPA’s summer conference provided

▲ TASPA members played an exhibitor

between sessions.

numerous networking opportunities.

▲ TASPA board members posed at the summer conference in Round Rock.

► TASPA members gathered for sessions

on TEA, SBEC, TRS and Legislative updates, timely legal issues and district best practices.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

traveled from across Texas to attend the summer conference.

safari bingo game during the conference.


Who’s News

Harrold ISD Cody Patton, former director of operations for Tioga ISD, is now superintendent of Harrold ISD.

> Continued from page 10

Greenville ISD The new principal of the Johnson STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Academy at Crockett Elementary School is Cheryl Dennis. She has spent her career in Greenville ISD, most recently as assistant principal of science and math at Greenville Middle School. She is a graduate of the University of Texas at Dallas with a master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Heath Jarvis, who was principal of Greenville High School for the past 12 years, is now the district’s chief human resources officer. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Brant Perry has taken

the helm as principal of Greenville High School. He spent 23 years in Plano ISD, the past nine as a middle school principal. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Midwestern State University, a master’s degree from Hardin-Simmons University, and a doctorate in education administration from the University of North Texas.

Gunter ISD A new superintendent is in place for Gunter ISD. Scott Martindale comes to Gunter from Iola ISD, where he was a principal and, most recently, superintendent.

Hallsville ISD Clayton Farrell has been named principal

of Hallsville Junior High School. The Abilene Christian University graduate holds a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University. He is a 13-year public school education veteran. Aaron Hoecherl has accepted the position of

principal of Hallsville Intermediate School. He began his career as a teacher, then spent six years as an assistant principal at the middle school and high school levels.

Tana Scholl is the new principal of Hallsville North Elementary School. She has been with the district since 2009, working as a teacher, dean of instruction, student services coordinator and assistant principal.

Stewart Elementary School has welcomed Shannon Williams as principal. She comes to her new job from leading Johnson Elementary.

Haskell CISD Former Windthorst ISD superintendent Lonnie Hise is the new superintendent of Haskell CISD.

Hays CISD The academic year began with Joanne Lytle in place as principal of Wallace Middle School. She began her career in 2006, coming to HCISD in 2009 as a math teacher. Her most recent assignment was academic dean of Lehman High School. She graduated from New Mexico State University and holds a master’s degree from Concordia Lutheran University. Hays CISD announces the appointment of Fernando Medina as chief human resources officer. Initially a music teacher and band director, he worked in Grand Prairie ISD and in Richardson ISD, where he was executive director and then assistant superintendent of human resources. He is a graduate of the University of North Texas, where he also earned his doctorate, and holds a master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington. Amanda Muro has moved from serving

as Uhland Elementary School’s assistant principal to principal. She joined Hays CISD in 2017 and has also worked as a bilingual teacher, instructional coach and dual language coordinator.

Houston ISD A new superintendent is in place for Houston ISD. Millard House spent the past four years as superintendent of the ClarksvilleMontgomery County School System in Tennessee and previously served as chief operating officer of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools in North Carolina.

Huntsville ISD The new director of special education is Ashley Kimich, who has served as the district’s special education coordinator since 2018. Before coming to Huntsville, she spent nine years with Bryan ISD.

Hutto ISD The district’s new DAEP (Disciplinary Alternative Education Program) principal is Roy Christian, who was principal of Hutto High School since 2014. He previously worked as a teacher and principal in Poteet ISD and San Antonio’s Southside ISD. The new principal of Hutto High School, Jonathan Smith, was principal of Deerpark Middle School in Round Rock ISD since 2016. Prior to that, he was an academic dean and assistant principal in Austin ISD. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Hampton University and his master’s degree in educational leadership from Concordia University.

Katy ISD Gina Cobb is the new principal of Mayde Creek High School. She has spent her career with Katy ISD, working as a teacher and in administrative positions, most recently as principal of West Memorial Junior High.

Former Mayde Creek High School principal Ronnie Edwards now serves as assistant superintendent for school leadership and support. He previously worked in Santa Fe (Tx.), Van Vleck, Abilene and Brazosport ISDs. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Tarleton State University and a master’s degree in administration from the University of Houston at Victoria. Todd Knobbe has been

welcomed as principal of West Memorial Junior High School. He began his career in Alief ISD and most recently was associate principal of Katy ISD’s Seven Lakes High School. He is a graduate of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln with a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University.

> See Who’s News, page 24 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

15


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association of School Administrators

Doug Williams leads TASA onward by James Golsan

F

rom his earliest days growing up on a blackland farm in Hunt County, new Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) President and Sunnyvale ISD Superintendent Doug Williams says he always saw himself on a path toward a career in education. “My dad was a farmer and my mother was an educator; she was actually my fifth grade teacher,” he says. “I grew up playing everything, every type of sport, and really felt the calling to become a teacher and a coach.” Williams spent the first 12 years of his career teaching social studies and government at the middle and high school levels, as well as coaching football, though he adds that when you coach in smaller school districts for most of your career as he has, “You end up coaching a little bit of everything.” A father of three, Williams says that his decision to move from teaching and coaching into an assistant principal role was ultimately a choice he made for his family. “Often, my wife (Williams has been married for 34 years) would be taking our oldest to a tennis tournament, and I’d have to stay

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

behind and get a game plan ready or something. When I had an opportunity to become an assistant principal, I didn’t work any less hard, but the hours changed a little and I was able to become a little more involved in their lives.” Williams was in Winnsboro ISD when he transitioned from teaching and coaching to administration, and says that in addition to the role change being a better fit for his family, the opportunity to become a leader in the education space was also a draw. “When I got out of coaching and moved into administration, I set a goal for myself to become a superintendent,” he says. “My philosophy of leadership is to recruit, hire and train great people, and provide them with the vision and resources they need to do a great job.” Now that Williams is entering his 15th year as superintendent of Sunnyvale ISD, he’s quick to credit the people around him with his success in education leadership. “I feel like I’ve been blessed with great faculty, a supportive community, and a great school board the entire time I’ve been


here,” he says, adding that in his entire 15year run at Sunnyvale, he’s had a total of 13 board members, and the board’s continuity and support have been invaluable. Regarding his relationship with TASA and his career growth from principal to superintendent, Williams credits former Brownsboro ISD Superintendent Elgin Caldwell, who Williams says began grooming him for a superintendent role when he hired him as a principal and encouraged him to get involved with TASA. Williams has come a long way since Caldwell introduced him to TASA in 2003. Eighteen years later, Williams finds himself assuming the presidency of the organization, and at a critical moment in Texas education history: Williams will be one among many education leaders tasked with leading his community out of the COVID-19 pandemic. “To me, that’s the key piece,” Williams says. “I believe that TASA is made up of inspiring leaders, and we have a charge now in this year ahead as schools hopefully begin to return to normal, to step up and really lead our districts forward. Our call to action is to rise to the occasion for

our schools, our communities and our employees.” Williams adds that especially in smaller communities across the state, a school or school district is often the lifeblood of the area, and in his capacity as TASA president, he hopes that he can provide the superintendents of those districts with the support and encouragement they need to continue to lead their own communities into whatever’s ahead. “I know that a lot of people have been beaten down because of the pandemic and the painstaking decisions they have had to make on a day-to-day basis, and I really believe it is our time to step up.” For his part, Williams hopes to continue to build on the foundation laid by former TASA president and Northside ISD Superintendent Brian Woods, and says that beyond the pandemic, he hopes to lead the charge on reforming Texas’ A-F school accountability system, which he believes is flawed. With a strong, experienced leader such as Williams leading the charge, it’s hard to imagine those advocacy efforts being anything but effective.

Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) Membership: TASA membership includes public school leaders at the district and campus levels. Mission: TASA’s mission is to promote, provide and develop leaders who create and sustain studentcentered schools and develop futureready students. Year founded: 1925 Website: tasanet.org

JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

November 1-3 | Round Rock, Texas

The only statewide conference dedicated to providing the latest information on assessment, testing, and accountability in education — elementary, secondary, and post-secondary. Pre-register by October 22!

txassessmentcon.org Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

17


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents

Rick Lopez works to advance student achievement in his district and across the state by James Golsan

A

t just 10 years old, the Texas Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents (TALAS) is relatively young as Texas education organizations go. The organization’s mission is to “with an unrelenting commitment to improving learning outcomes for Latino learners … provide leadership development, collective impact, advocacy and a proactive voice for Latino and non-Latino leaders who have a passion for serving the fastest growing student population in Texas,” and it’s a big job. Latino students now comprise 53% of school-age children in Texas; to achieve their goals, TALAS must be a champion for millions of young learners. New TALAS President Dr. Rick Lopez is exactly the sort of strong, visionary education leader needed at the head of such an undertaking, and he has already begun to show TALAS membership — and the entire Texas education community — what he can do. In addition to being TALAS president, Lopez is superintendent of Garland ISD, one of the largest school districts in Texas. While his success in the education field proves he found his true calling, it was

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a challenge from Lopez’s father that started him down the path he chose. He felt unchallenged by his own high school experience in El Paso, and even with a family background in the field, education was not where Lopez saw his career going as a young man. “I originally did not want to get an education. My mom is an educator, as well as her whole side of the family, and I just felt like that wasn’t for me. My dad challenged me, and told me ‘If you don’t like it, why don’t you go in and fix it, and make education more like what you think it should be?’ That’s what initially drove me in.” Lopez has done exactly that during his time in leadership at Garland, molding the district and improving education and career outcomes every step of the way. “In Garland ISD, we have more than 200 career opportunities for children. Our economically disadvantaged rate [within the student body] is 71%, and our demographics mirror a lot of the state averages, but what is particularly telling is that our graduation rate is above the state average, and has gone up nearly five percentage points since I’ve been here.”


Lopez adds that even during the COVID-19 pandemic, Garland ISD has managed to maintain a 95% graduation rate and fully intends to build on that success through the 2021-22 school year. When he speaks of student achievement in his district, Lopez speaks with pride, but it’s clear that he credits those achievements to the students themselves as well as educators and support staff in Garland. When it comes to his own leadership skills, Lopez is quick to credit the investment of others in his career, just as much if not more so than his personal drive, with the success he has enjoyed. “People have taken the time to really develop me as a person, and as a leader, and that’s why I’m here, because others took time to mold and shape me alongside my own vision as an educator.” As he assumes the presidency at TALAS, Lopez will put those well honed leadership skills to work at the statewide level. A longtime board member and past vice president with the organization, Lopez has watched TALAS grow from its inception and intends to continue developing the organization through district-level TALAS affiliates. Such affiliates are new to TALAS, and Lopez believes strongly that as more

affiliates are added in the coming years, the stronger a position TALAS will be in to advocate on behalf of Latino students, educators and education leaders. “We want to go deep and make connections at each area level so they can represent the Hispanic and bilingual communities to create a collective vision that no matter what your background is, you can achieve.” As TALAS continues to grow its footprint, Lopez wants to be clear that while the organization advocates for the Latino student community, it is not an organization only for Latinos, and encourages any educator or education leader serving Latino students in Texas to learn more about TALAS and see what the organization can do for their students and community. As driven as he is humble, Lopez firmly believes that a leader is only as strong as the team around him. His success as president of TALAS, then — and it is impossible to speak with him and see anything but success in TALAS’ future — will be a reflection of not only his own excellence, but that of his staff and TALAS membership. Lopez’s father dared him to change Texas education. He is doing exactly that. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

Texas Association of Latino Administrators and Superintendents (TALAS) Membership: TALAS membership is open to education leaders with an interest in the advancement of the Latino population in Texas public schools. Mission: TALAS, with an unrelenting commitment to improving learning outcomes for Latino learners, will provide leadership development, collective impact, advocacy and a proactive voice for Latino and nonLatino leaders who have a passion for serving the fastest growing student population in our state. Year founded: 2011 Website: talasedu.org

2021-22 Johnny L. Veselka

Scholarship

TASA Active or Student Members enrolled in accredited university doctoral programs in the field of education are eligible to apply for the Johnny L. Veselka Scholarship. The $2,500 scholarships provide financial assistance to TASA members who are doctoral students pursuing careers in educational leadership, with particular emphasis on the superintendency.

Apply by September 14! https://tasanet.org/awards/johnny-l-veselka-scholarship/ Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

19


Calendar Professional development & events SEPTEMBER September 23 TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders (session 1 of 8) Omni Hotel Dallas For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasanet.org

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Central Texas Area Leander ISD For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

O C TO BE R

TSPRA Regional Meeting, North Central Texas Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

September 29-October 2

October 11

TheatreFest 2021 Moody Gardens, Galveston www.txeta.com Cost: Early Bird registration (by Sept. 20), $150; onsite registration, $170. October 4-5 TASPA Fall Support Staff Conference Kalahari Resort, Round Rock For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

TASBO Workshop: Investment Training Offices of ESC Region 3, Victoria For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275. October 11-12

TASA CMAT, Level 1 TASA HQ, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850.

TEPSA Assistant Principals Conference Omni Southpark, Austin and/or AP to Go (series of short videos) For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org Cost: In-person conference only by Sept. 24: TEPSA members, $259; nonmembers, $319. Inperson conference only after Sept. 24: TEPSA members, $309; nonmembers, $369. In-person conference and AP to Go by Sept. 24: TEPSA members, $308; nonmembers, $418. In-person conference and AP to Go after Sept. 24: TEPSA members, $358; nonmembers, $468. AP to Go only: TEPSA members, $149; nonmembers, $199.

October 6

October 12

October 5 ED 311 Back to School Workshop Civic and Convention Center, New Braunfels, or online For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: $175. October 5-7

TASPA Region 10 Meeting Spring Creek BBQ, Richardson For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org TRTA District 6 Fall Conference Offices of ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 8 TRTA Houston ART Meeting 4717 Bellaire Blvd., Bellaire For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org

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ED311 Back to School Workshop Offices of ESC Region 17, Lubbock, or online For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: $175. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Lubbock/Abilene Cohort (session 2 of 6) Abilene ISD, Abilene For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

October 12-14

October 14

TASA CMAT, Level 1 Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850.

TSPRA Regional Meeting, Houston/Beaumont Area Pasadena ISD, Pasadena For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

October 13 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio Cohort (session 2 of 6) Northside ISD, San Antonio For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Virtual Cohort (session 2 of 6) Virtual event For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $800 for all six sessions. TASB Webinar: Update on Student Discipline and School Safety Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TASPA Region 16 Meeting Offices of ESC Region 16, Amarillo For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org TRTA Katy ARE Meeting Merrell Center, Katy For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, San Antonio Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org October 13-14 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XXXIV (session 1 of 3) Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org

October 16 TRTA Corpus Christi RTA Meeting Hamlin Middle School, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 18 TASBO Workshop: Payroll Fundamentals Embassy Suites, Denton For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275. TASBO Workshop: Personnel Fundamentals Embassy Suites, Denton For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275. TRTA District 19 Fall Conference Springhill Suites, El Paso For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org TRTA Hill Country RSEA Meeting Dietert Center, Kerrville For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org October 19 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Rio Grande Valley Cohort (session 2 of 6) Weslaco ISD, Weslaco For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.


TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas Area Cohort (session 2 of 6) McKinney ISD, McKinney For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

October 20-22

TASA Executive Leadership Group I Meeting Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Victoria/Corpus Christi Cohort (session 2 of 6) Corpus Christi ISD, Corpus Christi For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

October 19-20 TASBO Payroll and Personnel Academy Embassy Suites, Denton For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $325; nonmembers, $375. October 19-21 TASA CMAT, Level 2 TASA HQ, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. October 20 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 2 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org October 21

TRTA District 15 Fall Conference First United Methodist Church, Comanche For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 21-22 TASBO Purchasing Academy Embassy Suites, Denton, or online For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $325; nonmembers, $375. October 22-November 12 TASB/TASPA Virtual HR Academy Virtual event each Thursday For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org Cost: $250. October 24-25

TASBO Workshop: Purchasing Fundamentals Embassy Suites, Denton For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $225; nonmembers, $275.

Texas ASCD Transformative Principal Leadership Academy (session 2 of 3) Kalahari Resort, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org

TASPA Region 14 Meeting Offices of ESC Region 14, Amarillo For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

October 24-26

TRTA Fort Worth RSEA Meeting Zoom meeting For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, Northwest Texas Area Plains Capital Park, Lubbock For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

Texas ASCD Annual Conference Kalahari Resort, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org October 26 TSPRA Regional Meeting, East Texas Area Willis ISD, Willis For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

TASA Executive Leadership Group II Meeting Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org October 26-27 TASA/N2 Learning Principals’ Institute (session 2 of 6) Hilton Park Cities, Dallas For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $6,000 for all six sessions. October 26-28 TASA Future-Ready Superintendents Leadership Network (session 1 of 3) Austin area For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.futurereadytx.org TASA CMAT, Level 2 Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. October 27 TASPA Region 11 Meeting Joe T. Garcia’s, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

NOVEMBER November 1-2 TASB/TASPA HR Academy Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org Cost: By Oct. 18, $385; after Oct. 18, $450. November 1-3 Texas Assessment Conference Kalahari Resort, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.txassessmentcon.org Cost: Early Bird registration (until Sept. 17), $175. Preregistration (Sept. 18-Oct. 22), $195. Onsite registration, $245. November 2 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org

November 3 TASPA Region 15 Meeting Location TBA, San Angelo area For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org TASPA Region 18 Meeting Location TBA, Midland/Odessa area For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org November 3-4 TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 3 of 4) Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org Cost: All four sessions, TASA members: $845; all four sessions, nonmembers: $945. Any one session, TASA members and nonmembers, $295. TASBO Accounting and Finance Academy Omni Galleria, Houston, and online For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $325; nonmembers, $375. November 3-5 Texas Counseling Association Annual Professional Growth Conference Galveston Island Convention Center, Galveston or virtual event, at attendee’s option For more info, (512) 472-3403. www.txca.org Cost: Pre-registration (by Oct. 20): Professional members, $215; new professional, student, retired members, $150; nonmember professional, $425; nonmember new professional, student, retired, $265. Standard pricing (Oct. 20-conference onsite): Professional members, $265; new professional, student, retired members, $200; nonmember professional, $475; nonmember new professional, student, retired, $315. November 4 TASPA Workshop: Documentation Basics Floresville ISD, Floresville For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

21


November 4-5

November 10

TASBO School Operations Conference Omni Galleria, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $250; nonmembers, $300. November 5

TASBO Course: Budget and Financial Planning ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $185; nonmembers, $235.

TASB Fall Legal Seminar TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org November 7-8 TEPSA Grow Leadership Conference Hilton Dallas Rockwall Lakefront Hotel, Rockwall For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org

TASPA Region 2 Meeting Location TBA, Corpus Christi area For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, San Antonio Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org November 10-12

TSPRA Regional Meeting, East Texas Area Virtual event For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

TASA CMSi Curriculum Writing Workshop TASA HQ, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500.

November 8-9

November 11

TASA CMSi Curriculum Management Planning Workshop TASA HQ, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500.

TRTA Birdville ARSP Meeting Thomas Coliseum, Haltom City For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org

November 8

November 9 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Rio Grande Valley Cohort (session 3 of 6) Weslaco ISD, Weslaco For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASB Fall Legal Seminar Location TBA, Midland For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org November 9-10 TCASE/TASBO Synergy 2021 Conference Courtyard by Marriott, Pflugerville, or online For more info, (512) 474-4492. www.tcase.org Cost: $325.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

November 11-13 Leadership TASB (session 2 of 5) Location TBA, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org November 12 TASB Fall Legal Seminar Virtual event For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, Central Texas Area Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, North Central Texas Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org November 15 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or

(800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org November 16 TASB Fall Legal Seminar Location TBA, Kilgore For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org November 17 TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders (session 2 of 8) Virtual event For more info, (512) 462-1711 www.tasanet.org TASPA Region 8 Meeting Zoom meeting For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org November 17-18 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XXXIV (session 2 of 3) Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org November 19

DECEMBER December 1 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio Cohort (session 3 of 6) Northside ISD, San Antonio For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASBO Course: Financial Coding for Texas Schools ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $185; nonmembers, $235. December 1-2 TASA Future-Ready Superintendents Leadership Network (session 2 of 3) Location TBA For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.futurereadytx.org Cost: $695 per superintendent; $595 each for up to three additional central office or campus leaders from the same district.

TASPA Webinar Series: Legal Issues Related to Remote Instruction Online For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: TASPA members, no charge; nonmembers, $25.

December 1-3

November 20

TAHPERD Annual Convention Convention Center, Arlington For more info, (512) 459-1299. www.tahperd.org

TASB Fall Legal Seminar Location TBA, South Padre Island For more info, (512) 467-0222. www.tasb.org November 30-December 1 TASA/N2 Learning Executive Leadership Institute (session 2 of 4) Hilton Post Oak, Houston For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $4,000 for all four sessions. TASA/N2 Learning Principals’ Institute (session 3 of 6) Hilton Post Oak, Houston For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $6,000 for all six sessions.

Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented Conference Hilton Anatole, Dallas, and online For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org December 1-4

December 2 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas Area Cohort (session 3 of 6) McKinney ISD, McKinney For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TSPRA Regional Meeting, Houston/Beaumont Area Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org


December 2-3

December 9

January 13

Texas ASCD Transformative Principal Leadership Academy (session 3 of 3) Location TBA, Dallas-Fort Worth area For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Victoria/Corpus Christi Cohort (session 3 of 6) Corpus Christi ISD, Corpus Christi For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

TSPRA Regional Meeting, East Texas Area Virtual event For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

December 7 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Lubbock/Abilene Cohort Abilene ISD, Abilene For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org December 8 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 3 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Virtual Cohort (session 3 of 6) Virtual event For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $800 for all six sessions. TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders (session 3 of 8) Virtual event For more info. (512) 462-1711 www.tasanet.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, East Texas Area Tyler ISD, Tyler For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org December 8-10 TASPA Winter Conference Kalahari Resort, Round Rock For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

December 9-10 TAMS/TARS Legislative Conference Lakeway Resort, Lakeway, with a Zoom option For more info, (210) 865-6123. www.midsizeschools.org December 10 TSPRA Regional Meeting, Central Texas Area Hutto ISD, Hutto For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, North Central Texas Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org December 15 TSPRA Regional Meeting, San Antonio Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

JA N UA RY January 11 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org January 12 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XXXIV (session 3 of 3) Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, San Antonio Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

January 14 TSPRA Regional Meeting, Central Texas Area Hays CISD, Kyle For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, North Central Texas Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org January 19 TRTA Mainland RTA Meeting Doyle Convention Center, Texas City For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org January 19-20 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XXXV, Waco area (session 1 of 3) Robinson ISD, Robinson For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org

Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 727-2723. www.txascd.org January 26 TASPA Region 20 Meeting Zoom meeting For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org January 27 TSPRA Regional Meeting, Houston/Beaumont Area Aldine ISD, Houston For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org January 30-February 2 TASA Midwinter Conference Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361 or (800) 725-8272. www.tasamidwinter.org January 31 TRTA Retirement Seminar Irving ISD, Irving For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org Cost: No charge for TRTA members. ◄

January 20 TSPRA Regional Meeting, Gulf Coast Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org January 21 TASPA Webinar Series: Title IX Part One – How Do the New Regulations Impact Human Resources? Online For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: TASPA members, no charge; nonmembers, $25. January 25 TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals Offices of ESC Region 20, San Antonio For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org

Where did you find that great conference? I found it in Texas School Business! Discover upcoming conferences and continuing education opportunities in the calendar section of each issue of Texas School Business and on our website. TexasSchoolBusiness.com

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

23


Who’s News

Killeen ISD

> Continued from page 15

principal of Haynes Elementary School. Most recently assistant principal of Fowler Elementary, she has more than 20 years of experience as a teacher, instructional specialist and math interventionist. She earned her master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University.

Norma Veguilla-Martinez

now leads Memorial Parkway Elementary School. She began her career in 2008 in Edinburg CISD, joining Katy ISD as a third grade teacher. She comes to her new job from Beckendorff Junior High, where she was an assistant principal.

Keller ISD The district’s new associate superintendent of education is John Allison, former superintendent of Olathe Public Schools in Kansas. Christy Johnson has accepted the position

of director of early childhood. She has been with the district for 15 years, serving as principal of the Keller Early Learning Center South since it opened five years ago. Also, the following campus administration assignments have been made: • Brianna Baker, assistant principal, Fossil Ridge High School; • Timothy Berube, assistant principal, Hillwood Middle School; • Joshua Boyd, assistant principal, Keller Collegiate Academy; • Courtney Brandel, principal, Indian Springs Middle School; • Phillip Daurio, assistant principal, Timber Creek High School; • Shawn Duhon, principal, Timber Creek High School; • Jeffrey Gauntt, assistant principal, Keller Middle School; • Holly Hennig, assistant principal, Indian Springs Middle School; • Justin Hennig, principal, Ridgeview Elementary School;

Alice Baumann has been tapped to serve as

Wood Elementary School’s new principal,

• Jordyn Neiswender, assistant principal, Liberty Elementary School; • Beatrice Rivera, assistant principal, Whitley Road Elementary School; • Amber Ross, assistant principal, Fossil Ridge High School.

24

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

Alphonso Bates is the

district’s new chief student services officer. With more than 22 years of experience as an educator, he comes to his new job from Community ISD, where he was interim superintendent and chief of organizational management.

A new leader is in place for Patterson Middle School. Christina Harris is an educator with 20 years of experience, most recently serving as director of curriculum and instruction at Killeen High School. She holds a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University Central Texas.

A new principal is in place for Carter Elementary School. Leann Imrie, who was the school’s assistant principal, previously was a teacher and gifted and talented specialist. She received her bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan State University and her master’s degree from the University of Houston at Victoria.

new position from serving as assistant principal. An employee of the district for 15 years, she was also assistant principal of Montague Village Elementary School. She holds a master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas at Tyler.

John Hocking is now the district’s executive director of technology services. He was previously director of network and security systems. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Trident University International.

The district’s new executive director for strategic initiatives and accountability, Nicole Koch, took her first administrative assignment in the district in 2017 and most recently was in charge of the teacher incentive allotment program. She holds a doctorate in educational leadership from the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor. Julie Sims, newly appointed principal of

Meadows Elementary School, has joined KISD with 11 years of campus leadership experience, having previously worked in Midland and Lubbock ISDs. She received her doctorate in educational leadership from Texas Tech University.

Kingsville ISD Cynthia Winchester has been named the district’s director of secondary instruction. She comes to Kingsville from Corpus Christi ISD, where she was principal of Berlanga Elementary.

• Hector Lugo, assistant principal/ academic dean, Timber Creek High School;

• Angel Magruder, assistant principal, North Riverside Elementary School;

Lamar CISD

Amber Dibble, has been promoted to her

• Traci Kraeszig, principal, Keller Early Learning Center South;

• Kevin McLendon, assistant principal, Willis Lane Elementary School;

superintendent. He previously was with Sheldon ISD. A graduate of Texas A&M University, he holds a master’s degree in strategic public relations from George Washington University and a doctorate in educational leadership from Baylor University.

Klein ISD A new chief academic officer, Anthony Indelicato, is in place for Klein ISD.

Lake Dallas ISD Lake Dallas ISD has welcomed Mike Rockwood, former deputy superintendent of Lamar CISD, as

Darnell Jackson has accepted the position of head football coach and campus athletic coordinator for Terry High School, coming to his new job from coaching at George Junior High. The University of North Alabama graduate joined Lamar CISD in 2015. Wayne Morren has been named an area

superintendent. He is a 25-year educator who comes to Lamar CISD from Floydada Collegiate ISD, where he was a secondary principal. Now serving as an area superintendent for the district is Marlon Waites, Jr. An educator for 16 years, he most recently was director of student services and interim fine arts director for Lancaster ISD.

Laredo ISD Dolores Flores, who has been with the district for 25 years, is now principal of Ryan Elementary School after serving as assistant principal there. She received her bachelor’s degree from Texas Woman’s University and her master’s degree in bilingual education from Texas A&M International University.

Former Milton Elementary School assistant principal Michelle Gonzalez has accepted the position of principal of Santo Niño Elementary. The 15-year education veteran began her career in Laredo’s United ISD after earning a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University. She also holds a master’s degree in counseling psychology from that institution. Tarver Elementary School welcomed

Ana Mastee as its new principal at the start

of the 2021-22 academic year. Previously assistant principal of Cigarroa Middle School, she holds master’s degrees in


curriculum and instruction and educational administration. Jose Perez, who was principal of Santa

Niño Elementary School for the past six years, now leads Santa Maria Elementary. He is a 20-year employee of the district and has a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M International University.

Leander ISD Veteran educator Staci Cordell has been chosen to lead Faubion Elementary School as principal. Most recently Reagan Elementary’s assistant principal, she began her career in Coppell ISD in 1999, going on to work in Pflugerville for three years before returning to Leander. Clay Currier, who was Leander High School’s

assistant principal, is now senior director of New Hope High School. He previously was an administrator in Tyler and Round Rock ISDs and worked as a teacher in Hutto ISD.

Wendy Gonzaba has been promoted from

Akin Elementary School’s assistant principal to principal of Camacho Elementary. She has been with the district since 2008, working at Knowles, Bagdad and Cypress elementaries. She received her master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University. Former Rouse High School principal

Christine Simpson has been promoted to

area superintendent. She began her career in Marble Falls ISD in 1997 before joining Leander ISD as an English and reading teacher. A graduate of the University of Texas at San Antonio, she holds a master’s degree from Texas State University.

learning departments. Her bachelor’s degree was awarded from Oklahoma City University and her master’s degree in educational administration from Texas Woman’s University. Lewisville ISD has confirmed the appointment of Lindsey Girlinghouse as principal of Valley Ridge Elementary School. Since 2016, she was assistant principal of Brinker Elementary in Plano ISD. She received her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in education leadership from Louisiana State University. Stephanie Gore has been

named principal of Huffines Middle School, coming to her new job from serving as assistant principal of Lewisville High School Main Campus, a position she held for 10 years. She is a graduate of Texas Tech University and holds a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of North Texas. Degan Elementary School has welcomed Andrea Smith as principal. She most recently led Stewart’s Creek Elementary. The Texas A&M University graduate earned her master’s degree in bilingual education from Southern Methodist University and her doctorate in educational leadership from Dallas Baptist University.

Little Elm ISD Shay Adams has accepted

Tonya Thompson, former district director

the position of assistant superintendent for business and finance, a job she held previously from 2000 to 2003. She has spent the past 18 years as chief financial officer for Lovejoy ISD.

of advanced programs, is now Rouse High School’s principal. She began her career in Montgomery ISD, then worked in Conroe, Manor and Round Rock ISDs before transferring to California, where she was an assistant principal.

Levelland ISD

Frank Felice, who for the past

17 years was director of bands at Little Elm High School, is now the district’s director of fine arts. He has 28 years of experience in districts in Texas, Louisiana and Oregon.

Lyle Leong has been named

head football coach and athletic director at Levelland High School. He comes to his new assignment from Highlands High School in San Antonio ISD, where he was co-offensive coordinator.

Lewisville ISD A new executive director of learning and teaching is in place for LISD. Adrienne Gall was executive director of elementary curriculum and programs and previously led the early childhood, gifted and talented, and outdoor

Lovejoy ISD The Lovejoy ISD board of trustees announces the appointment of Jennifer DuPlessis as chief financial officer. She comes to her new post from Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, where she served in the same capacity. The University of North Texas graduate holds a doctorate from the University of Texas at Tyler.

Lubbock-Cooper ISD The following administrative assignments have been confirmed by the district: • Brittany Brown, assistant principal, Bush Middle School; • Kyle Hendrix, principal, Bush Middle School; • Angie Inklebarger, assistant superintendent of human resources; • Krista Klein, assistant principal, North Elementary School; • Edna Parr, director of administrative and community services; • Missy Ware, assistant principal, East Elementary School and South Elementary School.

Lufkin ISD The new principal of Lufkin High School is Andre Emmons. He began his career in the district in 2006, leaving for a time to work in Crockett and Diboll ISDs. He is a graduate of the University of North Texas with master’s and doctoral degrees from Stephen F. Austin State University. Now serving as director of special services is Irma Herrera, who began her career in Lufkin ISD’s bilingual department. She has spent the past seven years as an educational diagnostician and special education coordinator. The district’s new executive director of PK-5 teaching and learning is Kathy Jost, a 34-year educator who most recently was principal of Coston Elementary School. She has spent her career in Lufkin ISD, working as a teacher, counselor and assistant principal as well as principal. Kim Kassaw, newly appointed executive

director of special programs, joined the district in 2003. She has since served as a lead diagnostician, special education coordinator and special services director. The new director of bilingual services,

Betsy Mijares, previously worked in the

district as a teacher, assistant principal and, most recently, principal of Burley Primary School. She is also an adjunct professor at Sam Houston State University.

Cindy Tierney, now serving as executive

director of student services and federal programs, began her career in the district as a second grade teacher 21 years ago. She has since worked as a literacy coordinator, principal and, most recently, director of middle school curriculum and instruction.

> See Who’s News, page 26 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

25


Who’s News > Continued from page 25

McKinney ISD McKinney ISD announces the appointment of Amy Plate as director of childcare programs. She has over two decades of experience in creating and implementing childcare programs, working in Allen ISD since 1995. She is a graduate of Texas Woman’s University.

Marble Falls ISD Former Marble Falls High School girls’ basketball coach and girls’ sports coordinator John Berkman is now the school’s assistant athletic director. Marble Falls High School’s head football coach, Brian Herman, has assumed the additional responsibility of campus athletic director.

Elementary School. She holds a master’s degree in educational leadership from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Brenda Gonzalez, bilingual communications coordinator, joins MISD with five years of experience as a television reporter, including stints with Telemundo and Univision. She is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington. Jeff Johnson is the new principal of the

Mesquite Academy. He has 21 years of experience, the past 12 in MISD. He is a graduate of Henderson State University with a master’s degree in administration from Lamar University.

Teri Mapengo is the district’s new transportation director. She came to Mesquite ISD in 2018 as transportation manager and was named assistant director of transportation in 2021.

The new coordinator of innovation is Tai Preuninger, who has spent her 14-year career in Mesquite ISD. She has served at Kimbrough Middle School since 2007 as a teacher, coach, department chair and technology coach.

Rick Hoover, who previously was athletic

Midland ISD

Marshall ISD

The district’s new deputy superintendent of learning, leading and innovation is Kregg Cuellar, who was deputy superintendent of instruction and school communities for Portland (Ore.) Public Schools.

director at Marble Falls High School, is now the district’s director of special programs.

The new principal of Marshall Early Graduation School is Sonya BurnettAndrus, who has been with the district since 2016. Prior to that, she was an educator in Monroe, La., and Fort Bend ISD and at Prairie View A&M University and Wiley College. Blake Langley, former assistant principal of

Foster Middle School in Longview ISD, has joined Marshall ISD as principal of Young Elementary School. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a master’s degree in educational leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University. Additionally, two new assistant principals are in place: • Shannon Clemons, Travis Elementary School; • Jacqueline Harman, Young Elementary School;

Martin’s Mill ISD New superintendent Scott Tyner was most recently superintendent of Tenaha ISD.

Mesquite ISD Floyd Elementary School has welcomed Christina Alvarez as principal. She has spent her 14-year career in the district, most recently as assistant principal of Achziger

26

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

Charles Garcia has been named associate

superintendent, coming to Midland from El Paso, where he was principal of Ysleta ISD’s Bel Air High School. He is a 20-year educator. Luz Martinez has been appointed associate

superintendent, bringing 25 years of experience to her new position, having worked as a teacher, assistant principal, principal and executive coach/trainer.

Montgomery ISD Lincoln Elementary School’s new principal, Kerri Ashlock, has arrived in the district from Katy ISD, where she was an assistant principal. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce and her master’s degree in education administration from Sam Houston State University. New director of transportation Elissa Cross comes to Montgomery from Klein ISD, where she was operations manager. Former Lincoln Elementary School principal Courtney Dyer now serves as the district’s director of community services. Prior to her most recent position, she

worked in MISD as a teacher, counselor and assistant principal. Her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in school counseling were awarded from Sam Houston State University. Megan Evans is the district’s new secondary instructional coordinator. She joins MISD from Katy ISD, where she was a high school instructional coach for the past six years. Robert Ingalls has been

named principal of Montgomery Elementary School, coming to Texas from Montana, where he spent the past 19 years as a principal in the Great Falls Public School District. His master’s degrees, in elementary education and administration, were awarded from Montana State University and the University of Great Falls, respectively. Now filling the position of instructional coordinator is Jaimie McCallister, most recently an instructional coach at Madeley Ranch Elementary School. She is a 20year educator who also was a teacher and principal.

Moody ISD Former assistant superintendent Andrew Miller now leads Moody ISD as superintendent, having previously served in Belton, Midland and Temple ISDs. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Baylor University. A master’s degree in education from the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor followed.

Nacogdoches ISD Carpenter Elementary School’s new principal is Lynsey McAninch, former assistant principal of Fredonia Elementary.

New Caney ISD Former Porter Elementary School principal Nicole Land now serves as the district’s human resources director. Donda Slaydon, who was Porter High School’s dean of instruction, is now that school’s principal.

Northside ISD (San Antonio) Dana Gilbert-Perry now leads one of

Northside ISD’s new campuses, Straus Middle School, the district’s 21st middle school. She has been principal of Vale Middle School for the past 10 years and has spent 18 of her 21 years as an educator in NISD.

A second new campus, Tomlinson Elementary School, has Wendy Tiemann as principal. An educator for 30 years, she spent the past five as principal of Timberwilde Elementary.


Penelope ISD

Ranger ISD

Former Dawson ISD director of human resources Robert Bray is now superintendent of Penelope ISD.

Kevin Shipley is the new superintendent of

Pflugerville ISD Brandon Cardwell has been named executive

director of facilities and construction. He previously served as maintenance and operations director for Eanes ISD in Austin and in a similar capacity in Round Rock ISD.

Lucy Kerley is Pflugerville ISD’s new director of transportation. She was Belton ISD’s transportation director since 2013 and previously worked as a safety training coordinator in Taylor ISD. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business administration from the University of Phoenix. Alejandro Mojica has been tasked with the position of director of the district’s multilingual department. He comes to Pflugerville from Victoria ISD. He is a graduate of Universidad de los Andes in Colombia and holds a master’s degree in education curriculum from Tarleton State University.

In addition, five new principal assignments have been announced. They are: • Laura Brown, Park Crest Middle School; • Brendy Dossey, Caldwell Elementary School; • Dora Molina, Delco Elementary School; • Jennifer Perez, River Oaks Elementary School; • Andre Underwood, Dearing Elementary School.

Plano ISD The district has a new assistant superintendent for student engagement and district services. Selenda Anderson, who had been serving as executive director for school leadership and innovation, is beginning her 26th year as an educator, 20 of those with Plano ISD. She also worked in Garland ISD and in districts in Virginia and North Carolina. Bart Rosebure has been named director of safety and security. He held the same position in Rockwall ISD, worked in Plano ISD as a security specialist, and comes to his new position from Baylor University, where he was director of technical security. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce and a master’s degree in security studies from Angelo State University.

John Manning is the new principal of

Ranger ISD. He has been an educator for 31 years, nine of those teaching and coaching in Texas and Oklahoma, with 17 years of experience as a principal and five as a superintendent in Alaska.

Richland Springs ISD Former Graford ISD superintendent James Womack now leads Richland Springs ISD.

Riviera ISD The new superintendent of Riviera ISD is Patricia Thornton, who was principal of Kaufer Early College High School since 2019.

Round Rock ISD Former Donna ISD superintendent Hafedh Azaiez now holds the top position in Round Rock ISD. He received his bachelor’s degree in his native Tunisia, his master’s degree in education from the University of St. Thomas and his doctorate in educational leadership from Sam Houston State University. He previously worked in Houston and Spring ISDs as a teacher, coach, assistant principal and principal. Pearson Ranch Middle School has welcomed Monica Collins as principal. She is a 23-year educator who previously served as assistant principal of Grisham and Fulkes middle schools. The University of Texas graduate received her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Texas State University. Jessica Cuellar is the new principal of

Blackland Prairie Elementary School. An educator for 15 years, she was previously a vice-principal at Westwood High School. She is a graduate of the University of Texas Permian Basin, where she also earned her master’s degree in educational leadership.

Jerrod Gertsema has been promoted to the

role of principal of Success High School after serving as assistant principal since 2013.

Cynthia Griggs is the new principal of Gattis

Elementary School, having been assistant principal of Brushy Creek Elementary since 2017. She received her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in education from Texas State University. Now leading Spicewood Elementary School as principal is Alicia Hill, who was principal of Austin ISD’s Zilker Elementary since 2017. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and her master’s and doctoral degrees in education from Texas State University.

Deerpark Middle School. He was assistant principal of Pearson Ranch Middle School since 2017 and worked as math department chair at Westwood High. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of the Ozarks and a master’s degree in management and administrative sciences from the University of Texas at Dallas. New Walsh Middle School principal

Rudy Reyes served as the school’s assistant

principal since 2018. He is a graduate of Texas State University, where he earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degree in educational leadership.

San Angelo ISD The district announces the appointment of a new deputy superintendent. Greg McIntyre comes to San Angelo with more than 30 years of experience as an educator, most recently serving as deputy superintendent and chief administrative officer in College Station ISD. He received his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University.

San Elizario ISD Sambrano Elementary School now has Ernesto Siegel as principal. He has been an employee of the district for 24 years, most recently as assistant principal of Alarcon Elementary. He holds a master’s degree as an instructional specialist in educational technology.

Shallowater ISD Shallowater High School now has Rodney Vincent as head football coach and athletic director. He comes to his new position from Vista Ridge High School in Round Rock ISD, where he was for 13 years head football coach and athletic coordinator.

Sherman ISD Yolanda Beasley, newly appointed head volleyball coach at Sherman High School, is a 29-year teacher and coach, most recently serving as head volleyball coach in Little Elm ISD.

Sherman ISD has announced the hiring of Matt Ellis as head coach of Sherman High School boys soccer. An educator for 15 years, he has coached in Anna, Carrollton-Farmers Branch and McKinney ISDs.

> See Who’s News, page 26 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

27


Who’s News > Continued from page 27

The district’s new director of special education is Jill Schurr, who joins Sherman ISD from Plano ISD, where she was assistant director of special education student services.

Socorro ISD (El Paso) The new athletic coordinator and head varsity football coach for El Dorado High School is Frank Martinez, who was defensive coordinator at Franklin High School in El Paso ISD for the past five years. Eastlake High School has named

James Moreno its boys’ varsity basketball

head coach. He spent the past 16 years in the same capacity at Clint High School in El Paso’s Clint ISD.

South San Antonio ISD Tony Kingman has been hired as the district’s chief financial officer. He comes to San Antonio from Midland ISD, where he was director of finance and business. He holds two bachelor’s degrees, in management and finance, from the University of Texas of the Permian Basin and a master’s degree in finance from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Now serving as the district’s chief technology officer is Leonila Peña, who most recently worked in San Benito CISD. She has a bachelor’s degree in business administration and a master’s degree in educational technology. The district’s new child nutrition director is Debra Rice, who previously worked in that department as an assistant director. A registered dietician with 16 years of experience, she received her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma. Scott Stephens has been approved as executive director of business. He has been with the district since 2018, serving as child nutrition director and previously was Pleasanton ISD’s chief operating officer. His master’s degree in business administration was conferred by the University of the Incarnate Word.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

In addition, four new principal assignments have been announced: • Phillip De La Peña, Shepard Middle School; • Vanessa Dominguez, Benavidez Elementary School; • Evelia Montemayor, Athens Elementary School; • Amy Rodriguez-Lopez, South San Antonio High School.

Spring ISD With the hiring of Chase Giddings as Dekaney High School’s director of bands, Spring ISD has installed its first African-American in that position. Most recently the school’s associate director of bands, he did his student teaching there while attaining his bachelor’s degree at Sam Houston State University. He joined Spring ISD in 2013 and earned his master’s degree in conducting at Sam Houston as well.

Temple ISD The following administrative assignments have been made for the district: • Jill Owen, principal, Kennedy-Powell Elementary School; • Fran Smetana, director of academic intervention; • Quinessa Williams, principal, Cater Elementary School.

Texarkana ISD Now serving as principal of Nash Elementary School is Liliana Luna, who was the school’s assistant principal since 2011. She earned her bachelor’s degree and two master’s degrees, in curriculum and instruction and educational administration, from Texas A&M University at Texarkana. The new director of CTE (career and technical education) and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) is Todd Marshall, whose career began in Texarkana ISD in 2006. Prior to that he was an administrator in Atlanta (Tx.) and Pleasant Grove ISDs. His bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in administration were awarded from Southern Arkansas University.

Texas High School’s new principal, Patti O’Bannon, most recently led Nash Elementary School after serving in Hooks, Redwater and Liberty-Eylau ISDs. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Southern Arkansas University and a master’s degree in counseling psychology from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Sherri Penix has joined Texarkana ISD as chief innovation officer. She comes to her new assignment from Fort Smith (Ark.) Public Schools, where she was assistant superintendent of human resources and campus support. She is a graduate of Southern Arkansas University with a master’s degree in guidance and counseling from Henderson State University.

Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) Charles Dupre, who recently retired as superintendent of Fort Bend ISD, has joined TASA as deputy executive director of member engagement and support. He was TASA’s vice president for 2020-21. In addition to his time with Fort Bend ISD, he was superintendent of Pflugerville ISD and, while there, was ESC Region 13’s Superintendent of the Year. He is a graduate of Harding University with a master’s degree from the University of Houston and a doctorate in educational leadership from Lamar University.

Tomball ISD The following administrative assignments have been made for the 2021-22 school year: • Jeff Bailey, principal, Tomball Memorial High School; • Caitlin Cain, principal, Northpointe Intermediate School; • Erin Johnson, principal, Canyon Pointe Elementary School; • Allyson Jordan, principal, Creekview Elementary School; • Melissa King-Knowles, school support officer for secondary schools; • Alicia Reeves, school support officer for elementary schools; • Kevin Williams, principal, Willow Wood Junior High.

Tyler ISD Tyler ISD’s director of visual and performing arts, Sandra Newton, received the Texas Music Education Association’s Distinguished Administrator Award, which recognizes upper-level administrators who have played


Valley View ISD

White Oak ISD

The new principal of Legacy High School is Kristen Walls. She was principal of Hogg Middle School since 2020 and previously worked as academic dean and principal at Lee High School.

Superintendent Silvia Ibarra served in that role on an interim basis since February. Prior to that, she was McAllen ISD’s assistant superintendent for instructional services. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Texas Pan-American and earned her doctorate in educational leadership from North Central Arizona University.

White Oak Intermediate School’s new principal, Shane Wright, is a 29-year educator who worked in Carthage, Hallsville, LindenKildare and Harleton ISDs before becoming a math consultant and systematic planning director for leadership support and development at ESC Region 8.

United ISD (Laredo)

Veribest ISD

an important role in preserving quality music education programs in their campus and districts. Justin Simmons, formerly an assistant

principal at Tyler High School, has received a promotion to principal of Hogg Middle School. A product of Tyler ISD schools, he has worked in the district since 2017.

Christina Casanova

now serves as executive director for instructional accountability after spending the past seven years as director for student assessment. The 28-year educator holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at San Antonio and a master’s degree from Texas A&M International University. Maria Amparo Lanese is now UISD’s director of communications. She began her career in the district 25 years ago and for the past two years has worked as the advanced academics/ dual enrollment coordinator. She earned her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M International University.

United ISD announces the appointment of Emma Leza as associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction. She has been with the district for 26 years, the past nine as executive director for instructional accountability. Now serving as director of facilities maintenance and operations is Alfonso Peña, a project manager and designer with over 14 years of experience. He holds a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the University of Texas at San Antonio. Matias Ydrogo is the district’s

new director of special education. The 20-year education veteran has been with UISD for 11 years. He earned his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in special education from Texas A&M International University.

Veribest ISD’s new superintendent, Amanda Traylor, was most recently Sunray ISD’s high school principal.

Victoria ISD Roberto Rosas has accepted

the position of director of multicultural education. He has been with the district for eight years as a dual language/bilingual teacher and instructional coach. He earned his bachelor’s degree from St. Mary’s University and his master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Concordia University. The district announces the appointment of Anita Taylor as executive director of strategic planning and school improvement. She comes to Victoria from Beeville ISD, where she was a principal. The 10-year veteran educator holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and a master’s degree in counseling from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi.

Waco ISD South Waco Elementary School has welcomed Lauren Frasure as principal. She spent the past nine years leading Chavez Middle School, where she also served as a teacher, instructional specialist, dean and assistant principal. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Baylor University and her master’s degree in education from Lamar University. Waco ISD’s new deputy superintendent is Josie Gutierrez, who most recently served as assistant superintendent for human resources. She previously was Spring ISD’s chief of schools officer, assistant superintendent for school leadership in Dallas ISD and director of school leadership in Fort Worth ISD. Lisa Saxenian has been chosen as principal

of Waco High School. She has been with the district since 1986, spending the past 20 years as the school’s assistant principal and dean of academies.

Ysleta ISD (El Paso) Michelle Cadena, who was interim director of middle school academics, is now YISD’s director of elementary and middle school academics. The University of Texas at El Paso graduate began her career in 1996 at Pasodale Elementary School. She holds a master’s degree from the University of Phoenix. Richard Couder is the district’s new director of college readiness. He comes to YISD from El Paso ISD, where he was a college readiness facilitator. He has a bachelor’s degree from St. Edward’s University and a master’s degree in public administration from Texas State University.

After serving as principal of Valle Verde Early College High School, Paul Covey is now the district’s director of state and federal programs. Martin Segovia has been promoted from assistant athletic director to athletic director. He began his career in Kansas in 1995. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Nebraska at Kearney and his master’s degree from Kansas State University.

Seven principal assignments have been made for the district. They are: • Penny Bankston, Valle Verde Early College High School; • Maria Gonzalez, Edgemere International School; • James McIntyre, Loma Terrace Elementary School; • Daniel Medina, Riverside Middle School; • Jose Perez, Ysleta Middle School; • Javier Salgado, Parkland High School; • Jake Valtierra, Bel Air High School. ◄

Do you have good news to share about your district? Send news items for Who’s News directly to news@texasschoolbusiness.com Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

29


THE BACK PAGE

When second place is as good as first by Riney Jordan

A

Texas School Business Advertiser Index

School Outfitters...................................2 schooloutfitters.com Stantec........................................................4 stantec.com TASPA.......................................................... 5

s another school year begins, we all wonder what the next few months will bring. More strains of COVID-19? Schools closing and going online again? Masks? So many issues.

Reluctantly, he did.

taspa.org

“We’ve got this,” I told him.

TASA................................................... 19, 32

Despite whatever comes our way, I know, without a doubt, that teachers, administrators and everyone who makes up the giant team that makes our schools run smoothly will meet the problem with dedication, courage and commitment.

The next morning, we met at the site to begin the competition. Only a few youths had registered for horseshoes. Fortunately, his first opponent didn’t show up. As a result, Charlie was awarded his first match without pitching a single horseshoe.

Texas Assessment Conference......................................... 17

But of all of the responsibilities, perhaps none is more important than deeply caring about each student.

His second match wasn’t so lucky. He lost the game significantly.

texasschoolbusiness.com

I will never forget a little guy I had in my classroom as a fifth grade teacher. His name was Charlie, and someone started calling him “Charlie Brown,” from the comic strip “Peanuts.” He hated it, and the more they did it, the angrier and more frustrated he became. Unfortunately, Charlie left a trail of destruction everywhere he went. His school work was, oh, such a mess, and his desk and locker were constantly needing attention. His family attended the same church that my wife and I attended, and when summer rolled around, I found myself volunteering to go as a chaperone with the youth to their camp. Charlie was ecstatic that I was attending, and he attached himself to me like a shadow. When the youth leader announced that the camp’s “Summer Olympics” was about to begin, and each camper had to sign up for an athletic event, I watched Charlie’s eyes drop and a look of panic come to his face. As kids began to volunteer for baseball, volleyball, track, swimming and basketball, Charlie remained silent. “You’ve got to sign up for something, Charlie. Don’t worry, I’ll be there with you.” “Last event we’ve got,” the director announced. “Horseshoes!” “Whoa! You can do this, Charlie. Raise your hand! Raise your hand!”

We practiced until it was time for dinner, and I hate to tell you, but he was just terrible.

But because he had “won” his first match, he found himself in the final match for the championship. (Don’t tell me there’s not a God!)

I wish you could have been there! When they called Charlie’s name, our youth practically yelled their heads off. As he stood up, a couple of the bigger guys picked him up, placed him on their shoulders, and carried him to the front to receive his award. The crowd went wild … and “Charlie Brown” had one of the best days of his life. Charlie passed away a few years after that summer camp. He had suffered from a rare disease he had carried since birth. At his funeral, his mother came up to me and thanked me for spending time with him at camp. “He was prouder of that second-place ribbon than anything else he owned,” she told me. So, educators, keep doing what you’re doing: teaching … loving kids … making a difference. The “Charlie Browns” of this world and I surely do thank you!

convocation, graduation or awards banquet, visit www.rineyjordan.com.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2021

txassessmentcon.org Texas School Business................ 9, 23

txEDCON...................................................31 tasa.tasb.org

Although he didn’t score a point in that third match, he had won second place in the event without scoring a single point! But one of the greatest moments in my life happened the night of the awards ceremony. After all the other ribbons were awarded, they finally began the horseshoe winners.

RINEY JORDAN is the author of two books and a frequent public speaker. To invite him to speak at your

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Advertise in Texas School Business magazine! For specs and rates, contact jgarrido@tasanet.org or by calling (800) 725-8272

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September 24–26 Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Dallas tasa.tasb.org #tasatasb

General Session Speakers

Sylvia Baffour

Professional speaker, trainer and executive coach who helps organizations thrive and succeed with emotional intelligence strategies

Shayla Rivera

Aerospace engineer and former rocket scientist with NASA and current director of the ENGR program and professor of practice for the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University

Jessica Rector

Leading expert on burnout and mind wellness, helping people break through burnout and tackle inner communication to turn it into outer success and positive action

Join us in Dallas September 24-26!

REGISTER TODAY tasa.tasb.org

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Join Us! TASA is the professional association for Texas school leaders. In addition to advocacy and professional learning, we provide networks and services that offer mentorship and inspiration to our members. TASA is working hard to provide the support that Texas school leaders need. We invite you to be part of TASA!

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September/October 2021 Texas School Business  

The September/October 2021 issue of Texas School Business, published by TASA, takes a look at a couple of ways districts are working to help...

September/October 2021 Texas School Business  

The September/October 2021 issue of Texas School Business, published by TASA, takes a look at a couple of ways districts are working to help...

Profile for tasanet

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