July/August 2022 Texas School Business

Page 1

69

YEARS

The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas

Texas School Business

JULY/AUGUST

2022

A genuine leader Linsae Snider retires as TSPRA executive director

Also in this issue: TCWSE President Kathryn Washington Texas ASCD President Susanne Carroll


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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

12 Cover Story

18

A genuine leader Linsae Snider retires as TSPRA executive director

TCWSE President Profile Kathryn Washington helps TCWSE grow through mentorship, support

by Dacia Rivers

by Dacia Rivers

20 Texas ASCD President Profile Susanne Carroll steps up to lead Texas ASCD by James Golsan

Departments 7 Who’s News 36 Calendar 42 Ad Index

Columns

5 From the Editor by Dacia Rivers 9 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 22 Regional View 24 Student Voices 28 The Arts 42 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.


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From the editor

I

n this issue of Texas School Business, we honor a retiring public school advocate, Linsae Snider, executive director of the Texas School Public Relations Association. It’s been my pleasure to work with Linsae over the past few years. She has been a tireless supporter of Texas School Business, always on hand to help find a scoop, a contributor, or anything else we might need to put the magazine together. She will be missed by many, myself included. You can read what some of Linsae’s colleagues have to say about her starting on page 12. Speaking of public relations, I want to take a moment to remind you that Texas School Business is your magazine. We are here to spread the good news about what’s going on in Texas’ public schools. If you’d like to see your district represented in these pages, I encourage you to apply for our annual Bragging Rights issue by filling out the short form at texasschoolbusiness.com. Or if you have an idea for a column or feature article, shoot me an email at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com. For students, summer is a relaxing time, a much-needed break. For school administrators, it can be quite the opposite, as you work to wind up the last school year and prepare for another. I hope that for you all, the summer is both as restorative and as preparative as possible. No one deserves it more.

Texas School Business

JULY / AUGUST 2022 Volume LXIX, Issue 4 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 www.texasschoolbusiness.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Dacia Rivers DESIGN

Dacia Rivers Editorial Director

Phaedra Strecher COLUMNISTS

Riney Jordan Jim Walsh

ADVERTISING SALES

Jennifer Garrido

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published online bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators. © Copyright 2022 Texas Association of School Administrators

Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

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Who’s News Abilene ISD The new principal of Austin Elementary School, Clay Johnson, is in his 19th year with Abilene ISD, the last three as an assistant principal at Bowie Elementary and Abilene High. Johnson is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma and received his master’s degree from the University of Michigan. Cooper High School announces the appointment of Reece Kingcade as choral director. Most recently associate choir director at Canyon High School, he previously was choral director at Bushland High. He graduated from Oklahoma Christian University and holds a master’s degree in vocal music education from West Texas A&M University. Shannon Marshall, newly appointed principal of Thomas Elementary, has only been with the district since January, but has 10 years of experience as an administrator, having previously worked in Boys’ Ranch, Dalhart, Levelland and Sundown ISDs. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Angelo State University and a master’s degree from Lamar University.

The Abilene Education Foundation now has Adam Samuels as its executive director. He comes to his new position with 29 years of experience with nonprofit organizations. Janaye Wideman, principal of Dyess

Alief ISD H.D. Chambers, superintendent of Alief

ISD, has announced that he will retire in December. This will bring to a close a 37-year career, including stints in CypressFairbanks and Stafford ISDs, and 12 years in his present position.

Alpine ISD A new superintendent is in place for the district. Michelle Rinehart, who was assistant superintendent of Rankin ISD since 2021, previously worked as a math and science teacher, educational specialist and instructional coach. She received her bachelor’s degree from Queen’s University, her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Texas A&M University, and her doctorate in education leadership from Harvard University.

Anderson-Shiro CISD A new junior/senior high principal is in place for the district. Matt Caffey comes to Anderson-Shiro CISD from Olney ISD, where he was a principal for the past six years. Prior to that, he was a secondary curriculum specialist in Athens ISD and an assistant principal in College Station ISD. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University and his doctorate in educational leadership from Texas Tech University.

Elementary School, brings seven years of elementary school administrative experience to her new job. An educator for 16 years, she was most recently assistant principal of Stafford Elementary. She received her bachelor’s degree from Abilene Christian University and her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Former Paducah ISD high school principal, athletic director and head football coach John York has accepted the position of superintendent of Anton ISD.

Alba-Golden ISD

Arp ISD

Brittany Hall, former assistant

principal of the district’s secondary campus, is now secondary principal. Before joining Alba-Golden ISD, she worked in Angleton, Center, and Sealy ISDs. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University. Former Alba-Golden High School principal Macie Thompson has been promoted to district superintendent.

Anton ISD

Wes Schminkey has taken the position of Arp High School’s athletics director and head coach after serving as the program’s defensive coordinator. He also previously worked as the boys’ and girls’ powerlifting coach and as the district’s strength and conditioning coordinator

Ballinger ISD Ty Lang has accepted the position of athletic director and head football coach. He comes to his new job from Decatur ISD, where he spent the past eight years, most recently as offensive

coordinator. He previously coached in Brownwood and Grapevine-Colleyville ISDs.

Bastrop ISD Bastrop ISD’s new director of PEIMS (Public Education Information Management System) and data quality, Chris Tawater, has served as the district’s testing and data analysis coordinator since 2020. An employee of BISD since 2004, he has 18 years of experience in public schools. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Phoenix in information technology and business analysis.

Ben Bolt-Palito Blanco ISD New superintendent Marcela Baez has arrived from San Marcos ISD, where she was chief human resource officer since 2018. She began her career in Houston ISD and has also worked as a teacher, assistant principal, principal and director at both the elementary and secondary levels.

Birdville ISD Shannon Fears is the new head girls’ basketball coach at Haltom High School. She has worked there since 2008 as assistant junior varsity and varsity basketball coach. Prior to that, she was an assistant coach for women’s basketball at the University of North Texas, from which she earned her bachelor’s degree. Sherri Gamble, former principal of Foster Village Elementary School, now leads North Richland Middle School. She has been with the district since 1992. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of North Texas.

The position of head basketball coach for Birdville High School has been filled by Anthony Holman, who was the school’s assistant varsity coach since 2012. He received his bachelor’s degree from Austin College and his master’s degree from Lamar University. Richland Middle School now has Billy Neal as principal. He has been an assistant principal at the school since 2019 and previously worked in Mansfield ISD. He earned > See Who’s News, page 11 Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

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THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

“And when you pray ….” – the coach at the 50-yard line….

Vist TSB online!

by Jim Walsh

B

y the time you receive this issue of Texas School Business, we should have a decision from the Supreme Court on the Case of the Praying Coach, Kennedy v. Bremerton Public Schools. The conventional wisdom is that the coach is going to win, and I agree with that assessment. It’s likely that he will have at least five votes, and possibly two more. Justices Sotomayor and Kagan are almost certain to rule for the school district. Justices Roberts and Breyer are hard to predict. Here’s my other prediction about this case. One of the justices, probably in the dissent, will quote Matthew 6:5-7: And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by others … But when you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you. Coach Kennedy seems to have missed that instruction. If he had prayed as Jesus instructed his followers to do, he would still be coaching in Bremerton, Washington. Instead, he’s the plaintiff in a case that will likely shake up our understanding of how public schools deal with religious expression by their employees. This is the first time the Supreme Court will address the direct conflict that is embedded in the First Amendment as it applies to public education. The First Amendment guarantees us a right to the free exercise of our religious beliefs. That’s the foundation of Coach Kennedy’s case. He claims he just wanted to say thanks to God for 30 seconds or so. What’s the big deal? Isn’t that a constitutional right all Americans enjoy? It is. But the First Amendment also says that

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion.” Through more than two centuries of interpretation of that language we know that it puts restrictions on how public school employees exercise their right to the free exercise of religion when they are on the job, and particularly when students are present. Previous “prayer in the public schools” cases have dealt with more direct governmental involvement. In New York there was a prayer, written by a state board, that students were required to recite in the classroom every day. In Pennsylvania, a state law required the reading of scripture and the Lord’s prayer over the PA in every school in the state every school day. In the early 1960s the Supreme Court struck down both of those practices. Coach Kennedy presents a much closer case. This truly is a case involving a single individual who wishes to recite a short prayer. But the complicating factor is Coach Kennedy’s rigid insistence that he must be allowed to do this: 1) immediately after the game; 2) in the middle of the field on the 50yard line; 3) while wearing school apparel; and 4) that students must be allowed to join him. The school offered many alternatives, but the coach had lawyered up, engaged in a nationwide media blitz, and was out to prove a point. The Supreme Court is where a clash of values is ultimately decided. In this case the values espoused by both sides are important. We believe in the freedom to believe what we choose to believe, and to act on those beliefs. We also believe that the government should not use its power to push religious views or activities on children. When it comes to public school teachers and coaches, there is a line that has to be drawn. This case will tell us where that line should be. Stay tuned.

Check us out online at texasschoolbusiness.com for: ► recent issues ► how to submit articles ► Bragging Rights nomination info ► advertising information ► and more! Texas School Business THE NEWS MAGAZINE FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION IN TEXAS

69 Years and Counting

JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

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Who’s News > Continued from page 7

his bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce and his master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington. Barry Norton is the district’s

new director of athletics, coming to Birdville from Texarkana ISD, where held the same position since 2017. Prior to that, he was offensive coordinator at West OrangeCove CISD and offensive coordinator at Lufkin ISD. He is a graduate of East Texas State University. Now serving as director of child nutrition is Michelle Risenhoover, who was assistant director of the program since 2004. Carrie Welborn has been promoted from assistant principal of Stowe Elementary School to principal of Foster Village Elementary. The Texas Woman’s University graduate previously taught in Keller ISD. She holds a master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington.

In addition, the following assistant principal assignments have been made: • Mike Drysdale, North Richland Middle

School;

• James Hollis, Richland High School; • Frankie Norris, Richland High School; • Divya Tinsman, Birdville High School.

Bonham ISD Bonham High School’s new principal, James Branam, most recently led Celeste High School in Celeste ISD and previously taught and worked as an administrator in Anna and Bells ISD. He is at work on a doctorate from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Phillip Lentz has been named principal of

Rather Junior High. He was a middle school principal in Blue Ridge ISD since 2017 and was a teacher and administrator in Midland, Ector County, Lovejoy and GrapevineColleyville ISDs.

Brock ISD New Brock High School principal Eric Sams was previously district testing coordinator and assistant principal of Brock Intermediate School. He has been an educator for 22 years, 10 of those in administrative positions.

Now serving as director of communications and marketing is John Tarrant, who comes to Brock ISD with 14 years of experience in the field, most recently serving in Weatherford ISD. Prior to that, he was a sports reporter and news anchor in West Texas.

were awarded from the University of Texas at El Paso.

Carroll ISD Four new principal assignments have been made. They are:

Bryan ISD

• Christina Benhoff, Carroll High School;

The new Bryan High School head softball coach is Melissa Campbell, who comes to Bryan from Pearland ISD, where she spent the past six years as varsity softball assistant coach. She is a graduate of Lamar University.

• Patrick Holladay, Johnson Elementary

A new principal has been named for Bowen Elementary School. She is Kim Hendry Guess, former assistant principal of Rayburn Intermediate School. Cary Jackson has been named head tennis coach at Bryan High School. With 21 years of experience in education and coaching, he previously was head tennis coach at Garland High School in Garland ISD and, most recently, at Dripping Springs High in Dripping Springs ISD. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri with bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Alfred Scott, a product of Bryan ISD schools who has spent his career in the district, has been named principal of Sadberry Intermediate School, slated to open in August. He was most recently assistant principal of Bryan High. The Prairie View A&M University graduate holds a master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University.

Buena Vista ISD

School;

• Nikki Leonard, Dawson Middle School; • Whitney Wheeler, Durham

Intermediate School.

Channelview ISD The district’s new deputy superintendent is Franklin Cahuasqui. An educator for 15 years, he has worked as a teacher, assistant principal and, most recently, a school support officer. He is a graduate of the University of Houston with a master’s degree in educational leadership from Sam Houston State University. His doctorate in public school leadership was conferred by Texas A&M University.

Childress ISD The new athletic director and head football coach is Bo Helm, who has served as assistant coach since 2015. He previously coached in Quanah ISD.

Clear Creek ISD The new principal of Clear Creek High School is Ashley Orr, the school’s former associate principal. An alumna of Clear Creek ISD schools, she started her career in the district in 2008 as an English teacher. Elizabeth Raska, who was

A new superintendent is in place for Buena Vista ISD. Mason Kyle was most recently secondary principal and district safety coordinator for Meadow ISD. Prior to that assignment, he was district principal of Loraine ISD.

Clear Lake High School’s associate principal, has been promoted to principal. She began her career as a science teacher and specialist before joining Clear Springs High as an assistant principal in 2015.

Burkeville ISD

Additionally, the following administrative appointments have been made:

The Burkeville ISD board of trustees has announced the appointment of Gordon Thomas as superintendent. He previously led Benjamin ISD.

Canutillo ISD (El Paso) The Canutillo ISD board of trustees has appointed Debra Kerney associate superintendent. She began her career in El Paso’s Socorro ISD, joined Canutillo ISD in 2007 and most recently was executive director of curriculum and instruction. Her bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees

• Beth Pawlowski, principal, Armand

Bayou Elementary School;

• Jenny Thomas, principal, Weber

Elementary School;

• Stanley Zavala, director of advanced

academics and gifted and talented programs.

> See Who’s News, page 16 Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

11


A genuine leader

Linsae Snider retires as TSPRA executive director by Dacia Rivers

A

nyone who knows the Texas School Public Relations Association (TSPRA) knows Linsae Snider. Described as a “force” and a “whirlwind” by those who know her well, Snider stepped up to serve as the association’s executive director in 2010. Since then, she has led TSPRA with passion and determination, growing the association from 825 members when she took the helm to nearly 1,100 members as she retires this summer. TSPRA members are made up of school district communications and public relations staff, a group that is often on the front lines when challenges and controversies arise. Snider has inspired and supported these essential staff members with her limitless energy and can-do, will-do attitude. Before Snider stepped into her office at TSPRA, she was already a public education veteran, having served as a teacher in Goose

12

Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

Creek CISD and held numerous positions in the Region 17 ESC and Frenship ISD, where she was the district’s spokesperson and a TSPRA member herself. As Snider takes her well-earned exit from the TSPRA top office, Texas School Business spoke to some of her longtime association friends and asked them to put into words why Snider’s shoes will be so hard to fill.

First impressions “My first impression when I first met Linsae, when she came on the board at TSPRA, was that she was just a fireball of energy and a fun person to be around,” says Brad Domitrovich, a speaker and presenter who worked in school PR for many years. “Linsae and I are the same age, and I wish I could bottle her energy.” Monica Faulkenbery, assistant director of communications in Northside ISD and a

former TSPRA president, says when she first met Snider, she noticed her sense of style. “My first impression was she’s very stylish,” Faulkenbery says. “She always looks professional and kind of on-trend. I think she loves shoes. I teasingly say, ‘Your high heels are going to be really hard to fill.’” Patti Pawlik-Perales, director of communications and foundation in Beeville ISD, says that from their first meeting, Snider struck her as someone who was ambitious, and always willing to tackle any task. “Everybody talks about Linsae as the Energizer bunny, and she’s just so full of energy and spirit and full of life,” says PawlikPerales. “No task is too big. She just says, ‘You know what, I’m going to do it, I’m going to learn it, I’m going to conquer it, I’m going to make it happen, whatever it is.’” Current TSPRA President Rebecca Villarreal, who is the executive director of


communications in New Braunfels ISD, says she first worked with Snider when she volunteered to help decorate for the STAR Awards at the TSPRA Conference. She says that as soon as Snider, who had just been named executive director at that time, showed up, things started getting done. “I remember thinking she was a whirlwind, and I was super impressed with her as soon as I met her,” Villarreal says. “The way the conference was being put on that year was just such a difference from previous years. You could definitely feel her presence as soon as she came on and joined TSPRA, and it was great to know that she was also a former member.”

Linsae the leader Longtime TSPRA members credit Snider with helping the association grow in number and become financially solvent. “Linsae has been a dynamic presence for our organization,” Domitrovich says. “Her networking abilities are like none I have ever seen, and her work ethic is amazing.” “She brought a whole new level to TSPRA,” Faulkenbery says. “She’s kind of spoiled us because she brought in partners and all this revenue through the various vendors she’s brought to the conference. Her organizational skills and her fiscal management are incredible. We would not be in the great financial state that we are without her guidance.” Pawlik-Perales says that Snider’s past work in school districts made her an exceptional TSPRA leader, as she had not only a passion for public education, but an insider’s knowledge of the need for professional development opportunities. “She brings her spirit of learning and wanting others to be mentored and to learn, and that’s been a big part of the organization,” Pawlik-Perales says. “She also has this energy that she tackles new things and tries to better whatever place she’s at. She leaves it better than she found it. She has this ability to creatively build new things, create new things, build upon foundations that are there and strong, but yet she takes it to the next level.” Anyone who’s attended a TSPRA conference can vouch for the fun and friendly atmosphere. Members are a tight-knit group, something they say Snider models from the top down. “Linsae’s done a great job of bringing a cohesiveness that we were missing before,” says Villarreal. “TSPRA feels more like a family than it ever has before. She’s a great example of what an organization leader should be.”

▲ Snider poses with TSPRA members at a recent conference.

A mentor and a friend Many TSPRA members say they consider Snider a friend. Through years of working together, they have reached out to her for her expertise and support as they navigate challenging careers in an ever-changing field. “We’ve been a confidant to each other since she came on the board, and that friendship hasn’t ended since,” Domitrovich says. “She’s a person that I’ve always been in contact with, and there was never anything that I wouldn’t do for her.” “She’s always very supportive and encouraging,” Faulkenbery says. “When I served as president, she was a huge mentor and really raised me up to be better. We’re going to stay close after she retires. Our friendship has really blossomed over the years and she’s someone that I’ve become close with and rely on both professionally and personally.” For Pawlik-Perales, Snider has been a mentor during career changes, always on hand to offer support and advice. And from there, a friendship has grown. ​​ ”Linsae has been a mentor and a friend. She has been a role model. She has been an ear to listen when I needed advice. She’s been a cheerleader. She’s been a support system, and all of that on a professional and personal level. She knows when you’re going through something personal, and she’s there.”

Leaving a mark Long after Snider’s retirement, her name is sure to be remembered among TSPRA members. She has left a lasting impression on the organization and all those who know her. Villarreal says when she first got wind

of Snider’s retirement, she was eager to serve as president while she could still do so under Snider’s leadership. “I’m grateful that we had her for the time we did to get us to this next level and hopefully she will see us flourish and grow and thrive in the coming years,” Villarreal says. “She’ll be around, and that’s nice to know in the back of my mind that she’s not going anywhere.” Domitrovich also knows that Snider’s retirement won’t signal her exit from his life. “She’s a great lady and I will miss the working relationship that we have, but I know our friendship will continue on.” “Linsae has become the face of TSPRA, so it’s going to be really hard to replace her,” Faulkenbery says. “We’ve said that after every executive director, but she really did raise TSPRA up to be a bright shining light in Texas, the go-to for school public relations, and the go-to for crisis communication across the state. It’s kind of like we say, we want to educate the ‘whole child.’ Well, Linsae’s the whole package for TSPRA.” Above all, TSPRA members want Snider to know just how much they appreciate her, and it’s no small amount. “I don’t think she realizes just how fabulous and excellent she is,” says Pawlik-Perales. “I just hope that she knows that she is truly loved and appreciated, not just for being the executive director of the organization, but for who she is as a person and everything she’s done on a personal level and a mentoring level for each of us. She’s always striving to do more, but she’s already fabulous.” DACIA RIVERS is editorial director of Texas School Business. Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T

How Chatbots are Revolutionizing K-12 Communications By Rebecca Kabir, product manager at K12 Insight

Chatbots are a game-changer for the digital transformation in school districts. AI-powered chatbots help district leaders provide always-on customer service, create internal efficiencies, and improve the customer experience — giving stakeholders an avenue to get answers to frequently asked questions 24-7. Here are six facts about chatbots to help you understand how a chatbot can help your school district deliver superior customer experiences: 1. Chatbot technology has made vast strides in a very short span of time. With the use of Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), chatbots have become proficient in correctly answering FAQs asked in a variety of ways and using customer input to continue learning and improving. 2. Not all chatbots are the same. Choose a chatbot built for K-12. A chatbot worth your time leverages the most advanced Machine Learning and Natural Language platforms developed by the finest data scientists over the past two decades. As a district leader, you can take this technology a step further by taking a look at Let’s Talk! Assistant — the first chatbot built specifically for K-12 school districts using data analysis from over 300 school district partners across the nation. It uses one of the world’s most powerful machine learning engines built by Google. 3. You’d be mistaken in thinking no one will use a chatbot. Sometimes our own biases shadow reality. The average parent and staff member is in their early to mid 30s. These digital natives are comfortable adopting new digital tools and are often more comfortable typing a question than picking up the phone to ask one.

4. Chatbots save staff time and reduce PR risks. Email is labor-intensive and cumbersome, and 70 percent of questions coming into school districts are repetitive. A chatbot — which can accurately and reliably answer 80% of questions — can free up staff, giving your staff more time for complex inquiries that require personalized attention. In addition, chatbots help your district deliver effective and engaging service, easier, and quicker. Timely responses translate to fewer tweets and runaway PR issues, and stronger connections and trust in your community. 5. “Parents like to talk to a real, live human” is no longer a good argument. Some parents do need and prefer the personalized communication delivered by interacting with a staff member. Providing the option for digital self-service lets the stakeholder communicate in the manner they most prefer — giving staff more time to serve the stakeholders who have nuanced requests or prefer the in-person experience. 6. A standalone chatbot won’t do you much good. The economic stakes are high. The number one reason parents cite for exercising “school choice” and pulling out their child is bad customer experience. What districts need is a comprehensive customer experience and intelligence platform that includes chatbot capabilities.

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Who’s News

Conroe ISD director of bilingual and ESL programs, is now director of curriculum, instruction and staff development.

> Continued from page 11

Cleburne ISD

Now serving as director of athletics is Chris Feris, coming to his new position from Birdville ISD, where he worked in the same capacity.

James Woodard, former offensive

coordinator at Tomball ISD’s Memorial High School, is now Cleburne High’s head football coach and district boys’ athletic coordinator. He has 15 years of coaching experience, including stints in Whitney and AndersonShiro ISDs.

Longtime athletic director Danny Long has announced his retirement. He headed the district’s athletics department for 11 years.

Cleveland ISD Now serving as director of girls’ athletics is Daylyn Harris. She began her career in Cleveland ISD in 2015, going on to serve as recruiting operations coordinator at the University of Kansas and as girls’ athletics coordinator and head coach at Palestine ISD’s Westwood High.

The district’s new director of bilingual and ESL programs is Gilberto Lozano, who was principal of Hope Elementary School and previously led Anderson, Patterson and Milam elementaries.

Cleveland High School graduate Brian Ricci has returned to his alma mater as director of boys’ athletics. He brings with him 15 years of coaching experience in Texas districts.

College Station ISD Rocco Grande has been promoted from

assistant principal to principal of Oakwood Intermediate School. He previously worked in Bryan ISD and holds a bachelor’s degree from Barry University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Nova Southeastern University.

The new executive director of elementary education is Stormy Hickman, who for the last three years was the district’s director of talent management. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s and doctoral degrees from Lamar University. Now serving as principal of River Bend Elementary School is Heather Sherman. She opened the campus in 2019 as assistant principal and previously worked in Hearne and Navasota ISDs. The district’s new director of athletics is Kevin Starnes, who for the past two years has served in the same capacity at Grapevine-Colleyville ISD. He also taught and coached in Royal, Fort Bend and Alvarado ISDs. Josh Symank, former principal of Oakwood

Intermediate School, is now director of human resources. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and his master’s degree in education administration from Sam Houston State University.

Corpus Christi ISD Dayren Carlisle, former

In addition, three principal assignments were made. They are: • Shawn Almond, Oak Ridge High

School;

• James Bush, Grand Oaks High School; • Kevin Meyer, Conroe High School

Ninth Grade Campus.

Coppell ISD New Pinkerton Elementary School principal Amanda Sweeney has been part of the campus since 2015, initially serving as a fourth grade teacher and most recently as assistant principal. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Florida and her master’s degree in education from the University of North Texas.

Copperas Cove ISD The new principal of Williams/Ledger Elementary School is Tracie Phillips, who served as the school’s interim principal since January. The 33-year education veteran holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and a master’s degree in educational administration from Tarleton State University. Breanne Turner has accepted the position

of principal of Walker Elementary School. She has been with the district since 2012, working as a teacher, math, reading and dyslexia interventionist, and instructional coach. She is a graduate of Tarleton State University with a master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Violeta Guerra has been

appointed principal of Schanen Estates Elementary School, coming to her new position from Montclair Elementary, where she was assistant principal since 2018. Her master’s degree in educational administration was awarded from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. The new principal of Kaffie Middle School, Werner Hartman, led Driscoll Middle School since 2019 following three years as assistant principal of the campus. An educator since 2007, he holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi and a master’s degree from California University of Pennsylvania. Stacy Mitchan has taken the job of principal of Travis Elementary School. An employee of the district since 2003, she was assistant principal of de Zavala Elementary since 2021. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. Laura Perales, newly

appointed principal of Los Encinos Elementary School, comes to her new job from Oak Park Elementary, where she was principal since 2019. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. Oak Park Elementary School will welcome Federico Saqui as principal this fall when he transitions from serving as assistant principal of Driscoll Middle School. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Brownsville, earning both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees there. Now serving as principal of Calk-Wilson Elementary School is Christine Sierra, who was principal of Los Encinos Elementary since 2012. An employee of the district since 1998, she holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi.

Corsicana ISD Five administrative appointments have been made for Corsicana ISD. They are: • Tim Betts, principal, Carroll

Elementary School;

• Matthew Berry, assistant principal,

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

Corsicana Middle School;


• Traycie Griggs, assistant principal,

Corsicana High School;

• Brittany Mathis, principal, Navarro

Elementary School;

• Paul Toal, principal, Collins

Intermediate School.

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD The new principal of Bang Elementary School is Susan Bolado, a 30-year education veteran who began her career in the district before leaving Texas to teach in Louisiana. She returned to CFISD in 1999 and was most recently assistant principal of Post Elementary. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University and her master’s degree in education administration from Sam Houston State University. Jill Brister has accepted

the position of principal of Lamkin Elementary School, where she was assistant principal since 2013. She has spent all but one of her 24 years as an educator in CFISD. A graduate of Texas Christian University, she holds a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University. Amby Clinkscale, new principal of Arnold Middle School, was most recently associate principal of Cypress Creek High School. She has been an educator for 26 years, the past six with the district. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s degree in educational administration from Sam Houston State University. Darin Crawford, former

director of nutrition services, is now assistant superintendent of support services. He is a graduate of the University of New Orleans and holds a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Louisiana at Monroe. The district has named

Kenneth Henry assistant

superintendent for school leadership, promoting him from director of elementary and middle school student services. He is a 24-year educator, working in Texas City, Galveston and La Marque ISDs before joining CFISD in 2005. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Lamar University and a master’s degree from Concordia University. Former director of student services

Dennis Watkins is now director of the

Carlton Center. He began his 13-year career with the district as a teacher at his new campus and then worked as a counselor and assistant principal. He earned his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in educational leadership and counseling from Prairie View A&M University.

Dime Box ISD

Truitt Middle School’s new principal, Plas Williams Jr., served as associate principal of Cypress Springs High School beginning in 2020. The Grambling State University graduate, who began his career in Houston ISD, holds a master’s degree from Nova Southeastern University and a doctorate in administrative leadership from Walden University.

Duncanville High School’s new band director, Mark Teal, has been with the district’s fine arts department since 2005. Prior to that, he was assistant director of bands at Plano ISD’s Clark High. He holds a degree in music education from the University of North Texas.

DeSoto ISD Usamah Rodgers is the

new superintendent of DeSoto ISD, coming to DeSoto from Dallas ISD, where she was deputy chief of strategic initiatives and previously served as a campus administrator at all levels. She holds a doctorate in educational leadership and policy from the University of Texas.

Denison ISD Now serving as assistant superintendent is Andru Gilbert, former principal of Ferris High School in Ferris ISD. In addition, he was an adjunct professor in Dallas Baptist University’s College of Education.

Denton ISD Reed Heim has been selected as Guyer High School’s head football coach. He had been serving as defensive coordinator and linebackers coach. He previously was linebackers coach at Virginia Military Institute and coached at Southern Methodist and Baylor universities.

Former Calvert ISD head boys’ basketball and football coach Michael Thomas has accepted the position of boys’ basketball coach at Denton High School.

Deweyville ISD The district’s new superintendent is LaJuan Addison, who had been serving in the position in an interim capacity. A graduate of Lamar University with a master’s degree from McNeese State University, she has 30 years of experience as a teacher and administrator.

Jeff Conovan is the district’s new superintendent.

Duncanville ISD

El Paso ISD The newly appointed chief financial officer, Martha Aguirre, has served in the position on an interim basis for the past year. She previously was the district’s executive director of budget and external financial management. She earned her bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in human resource management from the University of Phoenix. Benjamin Baldner has been

chosen as the next principal of Lundy Elementary School, bringing with him 15 years of experience, most recently as a principal in El Paso’s Socorro ISD. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina and master’s degrees from Arizona State University and the University of Phoenix. New director of athletics

David Cervantes had served

in the position on an interim basis since 2021. He previously was EPISD’s assistant director of athletics, a physical education teacher and a baseball coach. Leticia Ewing is the first

principal of Bobby Joe Hill PK-8, scheduled to open this fall. The veteran educator has been principal of Collins Elementary since 2011 and was a teacher and administrator in El Paso’s Socorro ISD before joining EPISD. Now serving as assistant superintendent of student services is Nathan Glenn, former superintendent of Sierra Blanca ISD. His bachelor’s degree was awarded from Baylor University and his master’s degree from > See Who’s News, page 27 Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

17


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Council of Women School Executives

Kathryn Washington helps TCWSE grow through mentorship, support by Dacia Rivers

B

eaumont native Dr. Kathryn Washington is in her 31st year working in education, a fact that astonishes her when she considers it. For Washington, the time has passed in an instant. “You lose count when you love what you do.” With a family full of educators, including her mother, Washington grew up hearing her family members talk about their work, and it got into her head. When she graduated from Lamar University with a degree in computer science, Washington started substitute teaching and felt herself called into service. “I was able to help African-American and Hispanic children understand math,” she says. “The principal said, ‘My goodness, they don’t get it, but they get it with you.’” Along with several educators in the family, Washington’s father is a lifelong pastor, and she says recognizing a need for servant leadership was part of her upbringing. “I was raised that when there’s a need, you try to fill that need.” Washington started teaching math and science in Beaumont before moving to Houston, where she taught in Aldine ISD. After 10 years heading classrooms in Aldine, her principal suggested she make the move into leadership. Washington held various administrative roles at the campus and district levels, spending 17 years in leadership roles in Klein ISD.

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

During that time, Washington received her doctorate from Sam Houston State University and began teaching as an adjunct professor there and then at Houston Baptist University. When the opportunity arose for her to return to her undergrad alma mater Lamar University, Washington took the leap, and now teaches in the principal preparation program and in a doctoral-level superintendent prep program. In the fall, she will lead a new master’s of arts in teaching program at the university. “I thought I would move into higher ed when I retired, but when the opportunity comes, you have to be ready to step,” Washington says. In her research at Lamar, Washington focuses on relationship building and women in leadership, topics that tie in with her role as president of the Texas Council of Women School Executives (TCWSE). Washington joined the group in 2007, when her superintendent, LaTonya Goffney, strongly suggested it. “When I went to the first conference, I was hooked,” Washington says. “I immediately started working in the organization and helping out.” Washington says that TCWSE’s chief focus is on supporting advancements for women leaders in education. TCWSE hosts a newcomer session at its annual conference, and members step in to mentor and support women who are looking to make any moves in their careers. The group also hosts a superintendent institute within the conference, where some 80 female superintendents gather to network and connect with each other.


“We are all about getting them to dream, providing them with a mentor and giving them support to advance their careers or whatever they want to do,” Washington says. “If they are a teacher and want to be an assistant principal, we have a strand for that. For those who are assistant principals and want to be principals, we have a strand for that. We have a strand for central office, the superintendency and higher ed. We have a strand for those who want to be a consultant and own their own business. We try to hit every level of leadership that is possible for women.” TCWSE has grown since Washington joined. She says the annual conference had about 180 attendees when she first went, but the event this year had more than 500 participants. As president, Washington hopes to help the group continue to grow and expand. Her vision includes seeing TCWSE go national, and she is working to research the possibilities and create a framework for how that might look.

“We are working on a national movement,” she says. “My vision is to continue to grow the mission and the membership, to get the word out and extend on it so we can all collaborate and learn from each other.” With a mantra of “Each one, reach one,” TCWSE members are anything but exclusive, always looking to recruit and support new members so they can help each other achieve their leadership goals. “I’m a member of several different organizations, but this one is really special for me because of the opportunities and connections that I have been able to make with other women across the state of Texas,” Washington says. “The networking and mentoring and support, and just being together as women is a great feeling.” DACIA RIVERS is editorial director of Texas School Business.

Texas Council of Women School Executives (TCWSE) Mission: TCWSE’s mission is to create and maintain a united community of professional educational executives by promoting equity and quality in leadership through renewal, mentoring and career advancement support. Membership: Anyone who supports TCWSE’s mission is invited to join the organization. Active and student memberships are available. Year founded: 1984 Website: tcwse.org

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Superintendents Academy 22-23

The go-to training for beginning Texas superintendents for 30+ years! Session 1 of 4 | July 27-28 | Marriott Austin North, Round Rock

Book Housing by July 16 Register by July 26 http://bit.ly/ftsa-22-23 Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

19


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

Susanne Carroll steps up to lead Texas ASCD by James Golsan

D

r. Susanne Carroll, new president of the Texas Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (Texas ASCD) is a woman of many passions: mathematics, service to her community, and developing young leaders, to name a few. However, it is perhaps her passion for learning itself that has most significantly guided her career to date. A self-described “life-long learner,” Carroll believes that she, as a leader in the education community, should set an example for her students regarding the value of education by treating it as a lifelong process. “If I want to instill a passion for learning in my students, I need to show that passion for learning in my own life,” Carroll says, and show it she has. A lifelong dedication to learning often comes with a clear career focus and impressive professional credentials, and Carroll’s resume boasts both. While she did not originally envision herself working in the education field (her love for mathematics pushed her toward a pre-med major during her early years at the University of Houston-Victoria), it did not take her long to find out that was

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

the world in which she not only belonged but could thrive. After taking some time off from her own schooling to start a family, Carroll knew where she wanted to be by the time she returned to higher education. “I think what drew me to education was first of all my love for math, but also because I wanted to give back to students, and to my community as well.” After finishing her bachelor’s degree in secondary education with a primary focus on secondary level math and a minor in secondary language arts, she began teaching high school mathematics in Victoria ISD (her employer for the last 32 years) while continuing her own education in pursuit of a master’s degree. Carroll ended up with enough hours of coursework for a master’s in interdisciplinary studies with a focus in mathematics, as well as education administration. She would go on to teach at the secondary level for six more years before an opportunity to take the next step in her career was presented to her.


“Texas ASCD is an organization that supports all educational leaders. No matter what level they are at, whether they’re a principal, a classroom teacher, a counselor — they are our constituency.”

Texas Association for Curriculum and Development (Texas ASCD) Membership: Texas ASCD membership includes superintendents, principals, teachers, curriculum directors, staff developers, students and professors. Mission: Texas ASCD advances leadership and innovative capabilities of diverse educators and influences policy to ensure each child is healthy, safe, engaged, supported and challenged. Year founded: 1947 Number of members: more than 3,000 Website: txascd.org

“An opportunity came up for me to be the executive director at our local education foundation, which at the time was called ‘Making the Grade,’ and it really gave me time to devote more time to the community, but also to devote more time to students, and really grow them as leaders,” Carroll says, with obvious, and justified, pride in her voice. During her time at Making the Grade, Carroll pursued her principal certification, and upon returning to the more “traditional” wing of Victoria ISD (their central administration, in the capacity of a grant writer), pursued her doctorate from the University of Houston, which she received in 2004 in the area of curriculum and instruction.

Carroll says that the primary goal of her presidency will be to continue the organization’s mission of the “Whole Child.”

that students should be treated as leaders in education themselves, and should have a corresponding voice in the education world.

“I want to make sure those values stay at the forefront of everything we do,” Carroll says. “Those values being to create a healthy, safe, supportive, engaged and challenging learning environment for all students.”

“Whether it’s school board members, communities, strategic planning committees, it’s important that we train students to share their voice in a way that’s meaningful in their environment,” she says, adding that the opportunities she has had to provide students with those opportunities, all the way back to her time at Making the Grade to her current presidency at Texas ASCD, are the achievements of which she is most proud.

Carroll adds that she hopes to continue to build Texas ASCD as a network for education leaders, and provide them with a place where they can grow their passion as educators and have someone they can connect with when they need a voice or support.

“That’s where I found my real passion in education,” Carroll says, in reference to curriculum and instruction. “It’s an area that is most connected to students. To me, that’s why we’re here in education, to help instruct and serve students.”

“Texas ASCD is an organization that supports all educational leaders,” Carroll emphasizes. “No matter what level they are at, whether they’re a principal, a classroom teacher, a counselor — they are our constituency.”

A member of Texas ASCD since 2000,

As are students. Carroll believes strongly

It is impossible to walk away from a conversation with Carroll without recognizing the dedication she brings to her craft. If passion, leadership, and a service mindset are what Texas ASCD values in a leader, they could not have found a better president for their organization. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

21


REGIONAL VIEW

Education service center programs & practices

ESC partners with police and ISD to implement Handle with Care program by Lori Burton

T

he COVID-19 pandemic had an overwhelming impact on the way we “do school” in our country. It not only forced us to rethink our instructional delivery models and the resources our teachers and students needed to be successful, but it also brought a renewed sense of urgency to the issue of mental health and well-being. As educators, we work hard to recognize the many stressors and challenges that students today face; yet, we aren’t always aware of the situations

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

happening outside of the school environment that can potentially have a lasting effect on a student’s educational experience. Traumatic events involving school-age children can be more widespread than most people realize. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) reports that “more than two-thirds of children reported at least one traumatic event by age 16.” The organization goes on to say that such

Thomas Dromgoole, ESC Region 11 (right) discusses the network capabilities of the ESC Region 11 Data Center with Lt. Antione Williams, Fort Worth Police Department (left).

trauma can lead to learning challenges, suspensions, expulsions and increased involvement with the child welfare and juvenile justice systems.

Handle with Care program In 2019, law enforcement officials at the Fort Worth Police Department (FWPD) discovered a program they believed would help students and educators alike in


addressing the needs of students involved in traumatic police-related incidents. They learned that the Handle with Care program, which originated in West Virginia, had already been successfully implemented in San Antonio, and they began exploring how it could be used in North Texas to help students in need. Lt. Antione Williams, a 23-year veteran of FWPD, was asked to pilot the program on the city’s east side. After conferring with his wife, a schoolteacher, about the program, he was convinced that this was an opportunity to truly make a difference in the lives of many students. Unfortunately, the pandemic forced the pilot program to be put on hold for a couple of years, just as interest and excitement grew. This temporary pause, however, didn’t stop Williams from connecting with administrators from Fort Worth ISD and with technology staff from Education Service Center (ESC) Region 11 to explore how to build the program so that it had the greatest impact. Together, they partnered to create a system that they hoped would be user-friendly and seamless in its design. Although some behind-the-scenes work was required to coordinate all the moving parts, the program itself is rather simple. When a police incident occurs that impacts a school-age child, a notification is sent to that child’s school. The incident could include the arrest of a parent, a drug raid on the home, an assault, the death of a family member, the removal of the child from the home, etc. Without divulging any private details, the notification simply informs school staff that this student should be “handled with care.” Previously identified crisis intervention staff at the campus can then reach out to the student and offer any needed resources and support. Fort Worth ISD staff provided the contact information for crisis responders at the campuses located within the geographic area of the pilot program. The ESC Region 11 technology team then went to work building an Application Program Interface (API) that was embedded as a portal in the reporting software utilized by FWPD. This allowed officers to enter the child’s name, age and school district/ campus. The API then serves as a bridge to a regional database that connects the child’s information to the approved contact person at the campus. This connection

triggers an email message to that contact person indicating that the student may need some extra care.

February launch of Fort Worth pilot program In February of this year, the pilot program in Fort Worth finally launched. In the few short months remaining in the 2021-22 school year, 65 notifications were made to local schools, with 31 of those notifications made to campuses involved in the pilot program and 34 others made to campuses outside of the pilot group. Williams estimates that these notifications have impacted approximately 90 students in the Fort Worth area. In addition to his regular duties, Williams meets with campus and law enforcement staff to provide information on the pilot program and offer training, and act as a point of contact for anyone interested in learning more about starting a similar partnership between their police departments and the school districts within their jurisdictions. He shared that FWPD plans to expand the pilot program citywide for the 2022-23 school year.

Utilizing the data system statewide While ESC Region 11 staff originally built this API bridge and portal specifically for the FWPD, staff members soon realized that this resource could be utilized statewide. Thomas Dromgoole, a web application manager with the ESC, began building an app that allows any school district in Texas to enroll itself in the program and set up the contact information for each of its campuses. It didn’t take long for officials from school districts and municipalities across the state to begin inquiring about how they, too, can utilize the API “bridge” to implement their own Handle with Care programs. Interest in the program is not limited to educators and law enforcement, either. The ESC has also been contacted by leaders from a local fire department who wish to participate in the notification system to help kids involved in incidents to which they are asked to respond. “This was a no-brainer as far as we were concerned,” shares Dromgoole. “ESC Region 11 already had the infrastructure in place to build our app, and who wouldn’t

“As educators, we work hard to recognize the many stressors and challenges that students today face; yet, we aren’t always aware of the situations happening outside of the school environment that can potentially have a lasting effect on a student’s educational experience.”

agree that this is a good idea for our students?” Williams shares this sentiment. “Kids come to school every day sleepy, distracted, misbehaving, and there could be an underlying reason for some of this behavior. Instead of automatically resorting to disciplinary action, we might be able to employ some of the extra resources needed” to assist students involved in a traumatic event. “All kids need is a little help, a little hope, and somebody who believes in them.” — Magic Johnson The special partnership between ESC Region 11, FWPD and Fort Worth ISD works because all parties recognize the power of help and hope, and they understand that the difference between a good day and a bad day often hinges on whether a caring adult handles a student’s heart with care. For more information on how your school district can utilize ESC Region 11’s Handle with Care app to create your own local program, contact Thomas Dromgoole at (817) 740-3687. LORI BURTON is chief communications officer for ESC Region 11. Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

23


STUDENT VOICES

Eanes ISD’s 24-Hour PlayFest brings theaterloving students together

Neko Beverding performs as Dr. Watson in West Ridge Middle School’s presentation of “Holmes on the Range.”

by Neko Beverding

A

t Westlake High School in Eanes ISD, you can participate in many different activities, but I think that the best thing you can do here is the 24Hour PlayFest. From the name you might guess it’s a videogame competition or a carnival, but no. It’s a festival of plays. While I’ve only done this once, it was a great experience. The way PlayFest works is that one day on

the weekend (normally in January) anyone in the school district in grades eight through 12 can sign up to participate in 24 straight hours of play production. There are three groups to choose from: directors, writers and actors. You choose the role you want, excluding 8th graders who can only be actors. Starting on a Friday evening, the writers stay up all night writing creative short

scripts that will be performed the next day. In the morning, directors choose a script to produce, and after auditions, pick who they want to perform in their play. Normally it’s 10 groups of three to five actors in each. In my group, there were three actors, including myself. Each group spends the whole day rehearsing, memorizing the script, picking props and costumes, and doing light and sound checks. Finally they perform

“Student Voices” is a regularly featured column in Texas School Business. It’s an opportunity for students of all ages from across Texas to share their experiences in K-12 public schools. Contact Editorial Director Dacia Rivers at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com for publishing guidelines.

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022


their piece in front of all their friends and parents on Saturday evening, 24 hours after the PlayFest began.

knew each other and got along. I hope that I can have a similar experience like that when I enter high school this year.

I was in a group with one of my eighth grade friends and two high schoolers. We had a lot of funny moments while rehearsing, but we also got a lot done. It was awesome getting to know more people who like theater, and it’s great to know that I will already know a few older high schoolers next year as a freshman.

The PlayFest taught me how to work in groups better and break out of my shell. It also helped with more technical theater things, such as memorizing scripts fast and impromptu blocking. I’m glad I got to have this experience before high school and am excited to keep attending PlayFest.

While the day started slowly, once our group got comfortable with each other, the next six hours went by way too fast and before we knew it, it was time to perform.

NEKO BEVERDING is a rising freshman at Westlake High School in Eanes ISD.

“This whole experience made me very excited for high school theater and high school in general.”

A lot of the other groups’ scripts were super fun. For example, there was one about a butter cow that I found hilarious. Our play was about a company called Forest and the complaints they got from employees. My character was named Amy Zon, the spokesperson for Forest. It was so much fun to play her. Since you only have one day to prepare, the plays are around five minutes long each. With less than a day to memorize a whole script, this can lead to some funny mess-ups. For instance, during my group’s performance I was meant to say, “Some people believe that here at Forest we do not value our employees. I am standing here today to tell you this could not be further from the truth.” But it came out of my mouth as, “This could be farther from the truth.” Even though I had messed up everyone laughed and it seemed to break the audience’s silence. The rest of our performance went great. At the end of the night, the audience votes for their favorite performance, and the first-place winners get prizes. Our team won, and while getting candy and a gift card was great, I enjoyed the experience so much and am so excited to do it again next year. I have a feeling next year will be even better than this year since I’ll be a freshman and will probably meet even more people going to the PlayFest by the time it comes around. I love theater and at this event, it felt like I was around other people who genuinely cared about theater and performing, so I felt like I fit in and had found my group. This whole experience made me very excited for high school theater and high school in general. It was so inspiring to see how all the high schoolers at the PlayFest

▲ Students in Eanes ISD perform in the district's 24-Hour PlayFest.

Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

25



Who’s News > Continued from page 17

Western Governors University. He is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of the Cumberlands. Marivel Macias, chief

organizational transformation and equity officer, most recently was with El Paso’s Socorro ISD as assistant superintendent for administrative services. She received her bachelor’s degree and two master’s degrees, in educational administration and business administration, from the University of Texas at El Paso. Daniel Montoya will serve as the first principal of Dr. Josefina Villamil Tinajero PK-8, which will open this fall. He was most recently principal of Henderson Middle School. A graduate of Park University, he holds a master’s degree in education from the University of Texas at El Paso.

The new chief communications officer is Liza Rodriguez, who most recently was the marketing and communications officer for El Paso’s Canutillo ISD. She is a graduate of the University of Texas. Joseph Villalba Jr. has

returned to El Paso ISD to serve as executive director of procurement and school resources after spending nine years in a similar position in Goose Creek CISD. He was a bid specialist for EPISD from 2008 to 2010. He has a bachelor’s degree from Park University, a master’s degree from Webster University, and a doctorate in organizational leadership from Our Lady of the Lake University.

Elgin ISD The Elgin ISD board of trustees has named Jana Reuter district superintendent. She comes to Elgin from San Angelo ISD, where she was assistant superintendent.

Elysian Fields ISD The newly appointed assistant principal of Elysian Fields Middle School, Brooke Michel, began her career in 2003 in Jacksonville ISD and most recently was Elysian Fields Elementary’s special education, ESL and content mastery teacher. She is a graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University.

Krystal Woodley, who was a teacher at Elysian Fields High School, is now campus assistant principal. The East Texas Baptist University and Lamar University graduate has been with the district since 2008, teaching English, theater arts, speech and debate.

Eustace ISD The new superintendent of Eustace ISD is Julia McMains, former assistant superintendent of Palacios ISD.

Forestburg ISD Jason Briles has accepted the position of superintendent, having served as district principal since 2021.

Fort Bend ISD The following principal assignments have been announced: • Gregory Foulds, Schiff Elementary

School;

• Latoya Garrett, Sugar Land Middle

School;

• Kyella Griffin, Crockett Middle School; • Yvette Huerta Mendoza, Quail Valley

Elementary School;

• Carla Patton, Ferguson Elementary

School;

Julia Ramirez has been approved as principal of Rosenberg Elementary School. An educator for 20 years, she was most recently director of biomed/STEM communities at Ball High School. She is a graduate of the University of Houston with a master’s degree in educational leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University and a doctorate in educational leadership from Lamar University.

Georgetown ISD The new head football coach at East View High School is Michael Wall, who previously was Georgetown High’s offensive coordinator and quarterback coach. For the past four years, he was director of athletics and head football coach at Willis ISD’s Willis High.

Granbury ISD Drew McKinnie has been

named head coach for the Granbury High School boys’ soccer team. He comes to his new job from Denton ISD’s Braswell High, where he was head coach for the girls’ soccer program. He previously coached in Cleburne, Everman and Eagle MountainSaginaw ISDs. He is a graduate of HardinSimmons University.

Grand Prairie ISD

• Jonathan Sutton, Briargate Elementary

The new director of Grand Prairie ISD’s emergency management department is Neal Sandlin, who for 22 years served in the Cleburne Police Department.

• Audra Ude, Quail Valley Middle School;

Grandview ISD

• Nikki Roberts, Bhuchar Elementary

School;

School;

• Anitra Wilson, Parks Elementary

School.

Fredericksburg ISD Blaine Hahn is the district’s new primary

school principal after serving as assistant principal of Fredericksburg Primary School for the past four years.

Chris Weirich, newly appointed principal of

Fredericksburg High School, has been with the district for 14 years and was serving as the school’s acting principal.

Galveston ISD Former Sherman ISD athletic director Bob Jones is now executive director of athletics for Galveston ISD. He has 27 years of coaching experience at the secondary level.

Former Grandview High School principal Kirby Basham has been promoted to superintendent. A product of Grandview ISD schools, he has been employed by the district for 24 years. Grandview Elementary School principal Kathrine Stewart has been named 2022’s National Distinguished Principal for Texas by the NAESP (National Association of Elementary School Principals). She was recognized in June during the annual TEPSA (Texas Elementary School Principals Association) summer conference. She has led Grandview Elementary for the past 11 years. > See Who’s News, page 31

Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

27


THE ARTS

▲ Virtual art shows became so popular in Spring ISD during the COVID-19 pandemic that the district has continued to use them to showcase student art.

News in fine arts education

Spring ISD performing and visual arts virtual art gallery project by Joe Clark, Ed.D., and Amanda Byers

I

After the team developed a solid prototype, it created easy-to-follow instructions and video tutorials for the team of more than 50 visual art teachers. The teachers formed a design team and dove in.

Immediately, the Spring ISD performing and visual arts team jumped into action to plan how to keep the momentum and continue with the show. It quickly became apparent that there would be no in-person art shows in May 2020 even though the students and teachers had been preparing for the show all year. The team knew it was going to be a challenge to remain safe and relevant with the new challenges.

The show was met with rave reviews, and we continued to fine-tune the process to allow teachers and students continued ownership of their gallery rooms and the ability to customize and share their work.

n the spring of 2020, Spring ISD was still basking in the success of their first collaborative performance, “The Greatest Show,” which included more than 300 students from all fine arts areas and all grade levels. The district was well on its way to pulling off the next large event, the Spring ISD spring art show, when the pandemic made its grand entrance.

The first public virtual art show was the 2020 superintendent’s holiday card contest gallery, complete with a scavenger hunt, a learning experience and a guest appearance from the superintendent via an avatar.

Enter the virtual art show.

This adaptable approach to the art shows in the middle of school closures proved invaluable for advocacy, engagement and safety.

The search for a viable virtual art gallery platform proved almost impossible at first. Most of the services were cost prohibitive and a little difficult to organize. Eventually, the team relied on a previous professional development involving the Bitmoji classroom. They coupled this training with information from YouTube and came up with a personalized virtual art show and gallery experience using Google Slides.

Considering the arts were less visible without the access to stages, art studios and band halls, it was important for us to ensure that what we do as a performing and visual arts department remained front and center. These virtual shows allowed us a platform to continue our advocacy on the benefits of all arts in education. We were able to use the virtual art show as a teaching tool and give feedback to our students. They were able to receive critique and draw inspiration

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022


▲ Spring ISD students participate in a district art show.

when students and teachers came back in person. The teachers got excited about the ability to show students’ art this way and started creating their own galleries, by school, by project, by grade level and even by student. We realized early on that the platform was not limited to visual art and that we were able to use it in all fine arts areas and core content areas as well. The US history team began working on how to implement this into their capstone projects to share with our communities. ▲ Spring ISD hosts student art online as part of a district-wide virtual art show.

from their peers and for their future works. Additionally, these virtual shows proved to be an invaluable resource for keeping the teachers connected and promoting collaboration at a time when people were so isolated physically. We quickly learned that these virtual art shows had benefits that our traditional shows did not have, no matter how many hundreds of people came and how successful they were. With the virtual shows, more than just parents and local family members were able visit the show and enjoy the work. The virtual art gallery was easily shared with family members in other states and countries, community members who wouldn’t normally attend an in-person show, students’ classroom teachers and classmates and members of administration. Specifically, members of our community who needed to remain socially distanced were still able to safely engage with us during school closures. We found it to be a great tool for sharing between districts as well. The Spring ISD performing and visual arts team presented and shared, and will continue to share, the

template so others can benefit from this great experience. An unexpected benefit of the virtual show was how viewers could visit the artworks multiple times. In a traditional show, when the show is over and packed up, the piece goes home with the student and it’s over. These virtual art shows were able to stay “open” for months at a time, thereby allowing people to share with family members and spread the word. Finally, the most engaging piece of the virtual art show platform was the ability to make the viewing a personal experience. We were able to embed process photos, videos of the artwork being created, artist statements and student interviews. This gave the viewers the chance to see the students working and thinking like artists, and it made the experience much more authentic. The most obvious benefit of the virtual shows was the safety aspect — there were no large groups, no art intake, no drop off or pick up. The art show was able to go on. The impact of the way our district embraced the idea of virtual art shows did not stop

After becoming familiar with how to create a successful virtual show, we found that it was also a perfect vehicle for all of our work in arts integration and its applications. We are still using the virtual shows and galleries to showcase student work. Now, everyone looks forward to seeing the next virtual art show. The community knows how to navigate the links and share them with their friends. The virtual art shows have given us the feedback we need and connected us with our families. The ability to showcase our students and teachers through a virtual show experience is something fantastic that came from the pandemic. If you are interested in visiting one of our virtual galleries, please click on one of the links below. Spring ISD superintendent’s holiday card contest Spring ISD rodeo art virtual gallery DR. JOE CLARK is in his 24th year in education and his 10th year as the director of performing and visual arts for Spring ISD in Houston. AMANDA BYERS is in her 22nd year in education and her fifth year as the visual art coordinator for Spring ISD. Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

29


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Who’s News > Continued from page 27

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD A new communications director has been named for the district. Craig Civale is a former reporter for WFAATV and media relations director for Baylor Scott and White Health.

Guthrie ISD New superintendent Steve Wolf, who led Lazbuddie ISD since 2016, previously served in Byers, Motley County and Wichita Falls ISDs. The Tarleton State University graduate holds a master’s degree from Texas Tech University.

Hays CISD The new principal of Hays High School is Kristina Salazar, a 30-year educator who for the past four years has led Akins Early College High School in Austin ISD. She began her career in Lockhart ISD, going on to continue her career in Deer Park, Klein, Clear Creek and New Braunfels ISDs. She earned her bachelor’s degree from St. Edward’s University and her master’s degree in educational administration from Concordia University.

Hempstead ISD Former Greenville ISD assistant superintendent Herbert O’Neil now leads Hempstead ISD. He began his career in Waller ISD, where he was a teacher, coach and assistant principal. His bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in educational administration were awarded from Prairie View A&M University.

High Island ISD Former Christoval ISD superintendent David Walker now holds the top position in High Island ISD.

Highland Park ISD (Dallas) Now serving as athletic director is Rodney Webb, who has 32 years of coaching experience, including 19 years in athletic director and campus athletics coordinator positions. He was most recently with Guyer High in Denton ISD. He is a graduate of Tarleton State University and previously served as president of the Texas High School Coaches Association.

Irving ISD Khoria Newman, a graduate of MacArthur High School and its assistant girls’ basketball coach from 2018 to 2021, has returned to the campus as head basketball coach. Most recently head girls’ basketball coach at Forest High in Garland ISD, she is a graduate of the University of Alabama.

Katy ISD Emily Craig has been approved as the

district’s newest assistant superintendent for secondary school leadership and support. She began her career in Spring Branch ISD in 1997, joined Katy ISD the same year, and has served as principal of Memorial Parkway Junior High since 2014. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Auburn University, a master’s degree from the University of Houston at Victoria, and a doctorate in educational leadership from the University of HoustonClear Lake. Additionally, three new principals have been named. They and their schools are: • Jason Brown, Williams Elementary

School;

• Tanya Heard, Rylander Elementary

School;

• Thea Wofford, Exley Elementary School.

Keller ISD Fossil Ridge High School will welcome new principal Amanda Burruel in the fall. The former Keller Middle School principal brings 16 years of experience to her new job, including stints in San Antonio’s North East ISD and Cleburne, Granbury and El Paso ISDs. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Oklahoma Panhandle State University and her master’s degree in educational administration from Concordia University. The new principal of Keller Middle School is H.R. Lugo, who joined the district last year as associate principal of Timber Creek High. He previously was an administrator in Northwest ISD and in Hesperia, Cal. He holds a bachelor’s degree from New Mexico Highlands University and a master’s degree in administration from Chapman University. Lee Parker has been hired to serve as

principal of Keller Compass Center. He comes to Keller from Sherman ISD, where he was assistant principal of Sherman High School. Previously, he was with Irving ISD as a teacher and administrator. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington and his master’s degree from Lamar University.

Farah Rehman, new principal of Hidden Lakes Elementary School, has arrived in Keller from Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD, where she led Las Colinas Elementary. She has 16 years of education experience, 10 of those as an administrator. The Texas A&M

University graduate holds a master’s degree in educational leadership from Southern Methodist University. Matt Vrlenich has been hired as chief technology officer. He comes to the district from Olathe Public Schools in Kansas, where he held the same position since 2005. His bachelor’s and master’s degrees were awarded from Columbia College.

The following assistant principal assignments are announced: • Annah Bradshaw, Keller-Harvel

Elementary School;

• Trevor Crawford, Heritage Elementary

School;

• Darius Ingram, Timber Creek High

School;

• Ashley Jayne, Heritage Elementary

School;

• Maddy Juli, Lone Star Elementary

School;

• Onica Sinclair, Keller High School.

Killeen ISD New deputy superintendent of operations Megan Bradley was most recently the district’s chief financial officer. She has been with KISD for 25 years and, before that, was an auditor in the private sector. Five new principals have been announced. They and their schools are: • Shakira Bodón-Ramos, Peebles

Elementary School;

• MaryLynn Gawryszewski, Nolan Middle

School;

• Sharita Herrera, Gateway Middle

School and Gateway High School;

• Jessica Hicks, Willow Springs

Elementary School;

• Natalie Kirshner, Harker Heights

Elementary School.

Kirbyville CISD Stephen Edwards, former superintendent of

Fannett ISD, now leads Kirbyville CISD.

Klein ISD Longtime Klein ISD police chief David Kimberly has retired after 27 years with the district. He began as a district patrol officer, advancing to campus officer, sergeant and captain, and was promoted to the rank of police chief in 2014.

La Feria ISD The district’s new superintendent is Cindy Torres, former Sharyland ISD assistant superintendent for support services. > See Who’s News, page 33 Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

31


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The Executive Leadership Institute (ELI) is designed to build the capacity of district executive leaders for system-wide improvements in teaching and learning. Sessions will include opportunities for leaders to cultivate strategic approaches and actions in order to support district transformational efforts. In addition to the scheduled sessions, each participant will receive the support of an Executive Coach throughout the year. Logistics: • Registration Fee: $4,000.00 per participant (excluding travel expenses) • Four, 2-day sessions alternating between Austin, Dallas, and Houston

Logistics:

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Customized for individual districts or regional consortiums of districts Six full day sessions

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Who’s News > Continued from page 31

La Grange ISD A new superintendent has been selected for the district. Matthew McHazlett taught and coached in La Grange ISD from 2003 to 2010 and has been superintendent of La Pryor ISD for the past six years. He is a graduate of Sul Ross State University with a master’s degree in education from Lamar University.

La Porte ISD Dustin Bromley has accepted the position of deputy superintendent of administration and support services. He joins the district from Crosby ISD, where he was executive director of operations. The Oklahoma State University graduate holds a master’s degree in administration from Lamar University, which is set to confer his doctorate in education this summer. Rebecca Brown, newly appointed deputy

superintendent of curriculum and instruction, comes to La Porte from Spring ISD, where she was assistant superintendent for high schools. She is a 27-year education veteran, with 20 of those in leadership roles in Aldine and Houston ISDs. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston and a master’s degree and doctorate from Prairie View A&M University.

Lake Dallas ISD Jessica Bovan has been

approved as principal of Corinth Elementary School, coming to her new position from Lake Dallas Elementary, where she was assistant principal. A graduate of Texas Woman’s University, she worked in Denton ISD from 2008 to 2020 and holds a master’s degree in elementary education from the University of North Texas.

Lake Travis ISD Rebecca Hudson has been selected as principal of Lake Travis Middle School, bringing 20 years of experience to her new position. She taught in the district from 2004 to 2010 and was most recently an academic dean at Hays CISD’s Johnson High School. Laura Keogh, most recently assistant

principal of Bee Cave Middle School, is now principal of Hudson Bend Middle School. She was a teacher and coach at the school from 2014 to 2019.

Rough Hollow Elementary School will welcome new principal Vanessa Randels in the fall. She has been the school’s assistant

principal since joining Lake Travis ISD in 2020 and has nearly two decades of experience as a teacher and administrator in Texas and Arizona. The new principal of Lake Pointe Elementary School is Karen Reich, a 35-year education veteran who joined LTISD in 2008 and retired in 2019. She came out of retirement to accept her most recent role, interim assistant principal of the school. Lizeth Thompson has been promoted from assistant principal to principal of Lake Travis Elementary School. With 20 years of experience in education, she has also worked in bilingual/dual language education in Boerne ISD and San Antonio’s Northside and Northeast ISDs.

Lamar CISD The new chief operating officer of Lamar CISD is Gregory Buchanan, who previously held the same position in Community ISD. He also worked as chief operations officer of Lancaster ISD and as director of maintenance and transportation at Forney ISD. Kevin Croft has been selected as the first

principal of Phelan Elementary School, slated to open for the 2022-23 school year. A graduate of Schreiner University, where he earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, he has been with Lamar CISD for more than a decade, most recently serving as principal of Ryon Middle School. Ryon Middle School’s new principal, Stacie Johnson, has been an educator for 16 years, previously working in Alief ISD. She is a graduate of the University of Texas with a master’s degree from the University of Houston at Victoria. Her doctorate is from Liberty University.

Leander ISD The new chief of schools and strategic initiatives is Sarah Grissom, who has been promoted from area superintendent. She began her career in the district as an assistant principal, going on to lead Faubion Elementary School. She is a graduate of the University of Texas with a master’s degree from Texas State University and a doctorate from Concordia University. Crestina Hardie has been selected to serve as

Leander ISD’s chief communications officer after serving as the district’s communications specialist since 2020. Prior to that, she worked in the private sector as a founding partner of a video production company and as a news reporter, anchor and manager.

Amber Lasseigne is now the district’s

executive director of finance. She comes to Lewisville from Allen ISD, where she worked in the same capacity since 2018. The district’s new chief of schools officer is

Lori Litchfield, who has spent her 30-year

career in Lewisville ISD.

Chantell Upshaw has accepted the position of chief of middle schools. She has led Marcus High School Ninth Grade Campus since 2014.

Little Elm ISD The following administrative appointments are announced for the district: • Ray Borden, principal, Little Elm High

School;

• Charese Duffey, Title IX coordinator; • Christopher Reza, principal, Lakeview

Elementary School;

• Penny Tramel, assistant superintendent

for curriculum and learning;

• Kendra Vogt, director, child nutrition.

Lockhart ISD Eight administrative positions have been filled for the district. They are: • James Acuna, executive director of

operations;

• Stephaine Camarillo, deputy

superintendent;

• Shelly Jones-Herzog, girls’ athletics

coordinator and head volleyball coach;

• Melody McIntosh, director of special

services;

• Karen Nixon, principal, Lockhart Junior

High School;

• Ernesto Palomo, director of

maintenance;

• Monica Saldivar, principal, Carver Early

Education Center;

• Cassandra Salinas, director of

technology.

Louise ISD After 23 years as a speech and history teacher at El Campo ISD’s El Campo High School, Katrese Skinner has joined Louise ISD as principal of Louise High.

Lewisville ISD Now serving as principal of Owen Elementary School is Jennifer Barentine. The 28-year veteran educator led Ethridge Elementary for the past seven years.

> See Who’s News, page 34 Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

33


Who’s News

Marion ISD

> Continued from page 33

Now serving as district superintendent is Don Beck.

Lufkin ISD Angela Dean has been named director

of early childhood education. She began her career 16 years ago after earning her bachelor’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University, where she also received her master’s degree. She joined Lufkin ISD in 2017 as an instructional coach at Trout Primary School.

Joshua Slack is the district’s director of

CTE (career and technical education). He is a graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University, where he also earned his master’s degree in educational leadership, and has 21 years of experience as a teacher, coach and administrator. He most recently was assistant principal of Coston Elementary School. The district’s transportation director,

Tiffany Sootoo, comes to her new position

with 18 years of experience, including serving for the past four years on the board of the Gulf Coast Association of Pupil Transportation.

Ebonee King, the new

principal of Valley Creek Elementary School, has for the past two years been assistant principal at the district’s DAEP (Disciplinary Alternative Education Program). She began her career in 2000 in Plano ISD, coming to McKinney ISD six years later. She holds a bachelor’s degree from San Diego Christian College and a master’s degree from Grand Canyon University, where she also earned a doctorate in organizational leadership.

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

Northwest ISD (Fort Worth)

Renee Fairchild, who most recently led Sweet Home ISD, is now Moulton ISD’s superintendent.

Muenster ISD

Overton ISD

The new superintendent of Motley County ISD is Kurt Koepke, former principal of Hartley ISD.

Moulton ISD

Scott Bicknell has accepted the position of superintendent, coming to Muenster from Glasscock County ISD, where he spent the past four years in the top job. He is a 26-year educator.

Navarro ISD After 33 years in Texas public education, superintendent Wendi Russell has announced her retirement, effective in July. She has led Navarro ISD for the past two years.

Jared Critchfield has moved

After four years as coordinator of professional development, Wendy Hutton is now director for recruitment and retention. She brings 22 years of experience to her new position, having begun her career in Garland ISD before joining McKinney ISD.

principal, Rhodes Elementary School.

The new superintendent of Northwest ISD is David Hicks, a 33-year education veteran who most recently led Sherman ISD. Prior to that, he was an administrator in Denton ISD and a teacher and campus administrator in Carrollton-Farmers Branch and Grapevine-Colleyville ISDs. His doctorate in educational leadership was awarded from the University of North Texas, where he also earned his master’s degree.

Motley County ISD

McKinney ISD from working as assistant principal of McKinney High School to director of fine arts. Initially Faubion Middle School’s choir director, he went on to serve as associate choir director at McKinney High School and then assistant principal of Boyd High School. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Brigham Young University, a master’s degree from Southern Methodist University and a doctorate from the University of North Texas.

• Christopher Sandrin, associate

New Braunfels ISD Marty Lenard has been

named New Braunfels ISD’s first director of fine arts. He has been an educator for 11 years, beginning his career as Kerrville ISD’s band director. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music education from Texas State University, a master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University, and a doctorate in instrumental music education from Auburn University.

Northside ISD (San Antonio) The following administrative appointments have been announced: • Heidi Belson, assistant principal, Clark

High School;

• Amanda Garner-Maskill, principal,

Mead Elementary School;

• David Johnston, program director, Jones

Magnet School;

• Javier Lazo, principal, Jones Middle

School.

• Kelly Rasti, director of governmental

relations;

• Jessica Ruiz, principal, Leon Valley

Elementary School;

A new superintendent has been selected for Overton ISD. Larry Calhoun comes to Overton from Illinois, where he was CTE (Career and Technical Education) director of Mundelein High School in Mundelein. He began his career as a teacher in Mesquite, Garland and Austin schools before making the move to Illinois.

Paris ISD Former Justiss Elementary assistant principal Kendra Beshirs is now principal of the Givens Early Childhood Center. She spent the past 19 years at Justiss, working as a special education teacher and academic before taking her most recent position in 2015. She holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Pearland ISD Larry Berger has been promoted from

assistant superintendent for support services to superintendent. He has spent 15 of his 23 years as an educator with the district, including serving as assistant principal and principal of Pearland High School and as director of maintenance, operations and facilities.

Pflugerville ISD The Pflugerville ISD board of trustees has approved the appointment of Adelaida Olivarez as chief academic and innovation officer. Most recently associate superintendent for curriculum and instruction at Bastrop ISD, she has been an educator for 24 years. She holds a bachelor’s degree from St. Edward’s University, a master’s degree from Texas State University, and a doctorate in educational leadership and policy from the University of Texas.


Redwater ISD

Plano ISD The new principal of Sigler Elementary School is Tyson Jones, who comes to Plano from Richardson ISD, where he was assistant principal of Bukhair Elementary. He previously worked as an assistant principal and principal in Arlington ISD. His master’s degree in educational leadership and policy studies was awarded from the University of Texas at Arlington. Stinson Elementary School will welcome Ty Karl this fall as its new principal. His previous positions in Plano ISD have included stints as an assistant principal at Haun and Hager elementaries and as a teacher at Hager and Brinker elementaries. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Dallas and his master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Michael Minyard, new

principal of Barksdale Elementary School, was most recently assistant principal of Wyatt Elementary School and previously worked in Allen ISD and in the Irvine (California) Unified School District. He has a doctorate in educational leadership from the University of North Texas.

Pleasanton ISD The district’s new superintendent is Cheryl Barron, who had been filling the position on an interim basis. An employee of the district for eight years, she was assistant superintendent of personnel and operations since 2019.

Plemons-Stinnett-Phillips CISD New superintendent Jamie Copley previously led Follett ISD.

Poth ISD Now serving as district superintendent is Ashley Chohlis, who was executive director of student and community engagement for East Central ISD in San Antonio.

Ralls ISD The Ralls ISD board of trustees announces the appointment of Oscar Muniz as superintendent. He most recently led McLean ISD and, prior to that, was a principal in Coolidge and Sterling City ISDs. The 32-year educator received his bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and his master’s degree from Sul Ross State University.

San Isidro ISD

Theresa Dowling, former magnet school

Sara Alvarado has been

director for the Texarkana (Ark.) School District, has been named principal of Redwater Elementary School. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Southern Arkansas University.

River Road ISD (Amarillo) Steve Rhodes has come out of retirement

to serve as River Road ISD’s head boys’ basketball coach. He previously coached in Highland Park and Brownfield ISDs and in Bushland ISD, where he was the district’s first basketball coach.

Roma ISD Carlos Gonzalez has returned to Roma ISD as superintendent. He previously served the district as its career and technical education director, assistant athletic director, assistant principal, facilitator, teacher and coach. He spent the past five years as superintendent of Zapata County ISD.

Round Rock ISD Sommer Elementary School will begin the 2022-23 academic year with Brooke Elarms as principal. She has spent her 17-year career in Round Rock ISD, teaching at Teravista, Gattis and Blackland Prairie elementary schools. She was principal of Pond Springs Elementary since 2017. Cindy Hill has been named Round Rock ISD’s general counsel. She comes to her new job with 35 years of legal experience in law firms across Texas and previously served as outside general counsel for Fort Worth, DeSoto, Carrollton-Farmers Branch, Aledo, Duncanville, Grand Prairie, Joshua and Lancaster ISDs. She received her bachelor’s and law degrees from the University of Texas.

San Antonio ISD The district’s new superintendent, Jaime Aquino, began his career as a bilingual teacher in Queens, N.Y., 30 years ago. He then served in leadership positions in public schools in Los Angeles, Denver, and Hartford, Conn., and was most recently senior vice president of Discovery Education.

named superintendent of San Isidro ISD, coming to her new position from San Benito CISD, where she was assistant superintendent of academic services.

Sherman ISD New superintendent Tyson Bennett has been an employee of the district for 16 years, most recently serving as assistant superintendent for finance and operations. He began his career as a high school teacher, then was a faculty member in the department of secondary and higher education at Texas A&M University at Commerce. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Austin College. His doctorate in educational administration and supervision was awarded from the University of Southern Mississippi. Jake Hodges has joined Sherman ISD as boys’ head basketball coach. He brings eight years of experience to his new job, most recently serving as head varsity assistant coach at McKinney North High School in McKinney ISD. He also coached in Plano ISD.

Simms ISD Eddy May has accepted the

position of superintendent after serving the district for 13 of his 21 year career, most recently as principal of Simms Elementary School. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&M University at Texarkana.

Sinton ISD Andy Reddock is the new

district superintendent. Before arriving in Sinton, he was superintendent of Flatonia ISD and Pewitt CISD and a principal in Marble Falls and Seguin ISDs. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Tyler, his master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University, and his doctorate from Texas Tech University.

> See Who’s News, page 40

Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

35


Calendar Professional development & events AU GUST August 1 TAGT New Coordinator Boot Camp Virtual event For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org Cost: Members, $120; nonmembers, $220. August 1-2 TASBO Workshop: Leadership Fundamentals TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $500; nonmembers, $550. August 8-31 ED311 Webinar Series: Effective Documentation of Teachers (six modules) Virtual event For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: Webinar series only: $195; webinar series and handbook: $240. August 10 TASB Workshop: Preparing to Serve Webinar For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: No charge. TASBO Workshop: Purchasing Compliance Combine Community Center, Crandall For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $185; nonmembers, $235. August 16 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 1 of 12) Virtual event For more into, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org August 23 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 2 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

August 30 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 3 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org August 31 ED311 Interactive Training (covers modules 101 and 201 of teacher documentation series) Virtual event For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: Included in series registration.

S E PTE M B E R September 6 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 4 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org September 6-7 TASBO Workshop: Leadership Fundamentals Katy ISD, Katy For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $500; nonmembers, $550. September 7 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas Area Cohort (session 1 of 6) Allen ISD, Allen For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 1 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. September 7-8 TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 2 of 4) Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $845; nonmembers, $945; any one session, $245.

September 8 ED311 Back to School Workshop Klein ISD, Klein For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: With access to digital workbook, $180; with printed workbook, $205.

September 14 ED311 Interactive Training (covers modules 301 and 401 of teacher documentation series) Virtual event For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: Included in series registration.

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Virtual Cohort (session 1 of 6) Virtual event For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

TASBO Workshop: School Office Fundamentals TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $225; nonmembers, $275.

September 8-9 Texas ASCD Academy: Assessment for Learning Robinson ISD, Robinson For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

September 15 ED311 Back to School Workshop ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: With access to digital workbook, $180; with printed workbook, $205.

September 9 TRTA Regional Meeting, Williamson County Southwestern University, Georgetown For more info, (512) 476-1622 or (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org September 11-13 TACS State Conference Kalahari Resort and Conference Center, Round Rock For more info, (512) 440-8227. www.tacsnet.org

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Rio Grande Valley Cohort (session 1 of 6) Weslaco ISD, Weslaco For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TSPRA Regional Meeting, Houston/Beaumont Area Location TBA For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org

September 13 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio Cohort (session 1 of 6) North East ISD, San Antonio For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

September 19 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Wichita Falls Area Cohort (session 1 of 6) Wichita Falls ISD, Wichita Falls For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, West Texas Cohort (session 1 of 6) Frenship ISD, Wolfforth For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

September 20 TASBO Workshop: PEIMS Fundamentals Hilton Hotel, Arlington For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $225; nonmembers, $275.

Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 5 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 6 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org


September 20-24 TxETA Theatre Fest ‘22 Moody Gardens, Galveston No phone number provided www.tetatx.com Cost: Early Bird registration (until Sept. 10): $150; after Sept. 10, $175. September 21-22 TASBO PEIMS Academy Hilton Hotel, Arlington For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $325; nonmembers, $375. Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 35 (session 3 of 3) ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org September 22-23 Texas ASCD Transformative Principal Leadership Academy (session 1 of 3) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org September 23 TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals Ponder ISD, Ponder For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org September 23-25 TASA|TASB Convention: txEDCON 22 Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio For more info (512) 467-0222. www.tasa.tasb.org September 25-26 TASSP Fall Leadership Academy Hilton Palacio del Rio, San Antonio For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org September 26 TASBO CSRM Course TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members and nonmembers, $250. September 26-November 26 ED311 Back to School Workshop Online (accessible at any time during this period) Online event For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: With access to digital workbook, $180; with printed workbook, $205.

September 27 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 7 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org September 28 ED311 Back to School Workshop ESC Region 11, White Settlement For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: With access to digital workbook, $180; with printed workbook, $205. September 28-29 TASA/N2 Learning Executive Leadership Institute (session 1 of 4) Lakeway Spa and Resort, Austin For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $4,000 for all four sessions. TASA/N2 learning Principals’ Institute (session 1 of 6) Lakeway Resort and Spa, Austin For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $6,000 for all six sessions. September 29 ED311 Back to School Workshop ESC Region 10, Richardson For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: With access to digital workbook, $180; with printed workbook, $205.

O C TO B E R October 3 TASBO Committee Connect Courtyard Hotel, Pflugerville For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org October 3-4 TASPA Fall Conference Kalahari Resort and Convention Center, Round Rock For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org October 4 TASBO Course: At-Risk Students: Identification, Review and Funding Impact Webinar For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $75; nonmembers, 125. October 4-5 TASBO Workshop: Leadership Fundamentals ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

Cost: Members, $500; nonmembers, $550. October 4-6 TASA/CMSi CMAT Training, Level 1 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org October 5 ED311 Back to School Workshop Civic and Convention Center, New Braunfels For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: With access to digital workbook, $180; with printed workbook, $205. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 2 of 6) Berry Center, Cypress For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. October 6 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Virtual Cohort (session 2 of 6) Virtual event For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. October 10 TASBO Workshop: Payroll Fundamentals Embassy Suites, San Antonio, or online For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $225; nonmembers, $275. October 11 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio Cohort (session 2 of 6) North East ISD, San Antonio For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, West Texas Cohort (session 2 of 6) Frenship ISD, Wolfforth For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 8 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

October 11-12 TASBO Payroll and Personnel Academy Embassy Suites, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $325; nonmembers, $375. October 11-13 TASA/CMsi CMAT Training, Level 1 Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org October 12 TAMS/TARS Legislative Update Zoom meeting For more info, (512) 346-2177. www.midsizeschools.org TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas Area Cohort (session 2 of 6) Allen ISD, Allen For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASBO Workshop: Purchasing Fundamentals Embassy Suites, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $225; nonmembers, $275. October 12-13 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 38 (session 1 of 3) Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.ord October 13 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Rio Grande Valley Cohort (session 2 of 6) Weslaco ISD, Weslaco For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. October 13-14 TASBO Purchasing Academy Embassy Suites, San Antonio For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $325; nonmembers, $375.

> See Calendar, page 39 Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

37


Registration and Housing open Tuesday, July 19 9 a.m. CST. $100 discount per registrant for districts registering all board members (or trustees) and superintendent. Visit tasa.tasb.org for a list of pre-conference sessions that require pre-registration.

Ideas. Insights. Inspiration. Shaping Public Education Together

September 23–25 San Antonio Henry B. González Convention Center

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS JON GORDON, New York Times bestselling author of “The Power of Positive Leadership” and “The Energy Bus.” MERLYNA VALENTINE, a well-respected educator for over 30 years with numerous awards as a teacher, principal, and executive director in a highly successful school district. DERRICK JOHNSON, former Texas Longhorn and Kansas City Chief. Founder and president of Defend the Dream Foundation which caters to inner-city kids through education.


> Continued from page 37 October 14 ED311 Back to School Workshop ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.ed311.com Cost: With access to digital workbook, $180; with printed workbook, $205. October 17 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Wichita Falls Area Cohort (session 2 of 6) Wichita Falls ISD, Wichita Falls For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. October 17-18 TEPSA Assistant Principals Conference Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org October 18-20 TASA/CMSi CMAT, Level 2 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 9 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org October 19-20 TASBO Course: PEIMS Fundamentals Online For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $225; nonmembers, $275. October 20 Fast Growth School Coalition Lunch and Learn Virtual event For more info, (512) 536-1206. www.fastgrowthtexas.org TSPRA Regional Meeting, Houston/Beaumont Area Goose Creek CISD, Baytown For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org October 20-21 TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

October 23-24 Texas ASCD Transformative Principal Leadership Academy (session 2 of 3) Hyatt Regency Downtown, Houston For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

NOVEMBER

October 23-25 Texas ASCD Annual Conference Hyatt Regency Downtown, Houston For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

November 2 TASBO Workshop: Budget Fundamentals Hyatt Regency West, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $225; nonmembers, $275.

October 24-26 TASBO PEIMS Academy Online For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $325; nonmembers, $375. October 25-27 TASA/CMSi CMAT, Level 2 Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org TASA Future-Ready Superintendents Leadership Network (session 1 of 3) Location TBA For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.futurereadytx.org October 26-27 TASA/N2 Learning Principals’ Institute (session 2 of 6) Hilton Park Cities, Dallas For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $6,000 for all six sessions. TASBO Accounting and Finance Academy Embassy Suites, Frisco, or online For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $325; nonmembers, $375. October 27-28 TASBO School Operations Conference Embassy Suites, Frisco For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members: $250; nonmembers, $300; associate members, $425; associate nonmembers, $575.

November 1 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 10 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

November 2-3 TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 3 of 4) Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $845; nonmembers, $945; any one session, $245. November 3-4 TASBO Budget Academy Hyatt Regency West, Houston For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $225; nonmembers, $275. November 6-7 TEPSA Grow Leadership Conference Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org November 7-8 TASA/CMSi Curriculum Management Planning Workshop TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $525; nonmembers, $575. TASB Advanced HR Seminar Location TBA For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASB HR Academy Location TBA For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org November 7-9 TAMS/TARS Annual Assessment Conference Kalahari Resort and Conference Center, Round Rock For more info, (512) 346-2177. www.midsizeschools.org

November 8 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 11 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org November 9-11 TASA CMSi Curriculum Writing Workshop TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: Members, $600; nonmembers, $650. TCA Professional Growth Conference Sheraton Hotel, Dallas For more info, (512) 472-3403. www.txca.org Cost: Early Bird registration (until June 30): Professional members, $180; retired, student and new professional members, $130. Pre-registration (July 1-Oct. 26): Professional members, $215; retired, student and new professional members, $150. Onsite registration: Professional members, $265; retired, student and new professional members, $200. Non-members (includes one year of TCA membership: Nonmember professionals, $485; nonmember retired, student and new professional: $315. November 10-11 TASBO/TCASE Synergy 2022 Courtyard by Marriott, Pflugerville, or online For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members and nonmembers, $325. Texas ASCD Transformative Principal Leadership Academy (session 3 of 3) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org November 11 TSPRA Regional Meeting, Houston/Beaumont Area Friendswood ISD, Friendswood For more info, (512) 474-9107. www.tspra.org November 15 Texas ASCD Instructional Aides Academy (session 11 of 12) Virtual event For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

> See Calendar, page 40 Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

39


> Continued from page 39 November 16 TAMS/TARS Legislative Update Zoom meeting For more info, (512) 346-2177. www.midsizeschools.org November 16-17 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy 38 (session 2 of 3) Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org November 29-30 TASBO Workshop: Leadership Fundamentals Mansfield ISD, Mansfield For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $500; nonmembers, $550.

November 30 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 3 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (972) 515-2268. www.n2learning.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. November 30-December 1 TASA Future-Ready Superintendents Leadership Network (session 2 of 3) Location TBA For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.futurereadytx.org

TAHPERD Annual Convention Omni Hotel, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 459-1299. www.tahperd.org Cost: Early Bird registration: Professional and associate members, $150; retired members, $45; student members, $35. Preregistration: Professional and associate members, $170; retired members, $45; student members, $35. Late registration: Professional and associate members, $190; retired members, $55; student members, $45. <

November 30-December 2 TAGT Conference: Gifted 22 Marriott Marquis, Houston For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org

Where did you find that great conference? I found it in Texas School Business!

Discover upcoming conferences and continuing education opportunities in the calendar section of each issue of Texas School Business and on our website. TexasSchoolBusiness.com

> Continued from page 35

Evansville, his master’s degree in education administration from Tarleton State University, and his doctorate in the same field from Baylor University.

Snyder ISD

Tenaha ISD

Who’s News

The new superintendent of Snyder ISD is Bob Rauch.

Newly appointed superintendent Don Fallin has come out of retirement to once again lead Tenaha ISD. He previously was superintendent from 2005 to 2012.

Terrell County ISD Socorro ISD (El Paso) Eric Frontz, former football coach at Ysleta

ISD’s Parkland High School, has accepted the job of assistant athletic director at Socorro ISD. He has 25 years of coaching experience.

Stratford ISD Paul Uttley has been chosen

to fill the position of superintendent of Stratford ISD, where he previously served as high school principal. Most recently, he was superintendent of Paradise and Vega ISDs. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

Sergio Menchaca, who was Bowie ISD’s high school principal, now leads Terrell County ISD as superintendent.

Texarkana ISD Shawn Davis, former director of special populations and federal programs, now serves as principal of Texas Middle School. He began his career in Maud ISD, then worked in Liberty-Eylau ISD, joining Texarkana ISD in 2002. His bachelor’s degree is from the University of Arkansas and his master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University at Texarkana.

Tabitha Dudley has been appointed principal of Dunbar Early Education Center, joining the district from Houston ISD, where she led Mading Dual Language Elementary. The 15-year educator earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Arkansas, her master’s degree from the University of Texas, and her doctorate in executive leadership from Houston Baptist University.

The Texarkana ISD board of trustees announces the appointment of Kay Stickels as director of special populations. She comes to her new position after 21 years with ESC Region 8, where she was a math consultant. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Sul Ross State University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Texas A&M University at Commerce.


Tomball ISD Kevin Flanigan has taken the role of director

of athletics. For the past six years, he has been Tomball High’s head football coach and campus athletic coordinator. He has more than 30 years of coaching experience, 25 of those as a head football coach. When director of athletics Vince Sebo retires in August, it will bring to a close a 39-year career as a coach and administrator, the past six in Tomball ISD.

Tuloso-Midway ISD (Corpus Christi) Steve VanMatre has been named district

superintendent. He began his career in Corpus Christi ISD, going on to work in ESC Region 2 as an instructional consultant and project director. He is the former superintendent of Premont ISD.

Tyler ISD The district’s new deputy superintendent of administration is Lance Groppel. Most recently executive director of instructional leadership in Grapevine-Colleyville ISD, he previously was a campus administrator in Bridge City and Hillsboro ISDs. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Tarleton State University and his doctorate from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Vanessa Holmes is the

district’s new senior director of Title I. Most recently principal of Boulter Middle School, she was previously executive director of school improvement and director of career and technology. She has been an educator for 19 years. Now serving as chief academic officer is Lani Norman, who comes to her new position from Grapevine-Colleyville ISD, where she was executive director of learning. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University with a master’s degree in educational leadership and policy studies from the University of Texas at Arlington. Her doctorate in educational leadership was awarded from the University of North Texas. New principals in the district include: • Mina Naranjo, Birdwell Dual Language

Immersion School;

• Geoffrey Sherman, Tyler Legacy High

School;

• Rachel Sherman, Three Lakes Middle

School;

• Justin Simmons, Boulter Middle School.

Victoria ISD Denise Moreno returns to Victoria ISD

as principal of Stroman STEM Academy, having previously worked in the district as principal of Welder Middle School and Shields Elementary. She was most recently principal of Falfurrias Junior High in Falfurrias ISD.

Tonya Patterson has been named principal of Victoria West High School. She comes to Victoria from Alvin ISD, where she spent the past eight years as principal of Rodeo Palms Junior High. Mandi Prichard, former assistant principal

of Shields Elementary, is now principal of Mission Valley ISD. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Lamar University.

Yasmina St. Jean has taken the position of Crain Elementary School principal. She has spent her 10 years as an educator in Victoria ISD, the past four as assistant principal of Vickers Elementary. Michelle Sturm is the new principal of

Dudley Elementary School. She has more than 20 years of experience in education and was assistant principal of Schorlemmer Elementary School.

Waco ISD The newly created position of director of student attendance and welfare has been filled by Ricky Edison. He is the former principal of University High School, having joined Waco ISD in 2017 after serving as superintendent of Abbott ISD. After serving for more than two decades as an assistant principal, dean of academics and principal of Waco High School, Lisa Saxenian has taken her first central administration role. She is now the district’s new director of career and technical education.

West Oso ISD Superintendent Conrado Garcia retired at the end of June after having led the district since 2016. Prior to that, he was with Corpus Christi ISD for 30 years, 15 of those as principal of Moody High School. He was last year’s ESC Region 2 Superintendent of the Year.

Whitharral ISD Former Wellman-Union ISD superintendent Ben Prowell now holds the top job in Whitharral ISD. He previously taught in Brownfield ISD and was a principal in Levelland ISD.

Wimberley ISD Greg Bonewald, who was principal of Wimberley High School, has returned to the district to serve as superintendent. He has been with Victoria ISD since 2014 as executive director of human resources, assistant superintendent, and most recently, deputy superintendent.

Wylie ISD Caren Christian has been named principal of Wylie East Elementary School after serving as assistant principal of Wylie Junior High East for the past three years. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Baylor University and a master’s degree in education from Sul Ross State University.

Ysleta ISD Ana Esqueda, new director of academic language programs, has spent her 28year career in the district, beginning as a bilingual teacher. She holds a bachelor’s degree and two master’s degrees, in bilingual education and educational leadership, from the University of Texas at El Paso.

Ysleta ISD announces the appointment of Diana Mooy as director of student services, a position she held on an interim basis. She began her career in El Paso’s Socorro ISD in 2007 after receiving her bachelor’s degree from the University of Phoenix, from which she also earned a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction. James Vasquez has accepted the position of associate superintendent of student services, a job he has been filling on an interim basis since March. The 27-year education veteran joined Ysleta ISD in 2016 as director of the pupil and parent services department. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Texas at El Paso.

In addition, eight principal assignments have been made. They and their schools are: • Dolores Acosta, Chavez Sixth Grade

Academy;

• Antonio Acuna, Chavez Academy; • Amy Bejarano-Alarcon, Ysleta

Elementary School;

• Sandra Calzada, Desertaire Elementary

School;

• Veronica Frias, Del Valle Middle School; • Robert Robledo, Eastwood Knolls

International School;

• Michelle Romero, Mission Valley

Elementary School;

• Norma Sierra, Lancaster Elementary

School. <

Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

41


THE BACK PAGE

For all those kids who aren’t at the top by Riney Jordan

I

t’s strange how a simple act will generate huge rewards that you never expected.

I shared a posting on my Facebook account that I really liked. Not only that, but I agreed with it completely. The author is unknown, and although I tried to find the author, I’ve been unsuccessful. Let me share it with you, because as educators, I know that this will touch your heart as it did mine. “A big shout out to all the kids who barely made it through the school year. They didn’t win an award or make the honor roll. A big hug to the moms, dads, grandparents, teachers and foster parents who stuck by them as they maneuvered the school year. Here’s to the kids who didn’t get invited to the prom, didn’t get a scholarship, and perhaps have to go straight to work out of high school. Remember, you are still worthy of a pat on the back and people talking about how amazing you are. Some kids have to work twice as hard as other students just to get a C. Their achievements deserve recognition. Don’t forget those kids. Kindness, creativity, and generosity ... those attributes sadly don’t get the accolades they deserve.” This had been posted for a day or two when I received the following private message. He asked that his name not be used, but gave me permission to share his words with anyone who might benefit from them. His comments have been lightly edited. “Re: your post about the non-honor kids … I was that kid. I was diagnosed with ADHD, and my mom was told to put me on Ritalin. I once laid an essay on a teacher’s desk that I had written. She picked it up, wrote an F on it, and handed it back to me without reading it.

I tried to enroll in the local college, but the admissions director kept dropping F bombs on me, telling me I was a loser and that I was wasting the school’s time. Many teachers are awesome, but the bad ones can do damage that may never be repaired. When I was 28, broke, broken, and at the lowest point in my life, I applied to the University of Houston and was rejected three times. Finally, an admissions director gave me a chance. I arrived on campus and registered Jan. 5, 1992, with no money nor financial aid. All I had was a five-dollar bill hidden away in my wallet. The professors easily saw that I did not belong there, but I told them my story and they provided me with the extra help and encouragement I desperately needed. Four years later, I graduated with a bachelor’s in political science. I had learned to read and write and had taken classes in physics, archeology and humanities to learn about those areas that had piqued my interest. Why am I sending this to you? Because I wish teachers would do a better job of finding the atrisk kids. They just need to look up from behind their desks, as we are sitting right in front of them. If you’re wondering about the five-dollar bill I had tucked away in my wallet, I went to WalMart when I received my diploma and found a frame in the clearance section. I bought that frame and hung my diploma on the wall. It took my last five dollars at the time, but I finally had the education I had always wanted and needed. My diploma is still in that five-dollar frame.” Well, you can understand why I wanted to share this with you. These kids are in every classroom, and I encourage you to take that necessary step toward those who may be faced with difficulties and hardships that you nor I ever experienced.

RINEY JORDAN is the author of two books and a frequent public speaker. To invite him to speak at your convocation, graduation or awards banquet, visit www.rineyjordan.com.

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2022

Texas School Business Advertiser Index

Gexa........................................................... 26 gexaenergy.com HCDE.............................................................4 hcde-texas.org K12 Insight ...................................... 14, 15 K12insight.com Meteor Education............................... 10 Meteoreducation.coom N2 Learning............................................ 32 n2learning.org Navigate360..........................................30 nav360.link Owner Insite.............................................8 owner-insite.com School Outfitters...................................2 schooloutfitters.com TASA...........................................19, 38, 44 tasanet.org TASPA.......................................................... 5 taspa.org Texas School Business........9, 40, 43 Texasschoolbusiness.com Thought Exchange.................................6 thoughtexchange.com

Advertise in Texas School Business magazine! For specs and rates, contact jgarrido@tasanet.org or by calling (800) 725-8272

texasschoolbusiness.com


Help Texas School Business brag on your schools! Does your school or district have a program that's wildly successful? Tell us about it! Submit your nomination today for possible inclusion in the 16th Annual Bragging Rights special issue, which honors 12 deserving school districts and their innovative programs. To apply, visit texasschoolbusiness.com and fill out the Bragging Rights online nomination form. The nomination deadline is 5 p.m., Sept. 2, 2022. Winners will be announced with the debut of the special issue, out in December 2022. Nominated programs must have been in operation for at least one semester. There is no limit on nominations submitted per school or district. Questions? Contact drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com.

texasschoolbusiness.com


Join Us! TASA is the professional association for Texas school leaders. In addition to advocacy and professional learning, we provide networks and services that offer mentorship and inspiration to our members. TASA is working hard to provide the support that Texas school leaders need. We invite you to be part of TASA! Membership for the 2022-23 school year opens August 1.

tasanet.org