Spinning Yarns sample

Page 1

MATTHEW WEYER



Matthew Weyer

Spinning Yarns Six Solo Tales for Developing Four-Mallet Technique

Spinning Yarns by Matthew Weyer Š 2016 Tapspace Publications, LLC (ASCAP). Portland, OR. All rights reserved. International copyright secured. Printed in USA. www.tapspace.com Notice of Liability: Any duplication, adaptation, or arrangement of this composition requires the written consent of the copyright owner. No part of this composition may be photocopied or reproduced in any way without permission. Unauthorized uses are an infringement of the U.S. Copyright Act and are punishable by law.

TSPB-33



Table

of

Contents

Breathe ������������������������������������������������������������������������������8

Press ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������12

Leap ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������17

Drive ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������20

Swell ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������24

Torn ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������28

This collection contains a series of six etudes designed to accompany the beginning/intermediate marimbist on his/her journey into four-mallet technique. Each solo includes a set of “foundations” – exercises and suggestions to help the performer develop technique, musicianship, and a solid approach to learning and performing as a musician. Take your time to read, consider, and try the ideas on each of these pages. Don’t be in a hurry to learn the piece as quickly as possible. As many wise teachers have said, “If you don’t have time to learn it correctly, when will you have time to re-learn it correctly?” –Matthew Weyer


Matthew Weyer

Breathe Breathe (foundation)

Breathe is a simple, happy reflection upon the pure and vulnerable nature of a newborn child. The performer should strive to achieve the most appropriate balance between the two hands for each musical situation. Medium to medium-hard mallets should create the best articulation and tone. Beware of the changing clef in the lower staff, and keep it fun!

Technique

and

Essentials

First, get comfortable with the E major scale. It may be easiest to visualize the shape of the scale on the keyboard:

E

major

4 & 4 œ #œ #œ œ

œ #œ #œ œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ #œ œ Œ

F# G#

C# D#

2 3

6 7

1

4 5

1

E

A B

E

If you will be using the Stevens grip to play this solo, practice the double vertical stroke. Some teachers suggest practicing the stroke on a table or floor before playing at the marimba. There are quite a few method books with helpful information about this technique, and a lesson teacher can help you develop these skills. Position your hand with the thumb on top and knuckles on the side, as if you are shaking hands with someone. It is important to move from the wrist, keeping your forearm level and still as much as possible. After becoming comfortable with the E major scale and the double vertical stroke, use the exercise below to develop the rhythmic coordination needed for this piece. You might also develop your own rhythmic permutations or try the exercise in a different major or minor key. Notice that the left hand rhythm in the last two measures is equal to dotted eighth notes, or the first note of every three in the imaginary sixteenth-note grid often referred to as “subdivision.”

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ &4

œœ œœ œœ œœ

œœ œœ œœ œœ

œœ

4 & 4 œ #œ #œ œ

œ œ #œ #œ

œ Œ Ó

j ≈ œ™j œ ™ œ ‰ j ≈ j ‰ # œ #œ #œ ™ œ Œ œ ™ #œ

{ 6

œœ

œœ

œœ

œœ

œœ

œœ Œ


Spinning Yarns

Musical Development Play the excerpt below from measures 18 to 22 of the solo, using each step provided to practice dynamic balance between the right and left hand.

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ &4

{

4 &4 Ó

œ 3œ 4

œœ

œœ

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ 4

œ 3œ 4

œœ

œœ

œœ Œ Ó

4 4

4 ##œœ Œ Ó Œ ‰ #œJ 43 #œœ ™™ œœ ‰ #œœ ≈ œœ ™™ 44 #œœ Œ Œ ‰ #œJ 43 #œœ ™™ œœ ‰ #œJ ≈ œ™ J 4 J J mp

mf

mp

mf

mp

Step 1: Ignore the written dynamics and play both hands at a comfortable volume, perhaps mezzo forte, and strive to achieve the same dynamic sound and feel with each hand. Step 2: Play the left-hand melody louder than the right hand. Can you still hear both parts? Step 3: Play the left-hand melody softer than the right hand. Are you hearing consistent dynamics through the entire excerpt? Step 4: Play the written dynamics. Notice the musical interplay between the two parts and work to balance both lines tastefully.

Growing

through the

Process

It is very important to be efficient with your practice time. Keep a notebook or practice chart and plan in advance when you will practice. Most percussionists do not have regular access to a marimba, so determine what time of day you will be able to use the instrument. Plan in advance what you will practice. Setting goals will keep you on track and prevent you from only practicing the sections you can already play! Remember, practicing the piece is only half of the job. Performers must also practice performing. Ask a few friends or teachers to listen to you play. This will generate some of the pressure of an actual performance. After you are comfortable playing in front of three or four people, increase the size of the group to eight or ten. Often students will prepare a solo for a recital and perform it only once. What a waste! Find more opportunities to perform your solo in front of an audience. Think creatively about possible venues: a library, coffee shop, or retirement home would all be excellent options. Create more opportunities to perform!

7


Level: Med-Easy Approx. playing time: 1’40”

for Emmaline

Breathe

q = 116

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ &4

{

? 44

mp

A

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &

œ 3œ 4

œ œ

œ œ

Matthew Weyer

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ 4

p

œ 3œ 4

œ œ

œ œ

4 4

Œ ‰ j 43 #œ ™#œ ‰ j ≈ j 44 Œ Œ ‰ j 43 #œ ™#œ ‰ j ≈ j 44 œ œ #œ ™ œ œ œ #œ ™

Ó

mf

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ &4

œ 3œ 4

6

{

4 &4

œœ

œœ

œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ 4

œœ œœ œœ œœ

#œ 3 4 ? j Œ Œ ‰ œ 4 #œ ™ #œ ‰ œ ≈ j 4 œ Œ Ó J œ™ œœ

B

œ 3œ &4

{

œœ

œœ

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ 4

3 4 Œ & 4 #œ ™ #œ ‰ œj ≈ #œj™ 4 œ œ 3œ &4

15

{

œœ

œœ

Œ

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ 4

3 4œ & 4 #œ ™ #œ ‰ œJ ≈ j ? 4 œ Œ Ó œ™ œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ &4

20

{

œ 3œ 4

œœ

œœ Œ Ó

œœ

mf

œœ

œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ 4

Œ ‰ œj 43 #œ ™ #œ ‰ œj ≈ j 44 #œ ™ # œ #œ œœ œœ œœ œœ

C

œœ œœ œœ œœ

œ 3œ 4

Œ

Ó

mp

3 4

‰ œj 43

œœ

œœ

mp

&

3 4

Œ ‰ j 43 œ

Ó

&

mp

œ 3œ 4

#œœ Œ Ó œœ

œœ œœ œœ œœ

4 4

Œ ‰ #œJ 43 #œœ ™™ œœ ‰ #œœ ≈ œœ ™™ 44 J J mf

œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ 4

œ 3œ 4

œœ

œœ

œœ œœ œœ 4 4

4 œ Œ Œ ‰ #œ 3 #œœ ™™ œœ ‰ #œ ≈ œ™ 4 ##œœ Œ Œ ‰ #œ 3 #œœ ™™ œœ ‰ #œ ≈ œ™ 4 & 4 #œ J 4 J J 4 J 4 J J #œœ #œœ œœ 4 mp

8

mf

mp

mf

© 2016 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.


Spinning Yarns

œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ &4

{

4 & 4 ##œœ Œ Ó

œ œ

œ œ

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ 4

œ 3œ 4

œœ

œœ

œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ 4

œœ œœ œœ œœ

#œ 3 4 ? j Œ Œ ‰ 4 #œ ™#œ ‰ œ ≈ j 4 œ Œ Ó œ J œ™ œœ

E

œ 3œ &4

œ œ

œ œ

4 4

mf

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ &4

4 &4

œ 3œ 4

Œ ‰ j 43 #œ ™#œ ‰ j ≈ j 44 Œ Œ ‰ j 43 #œ ™#œ ‰ j ≈ j 44 œ œ #œ ™ œ œ œ #œ ™

Ó

30

{

œ 3œ 4 p

p

{

D

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

25

œœ

œœ

œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ 4

mp

œ 3œ 4

œœ

œœ

œœ Œ Ó

œœ œœ œœ œœ

Œ ‰ #œJ 43

Ó

&

3 4

mp

mf

œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ 4

œ 3œ 4

œœ

œœ

3 #œœ ™™ œœ ‰ #œœ ≈ œœ ™™ 4 œ Œ Œ ‰ #œ 3 #œœ ™™ œœ ‰ #œ ≈ œ™ 4 ##œœ Œ Œ ‰ #œ 3 #œœ ™™ œœ ‰ #œ ≈ œ™ &4 J 4 J J 4 J 4 J J J J 4 #œ mf

mp

mf

œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ 4 &

40

{

4 & #œœ#œœ œœ 4 ##œœ Œ Ó p

46

&

{

œœ

œœ

œœ p

™ ? œ# œ ‰ œ œ Œ

œœ

œ 3 œ 4

œœ

œœ

mp

œœ

mf

3 4 # œ œ™ ‰ œ œ Œ

œœ œœ œ œ œ œ 4œ œ œ œ 4

œ œ™ Œ Œ 44 œœ Œ Ó

œ

œœ œœ #œ ™ Œ Œ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Ó

mf

œœ œ

œœ #œ ™ ‰

œœ œ

œŒ

œœ œœ Œ Œ

œœ mp

œœ œœ ? œ™ Œ Œ

œœ Œ Œ Œ ppp

∑ 9


Matthew Weyer

Press Press (foundation)

Press should create a mysterious mood, so use restraint and don’t overplay the dynamics. The dead stroke is featured throughout this solo; one approach to this technique is to play with a very light touch, like dampening the timpani. Be sure to bring out the notes of the melody indicated with a tenuto marking, without playing these notes loudly as true accents.

Technique

and

Essentials

Before starting to learn Press, you should become comfortable with the C minor scale. Many musicians are more comfortable with major scales than minor scales, so use the relative major scale (E flat) to get used to the key signature. Practice both scales, and notice that they use the same notes but start on different pitches.

C

minor

4 &4

Eb

œ œ bœ œ

Œ œ bœ bœ œ bœ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ

bœ 4 & 4 bœ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ

œ œ bœ bœ

Ab Bb

3

6 7

1 2

4 5

1

C D

F G

C

major

(relative major)

Eb

œ œ bœ Œ

Eb

Ab Bb

Eb

1

4 5

1

2 3

6 7

F G

C D

If you use the Stevens grip, be sure you are comfortable with the single independent stroke. This technique is used to play with one mallet individually and involves a twisting motion. Turn your wrist sideways, like turning a doorknob, and rotate the playing mallet around the tacet mallet, keeping the tacet mallet as still as possible. It is helpful to keep the tacet mallet low to the keyboard for more efficiency in the twisting motion. Try playing the scales shown above with each mallet individually. Move your feet so that your body stays behind the notes you are playing and focus on the twisting motion.

As suggested by the title, one recurring element of this solo is the “dead stroke,” appearing for the first time in measure 3. A dead stroke is commonly indicated with a “+” symbol above or below the notes:

b & b b -œ

{

? bb b

mf

+ œœ œœ

p

A dead stroke can be played at any dynamic level, but in this solo it’s usually marked piano. Try using a light touch and imagine dampening the bars, as you would muffle timpani to silence the drums. You may also try striking the bars near the top of the mallet, or the “crown,” when using the dead stroke. This effect is used to create a unique musical sound, or “timbre,” so be sure to make the effect obvious to your audience! 10


Spinning Yarns

Musical Development

b2 j j & b b4 œ - œ ‰ œ œ- n œ ‰ œ œœ œ ? b 42 œœ œœ œ œ bb

In the excerpt shown here, notice the line appearing below the notes in the treble clef staff. This is a “tenuto” symbol, which indicates that this note should be played with more weight than the others. In the case of these three measures, the tenuto notes are the melody.

{

mp

mf

+ œœ œ

p

Try playing the first example at one dynamic level. Then, add the crescendo. After you are able to play the written dynamics, play the melody louder than the chords to achieve the tenuto articulation. Try the same sequence with the next phrase:

b2 j j œ œ & b b4 œ œ œ œœ ‰ ‰ nœœ œœ œœ œœ ? bb 42 b

{

p

mf

+ œœ œœ

p

You will produce your best sound quality on the marimba by playing near the center of the bar and holding the mallets loosely. Be sure to support the mallets from the correct points in your grip, but don’t squeeze or you will start to lose your quality of sound. Be aware of your stroke velocity and weight, too!

Growing

through the

Process

Great musicians are very efficient with their practice time. If your goal is to learn a solo like Press, you must break up your goal into many smaller objectives, and then break up your daily practice time into micro-goals. Think of this like eating a pizza: You take one slice of pizza, take one bite, and chew a few times before you swallow. Learn this solo the same way. One possible goal for the first day, after a good warmup, would be to learn the first eight measures. Master all the details from the beginning. Are you playing the dynamics? Have you checked the key signature and accidentals carefully? Are you sure you’re playing in the correct octave? Use a stopwatch or timer to divide up your practice session into multiple periods, like classes in a school day. Allow plenty of time to master each goal, but in some cases, you may need to move on and return to work on a section the next day. Create a mental picture that describes the character of the piece of music and use this imagery to connect with the solo on a personal level. Many musicians associate certain feelings with chords and harmonies, and it can be very rewarding to recognize the emotional value of a piece of music. As a performer, it can be helpful to imagine using a musical phrase to communicate a certain idea to someone who is special to you. Imagine that you are using the instrument to express this idea, without using words, to the person you have chosen.

11


Level: Med-Easy Approx. playing time: 1’30”

Press + j œ- œ œ œ- œœ ‰ nœœ œœ œœ

Mysterious

b2 & b b4 œ - œ ‰ ? bb 42 œœ b

{

dead stroke

j œ œœ

p

b &b b œ œ - ‰ œ ? bb b œ

9

{

mf

mf

œ- œ ‰ œœ

p

Œ j j œ œ - n œ œ œ‰ + œœ œœ œœ Œ œœœ

mp

+ j œ œ j œ œ - œ œ - œ ‰ œœ nœœ œœ œœ

p

A

Matthew Weyer

mf

p

mp

-œ ™ œ™ œ œ 1

3

2

3

2

f

p

3 4 3 4

With motion

{

b & b b œ œ nœ nœ

23

{

?b bb

f

æ ææ b b b œ œ & œœ œœ œœœ ? bb b

œ

œœ

p

æ œœæ œœ œ œ mf

B

œ œ p

29

12

œ Œ œ œ œ 4

n-œœ

b3 & b b 4 œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ n œ œœ œœ mp f mp œ œ ? bb 43 ∑ ∑ ∑ Œ Œœ b

{

p

Œ

œ- œ œj œ‰ œœ œœ Œ

Œ

mf

Œ œœ

œœ

Slower

24 nœœœ œœœ 朜œ æ æ 2 4

œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

p

œœœ ææ

œœ œ

œ œ œ œ œ 3

3

1

mf

œœ -œ

æ œœ œ

mf p

æ œœæ œ

2

4

3

∑ æ æ œœæ œœæ œ œ mf

∑ ∑

œœ œ

Œ

Œ

© 2016 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.


Spinning Yarns

b &b b

37

{

3 2 1

æ #˙æ

æ ˙æ

? bb ˙˙ b

C

a tempo

:“; b &b b œ œ - ‰ œ ? bb b œ

{

j œ œœ

p

:“; b &b b œ œ - ‰ œœ ? bb b

j œ œœ

mf

p

? bb 42 œ œ œ nœ Œ b 2

3

-œ œ ‰ œœ

j œ œ- n œ ‰ œœ œœ

p

pp

Œ j œ œ+ œœ Œ œœœ

mf

∑ ∑

p

loco

∑ ∑

p

mp

f

œ

4œ 3 2 œ ‰ ∑ 4 œ- œ œj 4 nœœ- œ Œ 4 p n-œœ 3 œ U 2 œœ œœ 4 Ó œ Œ 4 4 nœ Œ 4 >

n>œ œ œ nœ œ Œ œ œ œ

b2 & b b4 Œ

œ

mp

accel.

Cadenza

3

p

+ j œ- œ œ œ- œœ ‰ nœœ œœ œœ

p

2

mp

mf

60

{

+ œ- œ œj œ- œœ ‰ nœœ œœ œœ

53

{

<n>œœ

n˙˙

œnœœ

rit.

“œ” œnœ

mf

U Œ

n -œœ

a tempo

mf

-œ œœ

Œ

mf

p

œœ+ œ

f

∑ Œ

mp

13


Matthew Weyer

Leap Leap (foundation)

Leap is a chorale inspired by a premature loss of life, and was composed on February 29, 2016. The musical construction of the solo features more space, simpler chords, and more stepwise motion than many traditional four-part chorales. The roll in measures 23 and 24 can be played as a one-handed roll or as a mandolin roll, which may be the most practical option. Experiment with a variety of roll speeds, take plenty of time in the rests, and use soft mallets to avoid excessive contact sound in the low register of the marimba.

Technique

and

Essentials

Even though there is no key signature in this solo, it is written in the key of A major. Learn and play the A major scale and arpeggio. Notice the scale degrees shown underneath each note.

A

major

4 & 4 œ œ #œ œ 1

2

3

4

4 œ #œ œ œ &4 1

3

5

8

œ #œ #œ œ #œ #œ œ œ #œ œ œ Œ 5

6

7

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

œ #œ œ Œ 5

3

C#

F# G#

3

6 7

1 2

4 5

1

A B

D E

A

1

When you play the notes in the arpeggio at the same time, you are playing a major chord. In Leap, the three chords used most often are A major, D major, and E major. Study these chords and identify them when they appear in the solo. They are shown here in root position, but the notes can also appear in a different inversion. The first chord of the piece is—you guessed it!—A major. Before rolling the chords, strike the notes once as if you were playing the vibraphone.

w w & #w A

#w w w D

#w w w E

4 &4

3 Œ 4œ œ # œ # œ ˙w ˙ 3 ? 44 w 4 #œ˙ œ Œ w

{

As a second step, play sixteenth notes on each chord for the full value of the rhythm. This will allow you to practice the approximate hand speed and chord changes before attempting to play rolls:

4 &4

{

3 Œ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œœ œœ œœ œœ

? 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 43 #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

14


Spinning Yarns

Finally, play a traditional roll on each note by simply playing single strokes. Many players and teachers prefer to start rolling a chord with the left hand so that the lower notes speak first. Another option is to strike all of the notes at once and then roll. Experiment, listen, and decide which sound you prefer for each situation. When rolling a four-note chord, you will be using the double vertical stroke, so be sure to move from the wrist, keeping the thumb on top with the Stevens grip. If one hand plays only one note, you will be using the single independent stroke in that hand. As mentioned earlier, this stroke is played using a twisting motion. Even though it looks simple on paper, a chorale is physically demanding to perform, often requiring dozens of strokes per measure. Be efficient with your motion, stay relaxed, and build endurance to sound your best throughout the piece!

Musical Development In most cases marimba players will use a traditional roll to sustain the chords in a chorale. This type of roll is played with single strokes between the hands, like a single stroke roll at the snare drum. Many times you will be using a double vertical stroke with each hand. The double lateral roll uses fast double lateral strokes to create a different texture, isolating each note of the chord (see Foundation for Torn on pg. 26). Players often use the 1-2-4-3 sticking to play this roll. You can also create a ripple effect by relaxing your grip on the inner mallet as you play a traditional roll, causing a “flam” as the outer mallet strikes before the inner mallet. With this option you allow the notes to ripple. Using the double lateral roll, you make the notes ripple. Either of these roll options can be used occasionally at the climax or end of a phrase for effect. A mandolin roll can be used with the right hand in measures 23 and 24. Place the inner mallet (3) above the edge of the bar and place the outer mallet (4) below the edge. Move your hand up and down as fast as possible, creating a roll by striking the top and bottom of the bar with alternating strokes. Experienced marimba players will vary their roll speed to suit different situations. A roll does not always have to be played with the fastest strokes possible. You can choose to use a slower roll speed to enhance the softest or loudest moments in a phrase or to emphasize the most interesting chord. In this example from measures 3 and 4, the roll speed is slower when the beams are closer together and faster as they spread apart:

4 &4

{

3 4 #œœ #œœ #œœ #œœ #œœ #œœ #œœ #œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œœ # œœ # œœ # œœ œ œ œ œ

? 44 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 43 #œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

15


Matthew Weyer

It is also important to bring out (play louder) certain notes in the chord. Always bring out the melody and any passing tones or suspensions (interesting notes that clash within the chord) by playing one mallet with more weight or velocity. In measure 5 shown here, play all of the treble clef (right hand) notes louder than the left hand, as this is the melody. Play the G# even louder than the A and the F#, since this note is a passing tone.

Growing

through the

4 &4 ˙

{

mf

# ? 44 #˙˙

mp

#œ #œ f

œ œ

Œ

mp

Œ

p

Process

In order to get the most benefit from your practice time, it is very important that you find a private, quiet place to practice. Whether you are practicing at home or at school, this can be very difficult. Try to choose the right time and place to avoid interruptions from other people. Turn off your cell phone or have someone monitor your phone for real emergencies. Be aware of distractions that disrupt your progress and keep them to a minimum. Take your time as you perform this piece. Allow some extra time for the ends of phrases and rests between the phrases. Many performers are uncomfortable with silence. Remember that the marimba will resonate in the room after you stop rolling. When your instinct urges you to move on, allow an extra second or two.

16


Level: Medium-Easy Approx. playing time: 2’00”

Leap

Matthew Weyer

q = 72 roll all notes except for grace notes and staccato notes

4 &4

3 Œ 4 œ œ ˙w # œ ˙ #œ

{

? 44 w w

3 4 #œ˙

pp

p

3 4 œ #œ ˙ ˙ œ 43 ˙

6

& ˙

{

w ? #˙™

4 4

3 4 #œœ #œœ Œ œ ˙w # œ 3 #˙œ 4

4 w 4 w

œ Œ pp

4 4˙

Œ

œ

4 #˙˙ 4

Πpp

Œ

˙

œœ Œ #˙˙

mp

p

p

Œ

p

mf

mp

mf

3 &4

{

œ

? 43 #œ œ

{

# ˙œœ #œœ

Œ

œ

œ

mf

mp

œ

3 Œ 4 œ œ # œ # œ ˙w ˙

? 44 w w

3 4 #œ˙

pp

p

˙™ œ

˙ #œœ œœ Œ

œ

œ Œ pp

j ‰ 4 3˙ œ 4 &4 . ˙ œ. œ. œ. œ. œ. 4˙ ? 43 ‰ #œ œ œ #œ œ 4˙

œ

3

mf

p

3 4 3 4

pp

œ

p

mp

œ #œœ #œœœ # œœœ ˙˙˙ 4 Œ 4

˙™ œ

œ

4 4

3 4 #œœ #œœ Œ œ # œ ˙w 3 #˙œ 4

4w 4w

mp

4w 4 4Π4

œ Œ p

œ

3 4

œ. œ. #œœ. œœ. 3 ‰ #œJ œ 4 mf

3

#œ.

4 4

pp

24

{

mp

p mf

mf

a tempo

4 &4

19

˙™ œ

Œ

rit.

Not too fast 12

œ œ

Œ #œ œ # ˙ œ ˙ œ #œ ˙™ #œ Œ

˙

œ #œ Œ #˙w

mp

#œ #œ Œ

4 ##˙˙ 4

œ Œ

mp

Faster

4 ˙ 4

#œ.

#œ.

œ # œ. j œœ ‰ Œ

˙ ˙˙

j œœ ‰

p

mp

p

Œ

Ó w

Œ

w w

p

Œ #œU

mp

© 2016 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.

pp 17


Matthew Weyer

Drive Drive (foundation)

Drive is all about creating a sense of energy and forward motion. A mallet capable of multiple articulations would be best for this piece. Don’t let the right hand ostinato become too heavy or shrill during letter A and B, and place a slight emphasis on beat one as indicated by the tenuto markings. In order to create a legato phrase at letter C, try using a slight decrescendo with each slur to allow the notes to “blur” into each other.

Technique

and

Essentials

As with any new solo, start by playing the scale. Musicians will often memorize the key signatures for each major scale to quickly identify the key. This solo has one flat in the key signature, and this indicates the key of F major. Another hint: Check the first and last note, as this is often the “tonic” note, or the first scale degree. Usually, this will indicate the key. Practice the F major scale and also use scale patterns, such as a “scale in thirds,” to become more familiar with the key:

F

major

4 & 4 œ œ œ bœ

œ œ œ œ

Bb

œ œ œ bœ

4 œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ &4 œ œ

œ œ œ Œ

4 1 2 3

5 6 7 1

F G A

C D E F

œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

After mastering the grip and strokes, the next important aspect of your four-mallet technique is shifting. This term refers to your method of moving between notes at the marimba. Generally speaking, a marimba player starts with the mallets above the bars, strikes the bars, and then moves as quickly as possible to a position above the next notes to be played. There are two parts to the shifting motion in the mallets: the vertical motion to return up and the horizontal motion to travel to the next notes. These two motions should blend together creating a diagonal path so that the complete motion looks like a check mark. Isolate the left hand notes at letter B and notice your movement in between each of the notes.

3 & b 4 œœ Œ Œ >

> œœ Œ Œ

œœ ™™ œœ ™™ > >

> œœ œœ œœ œ Œ Œ > > >œ

œœ Œ Œ >

>œ >œ œœ J

>œ œŒ J

>œœ Œ Œ

Sometimes, your whole body will need to move to allow you to comfortably strike the bars in the correct spot. As you shift from the second measure to the third measure, allow your elbow to move in toward your ribs as you shift the mallets to G and Bb. This technique is known as elbow shifting. Move your feet and body as you play so that you can keep your balance and stay in position to reach all of the bars.

18


Spinning Yarns

Musical Development As you play this solo, you may start to feel the meter as 6/8 instead of 3/4. If this happens, it’s okay. Bring out the accents and tenuto markings to emphasize beat one of each measure, but don’t fight the instinct to feel two triple-based beats instead of three duple beats. Music is very subjective, and your audience may even feel the pulse differently than you as the performer. Another important concept is how to create the six-note phrases at letter C. Due to the acoustic nature of the marimba, each note has a quick decay after being struck. One practical way to create the effect of playing in a “legato” style is to decrescendo from the first note of the phrase to the last note, allowing the notes inside the “slur” marking to blur together smoothly. Play the second note at the volume that the first note is sounding at that time, not at the volume that you struck the first note, and the two notes will sound like a slur on a string or wind instrument. Play all six notes of the phrase this way, and you will create a very smooth, legato phrase. Try this with the first two measures at letter C.

3 & b4

1

2

3

4

2

4

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > >

The next question is pretty obvious: What if I need to crescendo while playing legato? You certainly can’t get louder and softer at the same time. Another option to create smooth phrasing is to simply avoid squeezing the mallets or playing too hard. Use a consistent touch, hold the mallets loosely, and don’t pop the accents too harshly. Try this with the next two measures. The sim. marking means to continue the same style of legato phrasing as before:

3 & b4

œ œ œ œ œ> œ sim.

œ œ œ œ> œ œ

Most importantly, create and maintain a sense of energy and Drive! Practice with a metronome, slowly at first, and learn all the aspects of the solo as you read through it.

Growing

through the

Process

For many musicians, practicing and performing are two different worlds. Find ways in your practice routine to simulate the experience of performing. Use a cell phone or high quality audio recorder to record yourself as you practice. Save some time to listen honestly to how you sound. You’ll learn quite a bit as you devote all of your attention to listening without the task of performing at the same time. You will also generate some of the pressure of performing live, knowing that you will soon be listening to the recording. While you are practicing the physical act of playing the marimba, you are also practicing thinking through the solo. Additionally, you are practicing your internal messaging as you respond to mistakes. You’re also practicing how you feel about playing each part of the solo and making these feelings a permanent part of your future performance. Each of these thoughts becomes a habit as you practice, so practice the thoughts and emotions that you want to take with you on stage. 19


Level: Medium Approx. playing time: 1’15”

Drive

Matthew Weyer

>œ >œ >œ >œ >œ œœ œœ 3 &4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > œœ œœ > œœ œœ > > > > > Fast! q = 180–208

p

mp

œœ œœ œœ œœj & œ œ > œ > œœ > œœ >œ

6

> œœ œœ b>œ œœ Œ œœ œœ J > >

mf

-j j -œj œ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ Œ Œ Œ Œ > > mp

A

Œ

f

-j j j j j j j j œœ œœ œœ œœ -œœ œœ œœ œœœ™ œœ œœœ™ œœ œœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœœœ œœ œœ œœ bœ ™ œ™ & œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ > > > > > mf

11

16

&

œ-œ œœ œœ

j œœœ œœœ & bœJ œ > >

21

f

-j -j -j j j j œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ -œœ œœ œœ œ œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ Œ œ > > > mp

j j œœœ™ œœ œœœ œœœ œ œ œ™ J > > >

B -j j j j j œœœ™ œœ œœœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ™ œœ Œ Œ Œ Œ > > > mf

-j -j j j œœœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœœ bœœ ™™ œœ ™™ œ & œ Œ Œ > > > >

26

j œœœ œœœ & bœJ œ > >

31

f

j œœœ™ œœ œœœœ œ™ Œ > >

Œ

œœ bœœ >

œœ œœ >

-j j œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Œ >

mf

-j -j j j œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Œ œœ Œ Œ > > -j j œœœ œœ œœ œœ œ Œ Œ >

-j j œœ œœ œœ œœ bœœ ™™ œœ ™™ > >

© 2016 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.


Spinning Yarns

œœ œœ >

œœ

bœœ

œœ™™

œœ

bœœ

œœ

p

œ>œ ™™

~~~ ~~~~ ~~~~ ~~~~

œœ œœ œœ & œœ bœœ œœ > > >

36

mf

œ

f

Œ

Œ

C

&

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b >œ œ œ œ b >œ œ œ œ > > > mf 1

2

3

4

2

4

sim.

p 46

&

51

&

3 2

œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > 2

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > >

p

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ > > > > > mf

56

& œ 2

œ 3

œ 3

D j j j j j œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ

œ -

Œ

œœ -

Œ

Œ

Œ

mp

j j œœ œœ œœ œœ & Œ Œ œ -

61

bœ -

Œ

j œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Œ Œ -

j j j j œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ Œ Œ -

j j œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Œ œ -

mf

j j j j œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ & œœ Œ Œ bœ Œ Œ -

œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Œ -

j œœœœ œœœœ & J

>œœ œœ Œ Œ

66

71

j œœœ™œ™ œœ œ>œœ ™™™™ œ>œœ ™™™™ bœ œ f

œ>œœœ™™™™

œ>œœœ™™™™

j j œœ œœ œœ œœ Œ Œ œ -

mp

j œœœ bœ J

j œœœ œœœ™ œœ œ œ™

mf

>œ œœœ Œ Œ

œœj œœ œœ œœ > >

ff

œœ œœ >

œœj œœ >

œœ Œ Œ œœ > 21


Matthew Weyer

Swell Swell (foundation)

Swell depicts the excitement and intrigue of traveling to a new place, possibly overseas, where the culture and language are not your own. This solo is named for the dramatic nature of the two-measure phrase introduced at letter A. Use care to create expression with this repetitive pattern without covering up the chromatic bass line or the eighth notes marked as tenuto. A graduated set of mallets or perhaps medium soft rubber mallets would be a tasteful choice for performing this piece.

Technique

Essentials

and

Swell is in the key of D minor, which has the same key signature as F major. As you might notice, C# appears quite often, which indicates that the seventh scale degree is raised a half step. This is known as the harmonic form of the D minor scale. Practice D harmonic minor, and consider C# a regular member of this scale even though it will not appear in the key signature:

D

minor

(harmonic minor)

4 &4 œ œ œ œ

œ bœ #œ œ #œ bœ œ œ

œ œ œ Œ

Bb

C#

6

7

1 2 3 4 5

1

D E F G A

D

This solo covers a fairly wide range of the marimba, so it will be important to consider your body position and method of moving your feet. After learning a section of the solo, put down the mallets and move your body and feet as you would while playing. Will you have to reach for notes? Is your body centered on the notes you are playing? Are you crossing your feet as you move along the keyboard? Practice your body position with and without the mallets using these two excerpts: Ex. 1

U w 4 b & 4 ææ

{

ppp

? b 44

Fast

rit.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ 3

3

mp

3

3

œ Œ œ

U Πf

œœŒ

Ó

Ex. 2

3 œœ b 4 &

{

mf

? b 43 Œ

# œœ

U Œ

œœ Œ

‰ œnœ#œ œ Œ 3

Ó

f

> œ

One more consideration in performing this piece is how you are seeing the marimba. Maintaining proper field of vision is essential to the “target practice” of hitting correct notes. Play this selection from bars 15–18:

3 & b4 Ó

{

? b 43 Ó

4 œ œ Œ œ œ œ 3 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ 4 Ó 4 4 œœ œœ- 4 œf

œ

4 Œ Œ Œ 3 4œ 4

p

œ

œ œ #œ œ

4 Œ Ó 4œ >

œœ

This section contains a couple of large jumps and also some simultaneous responsibility between the high and low register of the marimba. Are you able to see the full keyboard? If you are leaning forward, it will be difficult to maintain a wide field of vision. Have you established the muscle memory to find some of the notes without looking? Are you looking back and forth between the high and low register? Most importantly, are you comfortable and consistent? These are all important thoughts as you prepare to perform this section. 22


Spinning Yarns

Musical Development

j œæ ‰ Œ Œ œ

Moving forward

The solo is named for the shape of the twomeasure phrases beginning at letter A. Even more challenging may be creating clear phrases at letter B. Since the first two phrases are short, try playing them using a subtle decrescendo:

3˙ & b4 ˙ æ

{

mf

? 43 b

æ 3 ˙æ b & 4˙

The next four measures contain a longer phrase. Try using a crescendo and decrescendo to achieve this line:

{

? b 43

mp

œ ææœ

mp

œ- Œ

Œ

æ j œæ #œæ ‰ Œ Œ œ œ

˙ ææ˙

mf

Œ

œ- Œ

æ j œœæ œæ ‰ Œ Œ œ

æ ææ æ æ æ æ œœæ œœ œœæ œœæ œœæ œœæ f

mp

mp

Œ

#-œ Œ

Many percussionists first encounter grace notes when playing a flam on the snare drum. A marimbist should approach grace notes like a wind player or vocalist. Refer to measures 16 to 19 in the solo and interpret the grace notes as sixteenth notes.

Another challenge to this piece is emphasizing the tenuto notes more than the “swell.” Try this example from letter A and play the notes marked tenuto with more stroke weight than the other notes:

Growing

through the

3 & b 4 Œ œœ œœ œœ œœ--

{

? b 43

mf

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ- -œœ œœ- Œ Œ œ œ œ

œœŒ

p

sim.

Œ

Process

What are your goals when you practice? Do you feel that you make solid progress every day? Do you waste time “working on” sections of the music that you can already play well in order to avoid tackling trouble spots? One solution is to keep a notebook including your practice goals for day, week, month, and year. Keep a clear record of your accomplishments and struggles. Reflect on your progress and notice any patterns that lead to success or failure. Performance anxiety is a common struggle for musicians of all ages and skill levels. It’s perfectly normal, even for professionals, and most people can manage the symptoms but not eliminate the feeling completely. Developing skill as a musician does not always guarantee becoming more comfortable performing in front of people. Don’t ignore or deny the physical and emotional effects of anxiety. Instead, channel this energy into your performance. Take time before you perform to relax and focus. Practice walking to your instrument on stage and imagine the kinds of thoughts you would have during this walk. Perform in front of an audience regularly. Maintain healthy habits in your exercise and diet. Finally, think of performing as offering a gift to your audience, and focus on the possibilities instead of the risk.

23


Level: Medium Approx. playing time: 1’30”

for Missi

Swell

U w 4 b & 4 ææ

{

ppp

? b4 4

Fast

œœœœœœœœœœœœ 3

3

3

mp

3

&b Œ

{

sim.

12

&b

{

?b

f

p

Œ

mf

3 œ 4œ Œ

œŒ

sim.

œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ Œ

mp

œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ- œ- œœœ œ œ

œœŒ

mf

poco rit.

4 & b4 Ó

œ

{

œ œ #œ œ

? b4 4œ Œ Ó > ææ ˙ b & ˙

24

{

œ

U 3 Œ 4Œ

Expressive

Œ

mp

Ó

œ

œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ- œœ œ œ

œŒ

Œ

œ œœ œ 3 œœ œœœ œ œ 4 œ #œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ 4 œœ Œ 4 œ œ œ -- œ œ œ - - fp œ œŒ Œ 4 3 ∑ ∑ Ó œ Œ Œ nœ œ 4œ Œ Œ Œ 4

3 œ #ÆœJ œ Œ 4

18

?b

#œ œ œœŒ Ó

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ- œœ- œœœ œ œ

?b œ œ Ó

A

rit.

6

Matthew Weyer

ææ œœ ∑

œ œ

3 4

B

Moving forward

˙ ˙ æ

mf

æ æ œœæ œœæ œææ œ

ææ ææ œææ œœ œœ œ

œ ææœ

j œæ ‰ Œ Œ œ Œ

œ- Œ

æj ‰ Œ œœ

Œ

Œ

Œ

#œ-

æ j œæ #œæ ‰ Œ Œ œ œ

˙ ææ˙

˙ ææ˙

œ ææœ ∑

œ- Œ

Œ

j œæ ‰ Œ œ

Œ

œ-

Œ

Œ

© 2016 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.

4 4 4 4


Spinning Yarns

˙ &b ˙ æ ?b ∑

30

{

C

æ j œæ #œæ ‰ Œ Œ œ œ

˙˙ ææ

## œœ ææ

œœ æJ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ 3 œœœ œ Œ Œ 3

f

Œ œ Œ

Not too fast

&b Œ

{

Œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ

?b œ œ Œ mp

42

& b œœ-

{

mf

Œ

48

& b œœ ?b

f

Ó

mp

œ

Œ

œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ- -œœ œœ-

œœÓ

œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ- œ- œœ-

? b #œ œ Œ

{

œœ ææ

Œ -œ

Œ

œœ ææ

œœ ææ

>œ

Œ

œ

œŒ

Œ

rit.

p

œœŒ

mf

œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ- œ- œœ-

œœ œœ œœ œœ #œœ œ œ œ ‰ J nœ bœ œ

œ Œ Œ

sim.

mf

# œœ

U Œ

Œ œœ Œ

œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ- -œ

p

sim.

Œ

œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œœ- œœ-

œŒ

Œ

Ó

œ

A tempo

‰ œnœ#œ œ Œ 3

Ó

f

> œ

25


Matthew Weyer

Torn Torn (foundation)

Torn is a musical expression of the mixed emotions resulting from a deeply personal loss. Once again, a graduated set of yarn mallets would be an excellent choice for this solo. Feel free to be as expressive as possible with tempo and dynamics. There are many rolls in this piece, so keep it fresh with a variety of roll speeds and types. Experiment with moving toward the crown of the mallet as you decrescendo the rolls.

Technique

and

Essentials

Immerse yourself in the key of Db major. Don’t limit yourself to playing scales in single octaves. Practice the scale over the full range of the instrument and try using two octaves at once, as shown here:

Db

major

4 bœ & 4 bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ œ œ bœ ? 44 bœ bœ œ bœ bœ bœ

{

œ bœ bœ bœ

œ bœ bœ

œ bœ bœ bœ

Œ

Db Eb

Gb Ab Bb

1 2

Db

4 5 6

œ bœ bœ Œ

1

3

7

F

C

On a couple of occasions in this solo, you may need to use the double lateral stroke. This stroke combines the vertical wrist motion of the double vertical stroke with the horizontal twist motion of the single independent stroke to quickly play two separate notes in one hand. The exercise below may be played slowly with the single independent technique but will require the double lateral stroke when played faster:

4 bœ b œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & 4 bœ œ œ œ 4

1

2

4

3

1

2

4

3

1

2

4

3

Playing the following excerpt from measure 10 will require the double lateral stroke with the left hand. Use the indicated sticking and twist your left hand using one wrist motion to play Bb and Db.

26

1

2

3

b 4 & b bbb 4 Œ

‰ œœœœ 3

3

1

2

4

Œ


Spinning Yarns

Musical Development Chords and harmonies create certain feelings and moods. A chord with clash and tension is said to be dissonant. A chord that is harmonically stable is said to be consonant. Play and listen to these four chords from the solo:

b 4 & b bbb 4

{

˙ ? bb b 44 ˙æ˙˙ bb æ

pp

˙˙˙ ˙ ææ

∑ ˙˙˙ ææ˙

U ˙˙˙ ˙ ææ

,

The first and fourth chords create the same general mood, but the first chord has more tension due to the Ab added to the Gb major chord. This non-chord tone creates a gentle dissonance called a “suspension.” The second chord is pleasant but doesn’t complete the musical idea. Without a doubt, the third chord has the most dissonance, which immediately resolves at the fourth chord. Why is all this important? Recognizing the presence of musical tension and release allows you to make artistic choices with your dynamics, roll speed, and tone quality. Each of these nuances helps to create a mature performance that will communicate the musical idea to your audience.

Growing

through the

Process

Practice makes perfect? Not exactly. Practice makes permanent. Consistent, correct repetition makes perfect. And who has the attention span to do that? Create a game that makes it fun to practice. Stack ten coins on the end piece of the marimba and move one over to a new stack for each correct repetition. Continue until all ten coins have been moved to the other stack. Don’t speed up your tempo and don’t cheat! This exercise creates some pressure as you near your goal and motivates you to achieve consistency in your repetition. Listen carefully, perform thoughtfully, and don’t drift into mindless practice. Even though you didn’t compose the solo, own it. Make the piece yours through your musical imagination by making creative decisions with tempo, phrasing, and other musical elements. Take ownership of an interpretation that is unique to you. Attach some imagery and meaning to each section and communicate this meaning as you play. What does this piece of music mean to YOU? Most certainly, there was an inspiration behind the composition of this solo, but even more important is creating your own voice through your personal connection to the music.

27


Level: Medium Approx. playing time: 2’30”

Torn

Smoothly q = 76

b 4 & b bbb 4

{

mp

? bb b 44 œ œ bb b 4 & b bbb 4

œæ œ ˙æ˙ ™™

5 4 5 œ 4 œ5 4

5

{

mp

? bb b 44 œ œ bb -

œæ œ ˙æ˙ ™™

{

pp

˙ ? bb b ˙æ˙˙ bbæ b 5 & b bbb 4

œ

œæ œ ˙æ˙ ™™

œ

œ-

œ œ-

œ

œ

mp

œœ œ œ

‰ œœœœ Œ

œœ+ dead stroke œ Œ Ó œ

œ

œ

œæ œ ˙æ˙ ™™

œ œ-

œ œ- œ

3

Œ

˙˙˙ ˙ ææ

œ-

5 œ 4 œ-

A

b & b bbb

œ

œ

Matthew Weyer

pp

œ-

œ

œ

3 4

˙˙˙ ˙ ææ

˙˙˙˙ ææ

œ

œ-

œ

{

œ

? bb b 45 œ œ bb -

œæ œ ˙æ˙ ™™ -œ

œ

b 5 œ & b bbb 4 œ ™ œ œ œ ‰ œ™

18

{

mf

? bb b 45 œœ bb

Œ

Ó

œ œ- œ

œ œœ œ 3

Π44

˙˙ Œ 44 ˙æ˙ æ

pp

œ

œ -œ ∑

˙˙ ˙˙ ææ

œ

œ

œ-

Œ

mp

œœ œœ

mp

œ 3 œœ 4œ

mf

4 4

œæ œ ˙æ˙

4 4

4 4 4 4

+ œœœœ ™™™ œœœœ ≈J Œ Ó

4 4

œœ+ œ Œ Œ œ

œ

œœ+ œœ Œ

œ

æ æ ææ œœæœ œœæœœ w w ww

æ œœæœ œ

4 4 pp

æ ˙˙æ˙ ™™™ ˙ ™

f

æ œœæœ œ f

pp

˙˙˙˙ ææ

4 œœ 4æ ˙æ ™ ˙˙ ™™™ ˙

5 4

ææ ˙˙ ™™

5 4

C

mp

œœ

˙˙ ˙˙ ææ

˙˙˙˙ ææ

pp

˙˙˙ ææ˙

4 4

mp

B

œæ œ ˙æ˙ -œ

6 4

œ

œ

14

œ

œ

6 4

œæ œ ˙æ˙

5 4

˙˙˙ ˙ ææ

5 4

U ˙˙˙ ˙ æ

© 2016 Tapspace Publications, LLC, Portland, OR. (ASCAP) International copyright secured. All rights reserved.

,

5 4 5 4


D

b 5 & b bbb 4 Œ

{

? bb b 45 œ œ Œ bb mp

p

Ó

Œ 47 œ œ Ó mf

œ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ

b & b bbb ‰

27

{

œU ˙˙ œ ˙ œ ææ œ œ œ œ œ

œU œœ ™™ 7 œ J Œ œ œ œ ææ 4

Freely

œ

œœ

mp

? bb b bb

œ

Œ

Ó

b 2 & b bbb 4

{

? b b 42 bbb

b 3 & b bbb 4

41

{

3 4

œ 4 œ Œ 4 œ œ p

? bb b 43 œ œ bb mp

4œ 4-

œ

mp

œ æ œ ˙æ˙ ™™ mp

2 4

ppp

œœœœ œœœœ Œ p

2

3 4

3

3 œœœ 4œ 1

E

rit.

2 œ 4 œ œœœœœœ 3

œ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ

2

3

œ œ™

œœœ œœœ œ œ Œ pp

4 4

œœœœ œœœœ 2 4

4 4

2 4

4 4

œ æ œ ˙æ˙ ™™

2 4

p

a tempo

4 œœ 4-

2 4

4

3

p

Œ

3 4 3 œ 4 -œ

2 4 œ œœœœœœ œ

mp

mp

Ó

p pp

mp

b 4 3 & b bbb 4 ‰ œ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ 4 œœœœ œœœœ Œ

36

mp

4 4

31

{

4‰ 4

p

mf

œ œ œœ œœ œœœ œœœ œœœœ œœœœ œœœœ

Faster

p

? bb b 44 bb

Spinning Yarns

œ

3

3

ppp

2 4

3 4

3 4

rit.

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ 3

3

ppp

29


www.tapspace.com



Tapspace Publications, LLC Portland, Oregon www.tapspace.com

TSPB-33