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66

YEARS

The News Magazine for Public Education in Texas

Texas School Business

SEPTEMBER/ OCTOBER

2019

Beyond House Bill 3: What else passed this session?

Also in this issue: TASA President Greg Smith TARS President Rebecca McCutchen


© 2019 College Board.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

20 24 TASA President Profile Clear Creek’s Greg Smith brings passion to TASA presidency

Cover Story Beyond House Bill 3: What else passed this session? by Colby Nichols

by Dacia Rivers

Departments

26

7 Who’s News 32 Calendar 42 Ad Index

In the Spotlight Adriana Tagle encourages, rewards teachers and students to great results

Photo Features

by James Golsan

28 TARS President Profile New TARS president ready to advocate for Texas’ rural schools by James Golsan

8 Summer conference draws TEPSA members to Austin 10 UT and TASA team up for 71st joint summer conference 22 Texas ASCD members flock to Houston for Ignite19 36 TASSP Summer Workshop welcomes Texas' secondary school principals

Columns

5 From the Editor by Dacia Rivers 15 The Law Dawg— Unleashed by Jim Walsh 30 Regional View by Dr. April Estrada 38 Student Voices by Angie Maravi Campos 42 The Back Page by Riney Jordan

The views expressed by columnists and contributing writers do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or Texas School Business advertisers. The publisher also makes no endorsement of the advertisers or advertisements in this publication.


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From the editor

I

hope this fresh school year finds you all renewed and inspired. I am excited to bring you another academic year’s worth of good news out of your schools and share your excellent work with our readers.

We’re kicking off this issue with a cover story on the 86th Texas Legislature, an overview of what went down under the dome and how it relates to the work that you all do. Don’t miss that one, starting on page 20. This time of year, I find inspiration in all of the excited students returning to the classroom to dig into the hands-on and in-depth lessons their teachers have prepared for them. If you turn to page 38, you’ll read one such story out of Irving ISD, a student who participated in her school’s aviation science program and had a blast doing so. Of course, that’s just one example of the fantastic opportunities your Texas public schools offer their students. If you’d like to share the story of a similar program in your district, don’t hesitate to reach out to me at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com. Thank you so much for reading, and thank you for the work you do. Let’s make this one of the best years ever for Texas public ed.

Texas School Business

SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019 Volume LXVI, Issue 5 406 East 11th Street Austin, Texas 78701 Phone: 512-477-6361 • Fax: 512-482-8658 www.texasschoolbusiness.com EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Dacia Rivers DESIGN

Phaedra Strecher COLUMNISTS

Dr. April Estrada Angie Maravi Campos Riney Jordan Jim Walsh ADVERTISING SALES

Dacia Rivers Editorial Director

Ann M. Halstead

TEXAS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Kevin Brown

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS AND MEDIA RELATIONS

Amy Francisco

Texas School Business (ISSN 0563-2978) is published online bimonthly with a special edition, Bragging Rights, in December, by the Texas Association of School Administrators. © Copyright 2019 Texas Association of School Administrators

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

5


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Who’s News Abernathy ISD New superintendent Aaron Waldrip comes to Abernathy from Wellman-Union ISD, where he also held the top position. After graduating from Texas Tech University, he began his career in Lubbock ISD, then worked as an assistant principal and principal in Brownfield ISD.

Abilene ISD Mike Fullen has been promoted from

Abilene High School’s assistant head coach to head football coach and athletic coordinator. He is a graduate of Angelo State University. Deputy superintendent Gail Gregg has retired. This concludes a 39-year career, the past 27 of which have been spent in Abilene ISD. He also served the district as executive director of career and technical education and as principal of Cooper High School. Stevanie Jackson is now the district’s

director of special education. She spent the past three years as principal of Bonham Elementary School. Teri Reece, who has spent 28 of her 30

years as an educator with Abilene ISD, has been named executive director of special education. She was the district’s special education supervisor since 2004. Alison Sims, the district’s new executive

director of elementary education, was principal of Ward Elementary since 2015, previously working as a counselor at Bowie Elementary. Cooper High School’s newly appointed girls’ head soccer coach is Michelle Velez, who was Craig Middle School’s girls’ athletics coordinator since 2016. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Hardin-Simmons University. Gustavo Villanueva has been named

assistant superintendent for leadership and student services. He was executive director of secondary education for the past three years. New principal assignments have also been made. They are: Chad Drake, Dyess Elementary School; Michele Josselet, Jackson Elementary

School;

Dawn Ripple, Ward Elementary School; Keri Thornburg, Taylor Elementary School; Lyndsey Williamson, Cooper High School; Kyle Wiskow, Bonham Elementary School; Cecelia Zertuche, Bassetti Elementary

School.

Aldine ISD

Aubrey ISD

Four assistant superintendents, one for high schools and three for elementary schools, have been announced for the district.

Kari Abrams now serves as the first principal

LaTonia Amerson is assistant superintendent

of the new Fuller Elementary School. She was principal of Brockett Elementary School for the past two years.

of elementary schools. She has spent her 15-year career in the district, beginning as a language arts teacher and going on to work as an assistant principal and principal, most recently at Eisenhower Ninth Grade Center.

Monaco Middle School’s new assistant principal is Brett Dobbs, who comes to Aubrey from Oklahoma, where he was an educator for 17 years.

Faviola Cantu is assistant superintendent

Austin ISD

of elementary schools. A former assistant principal and principal, she comes to Aldine from Sheldon ISD, where she was director of multilingual programs. Todd Lindeman will serve as assistant

superintendent of high schools. An educator with 24 years of experience, he comes to his new position from Eisenhower High School, where he was principal for the past two years. LaToya Wynne is assistant superintendent of

elementary schools. She began her career in Aldine ISD as an ESL teacher and was most recently executive director of teaching and learning in Klein ISD.

Alice ISD Former Flour Bluff ISD boys’ basketball coach Jaime Boswell is now assistant athletic director of Alice ISD. He joined Flour Bluff after spending six years as head coach at San Angelo ISD’s Central High School, having also coached in Granger and Comanche ISDs.

Alvarado ISD Alvarado has created its first police department and chosen Timothy Payovich as police chief. He comes to Alvarado from serving at the University of North Texas Health Science Center.

Anthony ISD Kazen Elementary School’s new principal, Monica Arriaga, has been an employee of the district for eight years, working as a teacher and as an assistant principal at Kazen, Nye, Centeno and Zaffirini elementary schools. She is a graduate of Texas A&M International University, where she also earned her master’s degree in educational administration. Longtime Anthony ISD administrator Oscar Troncoso has been named the district’s superintendent. During his 11 years with AISD, he has served as a middle school and high school principal and, most recently, assistant superintendent. Prior to those assignments, he worked in El Paso’s Ysleta and Socorro ISDs.

Austin ISD has hired its first equity officer, Stephanie Hawley. She comes to her new position from Austin Community College, where she was associate vice president of equity and inclusion. Prior to that, she was an administrator at City Colleges of Chicago, Morton College, Oklahoma City University and Del Mar College. Her doctorate in higher education administration was conferred by the University of Texas. Six new principals are in place for the district. They are: Chaolin Chang, Joslin Elementary School; Steven Covin, Lanier Early College High

School;

Jack Drummond, Hill Elementary School; Stacy Foss, Pease Elementary School; Melissa Rodriguez, Linder Elementary

School;

Kara Karam Schultz, Ridgetop Elementary

School.

Azle ISD Former Peaster ISD superintendent Matt Adams has accepted the position of finance director for Azle ISD.

Bandera ISD Bandera High School’s new principal is Kenneth Vogel, who joins the BHS staff from Warren High School in San Antonio’s Northside ISD, where he was an assistant principal. A high school administrator for 13 years, he received his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Bastrop ISD Bastrop ISD has appointed a new chief of police and director of safety and security. Scot Bunch has more than 20 years of experience in law enforcement and school policing with the Garland Police Department. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Mountain State University > See Who’s News, page 11 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

7


Photo Feature

SUMMER CONFERENCE DRAWS TEPSA MEMBERS TO AUSTIN The Texas Elementary Principals and Supervisors Association held its summer conference in Austin in June, bringing together school leaders from around Texas for fun, education and team-building opportunities. Photos by Lifetouch, official photographer of TEPSA.

▲ TEPSA President Annette

Sanchez and Superintendent Marc Puig, Beeville ISD.

▲ TEPSA members from Rockwall ISD pose at the conference.

► Rev. Charles Foster Johnson

receives the Tribute to Texas Children Award from TEPSA Executive Director Harley Eckhart.

▲ Christal Callhoun of Malakoff ISD receives the 2019 Texas National Distinguished Principal Award.

▲ Administrators from Tomball and Cleveland ISDs network at the conference.

► Attendees pose with general session

speaker Michael Bonner’s book “Get Up or Give Up.”

8

Texas School Business JULY/AUGUST 2015


▲ TEPSA members from Rockwall ISD pose at the conference.

▲ The members of TEPSA’s executive committee.

► Belinda George and Dimitrise Haynes of Beaumont ISD.

► Conference attendees catch up at the TEPSA Coffee Chat table.

▲ TEPSA members promote the group’s Kindness Campaign, which works to inspire kindness in Texas schools.

► TEPSA presents the Student Leadership Awards to recognize outstanding student leadership teams.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

9


Photo Feature

UT AND TASA TEAM UP FOR 71ST JOINT SUMMER CONFERENCE The Texas Association of School Administrators and the University of Texas at Austin’s College of Education held their annual joint summer conference in June, with a focus on developing the whole leader, including insights on legislative advocacy, personal wellness, professional ethics and transformational leadership.

▲ Ruben Olivarez, executive director of the Cooperative Superintendency Doctoral Program at The University of Texas at Austin, addresses attendees during the general session

▲ Keynote speaker Todd Whitthorne

addresses attendees on decreasing stress and increasing productivity.

opportunities for learning and networking.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

tation on transformational leadership.

▲ Conference attendees listen to insights on legislative

advocacy from TASA’s Governmental Relations team.

► Presentations ▲ The joint conference offered many

▲ School administrators gather for a presen-

during the conference focused on a wealth of areas, including professional ethics for educators.

▲ Personal wellness was a

focus during the summer conference.


Who’s News

Breckenridge ISD

> Continued from page 7

Superintendent Tim Seymore retired at the end of August, capping 31 years as an educator.

and a master’s degree in criminal justice administration from Saint Leo University.

Brenham ISD

The new principal of Bastrop High School is its former assistant principal, John Gosselink. He is a former BHS teacher with 20 years of administrative experience. His bachelor’s and master’s degrees were awarded from Stephen F. Austin State University. Alison Hall has been chosen

to serve as principal of Cedar Creek Intermediate School, where she was an assistant principal from 2013 to 2015. She has been principal of Bluebonnet Elementary since that time. She is a graduate of Prairie View A&M University with a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction. Kelly Hubley has been

promoted from assistant principal of Red Rock Elementary School to principal. Previously a counselor at Mina Elementary, she was a teacher and administrator in Smithville ISD. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s degree from Sam Houston State University. Now serving as principal of Bluebonnet Elementary School is David MacRoberts, a 15-year education veteran who was a principal and assistant principal in New Braunfels and San Antonio’s Alamo Heights ISDs. He received his bachelor’s degree from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University), where he is currently engaged in doctoral work, and his master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas.

Belton ISD Former athletic director Mike Morgan now serves as assistant superintendent of student services, a new position within the district. Prior to joining Belton ISD in 2007, he was athletic director and head football and softball coach in Gatesville ISD. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University) and his master’s degree in coaching and athletics administration from Concordia University.

The district announces the appointment of Sarah Cook as director of curriculum, instruction and accountability. She began her career with Brenham ISD in 2004 and most recently was a science and social studies content specialist. She is a graduate of Sam Houston State University with a master’s degree in education from Lamar University. Kim Rocka has been chosen to

serve as interim principal of Brenham Elementary School. She has 20 years of experience as an educator.

Brownsville ISD Former Edinburg ISD superintendent Rene Gutierrez now leads Brownsville ISD as superintendent.

Burleson ISD Four new campus principals have been approved for the district. Cretia Basham returns to Hajek Elementary

School, where she served as principal previously from the school’s opening in 2008 until 2013. She has a bachelor’s degree from Texas Christian University, a master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington, and a doctorate in educational leadership from Texas Wesleyan University. Marcus Canonico is the new principal of

Crossroads High School. An educator for 24 years, he joined BISD in 2017, overseeing the district’s career and technical education program. He received his bachelor’s degree from Baylor University, his master’s degree from Dallas Baptist University and his juris doctor degree from Texas Wesleyan School of Law. He is at work on a doctorate in educational leadership from Abilene Christian University. Ana Ketcham holds the top position at

Taylor Elementary. A 24-year educator, she has worked in Burleson ISD for the past 14, most recently as the district’s bilingual and at-risk coordinator. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas Christian University and her master’s degree in educational leadership from Tarleton State University. Tricia Lyday now leads Frazier Elementary.

She has spent five of her 17 years as an educator with Burleson ISD, most recently as academic assistant principal of Hughes Middle School. She received her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her

master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Bryan ISD Ross Elementary School began the 2019-20 school year with Amy Bay as principal. She was principal of Brule Elementary in Navasota ISD for the past three years. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Sam Houston State University. Catherine George has

accepted the position of director of special education after serving in the same position for ESC Region 6. In addition, she was director of special services in College Station ISD. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, a master’s degree in special education from McNeese State University, and a doctorate in educational psychology from Texas A&M University. The district’s new director of student health, fitness and athletics is Dereck Rush, who comes to his new post from Oak Ridge High School in Conroe ISD, where he spent the past seven years as assistant athletic director and head football coach. His bachelor’s degree was awarded from Mississippi State University and his master’s degree in education is from Grand Canyon University. Janice Williamson is the district’s new executive director of athletics, student health and fitness. She has been with BISD since 1981, starting the Bryan High School softball program in 1987. She is a graduate of Bryan High School with a bachelor’s degree in health and physical education and a master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University.

Cameron ISD The Cameron ISD board of trustees has hired Kevin Sprinkles as district superintendent. He comes to Cameron from Little River-Academy ISD.

Carthage ISD Allen Koch, former high school principal in

East Chambers ISD, is now chief learning officer of Carthage ISD. The 28-year educator also served as principal of Tatum High School in Tatum ISD.

> See Who’s News, page 12 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

11


Who’s News > Continued from page 11

Cedar Hill ISD Former Collegiate Academy and High School ViceChancellor Eric Barnes is now principal of Bray Elementary School. He has been an educator for 13 years, seven of those in administrative positions, beginning his career in Mississippi and joining Cedar Hill ISD in 2018. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Jackson State University and a master’s degree in elementary education from Mississippi College. Cedar Hill High School graduate Corey Chism has returned to his alma mater as head boys’ basketball coach after spending four seasons in the same position at Duncanville High School in Duncanville ISD. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in educational administration from Prairie View A&M University. Gerald Hudson has

accepted the position of superintendent, coming to his new assignment from leading Jasper ISD. A graduate of Texas Tech University, he began his career in Garland ISD as a teacher, going on to serve as an area director. He received his master’s and doctoral degrees from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Jason Miller, the new

principal of Cedar Hill High School, is returning to his hometown, where he previously served as principal at Plummer Elementary and Coleman Middle School. He also worked in Houston, DeSoto and Italy ISDs. He is a graduate of Texas Southern University with a master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of North Texas. Shay Whittaker began her career at High

Pointe Elementary School and now has returned to lead the campus as principal. After her initial time at High Pointe, she went on to serve as a teacher and assistant principal at other campuses, most recently working as interim chancellor at Collegiate Prep Elementary.

Chico ISD Scott Higgins, newly appointed

superintendent, previously led D’Hanis ISD.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

Cleburne ISD

Conroe ISD Lamar Elementary School has welcomed Kristen Belcher as principal. She began her career in Conroe in 2008, serving as a teacher, summer school principal and assistant principal.

Jeffrey Bush is Cleburne High School’s new

head basketball coach. His career includes head positions in Groveton and Loop ISDs, and he was most recently head coach at De Leon High in De Leon ISD. Dustin Conn is the new assistant principal

of Smith Middle School. He spent the past 12 years with Burleson ISD, where he most recently was a positive interventions and special education behavior specialist. He received his bachelor’s degree from Southwestern Assemblies of God University and his master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University. Molly Fitzgerald has been approved as

assistant principal of Irving Elementary School. She comes to her new job from Cedar Hill ISD, where she was Collegiate Preparatory Elementary School’s instructional coach. She is a graduate of Midwestern State University with a master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas at Arlington. Rosalind Lawrence returns to the district

as head girls’ basketball coach at Cleburne High School. She is a Cleburne High graduate who has spent the past three years as head girls’ basketball coach at McKinney ISD’s Boyd High School. She also led the programs at Houston ISD’s Spring Woods High School and Midland’s Lee High.

College Station ISD Laura Casper-Teague has been named

principal of Spring Creek Elementary School, coming to College Station from Clear Creek ISD, where she was an assistant principal and instructional supervisor. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan at Dearborn and her master’s degree in education from Michigan State University. Austin Chandler is the new assistant

principal of College Station High School, joining the district from Taylor ISD, where he also served as an assistant principal. The new director for employee engagement is Nkrumah Dixon, who was assistant director of human resources for the past four years. Susan Heath has accepted the position of

director of early education services.

The district’s new director of talent management is Stormy Hickman, former principal of Spring Creek Elementary. She has been an employee of the district for 17 years. Now serving as director of business services is Thad Lasater, who most recently was director of finance for La Porte ISD. Cristal Vazquez has been approved as

assistant principal of Southwood Valley Elementary School. She comes to College Station from Rockdale ISD, where she was elementary instructional coordinator.

Melanie Bujnoch, former

assistant principal of Klein High School in Klein ISD, now leads Oak Ridge High School’s Ninth Grade Campus as principal.

Coppell ISD Angela Brown has been

named executive director of communications and community engagement. Most recently CarrolltonFarmers Branch ISD’s chief communications officer, she has 20 years of experience with that district. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Dallas Baptist University and a master’s degree in education leadership from Texas Christian University. Now serving as director of intervention services is Stephanie Flores. She was coordinator of special education for CarrolltonFarmers Branch ISD since 2015 and, prior to that, was an educational diagnostician and teacher in that district. She has a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in teaching from Austin College. A new director of science has been appointed for the district. Evan Whitfield, who was a science and physics teacher at Coppell High School since 2014, is also an adjunct instructor at North Lake College. He received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in science from the University of Albany.

Corpus Christi ISD Jamie Copeland has been selected to serve as

principal of Carroll High School, where she was assistant principal from 2010 to 2014. She previously led Kaffie Middle School and Dawson Elementary.

Karen Griffin has been named

deputy superintendent of business support services. She previously served as assistant superintendent in the same field for San Marcos CISD and Kingsville ISD. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business administration from Texas A&M University at Kingsville.


Who’s News Now serving as the first principal of the new Cunningham Middle School at South Park is Sandy Salinas-DeLeon. An employee of the district for 15 years, she previously was principal of Cunningham Middle School, which has now merged with South Park Middle School.

Corrigan-Camden ISD Now serving as district superintendent is Richard Cooper, former Groesbeck ISD high school principal. An educator for 23 years, he has spent 14 of those as an administrator.

Corsicana ISD Corsicana High School’s new band director is Brent Smith, who was most recently Pearce High School’s director of concert and symphonic bands. He received his bachelor’s degree in music education from Baylor University.

Cypress-Fairbanks ISD The new principal of Horne Elementary School, Tracey Bennett, was most recently assistant principal of Andre Elementary School. Now completing 22 years in education, she came to CFISD in 2005. She earned a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Oklahoma. She received a second master’s degree, in educational administration, from Sam Houston State University. Martin Drayton, former

director of instruction at Cypress Ridge High School, is the new principal of Cook Middle School. An educator for 19 years, he began his career in Fort Bend ISD, joining CFISD in 2007. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Grambling State University and his master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Houston at Victoria. The former assistant principal of Woodard Elementary School, Dinah McMichael, has been promoted to principal of Lieder Elementary. She has spent her 13-year career with Cypress-Fairbanks ISD after earning her bachelor’s degree from Ouachita Baptist University and her master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University. The district’s new assistant superintendent of business and financial services is Connie Morgenroth, who has 20 years of

experience in public school administration. She began her career in Clear Creek ISD and was most recently assistant superintendent of business and operations for Friendswood ISD. She received her bachelor’s degree in business administration from Texas State University. Former Frazier Elementary School assistant principal Michael Pagano now leads the school as principal. An educator for 15 years, he worked in Utah’s Nebo School District before joining CFISD in 2005. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Brigham Young University and a master’s degree in education from Stephen F. Austin State University. Gloria Ramirez, Langham

Creek High School’s director of bands, received the 2019 Meritorious Achievement Award for outstanding commitment to music education from the Texas Bandmasters Association. With 38 years of experience in music education, she taught in Spring and Humble ISDs before joining CFISD. Karen Stockton, the new

principal of Post Elementary School, most recently led Lieder Elementary. She has served in CFISD for 27 years, beginning as a teacher and going on to work as an assistant principal and principal. Her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in counseling were awarded from Prairie View A&M University and her doctorate in professional leadership from the University of Houston. Now serving as principal of Duryea Elementary School is Tomicka Williams, who most recently led Post Elementary. An educator for 25 years, she worked in Lufkin and Katy ISDs and in Stafford MSD before coming to CFISD in 2010. She has a bachelor’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University and a master’s degree in education from Prairie View A&M University.

Del Valle ISD The Del Valle ISD board of trustees announces the appointment of deputy superintendent Annette Tielle Villerot to the position of interim superintendent. She previously served as assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction for Pflugerville, Comal and Manor ISDs. She received her bachelor’s degree from

Bloomsburg University, her master’s degree from East Stroudsburg University, and her doctorate from the University of Texas.

Decatur ISD The Decatur Board of Trustees appointed Brett Springston interim superintendent. He was previously superintendent of Brownsville and Bartlett ISDs.

Denton ISD Now leading Pecan Creek Elementary School is Amanda Bomar, who was assistant principal of Wilson Elementary. She began her career in Crockett ISD, going on to work in Lufkin and Mesquite ISDs and joining Denton ISD in 2010. She holds a bachelor’s degree from East Texas Baptist University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Stephen F. Austin State University. Former Pecan Creek Elementary School principal Lacey Rainey is now DISD’s area superintendent of academic programs. She brings 17 years of experience to her new position, including three years as an administrator in Community ISD. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas, her master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce, and her doctorate from Dallas Baptist University. The district’s new director of secondary curriculum is Lisa Thibodeaux, a 22-year employee of Plano ISD. She is also an adjunct professor at the University of North Texas and Southern Methodist University. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of South Florida and her master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of North Texas.

Dripping Springs ISD Dripping Springs High School has welcomed Angela Gamez, a former assistant principal at the school, as principal. She previously taught in Karnes City, Marble Falls and Llano ISDs. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she holds a master’s degree in teaching from St. Edward’s University. Melinda Gardner has

accepted the position of Walnut Springs Elementary School principal. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas State University and a master’s degree in > See Who’s News, page 14 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

13


Who’s News > Continued from page 13

educational administration from Lamar University. Susan Maxey is now director

of special services, coming to her new job from Luling ISD, where she was executive director of special programs since 2017. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and her master’s degree in educational administration from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University), where she is now at work on her doctorate in school improvement. Rooster Springs Elementary School has welcomed Steve Novickas as principal. He comes to his new job from Sycamore Springs Middle School, where he was assistant principal. He received his bachelor’s degree from Illinois State University and his master’s degree in educational leadership from Regis University.

Duncanville ISD Newly appointed chief of schools (elementary) Winnifred Goodman has been with the district for four years, beginning as director of elementary education and most recently serving as executive director of academic services. Executive director of academic services Tiffanie King comes to Duncanville from Mansfield ISD, where she was an administrator. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Houston, her master’s degree from Tarleton State University, and her doctorate in education from Texas A&M University at Commerce. Now serving as director of professional development is Sherri Smith, who spent the past five years as principal of Central Elementary School. She has been an employee of the district for 18 years. Norbert Whitaker is the

district’s new director of student services. Previously a secondary principal in Fort Worth ISD, he received his bachelor’s degree from Grambling State University, master’s degree from the University of

14

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

Phoenix and doctorate in education from the University of North Texas.

Eagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD Rachel Bradley, principal of

Dozier Elementary School, is a 16-year educator who spent the past five years as assistant principal of Saginaw Elementary. She received her bachelor’s degree from Williams Baptist College and her master’s degree in education administration from Lamar University. The district’s new director of multi-tiered systems of support is Beth Epps, who was most recently principal of Dozier Elementary School. Her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in educational administration were awarded from Lubbock Christian University. John Fahey, former assistant

principal and academic assistant principal at Boswell High School, is the new principal of Wayside Middle School. An educator for 13 years, he earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Harding University. Now serving as principal of Chisholm Ridge Elementary School is Krystle Green, who comes to her new position from Irving ISD with 15 years of experience. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas State University and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of North Texas. In addition, 14 principal assignments have been announced. They are: Carrie D’Amico, Saginaw High School; Karen Burch, Highland Middle School; Melissa Curtis, Saginaw Elementary School; Ronald Gatlin, Chisholm Trail High School; Wat Harden, Chisholm Trail High School; Terrilin Holz, Greenfield Elementary School; David Kinney, Chisholm Ridge Elementary School; Natasha Provo, Northbrook Elementary School; Genesis Reddic, Boswell High School; Renata Schlotzhauer, Chisholm Trail High School; Heather Smith, Willow Creek Elementary School; Jason Sneed, Chisholm Trail High School; Jim Wade, Bryson Elementary School; Whitney Wheeler, Marine Creek Middle School.

Edgewood ISD (Region 7) Kristin Prater, formerly the district’s director

of student services, has been promoted to superintendent.

Edgewood ISD (San Antonio) The following campus administrative assignments have been made: Walter Allen, assistant principal, Roosevelt

Elementary School;

Lilly Benavidez, assistant principal, Cardenas

and Stafford Early Childhood Centers;

Ana Cantu, assistant principal, Winston

Elementary School;

Juana De La Garza, assistant principal,

Gonzalez Elementary School;

Emma Dromgoole, assistant principal,

Stafford Elementary School;

Martha Esquivel, assistant principal, Johnson

Elementary School;

Roger Gonzalez, principal, Loma Park

Elementary School;

Monique Lara, assistant principal,

Gardendale Elementary School;

Cindy Pena, assistant principal, Cisneros

Elementary School;

Wendy Salazar, principal, Stafford

Elementary School.

El Paso ISD Maria Kennedy, the district’s

athletic director, was honored by the Texas Girls Coaches Association at their annual convention in July. She received the Margaret McKown Distinguished Service Award, which recognizes those who have made outstanding contributions to girls’ athletics in the state. A longtime coach and administrator, she has been in her current position with EPISD since 2016. The new director of transformation talent development is Teresa Zamarripa. She was previously principal of Guillen Middle School. The following new principal assignments have been made: Leticia Ewing, Terrace Hills Middle School

and Collins Elementary School; Corina Favela, Brown Middle School. Additionally, the following interim appointments have been made: Armando Gallegos, interim principal, Jefferson High School and Silva Health Magnet; Anna Torres, interim assistant superintendent of elementary schools.

> See Who’s News, page 16


THE LAW DAWG – UNLEASHED

Ross Perot and the red, red rose by Jim Walsh

T

he recent passing of Ross Perot brought back a lot of memories. To explain, we need to go all the way back to December 1965, when this publication included damaging photographic evidence of high jinks and tomfoolery among the educational leadership of the state. There is a picture of a line of school administrators, each one blindfolded, each one with his hand on the shoulder of the man in front of him (yes, they were all men). Their pants legs are rolled up, revealing, in some instances, an above-the-sock stretch of calf. The caption reads: “Lowly Neophytes await initiation into Red Red Rose.” I have fond memories of the Red Red Rose. I began attending TEA’s Midwinter Conference in the early 1980s, a young lawyer, trying to fit in with a bunch of good ol’ boy Texas superintendents. I noticed several individuals wearing red rose lapel pins. I inquired about their meaning, and was told that it was a highly secret society, open only to those invited. Thus, I established a goal for myself. I would find a way to be accepted into this sanctum sanctorum. I don’t remember how many years it took, but I finally received the letter. I had been accepted as a Neophyte, and would be initiated during Midwinter the next January. The letterhead was a hoot, identifying various individuals as The Lord High Mocus, the Keeper of the Inner Wicket, the Keeper of the Outer Wicket, and most ominously, the Chief Prodder. CHIEF PRODDER??? My anxieties were not relieved when I asked J.D. Cox, later the superintendent in Atlanta ISD, what I should expect. He paused, looked at me intently and asked: “Have you disclosed any physical disabilities?” The only specific advice I got was not to wear my best suit.

blindfold, turned my suit coat inside out, put my hand on the shoulder of fellow Neophyte Bill Farney (UIL) and entered the initiation chamber. By the time the evening was over, I had been accepted — I had the lapel pin. A few years later the RRR went out of business. I’m not sure exactly what happened, but it had something to do with Ross Perot. This was about the time that Perot was heading up blue ribbon commissions, and making suggestions as to how we should fix public education. Perot enjoyed ridiculing things that he found worthy of ridicule. The Red Red Rose was an easy target. I think the Rose shut down for fear that Perot would bring the TV cameras in to see a bunch of school administrators acting like high school sophomores. “Sophomoric” is an accurate word to describe the Red Red Rose, but what’s wrong with that? I happen to recall my sophomore year of high school as one of the happiest times of my life. The Red Red Rose was about nothing but fun, fellowship and a touch of silliness. Fortunately, the women picked up where the men left off. About the time that the Red Red Rose shut down, female administrators began to sprout pink rose lapel pins. Having been excluded from the Red Red Rose, this small group of pioneering female administrators established the Pink Pink Rose, though nothing lasts forever, and they have now gone out of business as well. When you say “Ross Perot” to most people, they may recall the presidential campaign, the no-pass-no-play bill, the successful business career, the big ears. But for me, Mr. Perot brings to mind a unique evening of fellowship and foolishness. Not to mention the Chief Prodder.

My desire to be accepted overcame my fears. I showed up for the initiation, donned the JIM WALSH is an attorney with Walsh Gallegos Treviño Russo & Kyle PC. He can be reached at jwalsh@wabsa.com. You can also follow him on Twitter: @jwalshtxlawdawg. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

15


Who’s News > Continued from page 14

Fabens ISD Three new administrators have been named for the district. They are: Yvonne Coupland, chief business officer; Anthony Prado, principal, Fabens High

School;

Nancy Torres, principal, Fabens Middle

School.

The new principal of Cooper Elementary School is Tish Ptomey. She was previously assistant principal of Forbes Middle School and helped to open Wagner Middle School in 2017.

Gonzales ISD John Schumacher has been hired as Gonzales

Flour Bluff ISD A new superintendent is in place for the district. David Freeman held the top job in London ISD since 2014 and prior to that served as superintendent of Montague ISD and as chief academic officer of Wichita Falls ISD. Also an adjunct professor at North Central Texas College, he holds a bachelor’s degree from Midwestern University, a master’s degree from the University of North Texas, and a doctorate in education from Texas Wesleyan University.

Galveston ISD Walter Fortune has joined Galveston ISD

as athletic director, bringing 29 years of experience to his new job. Most recently athletic coordinator and coach at Conroe ISD’s Grand Oaks High School, he is a graduate of Sam Houston State University with a master’s degree from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Georgetown ISD Jacob Donnell has accepted

the position of principal of Pickett Elementary School. He was an elementary principal in Waco ISD and has 13 years of experience as a math teacher, associate and assistant principal and principal. East View High School principal LaToya Easter comes to Georgetown from Leander ISD, where she was principal of Four Points Middle School. Prior to that, she worked in Round Rock ISD as an associate principal and in Alvin ISD as head girls’ basketball coach. Danielle Holloway is the

newly appointed principal of Wagner Middle School, which she helped to open in 2017.

16

Now leading Georgetown High School as principal is Brian Johnson. He most recently held administrative positions in Humble ISD.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

ISD superintendent.

Granbury ISD Former Granbury High School dean of instruction Tammy Clark is now principal of Granbury Middle School. A volleyball coach for 16 seasons, she came to Granbury ISD in 2002. She received her bachelor’s degree from the Universite de Bordeaux in France and her master’s degree in secondary education from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. Karla Willmeth has been named principal of Acton Elementary School, where she was assistant principal since 2012. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Abilene Christian University and her master’s degree in education from Lamar University.

Grand Prairie ISD An interim superintendent has been named for the district. Linda Ellis, who was deputy superintendent of teaching and learning, holds a bachelor’s degree from East Texas State University and a master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Skip Carter is the new

principal of iUniversity Prep, coming to his new job from working as an assistant principal in Northwest ISD in Fort Worth. Nicole Whiteside has been

promoted from interim principal of Silver Lake Elementary School to principal.

Hardin-Jefferson ISD New superintendent Brad McEachern previously held the top position in Warren ISD.

Harleton ISD New superintendent Brian Gray has returned to the district where he served as assistant superintendent from 1998 to 2002. During the time he was away from Harleton, he was superintendent of Union Grove and Irion ISDs.

Hays CISD Ginger Bordeau has been

named principal of Carpenter Hill Elementary School. With more than 25 years of experience as an educator, she has been with the district since 2002, most recently as assistant principal of Buda Elementary. A graduate of the University of Mississippi, she holds a master’s degree in education from the University of Texas Permian Basin. Iric Ramos has been promoted

from assistant principal to principal of Science Hall High School. He began his career in Austin ISD and joined HCISD in 2010, serving as assistant principal of Simon Middle School and Camino Real Elementary. He received his bachelor’s degree from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University) and his master’s degree from Concordia University.

Longtime district administrator Karen Zuniga has been tapped to lead Lehman High School as principal. Most recently principal of Science Hall Elementary, she has been with HCISD since 2002. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas State University and two master’s degrees, in curriculum and instruction from Texas State and in educational leadership and administration from Lamar University.

Highland Park (Dallas) Highland Park ISD’s fifth elementary school will open in the fall of 2020 with Amanda Reyes as principal. Currently principal of Olson Elementary in Allen ISD, she will spend the next year preparing for the school’s inaugural year.

Humble ISD Terry Perkins has been

chosen to serve as deputy superintendent of Humble ISD. He returns to the district from Crosby ISD, where he was principal of Crosby High School. Previously a teacher and basketball coach at Humble


High School, he also worked as a teacher and administrator in Fort Bend and Mineral Wells ISDs. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and his master’s degree from Sam Houston State University.

Katy ISD Katy ISD’s ninth high school, as yet unnamed, has appointed Ethan Crowell principal. He began his career in Pasadena ISD, joining Katy ISD in 2014 and serving as principal of Beckendorff Junior High since 2016. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Texas, master’s degree in humanities from the University of Texas at Arlington, and doctorate in professional leadership from the University of Houston. Beckendorff Junior High has welcomed Paul Moussavi as principal. An educator for 19 years, he has been with Katy ISD since 2000, most recently as principal of West Memorial Elementary School. He holds associate’s, bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Alfred University.

Keller ISD The district announces the appointment of Tricia Atzger-John as director of health services. She comes to Keller from Northwest ISD in Fort Worth, where she was a campus and district lead nurse and, most recently, coordinator of health services. She earned her bachelor’s degree at the University of Texas Health Science Center and her master’s degree in nursing from the Chamberlain School of Nursing. Carrie Pearson-Nelson has

joined Keller ISD as director of early childhood. A teacher in the district in 2006-07, she transferred to California, where she was a teacher and campus administrator. The 24-year educator has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at El Paso and master’s and doctoral degrees from California State University at Sacramento. Elaine Plybon has accepted

the position of director of personalized learning opportunities after serving as the district’s coordinator of virtual and blended learning. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Wichita State University and a master’s degree in sociology from Sam Houston State University. Now serving as executive director of student advancement, Leslee Shepherd has been an educator since 1991, arriving in Keller ISD in 2012. She

received a bachelor’s degree from East Texas Baptist University and a master’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce. New director of guidance and counseling Jennifer Todd comes to Keller from Irving ISD, where she was director of guidance, counseling and college readiness. Her bachelor’s degree was awarded from the University of Missouri at St. Louis and her master’s degree from Texas Wesleyan University. Robert Wright, the district’s

new director of career and technical education, served as the district’s CTE coordinator since 2016. He received his bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Parker University.

Killeen ISD The district announces the appointment of Taina Maya as its chief communications and marketing director. Most recently a news anchor for KWTX-TV in Waco, she holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of the Incarnate Word. Harker Heights High School’s new principal is Jorge Soldevila, an educator since 2008 and most recently principal of Liberty Hill Middle School in Liberty Hill ISD. He earned his master’s degree in business administration and is at work on his doctorate in education.

Klein ISD Now serving as superintendent of Klein ISD is Jenny McGown. The first female superintendent in the district’s history, she holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and completed her master’s and doctoral degrees at Sam Houston State University. She has served as assistant principal of Collins High School and as principal of Ehrhardt and Zwink elementaries and most recently was deputy superintendent and chief learning officer.

Krum ISD Three assistant principals have been appointed for the district. They are: Macy Faught, Dyer Elementary School; Lisa Mayfield, Dodd Elementary School; Lyndi Stupka, Krum Early Education Center.

Lake Travis ISD The district has named Stephanie Budai community programs coordinator. She joined Lake Travis ISD in 2013, most recently serving as assistant principal of Lakeway Elementary School. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University at Commerce and a master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University. Bee Cave Elementary School began the new academic year with Kim Kellner as principal. An educator for 20 years, she was the school’s assistant principal. She earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas State University. Lester Wolff has been selected

to serve as principal of Lake Travis Middle School, where he previously served as principal in an interim capacity. An educator for 33 years, he has a bachelor’s degree from Buena Vista University and a master’s degree in education from the University of North Texas.

Lamar CISD Ernie Bainbridge has taken

on the role of principal of Hubenak Elementary School. He is a graduate of the University of Houston with a master’s degree from Lamar University and had been serving as Hubenak’s assistant principal. Ryon Middle School’s new principal is its former assistant principal, Kevin Croft. Previously an employee of Junction ISD, he also was an assistant principal at George Ranch High School. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Schreiner College. Sharyn Kitto is now principal

of Wertheimer Middle School. Most recently an assistant principal at Leaman Junior High, she received her bachelor’s degree from Iowa State University and her master’s degree from Louisiana State University.

Tracy Mills has been promoted

from assistant principal to principal of Jackson Elementary School. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s degree from the University of Houston.

> See Who’s News, page 18

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

17


Who’s News > Continued from page 17 Theresa Mossige has accepted

the assignment of assistant superintendent for secondary education. She spent 12 years as a principal in Fort Worth ISD and is a graduate of Texas Wesleyan University with a master’s degree in educational administration and a doctorate in educational leadership from Texas Christian University.

Now serving as assistant superintendent of elementary education is Diane Parks, previously principal of Hubenak Elementary. A graduate of Purdue University, she received her master’s degree from the University of Houston. Heather Patterson is the new

principal of George Ranch High School. She has been a teacher and assistant principal in the district and previously led Ryon Middle School. A graduate of Texas Tech University, she earned her master’s degree from the University of Houston at Victoria. Briscoe Junior High School has welcomed Jennifer Zebold as principal. Previously a teacher and administrator in Katy ISD, she was most recently principal of Wertheimer Middle School. She has a bachelor’s degree from Texas State University and a master’s degree from Houston Baptist University.

Leander ISD Steve Crawford, a 21-year Leander ISD

employee, has accepted the position of principal of Four Points Middle School. He began his career with the district as a teacher at Giddens Elementary School and was most recently principal of Reagan Elementary. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas State University.

Lewisville ISD Lamar Middle School’s new principal is Kristy Casal, who previously was the school’s assistant principal before leaving the district to work in Dallas, Plano and Flower Mound ISDs. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Louisiana at Monroe and her master’s degree in educational leadership from the University of Texas at Arlington.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

Jaime Clark has accepted the

position of principal of Castle Hills Elementary School. Most recently principal of Story Intermediate School in Palestine ISD, she previously worked in Austin’s Eanes ISD and Ector County ISD. She holds a bachelor’s degree in education and a master’s degree in education from Tarleton State University. Lewisville ISD has announced the appointment of Heather Garrison as principal of Griffin Middle School. Most recently an assistant principal at Lewisville High School Killough, she has also worked in Duncanville, Irving, McKinney and Castleberry ISDs. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas Tech University and her master’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Liberty Hill ISD Burden Elementary’s new principal is Tanya Lambert. Most recently assistant principal of Rancho Sienna Elementary, she spent 11 years as a counselor in Royse City ISD and has also worked as a teacher, reading specialist and reading interventionist. Now serving as assistant superintendent is Brad Mansfield. He comes to Liberty Hill from Leander ISD, where he was an administrator since 2004, seven of those years as principal of Leander High School. His most recent position with that district was executive director of student services. Sharif Mezayek has been appointed chief

of the department’s newly created police department. He has 31 years of experience in law enforcement, the past 24 with the Williamson County Sheriff ’s Department.

Lovejoy ISD A new superintendent is in place for the district. Michael Goddard is the former principal of Lovejoy High School. A graduate of Stephen F. Austin State University, he holds a master’s degree in education from the University of North Texas, where he also completed his doctorate.

Lubbock ISD The district’s new chief innovation officer is Lisa Ramirez, who comes to Lubbock from Washington, D.C., where she was deputy assistant secretary for policy and programs in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education at the U.S. State Department. She previously served as principal of Lubbock ISD’s Ramirez Charter School.

Three principals have been appointed. They and their schools are: Lori Alexander, Byron Martin Advanced

Technology Center;

Anissa Briseno, Roberts Elementary School; Melissa Hernandez, Ramirez Elementary

School.

Marlin ISD The Marlin ISD board of trustees has approved the hiring of David Haynes as athletic director and head football coach. He most recently was with Connally ISD, where he was an assistant football and basketball coach.

Marshall ISD Leslie Glanton, who spent the past two years

as assistant principal of Young Elementary School, is now principal of Marshall Early Childhood Center. She is an alumna of Marshall ISD who earned a bachelor’s degree from East Texas Baptist University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from Texas A&M University at Texarkana. The new principal of Young Elementary School, Frances Moore, previously served as principal of Washington Early Childhood Center and Young Middle School. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Grambling State University and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce.

Melissa ISD Maddie Coe has been

promoted from community relations director to director of communications. The University of North Texas graduate, who has a bachelor’s degree in journalism and strategic communications, joined Melissa ISD in 2015.

Mercedes ISD The district’s newly appointed principal, Carolyn Mendiola, was previously assistant superintendent of Sharyland ISD.

Merkel ISD Brian Ramsey has been named Merkel ISD’s

head football coach. He was head coach in Cross Plains ISD for the 2010-11 school year and in Ranger ISD from 2013 to 2016, spending the past two years as head coach in Electra ISD.

> See Who’s News, page 35


Johnny L. Veselka SCHOLARSHIP for Doctoral Students in Education

Apply Now! TASA established the Johnny L. Veselka Scholarship in 2013 to honor and provide financial assistance to outstanding doctoral students pursuing careers in educational leadership, with particular emphasis on the superintendency. If you are an Active or Student member of TASA who is enrolled in an accredited university doctoral program, apply by September 30! Scholarship recipients are announced and the $2,500 awards are presented at the TASA Midwinter Conference in Austin each January.

See additional criteria and guidelines and access the online application: tasanet.org/scholarship

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

19


Beyond House Bill 3: What else passed this session? by Colby Nichols

D

ebate over school finance and property tax relief definitely dominated the 2019 legislative session. At times, it might have seemed almost impossible, given the time constraints, that the 86th Texas Legislature would be able to pass anything other than bills on those issues. However, they were not the sole focus of the Legislature. (As evidence, take a look at Figure 1 to see the bill passage statistics from this session; there was a significant increase from the 85th legislative session.)

HB 3 was only about finance, right?

Skeptics argue that the focus on school finance and property tax relief was an opportunity for some sleight of hand: Billions of dollars were being waved in the left hand, while new onerous requirements were being implemented with the right. While the motives may be debatable, it is undeniable that the Legislature passed bills that made some significant changes to state law unrelated to school finance.

Additionally, it requires all 12th graders enrolled in the 2021 school year to fill out either a FAFSA or TAFSA, unless they meet a narrow exception based on a counselor’s decision or parental consent. School boards must also adopt early childhood literacy and mathematics proficiency plans for K-3 with measurable goals. Boards of trustees must also adopt a similar plan for college, career and military readiness (CCMR).

Districts must now appoint a threat assessment team to assess threats and implement safe and supportive school programs. This may include individual student discipline matters when they consider them to be a serious risk of violence to themselves or others.

*Typical lawyer disclaimer jargon: The following information is not meant to be comprehensive in nature, but merely to highlight some major changes from specific bills.*

HB 3 also calls for the implementation of a “Do Not Hire Registry,” a central database housing information related to educator misconduct that will prevent “passing the trash.”

HB 18 was meant to redefine mental health and protocols for dealing with mental health in the school setting. The law literally redefined “mental health condition,” and requires districts, through their District Improvement Plans, to adopt evidence-based practices, positive behavior

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Texas School Business JULY / AUGUST 2019

Not exactly. In legal terms we call HB 3 an “omnibus bill.” Typically, omnibus bills include their subject matter and, in many cases, several other subjects or areas. HB 3 was no different. The bill requires K-2 assessments for reading comprehension (which do not count toward accountability) and phonics curriculum for K-3, including training, by 2021-22, for every teacher and principal who works with K-3 students.

SB 11 – School safety At the time of this writing, a large portion of SB 11 awaits rulemaking. However, the substantive portions mandating new requirements for a district’s emergency operations plan are already in place. Most notably, the Texas School Safety Commission will now have the authority to audit district plans, and potential district non-compliance with the plans could allow the Texas Education Agency to appoint a conservator or board of managers.

HB 18 – Mental health


interventions and support systems that integrate trauma/grief-informed care (replacing discipline management), and a comprehensive counseling program (that conforms to the Texas Model for Comprehensive Counseling Programs developed by the Texas Counseling Association). The legislation changed training requirements by requiring at least 25% of continuing education to focus on the various listed topics, including grief/ trauma informed care, strategies for positive relationships, etc. It also requires that mental health, including the science, risks, factors and causes of various forms of substance abuse, be included in the health curriculum. Both HB 18 and SB 11 call for additional duties and utilization of the School Health Advisory Committees (SHAC).

HB 3906 – Accountability and assessments Many were surprised by lawmakers’ efforts to advance legislation regarding assessments, considering all of the recent changes to the school accountability system during the past two sessions. However, the Legislature determined more change was necessary. The commissioner of education must now appoint a technical advisory committee to look at the validity and reliability of exams, and an educator advisory committee to advise on the development of academically appropriate tests.

Bills on student discipline HB 692 prohibits suspension of a homeless student unless they have committed: a weapons offense; violent assault; sexual assault; aggravated assault or aggravated sexual assault; or an offense related to marijuana or a controlled substance, a dangerous drug or an alcoholic beverage. Campus behavior coordinators must work with the district homeless liaison for out-ofschool suspensions. HB 811 adds homelessness and foster care as mitigating factors that a district must consider when assigning discipline measures. HB 3630 has already caused several administrators to submit questions to legal counsel. The bill essentially prohibits aversive techniques that may cause discomfort for students or a deprivation of senses. The examples and scenarios span a broad spectrum, such as spraying a noxious substance in a student’s face. However, the bill does raise questions about practices that have historically been used in areas of the school such as athletics. If you are a former athlete, you may remember receiving punishment involving “dropping down” and giving the coach 20 pushups. At the very least, there is an argument that such a practice is now formally prohibited by HB 3630 as it would cause discomfort or physical pain. In an ironic twist, the bill does explicitly exempt corporal punishment

During the interim, various agencies will be promulgating rules on the various bills impacting Texas public schools that past this session. Stay tuned as TASA staff will provide updates and input on behalf of members.

from the law. As always, remember there are other legal and political considerations beyond this legislation as to whether it is legally prudent to continue corporal punishment. COLBY NICHOLS is an Associate with Underwood Law Firm. He assists the Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) Governmental Relations staff — as a consultant — on issues related to school finance, special education, property taxation, tax ratification elections, bond elections and school discipline, among other issues.

Additionally, the legislation requires a transition plan be developed so that all assessments can be administered electronically beginning in the 2022-23 school year. It allows third- through eighthgrade STAAR tests to be divided into three parts and allows administration of exams to occur in multiple parts over more than one day. STAAR or EOC exam administration on the first instructional day of the week is prohibited. The bill also eliminates the stand-alone STAAR fourth-grade and seventh-grade writing tests, effective Sept. 1, 2021.

▲ Figure 1 Source: “Legislative Reference Library of Texas: End-of-Session Comparison, 86th Legislature.” Legislative Reference Library, 2 July 2019, lrl.texas.gov/whatsNew/client/ index.cfm/2019/7/2/EndofSession-Comparison-86th-Legislature.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

21


Photo Feature

TEXAS ASCD MEMBERS FLOCK TO HOUSTON FOR IGNITE19 The Texas Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development welcomed members to Houston in June for its ignite19 conference, with a focus on transforming curriculum with technology.

▲ Left to right, Ryan Wheeler, Kristi Visage and Suzanne Gaddis from Lockhart ISD walk the

audience through the process behind Visionary Instruction Plan (VIP) for increasing student performance, growth and engagement.

▲ Keynote presenter Steve Dembo

prepares to talk to educators about ways schools can become leaders in adopting new ideas in technology during his “Building Bolder Schools: It Doesn’t Hurt to be First” session.

▲ Joan Bowman (left) from Houston

Baptist University and Vickey Giles from Schreiner University present “Transform Storytelling via Technology” on day one of ignite19.

◄ Presenter Ashley May from Alief ISD

talked with educators about practical ways to use technology in the classroom to meet the needs of all learners.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

▲ Nicole Offerdahl from Newsela prepares to engage educators in her “Design Your Own Coren Resources” Innovative Highlights.


▲ Clark Lowery from Eukolos prepares

to talk to administrators about comparing and analyzing data in the new accountability system to effectively implement instructional strategies during his Innovative Highlights session.

▲ Texas ASCD board member Tory Hill (left), Emily Chapelle from PITSCO and Sweeny ISD

educators (left to right) Sandra Consilio, Michael Heinroth and Matthew Way present ideas about developing workforce-ready skills for future graduates.

◄ Ignite19

scavenger hunt winner Vanessa Benchley from Humble ISD.

▲ Texas ASCD board members (from left to right) Susanne Carroll,

Abigayle Barton and Janis Jordan visit exhibitors during a break at ignite19.

▲ Texas ASCD board member Kim Lawson and Amber Godby from Victoria ISD were some of the scavenger hunt winners.

▲ From left to right, Texas ASCD President Sara Ptomey and board member Janis Jordan join Allen David from Sibme join in on one last karaoke song at the Welcome Reception. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

23


PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association of School Administrators

Clear Creek’s Greg Smith brings passion to TASA presidency by Dacia Rivers

W

hen Greg Smith graduated from college in his native Michigan, teaching jobs were few and far between. Declining enrollment had led to the closing of numerous schools across the state, and teachers with 14-plus years of experience were suddenly finding themselves out of a job. Anyone looking to enter the teaching career had no option but to relocate. Lucky for Texas, in 1981, Smith made the move to Houston ISD, where he started his career as an elementary school teacher. There was no other career choice for Smith, as he’d felt the call to serve early in life, and always knew exactly where he wanted to dedicate his time. “My primary mission in life is to help others, and what better use of your time than to help children try to fulfill their hopes, dreams and aspirations,” Smith says. The path to administration is a familiar one, and Smith moved up the ranks as so many do, from teaching at the elementary level to teaching junior high before moving into the assistant principal

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

role, followed by principal, central office employee, and then the superintendency. Currently serving as superintendent in Clear Creek ISD, Smith also spent several years in the top post in Alvin. “After I got going in the classroom, I thought there might be opportunities to expand my capacity beyond teaching 120 to 150 kids a day,” Smith says of his move to administration. “I loved the classroom, but felt like I might be able to offer an entire school something down the line.” Clear Creek ISD sits in the backyard of the Johnson Space Center, which Smith calls the land of innovation. For him, it’s a perfect place for a school district, surrounded by a community that supports education and exploration. “The thing I’m most proud of in our district, is that we have an attitude that our students will not be dependent on or defined by a single test or datapoint,” Smith says. “We’ve had a community-based accountability system for the past five years that measures how our district is doing on things that our community values.”


In Clear Creek, this community-based accountability system covers all schools in the district of more than 42,000 students. The district uses this system to present an annual report to its community of trustees, reporting on factors such as teacher recruitment and retention, safety, college preparedness, workforce readiness, and the fine arts. Smith believes this is a much more comprehensive view of how a district is doing than standardized test scores can offer. “Students cannot be defined by a single datapoint; we’re just not going to let that happen,” Smith says. “You need to make sure that you’re constantly pushing the envelope for kids, and making sure they’re ready for their future, and not our past.” Smith joined the Texas Association of School Administrators (TASA) some 30 years ago, and he has recently stepped into the president’s position, taking the reigns to lead the association over the next year. He was part of TASA’s new vision for public education, helping to draft the vision document that serves to guide administrators

into the future, and it’s work that makes him proud, and optimistic about the future. “That work created a large footprint in me and a stronger desire to embrace TASA on another level,” Smith says. “More than anything, I think TASA provides the foundation for professional learning for all aspiring leaders in Texas — not just superintendents.” Personally, Smith has appreciated the networking opportunities he’s received through his TASA membership. He’s worked with and learned from other superintendents from across the state, and as president of the group, he now hopes to share that opportunity with others. “My focus is to embrace the diversity that Texas has to offer, and learn from each other along the way,” he says. “Part of that is being able to take our experiences and share them with each other so that we establish a strong network of leaders throughout the state.”

more districts are starting to realize that change must come from within. Rather than waiting for top-down change to trickle down from the state or federal governments, districts are paving their own ways and controlling their own fates, allowing them to better engage with their respective communities, and in turn focus on the unique needs of the children they serve. This optimism keeps Smith going, as he values his role as a leader, both of Clear Creek ISD and of TASA, and continues to dedicate his time and efforts into supporting schools in his own district and beyond. “There are three kinds of people,” Smith says. “There are those who make things happen; there are those who ask ‘What is happening?’ and there are those who ask, ‘What just happened?’ I look upon my philosophy as one who makes things happen.” DACIA RIVERS is editorial director of Texas School Business.

Smith is enthusiastic about the future of public education in Texas. He believes that

SEAN COVEY

ADAM SAENZ

DAMEN LOPEZ

KIM BEARDEN

2019

ANNUAL CONFERENCE October 27-29 -- Irving Convention Center

www.txascd.org

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Thought leaders and innovators in education

Adriana Tagle encourages, rewards teachers and students to great results by James Golsan

T

hink of the best boss you’ve ever had. What made them so good? While different people appreciate different leadership styles, there’s a good chance the person you’re thinking of appreciated and celebrated your good work, rewarded you for it, and made certain they were looking out for your best interests any way they could. If you’re lucky enough to work for Adriana Tagle, principal of Banquete Elementary School in Banquete ISD, you’ve got a boss who does all that and more. Treating teachers and students well is a core tenant of Tagle’s leadership style. “One of my major initiatives coming into this position was boosting student and staff morale,” says Tagle. “I’m a firm believer that if kids are excited to be at school, it increases attendance and student achievement.” It’s a principle she believes in with teachers as well. “If an employee feels appreciated and valued, they’re more likely to come to work and give me 110%,” she says. “What we do here [education] is a mission, and in order for our staff to come to work ready to carry out that mission, I need to foster those things in a work environment.” When it comes to fostering that environment, Tagle is a strong believer in doing the small things, such as forming a personal connection with an employee and giving tokens of appreciation for outstanding work — called “bulldog bucks” — that can be turned in at the end of the school year for tickets for a prize drawing. But there are bigger gestures that Tagle points to when discussing the successful culture she’s created, even if those gestures might seem a little unorthodox. “I encourage my staff members to make positive calls to parents,” she says, and points out that often times when a parent sees a call coming in from the school, they immediately assume it’s a bad thing. Tagle wants to make sure parents are told when their students are

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doing a great job as well, and specifically requests that staff members use the school phone to make those “good” calls to change the way parents think about what an interaction with their child’s school means. It’s a practice she believes in so strongly that she doesn’t limit it to students. “I have taken the emergency contact card our nurse has for every one of our teachers, and use them to make positive phone calls to the parents of my teachers,” Tagle says, adding that she calls spouses, too, and that once it becomes clear that the call they’re receiving is not an emergency, they absolutely love hearing from her. “It’s really changed the culture,” she says. But it’s not just this outreach beyond the classroom that makes the culture at Banquete Elementary special; Tagle also makes a point of providing positive reinforcement for her students during school hours whenever possible. “Teachers can nominate them for awards, and we’ll announce their names on the

announcements, or give them treats at the end of the day,” Tagle says. Perhaps her most unique rewards, though, for both students and staff, come from her “Woot Woot Wagon.” “I use a rolling cart that I’ve decorated, and when I feel like teachers are tired or getting a little run down, I’ll get drinks and snacks from the cafeteria, load up a boom box, and go visit the teachers in their classrooms,” she says, adding that sometimes all you need is a Dr Pepper to get you through your day. “Our kids love it,” Tagle says. “It gives them a chance to appreciate how good a job their teachers are doing.” And much like the calls to parents, the Woot Woot Wagon is not just for teachers; students who have done great work receive visits from it as well. Academic success has come with the culture Tagle has implemented, but she insists it’s the relationships she has with her staff and students that are responsible for that success more than any specific academic changes she’s made on her campus. She credits the education community at large for giving

her the ideas and inspiration to make these cultural gains at Banquete Elementary, and is always looking for new ways to reward staff and students from social media groups and by networking with other school administrators. Like many in the teaching profession, Tagle did not start her career planning to be a teacher. A dual English/Spanish major in college, she planned to be a professional translator. But when an opportunity to teach high school Spanish presented itself, Tagle took it and never looked back. She’s worked at big schools and small schools, high schools and primary schools, and has truly found a home at Banquete Elementary in education leadership. With a tremendously positive workplace and school culture established and academic success to go along with it, Tagle is more than deserving of the spotlight. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

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PRESIDENT PROFILE

Texas Association of Rural Schools

New TARS president ready to advocate for Texas’ rural schools by James Golsan

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ew Texas Association of Rural Schools (TARS) President Rebecca McCutchen is a natural fit to lead one of the leading advocacy organizations for the state’s rural schools. A native of Van Horn, she’s spent her whole life (save a few brief stopovers) in small towns, and believes strongly in the values Texas’ rural schools instill in their students. “I think the values we teach students in our rural schools are incredibly important, and I want to see those schools continue,” McCutchen says, adding that district consolidation is a semiconstant specter for those in the rural schools community. What is without question is that the schools and districts with memberships in TARS will have a strong advocate as long as McCutchen is in charge, even if education wasn’t the first field she imagined for herself. “I thought I wanted to go to vet school [in college],” the Texas A&M University graduate says. “But I kind of fell into teaching along the way and have loved it from day one.”

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

A teacher since 1997, McCutchen has worked in virtually every strata of public education in Texas. Her first position was as an agricultural teacher in Sierra Blanca ISD, a West Texas community not far from the Mexican border or her hometown of Van Horn. As is often the case in districts as small as Sierra Blanca, being the “ag teacher” meant teaching more than just agriculture. She taught psychology at both the middle and high school levels, as well as a journalism class (which published a school newspaper while she taught the course) during her six years at Sierra Blanca, before deciding to move to a bigger district. “I taught at Midland ISD for one year,” McCutchen says, and describes the experience (with clear understatement) of moving from a 1A district to a 6A district as “a little eye-opening.” Deciding that she was better suited to working in smaller communities, McCutchen, then still an agriculture teacher, took a job with Alpine ISD, where she moved into special education. It was during those first few years at Alpine ISD that she completed her master’s degree and became an educational diagnostician, before


transitioning into an administrative role as a special education director for a co-op serving 11 school districts in the area surrounding Alpine.

primary focuses for her organization: continuing to advocate for rural schools at the Texas Legislature, and expanding TARS’ membership.

McCutchen held that position for seven years before an opportunity to interview for Alpine’s superintendent position presented itself. McCutchen is now entering her fifth year as superintendent of Alpine ISD, and her first as president of TARS. Much like her career in education, her relationship with the organization she now leads began almost by accident.

“One of the main things we want to do is be present and advocate during the legislative session for adequate and fair funding for our rural schools,” McCutchen says, expressing concern about how changes to Texas’ public school finance system enacted during the 2019 legislative session could impact TARS’ constituency.

“A couple of years ago I was at TASA Midwinter, and a neighboring superintendent asked if I wanted to serve on our (TARS) board, and it was a breakfast meeting, so I said sure!” McCutchen jokes. Once again, it proved to be a natural fit, and as she assumes her role as TARS president, McCutchen says she has two

“One of the big things we want to address is small and mid-size school funding, which was an adjustment that was previously built into the school finance formula. [With the 2019 changes], it’s now considered a set aside, which could go away at any time, so we’d really like to see that put back into the formula.”

Where organizational growth is concerned, McCutchen enters her presidency on the heels of strong gains in that arena for TARS, as during the last year the organization has grown from 306 membership districts to 330. “We’d love to push that up to 400 if possible!” McCutchen says, but is quick to add they’d be happy with 360 or 380. It’s a message of growth and advocacy she’ll have plenty of opportunities to promote over the next year as president, including a speaking engagement at the Texas Tribune’s TribFest in September. Given her passion for rural schools and rural school advocacy, it’s going to be tough for her audiences — and potential new TARS members — not to believe in what McCutchen will be saying. JAMES GOLSAN is a writer and education professional based in Austin.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

29


REGIONAL VIEW

Education service center programs & practices

Crisis response teams: serving in a time of need by Dr. April Estrada

T

hey’re the calls we dread the most — when we learn that a student or fellow educator has just lost his or her life.

The heartbreaking news can come with the ringing of a phone or in the ping of an incoming text. You stop what you’re doing; you’re hit with a gnawing feeling in the pit of your stomach; your heart sinks. Region 10 Education Service Center’s crisis response team received not one but two of those messages within hours of each other on a cold winter day early last year. They’re the kind of calls that come more often than people realize. The grief washed over us like the impact of twin tidal waves. We assembled, formed our plan, and dispersed to the campuses where we knew we would find what we’ve unfortunately seen many times before: hurting, confused, shell-shocked communities of students, educators, parents and law enforcement officials. Not again. Be it by suicide, car accident, illness or gun violence, death can visit any campus at any time, and it’s the Region 10 crisis response team’s job to assist in the aftermath. In fact, regional service centers are a source for literally dozens of services our educators can’t function without. While we work to prevent these types of tragedies, there is nowhere else we would be than side by side with our districts and charters when they need us most.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

When a superintendent calls to tell us about the crisis unfolding on one of their campuses, I find I often offer a quick, “I’m just so sorry.” I know in that moment, however, that’s not what’s truly needed; the administrator on the other end of the line wants answers. What do I do now? What should I do in the next 10 minutes … and tonight … and first thing in the morning? Superintendents and principals find their daily duties radically change in a time of crisis. Suddenly there’s the need for frequent interactions with hurting family members, scared students and curious journalists. These are the moments administrators most need the support we are committed to delivering. The nearly two dozen Region 10 professionals who make up our crisis team are trained to offer everything from emotional support and grief counseling to help with food deliveries and the facilitating of visits with therapy dogs. We’re among the first assistance providers on scene, and often the last to leave. We return consistently for days, weeks and months to offer follow-up support and assistance. Our crisis response team came together a little more than two years


Region 10 consultants provide services at our offices in Richardson, a suburb of Dallas, as well as in field locations across the R10 area. We proudly serve more than 865,000 students and 106,000 school staff, of which 56,000 are teachers in more than 130 ISDs, charters and private schools across 10 north Texas counties. ago. We were being called on at an increasing rate, and we realized we had trained professionals who were already prepared to serve in a stepped-up capacity. Our communities needed our help, and we took action. We started by pulling together colleagues from across our ESC who had critical crisis response skills — counselors, school psychologists, social workers and behavior specialists. We asked ourselves, “Who has experience dealing with mental health issues? Who has either worked with grief counselors or provided counseling themselves? Who has a passion for this special work?” We discovered that people from across several of our departments had experience in and passion for this type of work and wanted to be involved, and we have been happy to put their skills to good use. Of the many positives that have resulted from bringing our team together, the cohesion we’ve been able to achieve within

the service center stands out as our biggest breakthrough. In times of crisis, we always provide help, but we do so now based on a plan. We make sure the right hand knows what the left hand is doing, and often that level of coordination makes all the difference. We no longer have Region 10 staff members arriving on a campus to deliver professional development only to be surprised by and unprepared to handle an unfolding drama. The crisis response team keeps the rest of the Region 10 staff informed and prepared to deliver the best service possible. One of the challenges for colleagues at other service centers who may not maintain a crisis team is, first, to take stock of the services you’re already providing. You may have elements of a crisis response team that are simply waiting to be brought together. Second, after your team has been assembled and trained as a cohesive unit, make sure you get the word out that you’re available

to assist. Administrators in your districts cannot call on help from teams that they don’t know exist. Finally, don’t wait for the next crisis before you pull your team together. Unfortunately, based on data from across the country, you can be sure it’s coming or is already happening in your community. Certainly the need to serve and support your communities during these tragic times is critical. Besides the opportunity my team and I have to make a difference for hurting people, we’ve seen another plus: Across Region 10, we’ve been blessed with the opportunity to deepen professional and personal relationships with our districts. There’s nothing like the bond that develops between peers who put their shoulders into a crisis and get through it together. It brings my team real satisfaction to know we’ve been there for our colleagues — that we’ve cried and prayed and worked alongside them in their darkest hours. Sadly, the tough times come for us all. It feels good to know that, when they hit, there are like-minded professionals ready to come together, to be of service in a time of need. We can do this, and we do do this. It’s one more way to serve … and isn’t that why we’re here? DR. APRIL ESTRADA leads the Region 10 ESC Special Populations Services team.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

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Calendar Professional development & events

S TA N D O U T F R O M T H E C R OW D ! Get premium placement and get noticed! For a nominal fee, you can showcase your conference, workshop or seminar on the opening page as a Featured Event. Contact Ann Halstead at ahalstead@tasanet.org for more details. O C TO BE R October 1 ED311 Back to School Workshop Brazos County Expo Center, Bryan For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigestevents.com Cost: $165, registration only; $185, registration and workbook. TRTA District 7 Fall Conference First Baptist Church, Nacogdoches For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org TRTA District 11 Fall Conference ESC Region 11, Fort Worth For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 2 TRTA District 9 Fall Conference ESC Region 9, Wichita Falls For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 3 ED311 Back to School Workshop Friendswood ISD Annex, Friendswood For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigestevents.com Cost: $165, registration only; $185, registration and workbook. TRTA District 5 Fall Conference St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Beaumont For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org TRTA District 17 Fall Conference ESC Region 17, Lubbock For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 6-8 TEPSA Assistant Principals Conference Omni Southpark, Austin For more info, (512) 478-5268 or

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

(800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org Cost: Early registration (by September 4): Members, $249; nonmembers, $309. Regular registration (after September 4): Members, $299; nonmembers, $359. October 7-8 TASPA Fall Support Staff Conference Embassy Suites, San Marcos For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: Early registration (through Sept. 6): Members, $175; nonmembers, $200; retired, $95. Regular registration (Sept. 7-23): Members, $195; nonmembers, $220; retired, $115. Late registration (Sept. 24-Oct. 7): Members, $210; nonmembers, $235; retired, $130. October 8-9 TASBO/TCASE Synergy 2019 Conference Embassy Suites, San Marcos For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: $295. TRTA District 19 Fall Conference Wyndham Airport, El Paso For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 9 TASA /N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Lubbock Area Cohort (session 2 of 6) Frenship ISD, Wolfforth For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TRTA District 6 Fall Conference ESC Region 6, Huntsville For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org

October 10

October 16

ED311 Back to School Workshop Convention Center, New Braunfels For more info, (512) 478-2113. www.legaldigestevents.com Cost: $165, registration only; $185, registration and workbook.

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio Cohort and Victoria/Corpus Christi Cohort (session 2 of 6) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown, and Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

TRTA District 15 Fall Conference First United Methodist Church, Brady For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 10-11 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XXIX (session 1 of 3) Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org October 11 TCWSE East Texas Conference University of Texas, Tyler For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tcwse.org Cost: $30. October 14-15 TASSP Leadership Academy Hilton Palacio del Rio, San Antonio For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Cost: $246. October 15 TRTA District 4 Fall Conference Memorial Church of Christ, Houston For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 15-17 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 1 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. October 15-17 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 1 TASA Headquarters, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA member, $750; nonmember, $850

TRTA District 3 Fall Conference Bible Baptist Church, Beeville For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 17 TASA /N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas Area Cohort (session 2 of 6) Allen High School, Allen For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASB Best Practices Workshop: Long-Range Facility Planning TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org TASPA Certification Fundamentals Workshop Red Oak ISD, Red Oak For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: Members, $110; nonmembers, $135. TRTA District 8 Fall Conference ESC Region 8, Pittsburg For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org TRTA District 16 Fall Conference ESC Region 16, Amarillo For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 18 TRTA District 1 Fall Conference Knapp Medical Center Conference Room, Weslaco For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 22 TASA Assistant Principals Lead /N2 Learning ership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 2 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress


For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASBO Operations and Facility Masters Conference Embassy Suites, Denton For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $225; nonmembers, $275; associate members, $400; associate nonmembers, $550. October 22-24 TASA Curriculum Management Audit Training, Level 2 TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $750; nonmembers, $850. October 24 TASPA-ESC Region 1 Mini-HR Conference The Pearl Resort, South Padre Island For more info, (512) 494-9353. TRTA District 20 Fall Conference St. Peter the Apostle Catholic Church, Boerne For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org October 24-25 TASB Conference for Administrative Professionals TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org October 27-28 Texas ASCD Transformational Principal Leadership Academy – Cypress-Fairbanks ISD (session 3 of 3) Convention Center, Irving For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org Texas ASCD Transformational Principal Leadership Academy – Round Rock ISD (session 3 of 3) Convention Center, Irving For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org TASSP/LYS Fundamental 5 National Summit Airport Hilton, Austin For more info, (512) 443-2100. www.tassp.org Cost: Early Bird registration (through Oct. 11), $246; after Oct. 11, $296.

October 27-29 ASCD Annual Conference Convention Center, Irving For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org October 28 TASBO Accounting and Finance Symposium Marriott Town Square, Sugar Land For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $295; nonmembers, $345.

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $215; nonmembers, $265.

For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $215; nonmembers, $265.

November 4-5

November 7

TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 2 of 4) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995.

TASB Fall Legal Seminar ESC Region 14, Abilene For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TRTA District 10 Fall Conference Dallas Baptist University, Dallas For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org

TASB/TASPA Texas School HR Administrators Academy Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Cost: By Oct. 8, $385; after Oct. 8, $450.

October 30

November 5

TRTA District 2 Fall Conference Holiday Inn Airport, Corpus Christi For more info, (800) 880-1650. www.trta.org

N OV E M B E R November 1 TASB Fall Legal Seminar TASB offices, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org Texas Assessment Conference Austin Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.txassessmentcon.org. Cost: $195 (through Oct. 18). November 3-4 TEPSA Grow Leadership Conference Hilton Hotel, Rockwall For more info, (512) 478-5268 or (800) 252-3621. www.tepsa.org Cost: Early registration (by October 4): $359. Regular registration (after October 4): $409. November 4 TASBO Academy: Payroll Boot Camp Embassy Suites, San Marcos For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $215; nonmembers, $265. TASBO Academy: Personnel Boot Camp Embassy Suites, San Marcos

TASPA Workshop: Certification Fundamentals Red Oak ISD, Red Oak For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: TASPA members, $110; nonmembers, $135. November 7-8

TASB Fall Legal Seminar ESC Region 5, Beaumont For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

TASBO Purchasing Academy Texas A&M University Hotel and Conference Center, College Station For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $295; nonmembers, $345.

November 5-6

November 11

TASBO Personnel and Payroll Academy Embassy Suites, San Marcos For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $295; nonmembers, $345.

TASBO Accounting and Finance Symposium Embassy Suites, Denton For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: Members, $295; nonmembers, $345.

November 5-7

November 11-12

Texas ASCD Instructional Rounds Round Rock ISD, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

TASA Workshop: Curriculum Management Planning TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $500.

November 6-7 Learning Forward Texas Workshop: Tips, Tool and Techniques 1 Comal ISD, New Braunfels For more info, (512) 266-3086. www.learningforwardtexas.org TASA First-Time Superintendents Academy (session 3 of 4) Marriott North, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: All four sessions: Members, $795; nonmembers, $895. Any one session: Members/nonmembers, $295. TASBO Academy: Purchasing Boot Camp Texas A&M University Hotel and Conference Center, College Station

November 12-14 Texas ASCD Instructional Rounds – Exclusive for Round Rock ISD Round Rock ISD, Round Rock For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org November 13 TASB Fall Legal Seminar ESC Region 7, Kilgore For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. www.tasb.org

> See Calendar, page 34 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

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> Continued from page 33 November 13-15 TASA Workshop: Curriculum Writing TASA offices, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: TASA members, $450; nonmembers, $600. November 14 TASB Fall Legal Seminar Texas A&M University, Commerce For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-0272. www.tasb.org TASBO CSRM Course: Handling School Risks Allen ISD, Allen For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

November 20-21

December 5

Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XXIX (session 2 of 3) Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org

TASBO Workshop: EDGAR and Texas School District Procurement ESC Region 2, Corpus Christi For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $205; nonmembers, $255.

D EC E M B E R December 2 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Dallas Area Cohort (session 3 of 6) Allen High School, Allen For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. December 3

TASPA Workshop: Documentation Basics Little Elm ISD, Little Elm For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: Members, $110; nonmembers, $135.

TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Houston Area Cohort (session 3 of 6) Cypress-Fairbanks ISD, Cypress For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

November 14-15

December 4

Texas Counseling Association Professional Growth Conference Convention Center, Fort Worth For more info, (512) 472-3403 or (800) 580-8144. www.txca.org Cost: Pre-registration (until Oct. 25): TCA professional/affiliate member: $210; TCA new professional/student/retired member: $145; professional/ affiliate non-member: $420; new professional/student/ retired non-member, $260. On-site registration: TCA professional/affiliate member: $260; TCA new professional/ student/retired member: $195; professional/affiliate non-member, $470; new professional/student/retired non-member: $310.

TASBO CSRM Course: Administering School Risks TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org

November 20 TASBO Workshop: Investment Training ESC Region 15, San Angelo For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $205; nonmembers, $255.

December 4-6 Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented Conference Marriott Hill Country Resort and Spa, San Antonio For more info, (512) 499-8248. www.txgifted.org December 4-7 TAHPERD Annual Convention Convention Center, Arlington For more info, (512) 459-1299. www.tahperd.org Cost: Early Bird registration (by Oct. 1): Professional and associate members, $125; retired members, $45; student members, $35. Pre-registration (by Nov. 1): Professional and associate members, $145; retired members, $45; student members, $35. Late registration (after Nov. 1): Professional and associate members, $165; retired members, $55; student members, $45.

TASBO Workshop: Leading Organizational Change TASBO offices, Austin For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $205; nonmembers, $255. December 10 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Lubbock Area Cohort (session 3 of 6) Frenship ISD, Wolfforth For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. December 11 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Austin/San Antonio Cohort (session 3 of 6) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions. TASPA/Legal Digest Personnel Law Conference for School Administrators Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org December 11-13 TASPA Winter Conference Renaissance Hotel, Austin For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org December 12-13 Texas Association of Mid-Size Schools Annual Legislative Conference Lakeway Resort and Spa, Austin For more info, (512) 346-2177. www.midsizeschools.org December 18 TASA/N2 Learning Assistant Principal Leadership Academy, Corpus Christi/Victoria Cohort (session 3 of 6) Victoria ISD, Victoria For more info, (512) 47i7-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,000 for all six sessions.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

JANUARY January 8 TASPA Workshop: Personnel Skills for Supervisors of NonExempt Staff Pearland ISD, Pearland For more info, (512) 494-9353. www.taspa.org Cost: TASPA members, $110; nonmembers, $135. January 9-10 Texas ASCD Curriculum Leadership Academy XXIX (session 3 of 3) Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD, Bedford For more info, (512) 477-8200 or (800) 717-2723. www.txascd.org January 13-14 TASBO Workshop: Bud to Boss Katy ISD, Katy For more info, (512) 462-1711. www.tasbo.org Cost: TASBO members, $490; nonmembers, $540. January 14-15 TASA Academy for Transformational Leadership (session 3) Georgetown ISD, Georgetown For more info, (512) 477-6361. www.tasanet.org Cost: $1,995. January 17-19 TAHPERD Annual Leadership Conference Conference Center, Granbury For more info, (512) 459-1299. www.tahperd.org January 26-29 TASA Midwinter Conference Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 477-6361. tasamidwinter.org January 29 TASA/TASB/TASBO Budget Cohort for Texas District Leaders (session 2 of 4) Convention Center, Austin For more info, (512) 467-0222 or (800) 580-8272. Cost: $3,000 for up to three participants for all four sessions; each additional participant, $750. â—„


Who’s News > Continued from page 18

Mesquite ISD The new principal of Henrie Elementary School, Lisa Lovato, is a 19-year educator who has led Rogers Elementary School in Dallas ISD for the past eight years. She has a bachelor’s degree from the University of North Texas and a master’s degree in educational leadership and policy studies from the University of Texas at Arlington.

Oakwood ISD The district’s new superintendent is Russell Holden, who comes to Oakwood from Cayuga ISD, where he was high school principal.

Pearland ISD Miller Junior High’s new principal is Tony Barcelona, who was the school’s assistant principal since 2016. Prior to that, he held the same position at Pearland Junior High South and Silverlake Elementary. He has a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and a master’s degree in educational management from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. The new director of purchasing is Lytrina Bob. Previously a senior contracts administrator for Harris County, procurement manager for the Harris County Department of Education and buyer for the University of Texas Health Science Center, she is a graduate of Lamar University. Now serving as director of information security is Emilio Garcia, a 21-year employee of the district who has worked as a network coordinator and technology technician and manager. Dawn Lyssy has been named

director of elementary education. The former teacher and reading and English language arts specialist holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Texas at Arlington. Challenger Elementary School begins the new academic year with Becky Morris as principal. She comes to Pearland from Deer Park ISD, where she

was an assistant principal. An educator for 15 years, she received her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Phoenix.

Round Rock ISD Callison Elementary School’s new principal is Penny Oates, a 20-year educator who has served as assistant principal of Bluebonnet Elementary since 2017.

Laura Reeves has been

promoted from assistant director of educational technology to director of educational technology. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Lamar University and a master’s degree in instructional technology from the University of Houston-Clear Lake and is at work on her doctorate in curriculum and instruction at Texas A&M University. The district’s new director of secondary instruction is former Pearland High School assistant principal Bonnie Scheidt. The 17-year education veteran received her bachelor’s degree from Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State University) and her master’s degree in educational administration from Lamar University.

Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD Superintendent Daniel King, who has led the district for 12 years, will retire at the end of September.

Pleasant Grove ISD Pleasant Grove High School’s new principal is Todd Marshall. He joined the district last year as the school’s assistant principal.

Red Oak ISD Ann Dixon has accepted the role of interim

Jessica Schock has accepted

the role of principal of Old Town Elementary School. She served as the school’s assistant principal since 2015.

Royse City ISD Emily Hays has begun her new job as

assistant principal of May Elementary School. An educator for 17 years, she received her bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University and her master’s degree in educational administration from Texas A&M University at Commerce. The new principal of Cherry Intermediate School is Kara Onken, who comes to Royse City from Garland ISD, where she was a principal. She earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Rusk ISD Former Rusk High School principal Scott Schwartz has been promoted to director of auxiliary services, a newly created position. Ronny Snow has accepted the position of

Rusk High School principal, coming to his new job from Malakoff ISD, where he was principal of Malakoff Elementary School and the district’s director of security.

superintendent, adding Red Oak ISD to the list of 19 other districts in which she has served in the same capacity during her 45 years as an educator. In addition, she has worked as a speech pathologist and superintendent, and with the Texas Comptroller’s Office and Texas Legislative Budget Board.

San Angelo ISD

Riesel ISD

San Angelo native Jennifer Crutchfield has been named the district’s director of communications, a position she held on an interim basis since January. Prior to that, she was director of advanced academics and fine arts and principal of the Carver Learning Center. She received two bachelor’s degrees from the University of Texas and a master’s degree from the University of Houston-Clear Lake.

Brandon Cope has been

promoted from district high school principal to superintendent. An alumnus of Riesel School, he began working for the district in 2015 after beginning his career in Waco ISD. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Baylor University. The district has selected Jeff McNair as the first chief of police and director of school safety for its newly created police department. He comes to Riesel from the Dallas County Marshal Service, where he was an assistant chief.

A new band director is in place for Lake View High School. Joshua Bailey, who most recently was band director at Jim Ned ISD’s Tuscola High School, previously taught music and band in Rotan ISD. He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington.

> See Who’s News, page 40 Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

35


Photo Feature

TASSP SUMMER WORKSHOP WELCOMES TEXAS’ SECONDARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS In June, the Texas Association of Secondary School Principals hosted its annual summer workshop in Austin, asking attendees to remember why they entered the field in an effort to inspire and motivate.

▲ Matt Russell, principal, Allen ISD, and

▲ TASSP members, ready to learn.

Dr. Herb Cox, principal, Midway ISD.

▲ Campus Teams working at the workshop.

◄ Busy times

in the Exhibit Showcase.

▲ Members stroll through the exhibit hall. 36

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

▲ The Texas Association of Student Councils visits with

principals about making a positive impact on campus culture.


▲ Cindy Jackson, TASSP associate executive director, visits with Vi Nguyen, Texas All-State Academic Team Recipient.

▲ Attendees at the Women in Leadership Luncheon and Seminar.

▲ TASSP President Dr. Herb Cox addresses attendees.

▲ Archie McAfee, TASSP executive

director, Dr. Herb Cox, TASSP president, and Carol Ibarra, Mentoring Minds honor Tim Lambert, Texas Principal of the Year, Texas Middle School, Texarkana ISD.

▲ Jamie Vollmer gives his keynote, The Great Conversation.

▲ Jim Walsh greets TASSP members at the TASSP/Ed311 Law Conference.

▲ Attendees at the general session. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

37


STUDENT VOICES

Taking flight in Irving ISD’s School of Aviation Science by Angie Maravi Campos

W

hen I moved to Irving High School my sophomore year, I had in mind that I wanted to become an engineer. Because I took an engineering class at my previous school that was more focused on civil and mechanical engineering, I only knew how to design models of cars and houses. However, the process of building any object with my hands, perfecting it and learning how it worked fascinated me. So, I was fine with studying other types of engineering. When my counselor recom-

mended the aviation program at Irving High, I didn’t hesitate to take the class. At that time, I thought the School of Aviation Science would simply teach me everything about the aviation industry, and while it certainly did, I never expected it to have a strong influence in my life. During the first weeks of my sophomore year, I was mostly studying and memorizing the parts of an airplane. I knew these things were essential to designing and flying airplanes. After all, the Wright Brothers had to study

Angie Maravi Campos poses in front a fixedwing single engine at the DFW Airport Aviation and Transportation Career Expo. Angie explains, “There is not an actual name for this plane because it was made by the man who let me take a picture of it. His name was Stephen, and he was an Air Force veteran.”

“Student Voices” is a regularly featured column in Texas School Business. It’s an opportunity for students of all ages from across Texas to share their experiences in K-12 public schools. Contact Editorial Director Dacia Rivers at drivers@texasschoolbusiness.com for publishing guidelines.

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Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019


weeks to design ANG18 and another two to test it. Although the majority of the time I was on the computer, writing and changing numbers, I learned the extensive math, time and patience behind designing and perfecting an airplane.

▲ Angie Maravi Campos assembles a Cessna 180 model made of balsa wood.

aerodynamics to design the first airplane and then fly it. After mastering the basics, our instructor challenged us to build our airplane in a design software called X-Plane Maker, and then test it in the X-Plane flight simulator. This was my first experience designing something from scratch. I chose to design a small passenger airplane similar to the King Air 350. I remember spending the first days trying to correctly calculate weight and wing calculations to input them in the software. With lots of scribbles in my engineering notebook and the help of our instructor, Mr. Tony Lech, I had all the calculations necessary to begin designing the airframe of my airplane. It took me two

As an aeronautical engineer and pilot, Mr. Lech knew that our class would like to design other things. During the fall, we created mini hot air balloons out of tissue paper and built a hydraulic-powered robotic arm to learn the different uses of hydraulics on airplanes. However, the most memorable project was building a 50-inch Skyhawk Cessna 172. Mr. Lech gave us the blueprints and six weeks to finish it. First, we delineated each of the pieces onto cardboard with carbon paper. After outlining each piece, we cut them with a utility knife and separated the pieces by codes. We then began to construct the wings followed by the fuselage and vertical and horizontal stabilizers. The entire process took approximately three weeks, including coming to class in our free time. After two weeks, we assembled the parts and finally saw an airplane. I remember being so happy to see five weeks of work by my partner and I come together. Because of that, I realized that I wanted to become an aeronautical engineer. Last year as a junior, I changed my flight class to drone engineering since I wanted to design more. As a class, we constructed

a Boeing 757 and a Bell UH-1Y Venom in AutoCAD. However, one of the greatest experiences was participating in the Real World Design Challenge. This national competition “provides high school students the opportunity to work on real-world engineering challenges in a team environment.” I was one of seven students who made the team. We were tasked with creating an unmanned aerial system (UAS) to survey plant health in an urban area. Moreover, we would need to document our team formation, design process, mission performance and a business case in 80 pages or less. Since we didn’t know each other, we spent the first day introducing ourselves and explaining the reasons we compete. We bonded and made it our goal to go to nationals. After that, we researched existing UAS that survey plant health. This took us about two weeks at least, and honestly, it was overwhelming. After sifting through a large amount of designs, we began brainstorming which one would be the most effective for the challenge. We realized that the fixed-wing design was used highly to survey plant health in large farms. Because of that, we decided to use a Hybrid VTOL design because it has both fixed-wing and multirotor characteristics. My teammate Gabriel and I were in charge of the design of “JEAG 19,” while our teammates Erika and Stahl were in charge of researching sensors for the surveying task. Caleb and Javier were in charge of developing a surveying path in the urban areas, and Jason was in charge of the business case. We would work on the challenge during the two periods of class we had and met after school on Mondays and Fridays for an hour or two. Since I was in charge of designing, you would assume I did more math than anything. And while I did, writing it out was far more extensive. After submitting an 80-page document of our solution for the challenge, we won the state competition and were able to travel to Washington, D.C., to represent Texas and present our design in front of judges. While we didn’t win nationals, I met students from many states and other countries and was exposed to how engineers and industries create their products and are part of an amazing team. If it weren’t for the School of Aviation Science at my school, I would have never had such a realistic experience in my life, or the opportunity to construct a 50-inch Skyhawk Cessna 172, or the chance to learn to fly small aircraft. More importantly, I wouldn’t have more firmly defined my career goals — to become an aeronautical engineer.

▲ Angie Maravi Campos and her teammates advanced to the national level of the Real World Design Challenge this spring. Team members are (from left) Caleb Fancher, Erika Gamboa, Jason Bernal, Javier Ramirez, Angie, Gabriel Sanchez and Anthony Stahl.

ANGIE MARAVI Campos is a senior at Irving High School. Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

39


Who’s News > Continued from page 35

The district’s new financial officer is Lisa Svoboda, former principal of Sealy Junior High. She is a graduate of Texas A&M University.

Darius Flowers, new principal of Bowie

Laura Villaflor, new principal of Sealy Junior

Elementary School, most recently served as assistant principal of Lake View High School, his alma mater. A graduate of Texas Tech University with a master’s degree from Angelo State University, he has been with the district for six years. Now serving as executive director of federal and state programs is Stephanie Free, most recently executive director of special programs. A 29-year educator, she holds two bachelor’s degrees from Lubbock Christian University and a master’s degree in education from Angelo State University. Her doctorate in education was awarded from Texas Tech University. Lauri Herndon has been promoted from

assistant principal of Lee Middle School to principal of Alta Loma Elementary School. She has spent 22 of her 23 years as an educator in San Angelo ISD and holds a bachelor’s degree from Angelo State University. Her master’s degree was awarded from Abilene Christian University. Jason Jones, former band director at Burnet

ISD’s Burnet High School, now holds that position at Central High School. Prior to his time in Burnet, he was director of bands at Early High School in Early ISD and Panhandle High School in Panhandle ISD. He is a graduate of Howard Payne University.

San Diego ISD Former San Benito CISD director of instructional implementation, Rodrigo Pena, is now superintendent of San Diego ISD.

Savoy ISD Savoy ISD has selected Danny Henderson as principal of Savoy Elementary School. He has more than 13 years of experience as an administrator in Blue Ridge and Pottsboro ISDs.

Sealy ISD Mary Gajewski, a 23-year employee of the

district, has been promoted from principal of Sealy Elementary School to director of special programs for Sealy ISD. Sarah Johnson is the new principal of Sealy

Elementary School. A former assistant principal, she has been with the district for 14 years. Chris Summers, newly-appointed assistant

superintendent, comes to Sealy from West Oso ISD, where he was director of curriculum and instruction. He previously worked in Hays CISD and holds a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from the University of Houston and a doctorate in educational leadership from Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi.

40

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

High, joins the district from Spring Branch ISD, where she was assistant principal of Stratford High School. Her master’s degree was earned from the University of Houston and her doctorate in educational administration from Texas A&M University.

Seguin ISD Five new administrators have been named for the district. Nikki Bittings, principal, Barnes Middle

School;

Chandra Bloch, associate principal, Seguin

High School; Laura Flack, principal, Vogel Elementary School; Rhonda Jubela, interim principal, Ball Early Childhood Center; Allison Pape, academic dean, Briesemeister Middle School.

Silsbee ISD New Silsbee High School principal Scott Schwartz is a 23-year educator with 16 years of experience as an administrator. He was principal of Rusk High School in Rusk ISD since 2008.

Socorro ISD (El Paso) Now serving as principal of Campestre Elementary School is Jennifer Avila, who joined SISD in 2003 as a fourth grade teacher. She went on to work as a literacy leader before becoming the district’s ESL/bilingual director. For the past three years, she has been an assistant principal at Eastlake High School. Benjamin Baldner is the new

principal of the Paseo Del Norte School. He comes to El Paso from Ohio, where he was principal of Austintown Middle School. Prior to that, he spent eight years in Phoenix, Arizona, as a teacher, instructional coach and assistant principal. The new director of athletic services is Jimmy Calderon, who for the past nine years has been athletic coordinator and head football coach at Eastlake High School. He held the same position at Riverside High School and coached in Giddings and Houston ISDs. He is a graduate of Sul Ross State University. Jina Eksaengsri is now principal of Lujan-

Chavez Elementary School, returning to her native El Paso from the United Arab Emirates, where she was an academic vice principal. She has been an educator for 16 years and holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas and a master’s degree in educational administration from Texas State University. Melissa Martinez has

been named principal of Montwood Middle School. A former assistant principal at Sanchez Middle School, she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Texas at El Paso and is a doctoral candidate in educational leadership from Concordia University.

Spring Branch ISD The district announces the hiring of Jennifer Blaine as superintendent. She brings almost three decades of experience, 19 of those with Spring Branch ISD, to her new position, including stints as a principal, executive administrator and associate superintendent. She was most recently associate superintendent for talent and operations. A graduate of the University of Iowa, she received her master’s and doctoral degrees from Sam Houston State University.

Stephenville ISD Sarah Broz is the new

assistant principal at Chamberlin Elementary School, coming to SISD from Alpine ISD, where she served in the same capacity. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas Woman’s University. Stephenville High School’s new assistant principal, Jackie Hamilton, comes to Stephenville from Glen Rose ISD. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Tarleton State University. The district’s new executive director of finance and operations is Teri Hodges, a former lead counselor in Denton ISD. The 13year educator earned her bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University and her master’s degree from Dallas Baptist University. Now serving as executive director of curriculum and instruction is Kelly Magin, an


educator for 18 years. She holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Tarleton State University. Central Elementary School has welcomed Esther Tucker as principal. A teacher and assistant principal at Chamberlin Elementary for 10 years, she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Tarleton State University.

Tomball ISD Decker Prairie Elementary School began the school year with Brenda Blackmon as principal. She was assistant principal of Lakewood Elementary since 2015.

Victoria ISD Former assistant superintendent of human resources Gregory Bonewald has accepted the position of deputy superintendent of operations. He has been with VISD for five years, previously serving as Wimberley ISD’s high school principal. He is a graduate of Concordia University with a master’s degree in education administration from Texas State University and a doctorate in education from the University of Texas. Clark Motley is now Victoria

ISD’s executive director of human resources, having been promoted from principal of Victoria East High School.

Greg Chappell, a 25-year educator who spent

the past 15 years with Tomball ISD, has retired. His last position with the district was principal of Rosehill Elementary. JoAnn Colson’s retirement has brought to a

close a 34-year career in education, the past 17 in Tomball ISD. She was most recently principal of Decker Prairie Elementary. Now serving as principal of Oakcrest Intermediate School is George Flores, who joins the district from Spring ISD, where he was principal of Bailey Middle School. Tomball ISD has opened the Early Excellence Academy, providing childcare for fulltime district employees, and has placed Holly Morrison as assistant director. She was previously secretary of the curriculum, instruction and assessment department. Megan Parker, formerly an

instructional specialist, has been chosen as director of the new Early Excellence Academy. The new principal of Rosehill Elementary School is Gloria Vasquez, who comes to Tomball from CypressFairbanks ISD, where she was principal of Frazier Elementary.

United ISD (Laredo) The district’s new director of bilingual education is Maria Arambula-Ruiz, a 28-year employee of UISD. She is a graduate of Laredo State University and Texas A&M International University, where she received a master’s degree in education. She spent the past eight years as principal of Kazen Elementary School.

Warren ISD Former Stafford MSD assistant superintendent Tammy Boyette now leads Warren ISD as superintendent.

Waxahachie ISD Bonny Cain has accepted the position of

superintendent. She had been serving in the top job on an interim basis. Waxahachie ISD has created a new position, director of fine arts, and hired Phillip Morgan to fill it. He comes to Waxahachie from Goose Creek CISD, where he was director of visual and performing arts and previously served in a similar capacity in Waco ISD. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Texas at Arlington and a master’s degree from Jones International University and is at work on his doctorate in administration and educational leadership at Lamar University.

Wimberley ISD Wimberley ISD has hired a new chief financial officer. Moises Santiago comes to his new job with 12 years of experience, most recently holding the same position in Uvalde ISD. He earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from Sul Ross State University.

Woodville ISD Lisa Meysembourg, former superintendent of

Schulenburg ISD, has accepted the position of superintendent of Woodville ISD.

Ysleta ISD (El Paso) Sylvia Belmonte, formerly the school nurse

at Lancaster Elementary, is now the district’s director of student health services. She began

her career in 2005 at El Paso’s University Medical Center and served as a clinical nursing instructor at the University of Texas at El Paso. Superintendent Xavier De La Torre has been named chair of the Texas Urban Council of Superintendents (TUCS). De La Torre has led Ysleta ISD since 2014 and has 32 years of experience as an educator. TUCS is a network of the state’s largest urban school districts — Aldine, Austin, Corpus Christi, Dallas, El Paso, Houston, San Antonio and Ysleta. Blanca Lopez has been named director of

secondary personnel after serving in that position on an interim basis for the 201819 school year. A 26-year educator, she holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of El Paso and a doctorate in curriculum from New Mexico State University. Shelley Smallwood, former instructional

technology initiatives coordinator, is now director of innovative learning. An educator since 1991, she received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Texas at El Paso. The following new principals are in place for the district: Maritza Balderrama, LeBarron Park Elementary School; Amy Bejarano-Alarcon, Del Valle Middle School; Juan Guzman, Scotsdale Elementary School; Stephanie Lahrman, North Star Elementary School; Angela Reyna, Parkland Middle School; Michelle Romero, Tierra Del Sol Elementary School; Javier Salgado, Desert View Middle School; Norma Sierra, Mesa Vista Elementary School; Jacob Valtierra, Riverside Middle School; Irene Youngs, Pebble Hills Elementary School. ◄

Who’s News Do you have good news to share about your district? Send news items for Who’s News directly to news@texasschoolbusiness.com Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

41


THE BACK PAGE

Which direction are you headed? by Riney Jordan

S

everal years ago, my wife and I were driving late one afternoon to a speaking engagement just south of Houston. I had been dreading going through the city during rush-hour traffic, so I asked her to pull out the Texas roadmap and tell me where I should turn to go around the city, and hopefully, avoid much of the traffic problems at that time of the day.

that straight, as I was beginning to make slight turns to the left, back to the right, then more curves and more curves.

Unfortunately, huge dark clouds were looming just ahead of us, and it was almost certain that we were going to be in a downpour.

She stared straight ahead and handed me the map.

Studying the map, she said, “If you really want to miss most of Houston, then turn right at the next road.” “Are you sure? This seems a bit too far away to be turning already,” I responded. “I know what I’m talking about. It’s a straight road that goes south, and then it turns one time and heads due east to south of Houston.” Now, I didn’t want to say anything, but my bride of almost 55 years has never been great with directions. She invariably goes the wrong direction to the elevator when we step out of a hotel room. She has learned that if she turns the map in the direction we’re going, she’ll get our left and right turns correctly. But this day, she was insistent. “This is right. Trust me!” she reiterated. “It’s a perfectly straight road here on the map.” “OK, but it doesn’t seem right.” Almost immediately, there was a streak of lighting and a clap of thunder so loud it shook the car. Suddenly my visibility was cut to a minimum. “Just keep going straight,” she reminded, “and before long you’re going to make a sharp, really sharp, left-hand turn.” By now, I was getting a bit nervous from the storm and the uncertainty of where we were headed. I began to notice that the road really wasn’t

In desperation, I said, “Honey, this can’t be right! This road is twisting all over the place.” As I carefully pulled off the side of the road, I gently asked, “Do you mind if I look at the map?

“Now, where is this road that we’re on?” I asked. “There! Right there! It’s the one in blue that goes straight and then turns left!” It took everything I had to mutter, “Sweetie, I hate to tell you, but that’s not a road. That’s the blue lines that shows the shape of the county.” Well, it was a quiet drive until we reached a road that would take us to our desired route.

Harris County Department of Education........................................ 29 hcde-texas.org Mutualink...................................................4 mutualink.net SAT College Board.................................2 satschooltoday.org Schneider Electric..................................6 schneider-electric.us Spectrum Corp.................................5, 15 Spectrumscoreboards.com StanTec..................................................... 43 stantec.com TASA........................................... 19, 27, 44 tasanet.org TASPA........................................................15 Taspa.org

Have you ever said something and then wished you could take it back? This was one of those times.

Texas ASCD............................................ 25

But as we all prepare for another school year, think about the direction you’re heading. Are you on a path to truly make a difference in the lives of the students you serve? Have you recommitted to making this the best year of your career? Have you determined that relationships are the best way to reach a hurting child? Have you vowed to live by the statement that, “They don’t really care how much we know until they know how much we care?” Our students need schools that focus on finding their gifts and developing them. Let this year be the one that leads you in the direction of success for every student. By the way … my wife just read my draft of this column and she emphatically says that I never said “Honey,” or “Sweetie.” I’m pretty sure she’s right.

convocation, graduation or awards banquet, visit www.rineyjordan.com.

Texas School Business SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2019

Advertiser Index

“Honey, don’t be upset. I’m sure you were absent the day they taught map reading.”

RINEY JORDAN is the author of two books and a frequent public speaker. To invite him to speak at your

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September 20–22 Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Dallas

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Play@Work: Unleashing Growth through Creativity and Innovation

Manny Scott Turn the Page

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The Ripple Effect of Public Education

Recharge your advocacy efforts at the 2019 Delegate Assembly! Held September 21 during Convention, the Assembly is where trustees develop the TASB advocacy action plan and elect TASB’s leadership. Attend to win! To celebrate 30 years of 100 percent membership, TASB will rebate Convention registration fees for 30 school districts that send representatives to attend Delegate Assembly. Learn more and register at delegate.tasb.org.

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I hope this fresh school year finds you all renewed and inspired. I am excited to bring you another academic year’s worth of good news out o...

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I hope this fresh school year finds you all renewed and inspired. I am excited to bring you another academic year’s worth of good news out o...

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