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FREE • Friday, September 16, 2016

TACOMA BOXERS BRING IT

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ABES BACK TO WINNING

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MOBY DICK: THE TALE RETOLD

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.com TACOMAWEEKLY YO U R CO M M U N I T Y NE W S PA P E R - 29 YE A R S O F SE R V I C E

TEARS OF SUPPORT, TEARS OF REMEMBRANCE

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE FAMILY

GRIEF AND SUPPORT. Parents Jon and Jennifer, and daughter Madison, had just a short time with new baby Maximus before his passing. They reached out to the TEARS Foundation for support, and hope that caring people will attend the TEARS fundraiser on Oct. 1 to help keep the Foundation strong for other parents suffering such a loss. Learn more details about the fundraiser in the story below.

TACOMA FOUNDATION HELPS PARENTS GRIEVING THE LOSS OF THEIR BABY By Carolin Jones

carolin@tacomaweekly.com

(Note: Last names in the story below have been withheld to help protect privacy.)

W

hen Jon and Jennifer met in 2003, a match was made. The casual encounter at a workplace function turned into a commitment for life when the pair tied the knot in 2007. Five years later, the couple welcomed daughter Madison. Being both from families with siblings, they wanted to add another member to their family and were expecting another child in no time. “I was so excited. I was just going to indulge in the pregnancy and enjoy every moment of it,” says Jennifer. During the weekly ultrasounds, the family enjoyed watching their baby grow. “We've gotten to see our little blueberry, and then our little plum, each week. We could see

WHILE NEWS OF PREGNANCY IS ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL EVENTS IN PEOPLE'S LIVES, SOMETIMES THE BEAUTY TURNS TO TRAGEDY. THE TACOMABASED TEARS FOUNDATION AIMS TO PROVIDE EMOTIONAL AND FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR FAMILIES EXPERIENCING THIS PAINFUL LOSS. him grow, and that was always so exciting,” she says. After the initial excitement of learning they were having a boy, the family also learned that the baby's brain hemispheres didn't separate and that he only had two heart chambers – traits of a rare condition called Trisomy 13. “I just remember crumpling into Jon's arms not knowing what that meant,” says Jennifer. Babies with Trisomy 13 have an average

NEVER FORGET 15 YEARS LATER

lifespan of five to seven days. They chose to continue the pregnancy and settled on the name Maximus, meaning “The Greatest.” Maximus was born on Aug. 14, 2015, weighing two pounds and three ounces at 14.5 inches length He passed away two hours later in his parents’ arms. Jennifer knew her family would need support and she reached out to the TEARS Foundation, a non-profit she previously held fundraisers for. “Never in my wildest

dreams would I have thought that we would need their services,” she said. Attending the support groups gave the family an opportunity to share their son's story and grieve with others who experienced the loss of a child. “We get it because we've been there,” said Sarah Slack, founder of the Tacomabased TEARS. She created the organization in honor of her son in 2002, two years after his death. “You're not alone. There is a whole network of grieving parents out here,” says Slack. The support groups offer opportunities to share stories, mourn and encourage each other. With its 21 chapters throughout the U.S, the organization not only provides support groups and peer-to-peer counseling for grieving parents, but also covers funeral costs for infants in an attempt to lift the financial burden of losing a child. After a year of raising money to pay for her son's headstone, Slack wanted to See TEARS / page A9

CITY’S BUDGET BEGINS TAKING SHAPE FOR FALL VOTE By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

TRIBUTE. Tacome Fire Department Chief James Duggan addresses a gathering of more than 100 people at the city's remembrance ceremony last Sunday to mark the 15th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 that leveled the World Trade Center in New York City, damaged the Pentagon and led to the crash of a commercial airliner in Pennsylvania.

PSE GAS PLANT UPDATE

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ouR viEw

Baby steps at Port of Tacoma. PAGE A6

The march toward a biannual budget is picking up pace with community meetings and study sessions slated this fall. A City Council vote on the 20172018 budget is scheduled for Nov. 15. The nutshell is that the city’s general fund budget, one that pays for city services from the police and fire departments to library books and human services, is expected to reach $400 million during the next two years. If the current levels of spending continue, after adjusting for inflation, raises and health care costs, the tax revenues will fall short by $6.7 million. That’s about 2 percent of the projected budget over two years. It’s a relatively small “structural defect” heading into budget talks, particularly since the city faced a $32 million gap in 2011 and $63 million shortfall in 2013. But still, more money is expected to flow out than

For years, Blake Kremer’s budding career as a Tacoma defense attorney was heavily weighted toward those charged with making crystal meth – not the kind of cases he envisioned while in law school. “A lot of my clients since then have taken personal responsibility for at least part of the offense they’re charged with,” Kremer said. “The defendants making meth knew what they’d done, took no responsibility and went crazy when you told them they were facing jail time.” That changed in 2009, when Kremer met Catholic nun Anne Montgomery. She and another Kremer

See budGEt / page A9

See KREmER / page A9

MAGIC SEASON ENDS

Kremer, the second time was the charm for them to find one another again and marry.

BLAKE KREMER: TACOMA DEFENSE ATTORNEY WHO LET A NUN LIVE DOWNSTAIRS By Larry LaRue larry@tacomaweekly.com

ZOMBIE PUNK DUO

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Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

PHOTO BY LARRY LARUE

REUNITED. In the case of Oratai and Blake

Sports ........................A10 Hot Tickets ................A11

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Facebook: facebook.com/tacomaweekly Twitter: @Tacomaweekly Tumblr: tacomaweekly.tumblr.com Pinterest: pinterest.com/tacomaweekly Flickr: flickr.com/tacomaweekly

A&E ....................... ....B1 Make A Scene ............B7

Calendar ................. B6 Horoscopes............. B6

Two Sections | 24 Pages


Section A • Page 2 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 16, 2016

Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK

53RD AND EAST K STREET Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the residents know it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.” In 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of roads riddled with holes, and continue those efforts. Two road packages passed by voters last year added money to the city’s street fund. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

Bulletin Board TOUR OFFERED OF HISTORIC CHURCH ON NORTH J STREET On Sept. 18 at 2 p.m., the current occupant of the historic building at 324 N. J St., Greater Destiny Church, will offer a tour of the former Temple Beth Israel. Admission is free. The tour will be hosted by Rev. Ivan Johnson, with a presentation by Deb Freedman of Tacoma Historical Society about the lives of Jewish pioneers remembered in the memorial windows. Originally the Temple Beth Israel’s second church, this structure at 324 N. J St. is designed in the Mission Revival style, with exterior cladding in stucco. It was built in 1922, with arched and original glass designs that are still intact. Be sure to note the star window facing North J Street. HISTORY MUSEUM SEEKS FIFE HIGH YEARBOOKS The Fife History Museum preserves and collects Fife High School yearbooks. A FHS Class of 1940 graduate recently visited the museum, and one of the highlights of his visit was seeing himself, his classmates and teachers in an old yearbook. The museum would like to ask the public for help in completing its collection so that volunteers never have to say “Sorry, we don’t have that year.” The following is a list of Fife High School yearbooks that we do not have copies of: 1933, 1935, 1980, 1981, 1983, 2005, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. If you are in possession of any of these missing yearbooks and would like to donate them to the Fife History Museum, please contact Julie Watts at the Museum office, (253) 896-4710. The Museum is located at 2820 54th Ave. E., Fife, WA 98424. Hours are Wednesdays and Fridays noon to 4:30 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and other days by appointment. HEART AND STROKE WALK: ARE YOU SIGNED UP? We're counting down to Saturday, Oct. 8 in Tacoma at Cheney Stadium. The Heart and Stroke Walk is familyfriendly and non-competitive, with activities for all ages. Walk or run the 5K or one-mile Survivor Route. Registration is easy: visit southsoundheartwalk.org and pugetsoundheartwalk.org to start a team or join as an individual. T-Shirt Contest: Did you make a special T-shirt for your walk team? Enter our t-shirt contest on Facebook by e-mailing a jpg of your design by Sept. 19 in Tacoma and Sept. 23 in Seattle. Entries will be posted for voting on the South Sound and Puget Sound Facebook accounts. The shirt that gets the most likes by the deadline will get featured during opening ceremonies at the walk. Details at southsoundheartwalk.org andpugetsoundheartwalk.org. Lifestyle Change Award: Inspired by how someone

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you know has greatly improved their health by making positive lifestyle changes? Nominate the person for a Lifestyle Change Award to honor their commitment to good health. Visit the Heart and Stroke Walk website for details. Sponsored in South Sound by Bennett Bigelow & Leedom, and in Puget Sound by Virginia Mason and EvergreenHealth. We are looking for volunteers to help with the Heart and Stroke Walk in Seattle and Tacoma during the event and setup the day before. Visitpugetsoundheartwalk.org and southsoundheartwalk.org for details.

TACOMA ARTS MONTH IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER October 2016 marks the 15th anniversary of Tacoma Arts Month – a community celebration of the arts that includes hundreds of community-hosted arts and culture events, exhibits and workshops for all ages, taking place every day throughout the month. Programming includes music, theater and dance performances, hands-on experiences, visual art exhibits, film screenings, literary readings, lectures, cultural events and workshops. All events are open to the public and many activities are free. Signature events include: Tacoma Arts Month Opening Party and AMOCAT Arts Awards: The community is invited to attend a free celebration on Sept. 29 from 6-9 p.m. at Asia Pacific Cultural Center (4851 South Tacoma Way). Start Tacoma Arts Month off with a kaleidoscope of pop-up art exhibits, hands-on activities, music and dance performances, and more at this family-friendly, community festival. There will be appetizers, dessert and a no-host bar. The event will include recognition of the Tacoma Arts Commission’s 2016 funding recipients and the AMOCAT Arts Award winners: Metro Parks Tacoma, Tacoma Youth Symphony Association and Christopher Paul Jordan. The event is presented by the Tacoma Arts Commission and Spaceworks Tacoma, and hosted by Asia Pacific Cultural Center. Tacoma Studio Tour: You look inside the working studios of 57 local artists to learn about the artistic process, ask questions and purchase one-of-a-kind creations. All studios will feature demonstrations or will have handson activities for visitors. This free, family-friendly, selfguided tour will run Oct. 15 and Oct. 16, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and covers 34 locations around Tacoma. Studio Tour attendees are encouraged to pick up a Tacoma Studio Tour Passport and have it stamped at each studio location visited. Once at least eight stamps have been collected, the passport can be submitted for a chance to win one of several prize packages containing artwork handcrafted by a selection of artists on the tour. Visit the Tacoma Studio Tour website for a complete list of studio locations, an interactive map, and information about the Tacoma Studio Tour Passport. See more bulletin board itemS at tacomaweekly.com


Friday, September 16, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 3

TRAFFIC FLOW, PARKING IMPROVED AT POINT DEFIANCE PARK With more than 3 million visits to Point Defiance Park each year and numbers expected to increase as new attractions take shape, it’s no wonder the park’s 2015 master plan update highlighted the need for improved traffic circulation and additional parking. At 6 p.m. Sept. 29, Metro Parks Tacoma will begin a series of public meetings to discuss options to make it easier to get to and from favorite destinations such as Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, to move around the park in general and to better separate pedestrian from vehicle traffic. The first public meeting will take place in the park’s Pagoda. Everyone who visits or otherwise cares about the park is invited to take part. “We are excited to show preliminary design options to improve the safety and user experience,” said Tom Dargan, the Metro Parks project manager leading the process. “We will explain the work that has been done to date and lay out the future agenda so the public can continue to be involved as the project moves forward.” Besides traffic changes and parking spaces, Metro Parks also is exploring operational

changes such as the possible introduction of a shuttle service. The Sept. 29 meeting will be the public’s first opportunity to weigh in on proposed solutions, which also will be posted online at DestinationPointDefiance.org. At the meeting, the consultants will share the guiding principles of their work and ask citizens about their priorities. Comments from the public will influence refinements and selection of a preferred option. The preferred option will be presented in yet another public meeting. Citizens will be asked in particular to examine plans for preserving the park’s tree canopy, which is a top priority for the park district, and to look over different possibilities for improving safety by separating pedestrians from vehicles. The project is funded through a $198 million capital improvement bond approved by Metro Parks voters in 2014. It is part of the broader Destination Point Defiance initiative, which includes not only the 2015 master plan update but also the Pacific Seas Aquarium, waterfront improvements, viewpoint improvements, infrastructure upgrades and additional work.

In addition to gathering feedback at public meetings, Metro Parks plans to launch a survey on paper and online to gauge the public’s response to the proposals. Citizens may also contact Dargan directly at tomd@ tacomaparks.com or (253) 305-1017. If you are unable to attend and would like to comment, contact Project Manager Tom Dargan at tomd@tacomaparks.com or (253) 305-1017. If your community group or civic organization would like a Metro Parks representative to speak about plans for improved traffic circulation and parking in Point Defiance Park, please contact Chief Communications and Public Affairs Officer Hunter George at hunterg@ tacomaparks.com or (253) 305-1065. Metro Parks and its consultants will also create a survey to help gauge citizens’ reactions to different options, as it did recently with plans for Fort Nisqually Living History Museum and the W.W. Seymour Botanical Conservatory. Once complete, the survey will be available online at DestinationPointDefiance.org and in various locations throughout the park.

TOP STORIES ON tacomaweekly.com

#1 TWO-SPORT STAR IS MAKING HIS MARK IN PUYALLUP #2 HOTEL PLANS TAKE SHAPE FOR CHAMBERS BAY #3 OUR VIEW: PSE GETS A GIFT, WHILE WE GET THE BILL #4 LINK EXPANSION TAKES SHAPE, WORKS TO PRESERVE STATION PARKING #5 GIG HARBOR POLICE SEEK ID OF ARMED ROBBER WHO HELD UP GAS STATION WITH SAWED OFF SHOTGUN #6 PUYALLUP TRIBAL COUNCIL TO EXPLORE OPTIONS FOR STOGIE’S PROPERTY #7 AFTER EIGHT YEARS, THERE’S A POOL IN THE HILLTOP

TACOMA MAN SENTENCED FOR THE MURDER OF EX-GIRLFRIEND’S MOTHER On Sept. 9, Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist accepted guilty pleas from Austin Richard Moores Nelson, 20, for first degree murder, first degree burglary and first degree animal cruelty. Moores Nelson shot and killed Teresa Ann Ryan, 46, last January. “Teresa was part of our family,” said Lindquist. “She worked in the District Court Clerk’s Office and was especially well-

known and well-liked in our courthouse.” In September 2015, Ryan's daughter began dating Moores Nelson. Ryan learned of the relationship and told Moores Nelson to stay away from her daughter. Moores Nelson continued his relationship with Ryan's daughter. On January 8, 2016, Ryan's daughter broke up with Moores Nelson, telling him she did not want to continue lying to her

mother. The following week, Moores Nelson sent text messages to Ryan's daughter, threatening to damage her car. Later that day, her car was vandalized in the school parking lot. The following week, Ryan called police and reported that her daughter received text messages from Moores Nelson, who was threatening to post photos and videos online of him and Ryan's daugh-

ter having sex. Later that day, the photos and videos appeared on Facebook and Instagram. On the morning of January 18, Moores Nelson approached Ryan in her driveway and shot her three times in the chest and back. Then, he broke into Ryan's home and shot the family dog. Ryan's daughter was not home at the time of the murder. Moores Nelson fled the scene and was arrested

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Section A • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 16, 2016

THANK YOU SEAHAWKS

SEATTLE SEAHAWKS LOCK ARMS IN UNITY PHOTOS COURTESY OF SEATTLE SEAHAWKS

ALL 53 SEATTLE SEAHAWK PLAYERS CAME TOGETHER IN A SHOW OF SOLIDARITY AND RACIAL UNITY DURING THE NATIONAL ANTHEM SEAHAWKS FANS Proud to See PlAyerS StAnd together The entire Seahawks roster, as well as Seattle staff, locked arms during the the national anthem prior to Seattle's game against the Miami Dolphins on Sept. 11 to raise awareness for racial inequality, police brutality and other social issues. The move was widely regarded as a class act by fans, many of which were initially upset upon hearing of the possibility of some sort of protest gesture by the team. Yet another reason why we love this team!

Proud SuPPorterS of the SeAttle SeAhAwkS!

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Friday, September 16, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 5

CounCil ChAmberS Set to reoPen WITH NEW SOUND, VIDEO SYSTEM

PHOTO BY CEDRIC LEGGIN

ProteSt. RedLine Tacoma activists waved signs

along 38th Street last week to gain support and awareness about the planned liquefied natural gas plant Puget Sound Energy wants to build on the tideflats. Critics fear the plant would be an unsafe risk to surrounding neighborhoods and businesses in the area.

SAFETY INFORMATION OF PSE PLANNED GAS PLANT COULD COME THIS FALL By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

A Washington State Court of Appeals commissioner has merged two appeals of a lower court decision on the disclosure of fire and emergency response information involving the proposed 8 million gallon liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility Puget Sound Energy wants to build on the tideflats. Port watchdog Arthur West and RedLine Tacoma activist John Carlton had independently sought the emergency response information that PSE filed as part of its Environmental Impact Statement last year. The City of Tacoma deemed it disclosable information but alerted PSE about the plans to release the information so utility officials could file legal actions to block the information from becoming public. The energy company did just that, but a Pierce County judge ruled in both filings that the disaster modeling and response procedures should be released. PSE has appealed those decisions on the grounds that disclosing the information would heighten risks of a terrorist attack. On Monday, Appeals Court Commissioner Eric B. Schmidt merged PSE’s appeals into a single case since they involve identical information and legal arguments. But the ruling earlier this week is only a partial victory for critics of the project because Schmidt denied West’s and Carlton’s call for a halt of any construction-related activity or permits for the project until the safety information is released because the court could not find any legal authority to block the issuing of permits, even while the project is under legal clouds. “It would have been good to put this on hold until it’s all ironed out,” Carlton said. “If (LNG) is so safe, why not share the information? The people have the right to know what is going on.” That knowledge could come sooner rather than later, thanks to the merger of the West and Carlton cases. Schmidt ordered an expedited process, with PSE’s opening briefs due by Oct. 7. The appeal is set for consideration in December, a month earlier than it had been originally slated for a hearing.

RENDERING COURTESY OF CITY OF TACOMA

uPDAteD DiGS. The Tacoma City Council Chambers is receiving a makeover that will not only update the sound and video system, but also update the upholstery on the chairs. By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The Tacoma City Council Chambers had dated back to 1979, a time when smoking was allowed in public buildings and putting carpet on walls was the only way to muffle sound. The need for a technology upgrade of the 8-year-old control booth to start broadcasting council meetings in high definition provided the opportunity for the chambers to get a makeover. The chambers have been closed since late June, with meetings being held at the Tacoma Public Utilities auditorium, at 3628 S. 35th St., in Tacoma during the renovations. The updated chambers will reopen later this month, following about $200,000 in aesthetic improvements and $400,000 in technology upgrades. The renovations will be done by Sept. 30. The chambers serves as the main meeting facility for the City Council, but is also used for city presentations, new hire orientations, departmental gatherings, some committee meetings and Hearing Examiner sessions. “All of those groups use this room,” said Cable Communications and Franchise Manager Jeff Leuders. “For me, from my perspective, it is a community room.” Each of the groups had input on changes based on how they use the chambers. BCRA Architects served as the architect of record for the interior design work. Aesthetic changes include new walls and refinishing of the council dais, presentation desks and podium as well as new carpeting that will also help muffle the noise created when people enter the chambers or chat in the marble-floored hallway directly outside. “We went with a simple, easy to maintain finish,”

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Facilities Division Manager Justin E. Davis said. “It wasn’t very aesthetically challenging.” The technological changes will add two audiencefacing monitors so that presentations can be seen from all of the seats, as well as have improved sound with a shift from wall-mounted speakers to 12 new ones that are in the ceiling. “It should be a much clearer sound environment,” Leuders said. Each of the council seats will have their own microphone, speaker and presentation monitor. A colorcoded light system will signal people giving public comment, another visual cue about when their testimony times start and near the limits alongside the clock to help streamline the public comment process. The broadcasting booth will control seven cameras, up from four, to better provide real time coverage. The new system also will allow real-time closed captioning, something that was available for viewers on television but not within the chambers until now. “The Council Chambers is an important meeting space for citizens to engage with city elected officials and city staff on issues that impact the Tacoma community,” said City Manager T.C. Broadnax in a release that announced the renovations. “These renovations will serve to improve the civic engagement experience and give citizens an enhanced platform to see their city government in action.” Council meetings will begin broadcasting in high defintion later this fall and can then be found on Comcast Channel 321 and Click Channel 512 as well as in regular definition on the existing channels, Comcast Channel 12 and Channel 21 outside of Tacoma.

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Section A • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 16, 2016

Our View

BABy StePS At Port of tAcomA

The Port of Tacoma Commission is making a gesture that it is willing to work with critics of its operations and its decision-making process concerning lease and development deals. At least it is a start. At press time, the commission was preparing to approve a new way of informing the residents it serves by being more communicative about what the Port actually does and what decisions it is going to make – before the decisions are made. The commission’s Thursday agenda included a framework for a new policy that would require additional public meetings before decisions are made by requiring lease agreements to be approved after two readings, rather than the current singular vote. Under the new policy, the commission would hold a public hearing on a lease and then vote on a lease agreement over two meetings before any agreement is official, leaving more time and opportunities for people to comment on any new deals. The proposal would specifically apply to any project that stores, processes or manufactures, with the intent to distribute, fossil fuels including oil, petroleum-based fuels, natural gas and coal on more than 10 acres of port-owned land, or uses more than 1 million gallons per day of water, emits more than 10 thousand metric tons per year of greenhouse gases or uses more than 26 megawatts of electricity. The policy change comes after community uproar regarding the now-dead plans to build the world’s largest natural gas to methanol plant earlier this year and the rising tide of opposition to Puget Sound Energy plans to build an 8 million gallon facility on port-owned property that would convert natural gas into liquefied natural gas to sell as a cleaner-burning fuel for two TOTE container ships and yet-to-benamed other customers, as well as store for use by utility customers during extreme weather conditions. Plans for both projects prompted heated criticism about safety issues concerning projects on the tideflats and the overall future of commerce and industry on the waterfront. There has even been talk about conducting a public process to review zoning descriptions about what would, and would not, be allowed along the waterfront, which is increasingly being surrounded by residential developments and calls for “greener� industries. It is a touchy subject for Tacomans since the city has a long history of being robbed of its natural resources by businesses that then leave taxpayers with the bill to clean up the environmental waste and destruction that the full-pocketed businesses left behind. Any effort to add voices to the debate about what happens on the tideflats is better than commission decisions made in a vacuum. It would seem prudent for commissioners to be more active in seeking thoughts on visions of future operations on the tideflats through forums, zoning reviews or area plans, rather than simply casting a wider net of public notification for proposals and drawing out the process of deciding on those decisions. Maybe that step toward full transparency will come someday – after all, the port did just sue residents to block their efforts regarding water use by mega projects. Baby steps.

By Don C. Brunell

correction Tacoma Weekly did not properly credit a photo of comedian Tom Green, taken by photographer Michel Grenier, that ran on the front page of City Life in our Sept. 16 edition. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error. The editorial in the Sept. 11 edition contained incorrect calculations. The feasibility rent Puget Sound Energy pays to the Port of Tacoma for the proposed liquefied natural gas site is $146,000 a month when factored for the $49,735 per month for the land plus the $7,000 added each month during the second year of the feasibility period. The editorial did not factor the added charges. That amount has now reached the same amount as what PSE would pay during the construction phase. The two-month extension continues that added charge. The lease payment if or when the facility goes into operation will be $212,445 per month. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.

By Rivera Sun

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Guest Editorials

WhAt hAPPenS in cAliforniA needS to StAy in cAliforniA California has become a manufacturing “job killer� bastion because of its shackling regulations, high taxes and excessive permitting requirements. Its quagmire of government-mandate programs is accelerating an industrial exodus. In 2009, the Milken Institute reported that California lost 79,000 manufacturing jobs in just six years (2003-2007) prior to the “Great Recession.� In contract, seven other competing states gained 62,000 workers. The report blames the state’s onerous regulations and high taxes for pushing business elsewhere. In 2014, a key Los Angeles Economic Development Corporation study showed that while manufacturing productivity accelerated, factory employment has declined faster than any other state. This trend continues. Kiplinger reported that California tops its “least-friendly list,� thanks to a combination of high income taxes, the nation’s highest state sales tax (7.5 percent) and a hefty gasoline tax. The Golden State has the nation’s third-worst business tax climate, according to the Tax Foundation. Its tax policy does not encourage manufacturing investments. Unlike Washington, California imposes a sales tax on the purchase of new machinery and equipment. To tax both the "input" and the final manufactured product amounts to "double taxation" and is poor tax policy, the California Manufacturers & Technology Association (CMTA) declares.

In 2015, California had the lowest rate for manufacturing investments for expansions, modernization and new sites. CMTA found that the state hasn’t received more than two percent of total U.S. investments since the year 2000. The cost of the state’s excessive climate change regulations is most troublesome. Even though the state is on target in reducing greenhouse gas emissions as prescribed by a sweeping 2006 law, Gov. Jerry Brown (D) just signed far-reaching new standards aimed at cutting carbon pollution by 40 percent (below 1990 levels) by 2030. In addition, Brown signed separate measures mandating more renewable energy (solar and wind) to produce electricity and cutting petroleum use in cars and trucks by as much as 50 percent over the next 15 years. The goal is to put an additional 1.5 million zero emission vehicles on California streets and freeways. Brown's administration believes that the new requirement would "make it possible" for the state to cut emissions by 80 percent (below 1990 levels) by 2050 even though California’s population will grow to 60 million. It is now 40 million. The most problematic for employers is that this bill gives California’s Air Resources Board sweeping, unchecked authority to increase costs on manufacturers. The new law puts “very severe caps on the emissions of greenhouse gases in California without requiring the regulatory agencies to give any consideration to how it will affect the economy or residents,� the California Chamber of Commerce states.

The growing cumulative impact of the state’s higher regulatory costs and taxes and fees continues to take its toll on manufacturers, workers and the economy. On Aug. 29, Ashley, the world’s largest furniture manufacturer, announced that it will close two plants in Colton and lay off about 840 workers. The company is transferring its production to its facilities in Wisconsin and North Carolina, citing the need to “create more efficiency.� “California is essentially eliminating its blue-collar sectors,� said John Husing, chief economist for the state’s Inland Empire Economic Partnership. He called Ashley’s move “a gigantic blow� for the region. The bottom line is that the combination of lower labor costs elsewhere, and automation, have already heavily impacted California’s manufacturing workforce. Between 1990 and 2012, the LA’s economic development leaders noted that California lost 40 percent of its manufacturing jobs. That amounted to over 840,000 layoffs. California’s imbalance continues to grow because its elected officials brush off economic impacts from the loss factories and processing plants. The bottom line: What is happening in the “Golden State� needs to say there! Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the state’s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

Sing the Body Politic, electric

Recently, I traveled by train across the US in a swaying, creeping journey that took me through the backyards and forgotten corners of our country. Here, you see the America that doesn't make it into the slogans of presidential campaigns. These back alleys are not evoked by the statistics and demographical jargon politicians use to describe this country. When the presidential candidates refer to "Americans" – a nation of 320 million souls – we are left flailing in a void of description. Corporate logos come to mind faster than the faces of our fellow citizens. There is no "average" American in a nation as diverse as ours. The politicians travel in private jets and stomp on campaign trails as celebrity figures; they do not slip through the private sorrows and hidden miseries of this country, anonymously and silently bearing witness to the suffering, dreams, hopes, and fears of the populace. As I ride the train, I watch my nation pass, poignant and poetic. In the side yard of a desert town, a man and his son - descendants of Spanish colonists - fix the electric fence of a cattle pen. In the mountains, a sunburned Boy Scout troop clambers down off the trail of a summer backpacking expedition. On the rattling train, Amish families ride between communities, wearing starched hats and white sneakers, carrying unique dialects and quiet babies. In Colorado, an AfricanAmerican trucker climbs aboard huffing "thank the Lord" as if only by grace did he make it through this day. These are the faces of my fellow Americans, each unique, each beautiful, each a repository of suffering and grace. I pass a lonely, battered sailboat tilting to the side in a working class backyard; spare time and waterways both lie dried-up, cracked with drought. Whole lives fall into the cracks of poli-

ticians' ambiguous generalizations. The homeless are swept out of the national conversation as callously as the police who scatter homeless encampments from the cities. Betrayed by political elites who bailed out banks instead of homeowners, broken dreams are flung away like the old mattresses that litter the flashflood-muddied creek beds. Desolate closed-down main streets stretch across the Midwest while corporate box stores blaze florescent at the far ends of town. Small business owners and the middle class can be added to the endangered species list along with the bison, cougar, and grey wolf. Meanwhile, under bright lights on sanitized, heavily guarded platforms, candidates lift their hands in victory gestures and squawk platitudes to bolster the flagging confidence of a disenchanted American public. Forgive me, but it is difficult to place my trust in candidates who cannot recall the faces that I see: the toothless, weeping lines of poverty; the screaming children; the weary parents. The slumped figures in beat-up cars rattling to a stop at crossroads in a cloud of their own exhaust. I cannot have confidence in a candidate for president who cannot invoke the brokenness of our souls. For there is deep sorrow raining across America. There is despair like a storm cloud hanging black over the plains. Hopelessness parches the hearts of our people. Fear stalks the concrete jungles. Grittedteeth anxiety shudders in the chests of our debt-shackled youth. Traveling this country, listening, watching, my heart cries out for the impossible: I do not want untrustworthy rhetoric and campaign promises from rich people. I want a poet to articulate the painful truths raging in us all. I want a modern-day Walt Whitman to sing our body politic electric. I want a glorious, six-foot Maya Angelou to awaken the mourning and yearning hiding in our souls. I want a Gary Snyder to hum an

irreverent hymn of the broken American heart. I want to hear from the poets, the ones who will speak our names, those who will cry over the lives shot dead in our streets. I want a poet to remember whom we are, to recall the painful past, to struggle through the present, to hold out the beacon toward our future. I want a poet to speak across our airwaves, a human shattered by compassion, committed to our fractured nation. I want a poet to believe in us again, so that we may climb out of the pit of our self-hatred, so that we might find our way to love. I want our nation to listen to a poet who dares to unchoke love from bellowing patriotism. One who will resuscitate the word with the sharp, rib-cracking pressure of truth, so that the gasp of the future may rush into our lungs, that we might breathe together and survive our broken hearts. And perhaps, even more, I want a public of poets. For decades, we – left and right – have projected our screaming need for change onto candidates attempting to use presidents and political figures as a proxy for our inability to face the hidden misery and beauty of the people that we are. We follow our candidates around on screens, and forget to bear witness to one another. We slap each other in our sorrow; we attack each other's bleeding souls. I want us to turn our eyes to one another, so that we may see the poetry of our aching existences. So that we might voice our hidden yearnings, so that we might lament our losses, so that we may be truthful, messy, and sincere; so that we might sing our body, electric, our populace, our fractured people. We are a nation of resounding difference, diverse, incredible, and waiting to be sung whole. Author/Activist Rivera Sun, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is the author of “The Dandelion Insurrection� and other books, and is programs coordinator for Campaign Nonviolence.


Friday, September 16, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 7

LESSONS IN BUSINESS:

KNOWING WHEN IT’S TIME TO CLOSE THE DOORS

By William Manzanares william@tacomaweekly.com

When big companies fail, we always seem to hear about or read an analysis of why from an outside observer – “business experts” and the like – but never really from someone inside the company laying out exactly why the business had to close. It could be that people just don’t want to face their failures. After closing my Tacoma Fresh natural foods convenience store last month, I want to shed some light on the subject for entrepreneurs who may be facing the same crossroads: when to hold ‘em, or when to fold ‘em. In the beginning months, Tacoma Fresh was doing great. The grand opening was a lot of fun and many friends came out to support my new venture and, in turn, support the employees I hired. As word began spreading, people came in to check it out and, being a convenience store in the health food market, Tacoma Fresh allowed for no real expectations for people to have preconceived notions of what the store was supposed to be. That was a good thing for those with an open mind to what we were trying to do, and a not-so-good thing for those who had it set in their minds what “healthy” means. That was difficult and a real challenge – the nitpickers and naysayers who had negative things to say about the store. I soon realized that a lot of people’s idea of health is somewhat skewed. I think that with the nature of what was put

out there about us being a health food store, everyone assumed that their idea of health was the right way. But when they came in and we didn’t have it to their exact specifications, one of the hallmarks of Tacoma Fresh was that we encouraged customers to tell us what they’d like to see in the store, to give them a stake in having a grab-andgo place to eat well. However, when I ordered it and put it on the shelves, they wouldn’t come back to buy it. Frankly, in this case we catered to the customer in a big way and it backfired on us. We lost money. The grab-and-go, freshly made food proved to be a hit, but it became a problem when we would run out of the things to make fresh foods all day. That left some customers unhappy and likely to not return. But serving fresh foods all day wasn’t our goal to begin with. The freshly made foods were just a part of the larger, overall store. We didn’t set out to be a Subway sandwich shop where customers could have it made their way. Tacoma Fresh wasn’t set up for that kind of individual service. We tried different things, like making a seating area

that some customers asked for, but that didn’t catch on. Plus, more grocery stores are expanding their selections of natural foods more than they did a year ago, which made for more competition. Some have said that the business needed a better location, but what does that actually mean? A place with more foot traffic? A place closer to those who wanted a different location? Then I realized that people shop at places like Whole Foods due in part to the prestige of it all – being able to afford the higher-end experience in a multi-million dollar grocery showplace located in nice, shiny neighborhoods. It’s why someone drives a certain brand of car that’s very expensive when they could be driving a mid-priced car. It’s that “experience” they want. So unfortunately the clientele we were trying to cater to could not and would not do their shopping at a small convenience store when they could go elsewhere and have “the experience.” Despite our best efforts, the numbers weren’t growing. I thought that things would kick into gear, but it didn’t happen. Somewhere along the line I real-

ized that Tacoma Fresh was not catching on and that it would be a poor business decision to stay open. I had to sit down and give some real, serious thought to why I should keep the store open. I learned a lot during the process of establishing Tacoma Fresh. I learned the market and that the graband-go fresh food sold the most, as opposed to prepackaged items that didn’t move as well. So I made the decision to close Tacoma Fresh and assimilate the employees over to my other business, Smokin’ Willy’s drive-thru convenience store, and brought Tacoma Fresh food there to sell. For those who are upset that Tacoma Fresh is gone, we’ve tried to bring as much as we can into the adjacent building so you don’t have to go very far. At Smokin’ Willy’s you can get the same best-sellers that were sold at Tacoma Fresh: Caesar salads with house made dressing; Guam style chicken salad and wraps; pesto chicken sandwiches; chicken curry

wraps; sub sandwiches with house made sauces; Bulletproof brand coffee; and freshly baked cookies, cakes and cinnamon rolls. We’re handing out samples every day so customers can try before buying. My focus now is to help Tacoma Fresh food exceed tobacco sales. I’ve knocked off the word “health” because I think it might actually scare some people away, but we’re still making things fresh and making it daily. Now the experiment is this: Can Smokin’ Willy’s sell those Tacoma Fresh food items that sold well in a stand-alone store? Interestingly, there are those who refuse to do business with a smoke shop, but Smokin’ Willy’s is much more than that – it is a drive-through convenience store that sells all sorts of items. The same Tacoma Fresh foods are still being made by the same employees, only at a different location. I am still committed to helping people live healthy lives – that has not changed. The lesson

in all of this is that failure is always an option and no one should go into any business without thinking about an exit strategy. If you go into business not thinking that it could fail, that’s just not smart. You should look at every scenario when you go into business: What if it succeeds beyond my wildest dreams? How am I going to keep that momentum going? What if it fails miserably? What’s my exit strategy? Asking – and answering – these types of questions early in the game can save you much heartache later and provide a “Plan B” for your entrepreneurial dreams. No one can take away the fact that I was passionate about giving the buying public a quick and easy way to get healthy, all-natural foods on the go. Customers who want to support this cause are invited to come to Smokin’ Willy’s on North Point and buy up these foods and keep people employed because that’s what it does – keeps local people employed.

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Local Restaurants SENERGO BRINGS HEALTHY TASTY FRESHNESS TO DOWNTOWN TACOMA By Erica Cooley Special to Tacoma Weekly

S

ince opening in 2015 at 1948 Pacific Ave. in downtown Tacoma, Senergo has been serving delicious and nutritious smoothies and wraps to locals throughout the area. Owner and founder Joseph Nguyen, originally from Vancouver, BC founded Senergo in the hopes of bringing popularized Canadian health conscious delicacies of fresh pressed juices, 100 percent fruit smoothies and toasty grilled wraps to clientele in the Pacific Northwest. Senergo’s mission is to provide a modern, smart and healthy diet for busy lives by using no sorbet, no puree and no added sugars; no hidden secrets – just simple goodness. Every aspect of this restaurant has a focus on bringing the highest quality products to each and every patron – even the name Senergo is a combination of: Smoothie Energy to Go. Nguyen states, “We aim to help our busy consumers with a ‘food-done-fast’ mindset. Senergo replaces the common burger with delicious, toasty, on-grill wraps that contain a nice balance of protein and vegetables. Instead of conventional soft-drinks, we offer natural, freshpressed juice made from your favorite

PHOTO BY ERIC COOLEY

FRESH. Come into Senergo at 1948 Pacific Ave. in downtown Tacoma and leave feeling satisfied and healthy.

fruits and vegetables; as well as 100 percent juice-bases smoothies made with real fruits and delicious extras.” With very close proximity to Tacoma School of the Arts and University of Washington-Tacoma on Pacific Avenue, Senergo has catered a menu cleverly to the student and educator clientele that frequents the establishment. The smoothie menu in separated into three different levels of smoothie types: Smoothie 101, Advanced Smoothies, and Smooth Connoisseur. Smoothies on the Smoothie101 menu are simple fruit and fruit juice combinations crafted for those

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who enjoy a pure and fruity taste. The Advanced Smoothie menu includes the same fresh taste of fruits like orange, apple and banana mixed with extra flavorful goodness from dairy products, coconut and more such as the Creamy Mango with mango, low-fat yogurt, apple juice, orange juice and skim milk for a perfectly satisfying taste. The final category of smoothies at Senergo is Smooth Connoisseur which includes mixtures of fruit, vegetables, nuts and other healthy ingredients that create delicious and filling smoothies. The Senergo is one of the most popular

smoothies served with a delicious tasting combination of kale, spinach, apple, banana, almond, orange juice and apple juice. All smoothies come in one hearty size of 22 ounces and can include extra add-ons of peanut butter, whey protein, vegan protein, coconut water and more. “Many students and professors from UWT will come down and have a smoothie for lunch and leave feeling full,” Nguyen said. In addition to the many different types of smoothies, 100 percent fresh pressed juices are served in 24-ounce portions – classic juices like orange, apple and carrot as well as combinations like LiverTon, a mix of beet, carrot, lemon and ginger, or the Ultra Veg! with lemon, celery, cucumber, kale and spinach. If you are in the mood for a heartier meal, Senergo’s grilled wraps are a must try. The Saigon Grilled Wrap is a customer favorite of a combination of fresh vegetables and chicken with a spicy, flavorful sauce to make for a bold and enjoyable taste in this wrap. “Grilling the wraps makes them taste better and customers enjoy the warm food taste way more,” comments Nguyen. Senergo is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5p.m, closed on Sundays. For more information and updates on specials and new menu items, follow Senergo’s Facebook page.

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Section A • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 16, 2016


Friday, September 16, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 9

t TEARS From page A1

prevent other parents from having to go through the same. “We never thought that we would be paying for our baby's funeral. Nobody else should have that burden when they are already experiencing the worst emotional distress in their lives,” she says. TEARS helps families with $500 for burial and cremation services and caters to about 300 Washington State families a year. Although one in four women experience infant loss in her lifetime, according to the Washington State Department of Health (2011), addressing the issue is still challenging for many. “You think: This doesn't happen, babies aren't supposed to die. But it happens, and it happens a lot,” says TEARS social worker Leeann Myers. “I think people's first mistake is just trying to sugarcoat it, but there is no sugarcoating the loss of a child,” Myers says. She has been offering emotional support, connecting families with resources, and sometimes just lending an ear. “We cry together, and that's okay. We walk with them, whatever direction that might be,”

t Kremer From page A1

friend – Father William Jerome Bichsel, known to most everyone as “Bix” – were members of the Bangor 5, and consulted their attorney before taking their planned action. “They were devoted peace activists, along with a second priest and two grandmothers,” Kremer said. “They were members of the Plowshare Movement, totally non-violent, and they knew that what they had planned would almost certainly put them in jail.” Kremer not only offered to help defend them, he told the then 82-year-old Sister Anne that she could stay in his home. “She was dedicated to stopping nuclear proliferation and stockpiling,” Kremer said. “Twice she’d jumped in the water to swim to a nuclear submarine and attack it with a small hammer.” On Nov. 2, 2009 the five cut their way through a perimeter fence and walked into the U.S. Naval Base at Kitsap-Bangor. They spent more than four hours inside, cutting their way through “impenetrable” defenses – eventually winding up in a “shoot to kill” zone. All were arrested, but late that morning Sister Anne wound up at Kremer’s Point Defiancearea home. “She moved in for three weeks and wound up staying three years,” Kremer said. “She lived in a downstairs bedroom, reading books, relaxing. She had never taken time for herself. When she was sentenced to four months of home detention, she served them here.” For two years, Kremer and a defense team worked not so much to avoid conviction as keep any prison sentences to a minimum. Still, all five went to prison on sentences ranging from two to 15 months. “They never worried about being found guilty. When they served sentences before, they'd started literacy programs in prison,” Kremer said. “They had no fear. “I’m not an activist, but I love handling cases like those,” he said. The son of Seattle attorney Dale Kremer, Blake was the only one of five children to follow his dad’s career path.

says Myers. “We live in a grief-avoidant culture, so when a baby dies, it is an uncomfortable subject for others. People often don't know what to say,” Slack says. “Don't be afraid that we are going to cry when you mention our child. We might cry, but it's not because you reminded us that our baby died – we live with that. What we fear most is that people are going to forget about our child.” Providing lunch, helping with chores and being willing to listen is a good way to support families that experienced the loss of a child. “We not only mourn the loss of our baby, but we grief for the future, the hopes and the dreams we had for our baby,” said Slack. Remembering the children and special anniversary dates like birthdays and other milestone events are crucial. The TEARS Foundation will hold its 11th annual gala dinner and auction on Oct. 1, 6 p.m. at the Chambers Bay Event Center in University Place. Tickets are available for $70 and will include dinner and entertainment. Tickets can be purchased through the TEARS website at www. thetearsfoundation.org and the organization is still looking for item donations for the auction, especially sponsorships and airfare. The group is also looking for volunteers for special events.

t Budget From page A1

come in from taxes, so cuts to programs and/or new taxes to fund them will be part of the current budget talks. “We have to balance the budget,” Tacoma Finance Director Andy Cherullo said. The budget process started earlier this spring when City Manager T.C. Broadnax asked each department to submit budgets that reduced spending by between 2 and 4 percent. He then takes those individual budgets to draft a proposed overall budget that balances spending with projected revenues for the City Council to then shift, shuffle or change spending plans of taxpayer dollars based on information that changes in one department affect others. Broadnax is hosting budget talks around the city, particularly at the Neighborhood Council meetings on top of the departmental budget overviews at City Council study sessions leading up to a Nov. 15 council vote. In 2017 and 2018, revenues are projected to grow at 1.8 percent, while expenses are projected to grow at a faster rate to create a shortfall of about $7 million by the end of 2018 that would otherwise grow in future years. “We are committed to closing the gap between revenues and expenses by balancing the need for savings with the effective delivery of core services,” said Broadnax in an announcement about the budget talks. Two issues, police and library services, have already bubbled up that will likely drive much of the discussions. The Tacoma Police Department makes up about a quarter of the general fund spending. It has 338 officers, down from its pre-recession high of 398 in 2008. Wage and benefit increases have kept the department’s spending, about $40 million a year, the same amount despite being a smaller department. A new union contract will change that further since the officers are working on a contract that actually expired in 2014. And some City Council members and Tacoma

residents want to add more officers to combat street-level crimes. The Tacoma Public Library System proposed two ways that the library could reach its budget goal of 4 percent less that it currently spends. Both plans are raising concerns with book and history lovers, who spoke out against either plan at recent City Council meetings. The departmental budget proposes either closing the Kobetich library branch in Northeast Tacoma or the Northwest Room, a repository of Tacoma’s heritage at the library’s downtown branch in efforts to cut $1 million from the library budget. So with that as a backdrop, the budget crafting begins.

MEETINGS:

City Manager T.C. Broadnax is attending regularly scheduled Neighborhood Council meeting as part of the budget outreach process. The remaining roster of those meetings includes: Eastside Neighborhood Council at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 19, at Stewart Heights Park Building, 402 E. 56th St. South Tacoma Neighborhood Council at 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 21, at STAR Center, 3873 S. 66th St. West End Neighborhood Council at 7 p.m. on Sept. 21, at TFD Station #16, 7217 6th Ave. City Council study sessions, at noon on Tuesdays, are slated to address departmental budgets. The schedule for those sessions is: Oct. 4: Budget overview Oct. 11: Capital Budget, Public Works, Public Assembly Facilities and Planning and Development Services. Oct. 18: General Government Utilities Budget and Rates Oct. 25: General Fund Revenues, Cost Drivers, Police and Fire Nov. 1: Municipal Courts, Library, Internal Services Nov. 8: Community Services and General Fund Nov. 15: Budget Wrap up followed by first reading at council meeting and final reading on Nov. 22. More information about the budget process and the projects, including a video “How the City Budget Works” is available at cityoftacoma.org.

After attending the University of Washington, Kremer got his law degree in 1992 from the University of Puget Sound. What followed was not always what he’d had in mind. “I moved into an office with two more experienced attorneys, who gave me an office by moving a copy machine,” Kremer said, laughing. “One morning in ‘92 one of the partners came to me and said, 'You've got your first solo case – and it begins right after lunch.' “I was terrified. I didn't know the client or anything about the case. I went to lunch with one of the experienced lawyers and just listened to him,” Kremer said. “It was a simple assault case, and a good attorney would have handled it in three hours. An inexperienced attorney would have stumbled through it in three days. “With me, the case went a full week. “I used everything the attorney had talked to me about, everything I could remember from law school. At one point, I knew there was something I should have said, but had no idea what it was, so I started channeling Perry Mason. “The judge put his face in his hands so jurors wouldn't see him laughing. The most amazing thing about the trial was the verdict – not guilty,” Kremer said. In 1986, Kremer met a woman from Thailand – her name is Oratai – and liked her, but between his school and her acclimation to a new country, things never seemed to work out. She married and, years later, so did Kremer. QUALITY FACILITY “My wife, Lea, died in 2003,” ONLINE TRAINING Kremer said. “My brother had stayed AVAILABLE in touch with Oratai, who was single FLEXIBLE CLASS again, and in 2009, my brother reintroSCHEDULE Courses Offered duced us.” This time, it worked. r Cosmetology “Blake hadn’t changed,” Oratai said, r Barber “except he didn’t cook as much and he had a nun living downstairs.” r Esthetics When the two married, the ceremor Manicure ny was conducted by Father Bix, who was dying but rallied for their wedding. r Instructor Training “It was a remarkable day,” Kremer Course said. “Bix was a Catholic priest, Oratai is a Buddhist – so we had monks there Call today for your free consultation! 253-301-2995 8024 S. Tacoma Way #C, Lakewood, WA 98499 – and I’m an agnostic. Somehow, it was nwbeautyacademy@gmail.com perfect.”

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SI DE LIN TH E

Sports

E

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2016

GAVRONSKI MAKES A TRIUMPHANT RETURN

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 10

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

SO LONG. Mike Freeman (above) gets

the force out at second base. After the Rainiers' season ended, the Seattle Mariners recalled Freeman, first baseman Dan Vogelbach and pitcher Cody Martin back up to the big club. Tacoma witnessed 204 player transactions over the course of the season.

EPIC SEASON ENDS FOR RAINIERS By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

PHOTOS BY ERNIE SAPIRO

BATTLE! (top) Tacoma's Mike Gavronski lays the lumber to the face of Australia's Jake Carr. The shot would

send Carr to the canvas. (mid-left) Despite fighting a much taller opponent, Andres Reyes was able to outbox and outpoint a tough Ramel Snegur. (mid-right) Tacoma's own Andre Keys put Antonio Neal to the test during the hometown kid's impressive victory. (bottom-left) Nate Serrano connects with Osvaldo Rojas' face. On any other night, this may have been the fight of the night. (bottom-right) Bobby McIntyre found himself on the wrong end of some heavy blows delivered by Tacoma's Lexus Pagampao. By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

T

here was definitely some home cooking going down at the Battle at the Boat 107 on Saturday, Sept. 10 at the Emerald Queen Casino showroom. With three boxers representing Tacoma on the six-fight bill, the hometown crowd had good reason to be loud and rowdy. When the dust settled on another excellent night of fisticuffs, the Tacoma faithful got more than their money’s worth as all three Tacoma fighters stepped back out of the ring with a victory under their belts. While there were some interesting matchups on the night’s fight card, the majority of the crowd was gearing up for the main event of the evening. Mike “Imagine Me” Gavronski was finally set to make his return to the ring, and his hometown fans were ready and waiting. Following a stinging defeat to Dashon Johnson last November in a title belt fight, some fight fans wondered if and when Gavronski would make his way back into the squared circle. It wasn’t going to be easy for the kid from Tacoma’s Hilltop. Gavronski would be facing Jake Carr and his sparkling 11-0-0 record. Before recently moving his boxing operations to Los Angeles, Carr was the Australian super middleweight champion. It was set to be his United States debut, and somewhere along the way, someone forgot to remind

Gavronski about being a gracious host. The two fighters sported similar builds and looked fit as a pair of fiddles. From the opening bell, it was clear that Carr came to exchange punches and he was going to stand square in front of Gavronski while doing it. After an active first round, Gavronski began dictating the flow of the fight later in the second. Another exciting third round was followed by a fourth that saw Gavronski draw first blood from Carr, as a cut opened up underneath his left eye. Midway through the round Gavronski staggered Car with a straight right, but despite a strong flurry to try and end it, Carr withstood the damage and made it to the bell. Gavronski looked fresh coming out for the fifth round, while Carr was beginning to look a little worse for the wear. However, despite appearances, Carr dished out a solid, active round and seemed as though he had plenty of fight left in him. The sixth round would be all Gavronski. With the hometown crowd surging to its feet, Gavronski drilled Carr with a shot to the jaw that buckled the former champ’s knees. As he was heading toward the canvas, Gavronski got one more lick in for good measure and Carr was in massive trouble. After regaining his feet, the referee decided to let Carr have another chance, but it was clear that he really had his eye on him. There was not going to be any dancing around for Gavronski. He looked as

though he smelled blood in the water and pounced on Carr, dishing out several shots that the Aussie was unable to defend. The referee had witnessed enough carnage and stopped the fight as the hometown crowd went absolute bananas. Not only was Gavronski’s (21-2-1) performance impressive, but it was easily the sharpest this writer has seen from the slugger. If there were any doubts as to whether he still had it, this sixth round technical knockout of Carr should have dispelled most, if not all of them. The five round semi main event featured quite the contrast in fighters. Andres Reyes would face Ramel Snegur in a 138-pound contest that saw Reyes giving up what appeared to be at least six inches in height. Despite the height and reach advantage, Reyes was able to inflict enough damage on Snegur (1-1-0) to win over all three judges for a unanimous decision. It was an entertaining fight and watching Reyes (5-1-1)swinging haymakers at such a taller opponent was something else. The five round featured bout would pit hometown favorite Andre Keys against veteran Antonio Neal in a 150pound bout. Keys looked impressive throughout the five round and nearly had Neal down for the count in the second round with a brutal shot to the body. While Neal 4-6-0) showed quite a bit of guts legitimately staying in the fight, it was the performance of Keys (2-1-0) u See boxing / page A13

When the boys are delivering competitive baseball over at Cheney Stadium, it's never easy to close the door on summer around Tacoma and bid farewell to the Tacoma Rainiers. This will go down as a tough one for South Puget Sound baseball fans, as we were front row and center for one of the most impressive seasons in Tacoma baseball history. The Tacoma Rainiers opened the season on April 7 at Cheney Stadium with a 6-5 win, putting them atop the Pacific Coast League (PCL) Northern Pacific standings. Throughout the 144 game PCL schedule, the Tacoma Rainiers never left their perch at the top of the leaderboard and won the division title, their first since 2010. Tacoma entered the postseason against an El Paso club that was aggressive at the plate and hitting on all cylinders. Despite winning three of their last four games against secondplace Reno to close the season, the Rainiers were starting to look a little gassed. When you are the lead dog, setting the pace all season, it can be pretty wearisome. Game one of the series went the Rainiers' way in El Paso. It took 12 innings, but Tacoma earned the 6-5 win and now held what looked to be a decisive advantage over the Chihuahuas with just one game left in El Paso before returning home for possibly three games. The yapping, snipping dogs turned ferocious on Tacoma the next night to close their series home spot with a 7-1 over the Rainiers, despite Tacoma pounding out 10 hits in the ballgame. The Rainiers came home to Tacoma with some Cheney dates to look forward to. The fantastic stadium over on Tyler Street had been the domicile of the best home record in the PCL at 46-26. It wasn't going to be enough. El Paso was bound and determined to take control and grab the PCL semifinal series, and they went out and snatched it from the Rainiers. A dominating performance in the third game by a combination of three pitchers held the Rainiers to just three hits and culminated in a 7-0 El Paso win at Cheney Stadium, giving the Chihuahuas a 2-1 series lead. A game five on Sunday looked like it was in the offing as game four rolled out Saturday, Sept. 10. Tacoma held the lead through much of the ballgame only to see it flip in the eighth inning and they were unable to recover in the 5-4 loss. The ninth inning heroics that we've been accustomed to around these parts weren't going to make an appearance on this night. The game and PCL semifinal series was over and so was the summer dream season. It truly was a majestic 2016 at Cheney Stadium, though. The Rainiers ran the table, going 81-621 on the season. Normally, you're not going to see a third digit on a season record in baseball. Well, when a Triple-A team from the other side of the country rolls into New Orleans, and the fourth game of the series gets called at 2-2 due to monsoon rains, there is no make-up date in the offing. It's going to be a tie game. There have a lot of baseball games played at Cheney Stadium since 1960. Since that first Triple-A season, there has been but one season of baseball that ushered in more fans than this 2016 season. Over 72 games, including one double-header, the Rainiers welcomed 377,164 fans throughout the season. When the bean counters were done tallying the digits, the 2016 season will go down as the second largest season total ever in the 56 years of baseball at Cheney Stadium. The 2011 Rainiers drew 378,518,

u See rainiers / page A13


Friday, September 16, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 11

SPORTSWATCH

PLU EDGES CAL LUTHERAN IN FOOTBALL OPENER

It took every second of the Lutes’ season opener at Sparks Stadium for Pacific Lutheran University to secure a 17-14 win over California Lutheran University on Saturday, Sept. 10. Jon Schaub got the start at quarterback for PLU (1-0) and took advantage of his opportunity, leading the Lutes on a 12 play, 78-yard opening drive that lasted 6:11. The drive was capped when Deren Hardgrove caught a five yard pass from Schaub. Dallan Rodriguez made the extra point attempt, and the Lutes led 7-0. "It felt great to start the game off with a touchdown,” said Schaub. “We still made a handful of mistakes on that first drive. We were able to flush it, fix it, and move on. It shows the maturity and the experience we have. It was fun to be successful as an offense and move down the field." Schaub split time with Cole Chandler at quarterback. Despite sitting out a couple offensive series, Schaub was effective, going 13-for-25 with 146 yards and two touchdowns. "I'm very proud of him," said head coach Scott Westering. "Played very well, and as always made very accurate throws. They started playing a lot of man-to-man; when you face man-to-man, throws have to be on people and accurate. He did well with that and played very well." California Lutheran (0-1) didn't lie down after the early score from the Lutes. The Kingsmen scored with 40 seconds remaining in the first half when Aaron Lacombe caught a pass from Adam Friederichsen. Cal Lutheran scored again early in the third quarter when Wendle O'Brein caught a 34-yard pass from Friedrichsen to stake a 14-7 lead. PLU needed a big play on defense, and they got it from one of their senior captains. Near the seven minute mark in the third quarter, Derek Chase leaped into the air and picked off a Friederichsen pass. As the intended receiver tried to pull Chase to the ground, Chase pitched the ball to Tabby Yu, who took the ball 31 yards up the visiting sideline. "It was just a heads up play," said Chase. "We made eye contact and we didn't lose it, so it worked out." "Derek and I joked about that at practice, if anyone had the chance to pitch the ball. It seemed like time slowed down. The guy was wrapped around him. We made eye contact, and I moved a little to the left to get behind him, so it was legal. He pitched it to me and it was just go, and follow my block," said Yu. PLU almost failed to take advantage of the interception. Schaub missed a wide open DJ Winter on a chance for a big play. Later Schaub connected with DJ Winter for a 15 yard touchdown to tie the game at 14 all. "I tried so hard to get it to him, that I short armed him." Schaub said. "The team expects more from me, I expect more from me. We were able to bounce back, we're toilets, we flush it, we fixed it. DJ made a nice route to shake the safety and create a wide open space for me to throw the ball. It was good for him to bounce back." PLU still needed to put points on the board to take the lead. The team got the ball late in the third quarter. Rodriguez capped a 10 play, 68 yard drive with a 29 yard field goal that would prove to be the game winner for the Lutes. PLU led 17-14 with 11:21 remaining in the game. CKU got its chance to tie or take the lead late in the fourth quarter. The Kingsmen got the ball with 1:32 left in the game on their own 26 yard line. Cal Lutheran completed a 21 yard pass, and a 16 yard pass to get close to field goal range. Nick Covey missed two field goals early in the game, one from 29 yards and another from 32 yards. With eight seconds left on the clock. Friedrechson threw the ball towards

the corner of the end zone. The pass was broken up by Travis McMillion securing victory for the Lutes. It was fitting for McMillion to be involved in the final play of the game. McMillion had been everywhere on the field as he led the Lute defense in tackles. The junior had 8.5 tackles including three for loss. "Together," said McMillion. "I think that was a huge thing, we played together. Our motto for the day was next play, we are going to make mistakes, but we got to move on. That was the key, we moved on. We made big plays, and kept their big plays to a minimum." The California Lutheran offense outgained the PLU offense 427 to 271. The Kingsmen had more field to travel due in large part to the efforts of Anthony Louthan. The Lute punter boomed the ball all afternoon long, punting seven times for 282 yards, averaging 40.3 yards per punt. "That's the expectation of Anthony, and will be for the next couple of years," said Westering. "There is no doubt, that that guy in his career will make a difference here... As a punter. He's a weapon." Marc Gallant and Hardgrove lead the way for the Lutes rushing attack. The two barrelled their way through CLU defenders, combining for 21 carries, 96 yards, averaging 4.5 yards per carry. "It's attributed all the way through," said Westering. "From the scheme that our run game coordinator Trevor Roberts puts it together. The line, it starts with them up front. You can't run it without those guys. Both of those guys work so hard in the offseason. It was a joy to watch both those kids run real hard today." The Lutes travel the Texas on Saturday, Sept. 17 to face Trinity University in San Antonio. – Christian Bond, PLU Sports.

UPS OFFENSE GOES CRAZY IN WIN OVER OCCIDENTAL

Puget Sound senior quarterback Hans Fortune set the school record for total yards in a game as the Loggers beat Occidental, 49-42, in Los Angeles on Saturday, Sept. 10. Fortune logged 601 yards of total offense, including a career-best 587 through the air, surpassing Duncan White's previous mark of 593 yards of total offense (2010, vs. Lewis & Clark). Fortune also threw for a career-high seven touchdowns. As a team, the Loggers (2-0) set a program record with 702 yards of total offense. The previous record was 643 yards against Lewis & Clark in 2010. Senior wide receiver Brennan Schon finished with a game-high 159 receiving yards on nine catches to go along with three touchdowns. Freshman Aiden Santino also came away with three touchdown receptions. He posted 99 receiving yards on 11 receptions. Senior Dustin Harrison matched Santino's 11 receptions for 105 yards. Senior running back Austin Wagner got involved with the passing attack by taking a short pass to the house from 93 yards out, giving the Loggers a 35-27 lead early in the fourth quarter. The Tigers (0-1) reached the end zone in the game's opening drive, but the Loggers responded with 19 unanswered points. Schon caught a 33-yard touchdown pass and Santino scored twice during that stretch. The Loggers held on to a 19-13 lead at halftime. The fourth quarter witnessed seven total touchdowns, but none were bigger than Santino's third touchdown of the night. Occidental evened the score, 42-42, with 7:37 left in the fourth quarter. The ensuing kickoff was short and gave the Loggers great field position at their own 48-yard line. Fortune completed consecutive passes to Harrison and Santino for 18 total yards. A six-yard pass to Schon moved Puget Sound down to Oxy's 23-yard line, and Fortune connected with Harrison once more for 16 yards. Following an incompletion, Santino hauled in a seven-yard touchdown reception to give the Loggers a 49-42 lead. The Puget Sound defense forced Occidental into a turnover-on-downs on six plays. The Loggers appeared to turn the ball right back over to the Tigers following an incompletion on 4th-and-11 with two minutes remaining, but Oxy was flagged for holding and Puget Sound held on for the win. The Loggers are off the next two weeks, and they open their Northwest Conference slate at home against Willamette on Saturday, Oct. 1, at 1 p.m.

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THURSDAY, SEPT. 15 – VOLLEYBALL Mt. Tahoma vs. Stadium Stadium HS – 7:15 p.m.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 15 – VOLLEYBALL Lincoln vs. Wilson Foss HS – 7:15 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16 – FOOTBALL Wilson vs. Lakes Harry Lang Stadium – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16 – FOOTBALL Bethel vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl – 7 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16 – FOOTBALL Bonney Lake vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium – 7 p.m.

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Section A • Page 12 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 16, 2016

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

RAIL SPLITTERS. (top left) The Lincoln defense closed the door in overtime and gave the offense a chance at winning the game. (top right) The Abes celebrate a

touchdown catch by Brandin Porter (17). (bottom left) Lincoln's LJ Lovelace gets into the backfield. (bottom right) Camron Deloney looks to make a move for daylight.

LINCOLN GETS BACK ON TRACK IN OT THRILLER By Chance Pittenger

Tacoma Weekly Correspondent

O CTO B E R 1 , 2 0 1 6

The Lincoln Abes took to their home field last Friday, Sept. 9, in an unusual position. Last year, they cruised through the regular season with nary a bump in the road and hit the playoffs with an undefeated record. This year, only one game in, they had already suffered their first loss of the 2016 campaign. They looked to get things on the right track against the Auburn Mountainview Lions, and the game was a barnburner. The teams traded possessions to start the game, and the Lions drew first blood on a 26-yard pass from Sui Daniels to Talan Alfrey. Lincoln wasted no time in responding, marching 93 yards down the field in just a little over two minutes. Junior running back Tristian Kwon had the big play of the drive with a 30-yard run that would be a taste of things to come, and Joey Sinclair capped off the

drive with an eight-yard touchdown pass to Kavon Holden, but they missed the extra point. The Abes added another score when Patrick Rogers returned an interception to the end zone, and the two-point conversion made it 14-7 Abes at the end of the first quarter. Each squad added another touchdown in the second, the Lions’ coming courtesy of a four-yard pass from Daniels to Alex McBee. The extra point was missed. Lincoln’s Kwon scored on a 29-yard run about halfway through the quarter, and to continue the theme the extra point was missed, leaving the halftime score at 20-13 in favor of the home standing Abes. Special mention should be made of Tristian Kwon of Lincoln. He played a monster of a game, with a 90-yard kick return and a 70-yard punt return both being called back due to penalties. He had multiple runs of 10 yards or more and had another 90-yard kick return for a TD in the fourth quarter that actually counted.

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Kwon had a very special kind of night. Again in the third quarter, the teams each scored once. Lincoln’s tally came on another touchdown pass from Sinclair to Nick Goss that covered nine yards. Auburn Mountainview’s Talan Alfrey, who is listed as a receiver but took over at quarterback, ran one in from two yards out, and heading into the final stanza the Abes were still out front 27-20. The fourth quarter was a wild one. Kwon’s aforementioned kickoff return put the Abes up by 14 and it appeared as though they had gained control of the game, but the Lions were not finished yet. Alfrey added another short run for a score and the lead was down to seven. Still, the Abes seemed to have their first win in hand until a couple of strange play calls as the game was winding down. With 1:57 to go in the game, they went for it on a fourth and one situation at their own 35-yard line. Conventional wisdom would have been a punt to force the Lions

to drive the field. Lincoln barely made the first down, but it did allow them to keep the ball and run more time off of the clock. The Lions put up a couple of tremendous defensive plays and the Abes faced a third down and 16. Again, going against the grain, the Abes dropped back to pass. This time it backfired as Sinclair was sacked and fumbled the ball, giving the Lions possession on the Lincoln 18 yard line with just 48 seconds to play. That was more than enough time for the Lions to score, and regulation time ended in a tie. Auburn Mountainview had the first opportunity on offense in the overtime period and could do nothing with it. In a fitting end, Tristian Kwon scored for Lincoln to secure the victory for the Abes, 41-34. Next up for Lincoln is a Friday, Sept. 16 home game against what could very well be a new league rival, the Bethel Braves.


Friday, September 16, 2016 • tacomaweekly.com • Section A • Page 13

the Ordinary!

doubles, six triples and 85 runs batted in. Vogelbach, who is now getting playing time with the Seattle Mariners, batted .292, with 23 home runs, 25 doubles, 96 runs batted in and 97 walks drawn. While it does the heart good to see the Seattle Mariners still doing everything they can to remain in the postseason picture, it’s going to be a long offseason of waiting for April 2017, when the gates open again down the street at Cheney Stadium.

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that was the hallmark of the bout, winning him a unanimous decision. He was sharp and showed some of the power that his earlier performances have been hinting at. The third fight of the evening was a 154-pound contest between Nate Serrano (4-4-2) and Osvaldo Rojas. Until the exciting fights to follow, this was in the running for the fight of the night. Both fighters kept at it for four solid rounds and when Rojas (9-3-2) was announced the winner via majority decision, the crowd was none too pleased. Personally, I might have ruled it a draw myself. The second fight of the night pitted Gabriel Solorio against Drew Brokenshire of Parkland in a 147-pound contest. After two lackluster rounds, it was clear by the third round that the first fighter to take

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control of this fight was probably going to win it. Brokenshire (1-1-0) just seemed a half-step slower than Solorio, who picked up the pace over the last two stanzas. In the end the judges awarded Solorio (2-2-1) a majority decision, with one judge ruling it a draw. The first fight of the evening was a fun opener matching Bobby McIntyre from Spanaway against Lexus Pagampao fighting out of Tacoma in a 160-pound affair. It was clear that Pagampao was far more prepared for this fight as he set a bull rush tone early and carried it through to the final bell of the fourth round. McIntyre did not look prepared to deal with Pagampao right up in his face for the whole fight and never looked comfortable in the ring. Pagampao earned a unanimous decision, kicking off the first of three victories for Tacoma fighters. Battle at the Boat 108 returns to the Emerald Queen Casino on Saturday, Nov. 19.

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Section A • Page 14 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 16, 2016

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Sherlock Holmes at Lakewood Playhouse

B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2016

SECTION B, PAGE 1

ASSEMBLAGE THEATER PRESENTS VIVID VERSION OF ‘MOBY DICK’ By Dave R. Davison

dave@tacomaweekly.com

N

o whales are killed during Assemblage T h e a t e r ’s production of Herman Melville’s classic story “Moby Dick.” No whales, of course, are physically present. Yet, working with a minimalist set and with nothing but skillful directing, a solid script and great acting, the drama and violence of a 19th century whaling ship are brought so vividly to life that mime-like enactments of the killing of whales seem so palpable that the act is disturbing. Moby Dick, the gigantic, white, indestructible force of nature in the form of a sperm whale, is one of the most iconic beings in American literature. Melville’s story of Captain Ahab’s obsession with taking revenge on the mighty whale, which cost him a leg, was adapted for the stage by Ken Conners. This stage version is called “Moby Dick: The Tale Retold.” Director David Domkoski and a cast of actors bring the tale to life and carry the audience with them on an odyssey that spans the globe as the crew of the Pequod hunt for whales (one of the 19th century’s main sources of illumination in the form of whale oil for lamps) and participate in Ahab’s obsessive hunt for Moby Dick. Tonally, the play rolls from quiet, moody moments to times of brash, high volume action. Cast as Captain Ahab, Dennis Rally seems to have emerged from the mind of Melville himself with his seaman’s beard and lanky, grey-brown hair. He looks just as one imagines Ahab. He turns in a powerful performance in the complex role of the vengeful obsessive who forsakes reason, economic logic and human compassion in his quest to hunt the white whale. Equally impressive is Mark Peterson as Starbuck, the first mate who is the counterpoint to Captain Ahab. The anatomy of Ahab’s motives is revealed through a series of verbal conflicts between Starbuck – honest, intelligent and

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ASSEMBLAGE THEATER

WHALE HUNTING. Cast of Assemblage

Theater’s “Moby Dick: The Tale Retold.” (above) (l to r) Front row: Chad Russell,(Stubb), Heather Christopher (Queequeg), Jillian Mae Lee (Sailor) Middle: Kaylie Rainer (Flask), Tyler Dobies (Sailor) Back Center: Mark Peterson (Starbuck) on ladder; Tim Hoban (Ishmael). (Right photo) Dennis Rolly (Ahab) and Mark Peterson (Starbuck).

morally grounded – and the vengeful, hateful Ahab. In an example of the colorblind, gender-neutral casting used in the production, Queequeg, the tattooed, Pacific Island harpooner, is played by Heather Christopher. The animistic Queequeg seems more in touch with the forces of nature. He is quick to befriend and exhibits a no nonsense acceptance of fate. When his divinatory bones indicate that he will die, he promptly orders a carpenter to make him a coffin. Christopher plays the role so well that she is soon accepted as the bronzed, muscular harpooner of the sea. Ishmael, the story’s literate narrator (a school teacher who goes to sea to

satisfy an itch for adventure and to see the world), is played by Tim Hoban. From time to time Hoban stands aside and engages the audience directly. Tyler Dobies (very debonair as the suave British captain of the Swan), Jillian May Lee, Kaylie Rainer and Chad Russell are all superb in their multiple roles. Most of the actors do double duty as there are more than a dozen roles played by the eight members of the cast. Well crafted lighting effects and a variety of haunting, nautical sound effects and music also help to evoke the vision of the ill-fated adventure that unfolds before the eye, the ear, and the mind’s eye of the audience.

“Moby Dick: The Tale Retold” captures the essence of the Melville classic. It is a psychological and philosophical examination of obsession and the burning desire for revenge. It seems to present the danger of a strain of Western worldview in which humankind places itself in an antagonistic stance towards the natural world. It may warn of the consequences of the greedy urge to usurp from nature more than should be taken. Industrial scale hunting of whales took a terrible toll on these magnificent creatures whose bodies were

treated as a limitless natural resource. The warning applies to us now in dealing with the destructive consequences of the hunt for fossil fuels at the cost of an ever-increasing amount of fracking, driving of pipelines, deep sea drilling and strip mining. While the play could have been condensed here and there in the interests of run time, this in a great story performed with great aplomb by a lively cast and crew. Assemblage Theater is a personal theater project of its director, David Dom-

koski. There is no board of directors, no staff, no space, no season. Assemblage was originally created in 2012. It exists to produce provocative, quirky and challenging plays that explore the endless possibilities of live theater; plays that celebrate language; plays that engage, inspire, entertain and challenge audiences. “Moby Dick: The Tale Retold” runs through Sept. 24. Shows are held at Tacoma Youth Theater space at 924 Broadway in downtown Tacoma. For further information visit www. assemblagetheater.com.

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE

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THEIR ‘UNDERPANTS’ IS SHOWING From the hilarious mind of Steve Martin, “The Underpants” will open on Friday, Sept. 16, and run through Oct. 2 at Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 N. I St. This wild satire, directed by Jennifer York, is adapted from a classic German play about Louise and Theo Maske, a couple whose conservative existence is shattered when Louise’s bloomers fall down in public. Though she pulls them up quickly, Theo is convinced the incident will cost him his job as a government clerk. While her momentary display doesn’t result in the feared scandal, it does attract two infatuated men, each wanting to rent the spare room in the Markes’ home. Tickets are on sale now with prices ranging from $20 to $24; www. tacomalittletheatre.com.

HALFWAY THERE After this weekend, there will only be six months remaining until St. Patrick’s Day, and Doyle’s Annex is celebrating with a big, free show that will kick off at noon on Saturday, Sept. 17. Activities will include the tapping of Doyle’s Oktoberfest Firkin at noon, watching the Seattle Sounders at 1 p.m., a Guinness Club meeting at 5:17 p.m., a drawing for the venue’s free trip to Dublin at 10 p.m. and performances by Ockham’s Razor and the Delvon Lamarr Organ trio, at 6 and 10:15 p.m., respectively. Doyle’s is located at 208 St. Helens Ave. S.; www.doylespublichouse.com.

THREE PARKING DAY Downtown on the Go is organizing a celebration of Park(ing) Day, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16 in downtown Tacoma. Park(ing) Day is

an international event in which artists, citizens and businesses temporarily transform a metered parking spot into temporary public spaces. Local businesses, organizations and residents will showcase their creativity by transforming more than 30 parking spaces into interactive “parks.” Visit them during your lunch break or stop by one of the event food trucks, which will be located on Pacific Avenue, between South 11th and 12th streets.

FOUR OLD-SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY Victoria Anderson will demonstrate the two most popular 19th century photographic processes during “Crafts of the Past: Photography,” a presentation that

will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, Sept.17 and 18, at Point Defiance Park’s Nisqually Living History Museum, 5400 N. Pearl St. Guests will have the opportunity to make their own prints of leaves, buttons, or lace. Anderson will also be making tin types which produce a direct positive image on a piece of metal that has been treated with a photo emulsion. Learn more online at www. metroparkstacoma.org/fort-nisqually-livinghistory-museum.

FIVE PROTEST ROCK The new super-group Prophets of Rage – which features members of Public Enemy, Rage Against the Machine and Cypress Hill – rocked Auburn’s White River Amphitheatre over the weekend with a little support from Awolnation and WA K R AT, and we were there. Check out our review online at www.tacomaweekly. com.


3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY 3EPTEMBER 

WEEKLY REWIND

Photos by Bill Bungard Ukulele master Jake Shimabukuro (above) headlined the Pantages Theatre with tunes from his new album “Nashville Sessions� on Sept. 7. Meanwhile, the Washington State Fair featured (clockwise from top, right) Joel and Luke Smallbone, aka Christian pop duo For King & Country; country singer Chris Janson, singing selections from his debut album, “Buy Me a Boat�; and country duo Thompson Square. Check out more of what staff photographer Bill Bungard saw online at www.tacomaweekly. com.

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LAKEWOOD PLAYHOUSE DELIVERS MYSTERY FARCE TO KICK OFF 78TH SEASON

Culture Corner

A Guide to the CulturAl events of tAComA

Tacoma Arts Month is just around the corner October 2016 marks the 15th anniversary of Tacoma Arts Month – a community celebration of the arts that includes hundreds of community-hosted arts and culture events, exhibits and workshops for all ages, taking place every day throughout the month. Programming includes music, theater and dance performances, hands-on experiences, visual art exhibits, film screenings, literary readings, lectures, cultural events and workshops. All events are open to the public and many activities are free.

Tacoma Arts Month is online

Information about all Tacoma Arts Month events, workshops and exhibits can be found online at TacomaArtsMonth.com. PHOTO BY TIM JOHNSTON

(/5.$%$ Lakewood Playhouse’s “The Hound of the Baskervilles� stars (l to r) Kayla Crawford, Gary Chambers and Jacob Tice. "Y$AVE2$AVISON dave@tacomaweekly.com

Don’t expect an actual Sherlock Holmes who-done-it when you attend the Lakewood Playhouse production of “The Hound of the Baskervilles� (the opening show of the venerable community theater’s 78th season of main stage plays). No, this version is the one adapted from Arthur Conan Doyle by John Nicholson and Stephen Canny in 2007. On paper, this production has a lot going for it: three of LP’s best actors – Jacob Tice (“Arcadia�), Kayla Crawford (“Avenue Q�) and Gary Chambers (“Noises Off�); a well known set of characters and story to play with and the fine direction of John Munn. Yet somehow, the comedic romp through the moody English moors gets a little bit bogged down in the mud. It is difficult to pinpoint precisely where the play falters, but many of the gags got just a polite giggle. Some of the jokes just lay there without receiving much notice at all. Perhaps the Sunday matinee that I attended simply did not have enough of an audience (it was the opening Sunday of the new Seahawks season) to have a critical mass to produce the comedic chain reaction between performance and audience. The actors were definitely energetic – racing to and fro, coming and going from various parts of the stage. Among the three actors, several dozen characters are played. The main characters, however, are Sherlock Holmes (Tice), Dr. Watson (Crawford) and Sir Henry Baskerville (Chambers). In addition to a somewhat pompous ver-

sion of Holmes, Tice also plays the eyepatched villain Stapleton, the gaudy floozy Sicily (who sounds like Julia Childs) and Barrymore, the bent butler who does everything with comical slowness. Crawford is dynamic in her role as the gun-toting, trigger happy Watson. Crawford’s beguiling presence is one of the strengths of the show. Chambers, meanwhile, is a great comedic actor with a rubbery agility perfect for a slapstick excursion like “Hound.� The minimalist set – a few chairs in a black, blank space – is designed to allow much of the scenery to take place in the imagination of the viewer. In this the piece is almost a hybrid of a theatrical performance and a radio show. The steam bath scene has the actors fully clothed, but wrapped in towels so that the audience understands that they are to be imagined naked. One of the more successful gags was when the two men stand up and drop their towels and confront one another as a cringing Crawford/Watson is trapped between them. Another audience favorite is the rapid replay of the entire first act as the beginning of the second act. Then the play drops back into low gear. The storyline gets lost amidst the gags, which too frequently go unloved by the sleepy audience. As I say, perhaps a Seahawks Sunday was not the time to generate a sufficient surplus of silliness to create the catalyst of laughter that this piece could surely produce on a good night. “Hound of the Baskervilles� runs through Oct. 9. For further information visit www. lakewoodplayhouse.org.

E-newsletter

Get the weekly calendar of Tacoma’s arts and culture happenings straight to your inbox so that you can plan out your weekday and weekend social calendar. Sign up for the twice-weekly Tacoma Arts Month e-newsletter and you’ll receive timely information about the multitude of fabulous arts and culture events you can be a part of this October.

Tacoma Arts Challenge

Attendees of Tacoma Arts Month events are invited to participate in the Tacoma Arts Challenge. Throughout October, those who attend Tacoma Arts Month events and post a photo to social media using #TacomaArts will be entered to win one of three prizes. More information about the Tacoma Arts Challenge is available at www.TacomaArtsMonth.com.

Signature events include: Tacoma Arts Month Opening Party and AMOCAT Arts Awards

The community is invited to attend a free celebration on Sept. 29 from 6-9 p.m. at Asia Pacific Cultural Center (4851 South Tacoma Way). Start Tacoma Arts Month off with a kaleidoscope of pop-up art exhibits, hands-on activities, music and dance performances, and more at this family-friendly, community festival. There will be appetizers, dessert and a no-host bar. The event will include recognition of the Tacoma Arts Commission’s 2016 funding recipients and the AMOCAT Arts Award winners: Metro Parks Tacoma, Tacoma Youth Symphony Association and Christopher Paul Jordan. The event is presented by the Tacoma Arts Commission and Spaceworks Tacoma, and hosted by Asia Pacific Cultural Center.

Tacoma Studio Tour

You are invited inside the working studios of 57 local artists to learn about the artistic process, ask questions and purchase one-of-a-kind creations. All studios will feature demonstrations or will have hands-on activities for visitors. This free, familyfriendly, self-guided tour will run Oct. 15 and Oct. 16, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and covers 34 locations around Tacoma. Studio Tour attendees are encouraged to pick up a Tacoma Studio Tour Passport and have it stamped at each studio location visited. Once at least eight stamps have been collected, the passport can be submitted for a chance to win one of several prize packages containing artwork handcrafted by a selection of artists on the tour. Visit the Tacoma Studio Tour website for a complete list of studio locations, an interactive map, and information about the Tacoma Studio Tour Passport. Start planning now; October is going to be a great month in Tacoma!

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3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY 3EPTEMBER 

THE MCKENZIE METHOD

EMPOWERING PATIENTS TO TAKE PART IN THEIR OWN CARE By Matt Kite Special to Tacoma Weekly

I’m deranged. And I need extension. That’s what I learned after visiting Sharon Ebelt, a physical therapist at downtown Tacoma’s Group Health. I’d lost a month of training to what my physician’s assistant had tentatively diagnosed as an oblique strain, and I was ready to do whatever needed doing in order to get running again. Turns out my problem, like so many sports injuries, was joint-related. In my case, it was one of the joints in my back, a bulging disc masquerading as abdominal and flank pain. Because the pain migrated and was inconsistent, Sharon knew I was complaining about a joint and not a muscle. But she didn’t run any expensive tests or dig any further. After a short Q&A and observing me perform a few simple exercises, she knew everything she needed to know about my injury. “Your body told me what to do,� she said. “I didn’t have to guess at the tissue or tissues involved. I don’t really care, because I would rather you be normal and running than have an ‘itis’ of some kind.� Energetic, observant and the owner of a playful sense of humor, Sharon is a passionate proponent of the McKenzie Method, an approach to physical therapy that encourages patient independence. Instead of passively accepting treatment, patients are empowered to actively take part in their own care. The late Robin McKenzie, the founder of the approach, first began treating patients in the 1950s according to a basic set of principles. According to the McKenzie Method, most patients suffer from one of three syndromes: derangement (in which the joint must be “reduced�), dysfunctional syndrome (in which the tissue must be “remodeled�) or posture syndrome (in which the patient must be reeducated). The latter syndrome, McKenzie asserted, is the root of most back and neck pain. “Most people are going to present to me with either a derangement or dysfunction or need to be screened for referral back to the MD,� Sharon explains. She didn’t need long to determine that I was displaying

PHOTO BY GEORGE UNRUH

TRAINING DAY. Sharon Ebelt, PT, DIP, MDT,

laces up for her daily run. She’s currently training for the New York Marathon in November.

derangement in my spine. Years of sitting in an office chair, playing guitar and gardening – all activities that put me in a near constant state of flexion – had turned me into a human pretzel. Like a lot of people, I spent most of my day hunched or bent over (something Sharon says the average person does three to five thousand times a day). I needed to try a new direction. “The McKenzie Method is first and foremost an evaluation tool,� Sharon says. “When I evaluated your back, I asked you a series of questions. Based on your answers, I was able to classify you as a derangement. Then the objective findings demonstrated you had a directional preference.�

Do you know your directional preference? Mine involves bending myself in a direction I thought impossible. While on the exam table, I was instructed to lie face down and, with my hands palms-down on either side of me, press upward toward the ceiling. “Don’t stop until you straighten your arms,� Sharon instructed me. My response was one of disbelief. “Seriously?� I could hardly move, but somehow found a way to bend backward at the waist until I looked like a seal stranded on dry land. I’d performed a similar exercise at a hot yoga session months earlier – before the injury – and even then it had seemed extreme. But after twenty repetitions of the maneuver, I felt significant relief. A moment later, Sharon had me on the floor doing push-ups – the very exercise that had first triggered my injury. I did them pain-free. Sharon sent me home with simple instructions: do 20 press-ups every two hours (waking hours) and then check back in the next day or two. She also gave me the green light to start running again. The pain, she said, would slowly migrate from my abdomen to my back. It did. She said it would centralize in my spine and then decrease. It did. Just like that, I was running again, not to mention doing chores and being useful around the house again. Though she’s been practicing physical therapy for 26 years, Sharon, 50, didn’t become an advocate of the McKenzie Method until about 10 years ago, when she entered the McKenzie Program and went on to become certified in MDT (Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy) and earn her boardcertification diploma in the specialty. At the time, she says, “there were only three hundred of us in the world.� These days, a growing body of evidence backs the approach and more people are giving it a look. I’m only two weeks into my treatment, but I hope mine is another success story. So far, so good. Matt Kite is an avid hiker and masters runner in Tacoma. Check out “3 Minute Hikes,� his hiking channel on YouTube.

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: CHRIS BOTTI AND ERIC CHURCH Two big shows just went on sale for 2017. Trumpeter Chris Botti will headline the Tacoma Dome at 8 p.m. on St. Patrick’s Day; and by the time his crew tears down and clears out, country star Eric Church will be ready to set up for his “Holdin’ My Own Tourâ€? stop, with that show set to kick off at 8 p.m. the next day, on March 18. Tickets are $26.50 to $196 to see Botti and $55 to $86 to see Church. Visit www.ticketmaster.com for more details on that and these other hot tickets, except for where otherwise noted. • Def Leppard with REO Speedwagon and Tesla: 7 p.m. Oct. 1, Tacoma Dome, $29.50 to $125. • Dr. John & the Nite Trippers: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 7, Pantages Theater, $39 to $110.

• Rita Moreno: 3 p.m. Oct. 16, Pantages Theater, $19 to $69; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Kanye West: 8 p.m. Oct. 19, KeyArena, Seattle, $25.50 to $124.50. • Alice Cooper: 8 p.m. Oct. 20, Emerald Queen Casino, $40 to $95. • Christopher Titus: 8 p.m. Oct. 26, Rialto Theatre, $25 to $45; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Craig Ferguson: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27, Pantages Theater, $19 to $69; www.broadwaycenter.org. • Steve-O: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 27 to 30, 10:30 p.m. Oct. 28 and 29, Tacoma Comedy Club, $22 to $30; www.tacomacomedyclub.com.

• Freak Night featuring Armin Van Buuren, Paul Van Dyk and more: 6 p.m. Oct. 28 and 29, Tacoma Dome, $304 two-day pass. • Sir Mix-A-Lot: 8 p.m. Oct. 29, Temple Theatre, $20; www.ticketfly.com. • Mangchi, Kid Koala, Sleep Steady: 8 p.m. Nov. 3, Real Art Tacoma, $10; www.etix.com. • Aries Spears: 8 p.m. Nov. 4 to 6, 10:30 p.m. Nov. 4 and 5, 5 p.m. Nov. 5, Tacoma Comedy Club, $16 to $32; www.tacomacomedyclub.com. • DJ Phinisey and guests: 8 p.m. Nov. 4, Real Art Tacoma, $7; www.etix.com.

A sellout, once rare, is now common sight. Fans line up at the gates to fill the ballpark each night. They come for a show and a show they do get. Always bigger and better. Who knows what to expect? They see hits and home runs, but that’s just a small part. Proudly displayed is Tacoma’s big heart. Yes, Cheney Stadium is something to see...

Welcome home to

House It’s a great place to be.

For tickets call 1-800-745-3000 or visit tacomarainiers.com TW R House 091216.indd 1

9/12/16 12:31 PM


Make a Scene

9OUR,OCAL'UIDE4O3OUTH3OUND-USIC

ZOMBIE PUNK DUO WASTEDEADS TO INFECT TACOMA

Friday, September 16, 2016 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

Nightlife TW PICK OF THE WEEK: WITH MULTIPLE ALBUMS CURRENTLY

CHARTING ON THE BILLBOARD 200 – INCLUDING HIS LATEST, “VIEWS,� WHICH WAS AT NO. 4 LAST WEEK – SUPERSTAR RAPPER DRAKE WILL TAKE OVER THE TACOMA DOME ON FRIDAY, SEPT. 16. FUTURE, DREEZY’S COLLABORATOR ON “WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE,� WILL OPEN AT 6:30 P.M. TICKETS ARE $49.50 TO $129.50 AND ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE AT WWW.TICKETMASTER.COM.

"Y%RNEST!*ASMIN ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Legions of shambling undead have already invaded some of our favorite movies, TV shows and comic books, and now the Zombie Apocalypse threatens to overrun Tacoma’s rock scene thanks to the Bay Area’s Wastedeads. The rotting and ravenous rock duo is the braaaaaaaaains-child of singer-guitarist Beth Allen – a.k.a. Beth Zombie – who plans to infect local punk fans with the help of drummer/boyfriend Shawn of the Dead on Saturday, Sept. 17, at the Valley Pub. Their own “undeadening� can be traced back to a zombiethemed pub crawl Allen participated in three years ago. “I went and did it, and I found my new calling,� she said, recalling just how convincing her makeup was that day. “It was Christmastime in San Francisco, and we met at the huge Christmas tree in Union Plaza. Immediately, I made two small children cry. The police come over and were like, ‘You have to leave this area.’ I’m like, ‘I’m just waiting for the other zombies to show up.’� A few beers later, and the wheels were turning in Allen’s head. “I thought it would be really funny to do a band; just to make videos, not even to play live.� The idea was to moan unintelligibly as they played. “Then we’d have really smart lyrics at the bottom as subtitles. So that was kind of how things got started.� By now, the duo has an entire closet filled with tattered zombie-wear; and their pre-show makeup routine is down to a tight 30 minutes. “We’ve gotten some really good ‘how to zombify yourself’ tips from people as we’ve gone

PHOTO BY JULIE PAVLOWSKI GREEN

WASTEDEADS. Zombies to invade Valley Pub.

along,â€? Allen said. “Teeth are really important to make yourself look disgusting. So I use black tooth paint, and I rinse my mouth out with black food coloring so my tongue turns black. ‌ Shawn likes to take his clothes out into the backyard and get them really dirty with grass stains.â€? The Wastedeads musical arsenal is stocked with scrappy, three-chord rockers with lyrics the living dead can relate to: chowing down on some gradeA cranium; kicking the crap out of rival werewolves and vampires; the inherent lameness of fast zombies. That last one is the theme of “Fast Zombies Suck,â€? a topic Allen feels strongly about. “That’s where we’re talking (trash) about movies like ‘World War Z’ and ‘28 Days Later,’â€? she said. “We’re into the more traditional George Romerotype zombies; brain-eating zombies that move very slowly.â€? The Wastedeads two albums, “Rot-N-Rollâ€? and “Live and Loudâ€? are available online at www.bandcamp.com (the former for $6.66). The duo will also have those and other

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WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Charlie Wilson with Joe (R&B) 7:30 p.m., $45-$65, AA B SHARP COFFEE: 322 Jazz Collective (jazz) 8 p.m., $7, AA CULTURA: Latin Fridays (Latin DJ) 9 p.m. G. DONNALSON’S: Chris Burchett Band (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Notorious 253 (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Nivanish with Gebular (Nirvana tribute) 8 p.m., $7-$10 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: S.A.S.S. (blues) 8 p.m., $10, AA REAL ART TACOMA: Hot Cops, Cloud Person, Bullets or Balloons, Etchings, Furnsss, Bread Pilot (indie-rock, alternative) 7 p.m., $8, AA THE SWISS: The Hipsters (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Tom Green (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $24-$30, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: Wayward Strangers (blues, rock) 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: Flames of Durga, Blanco Bronco, Bitter ExLovers (alternative, indie-rock) 8 p.m., NC

SATURDAY, SEPT. 17 WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Alan Jackson (country) 7:30 p.m., $50$85, AA B SHARP COFFEE: T-Town Blues Revue (blues) 8 p.m., $7, AA G. DONNALSON’S: Nancy Zahn (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Notorious 253 (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: “I Heart Bad Girls� with The Real Miss Meliss, Natalie Nunn, AK, OHJMarie, DJ Don Gee and more (DJ dance) 9 p.m., $15-$20 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Boneshaker, 80 Proof Logic, Inside the Gates , Shadow the Thief (rock) 8 p.m., $10, AA REAL ART TACOMA: Redeem the Exhile, I Am the Vision, Chris Bernstorf, Kevin Schlereth, Qajaq (metal, post-folk) 6:30 p.m., $8, AA THE SPAR: Tara Tinsley (alt-country) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Social Network with The Dance Factory Horn Section (pop covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Tom Green (comedy) 7:30, 10:30 p.m., $24-$30, 18+ early show UNCLE SAM’S: COC Benefit with Gritty Kitty, 8 p.m. THE VALLEY: The Wastedeads, Fuzz Attack, Radio On (punk, garage-rock) 8 p.m., NC

THE SWISS: Puget Sound Music For Youth (all-ages open mic) 4 p.m., NC, AA WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Voz de Mando, Proyecto X, Mariachi Divas (Mexican regional) 5 p.m., $15-$30

MONDAY, SEPT. 19 THE VALLEY: How, Sister Act, Garbage Type Items (punk, hardcore)

B SHARP COFFEE: Creative Colloquy (literary open mic) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Heather Jones and the Groove Masters (R&B, soul, funk) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: G’s showcase with Brian Feist (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Chuck Gay (open mic) 7 p.m., NC WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Chris Young with Cassadee Pope (country) 7:30 p.m., $40-$60, AA

TUESDAY, SEPT. 20

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Doug Skoog and Brian Feist (blues) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: G’s showcase with Brian Feist (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Stingy Brim Slim (blues) 7 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (open mic) 8 p.m., NC

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21 WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Gavin DeGraw & Andy Grammer (pop) 7 p.m., $43-$65, AA DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (R&B, blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: James Haye (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA HARMON TAPROOM: Open mic with Steve Stefanowicz, 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Open mic, 7:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY CLUB: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Dierks Bentley with Tucker Beathard (country) 7:30 p.m., $65-$100

SUNDAY, SEPT. 18 TACOMA COMEDY: Brett Hamil (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$16, 18+

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Inside Crescent Moon Gifts & Magical Garden Make your appointment today! 360-819-8129 revalysataylor@gmail.com www.facebook.com/Rev.Alysa

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ghoulish merch at the Valley. They’ve got zombie ball caps, panties, and if you’re hungry you can pick up a can of BrainsA-Roni. “It’s like Chef Boyardee, but it has our little zombie faces as the chefs,� Allen explained. “It has a really nice label on it, and it looks really good.� They’ve been known to sneak them onto local grocery store shelves wherever they go on tour. “It fits right in,� she said. Joining the Wastedeads onstage will be fellow Bay Area rockers Fuzz Attack and Tacoma’s own Radio On. Music starts at 8 p.m., and there is officially no cover charge, though a collection will be taken for performers. Learn more at www.thevalleytacoma. com and www.thewastedeads.com.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16

UI"WF 5BDPNB 253-507-4591 "HF

WARNING: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of reach of children.

B SHARP COFFEE: Tacoma Belly Dance Revue, 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: “Soulful Sundays� (blues, gospel) 8 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass Sunday, 3 p.m., NC REAL ART TACOMA: Fairlady, Oblio, The Melting Point, Dyodd (rock) 4 p.m., $5-$8, AA THE SPAR: Rod Cook and Toast (blues) 7 p.m., NC

ANTHEM COFFEE: Live Roots (open mic) 5 p.m., NC, AA CULTURA: Ladies Night Out (hip-hop DJ) 10 p.m. DAWSON’S: The Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC G. DONNALSON’S: Jared Hall Trio (jazz) 8 p.m., NC,AA KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Lachlan Patterson (comedy) 8 p.m., $16$22, 18+ TACOMA ELKS: Louis Ann Marler (dance) 6:30 p.m., $6-$10

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older


3ECTION"s0AGE sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY 3EPTEMBER 

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: TACOMA MOON FESTIVAL Sat., Sept. 24, 2-6 p.m. Chinese Reconciliation Park, 1741 Schuster Pkwy., Tacoma Enjoy music, dance and Chinese culture at the 4th annual Tacoma Moon Festival. Many activities take place around the beautiful Fuzhou Ting. This year’s theme is “tea house� with four Tacoma-area performances from East Asian cultures that traditionally celebrate Moon Festivals in September, and a final performance of Beijing Opera by Seattle’s Hwa Sheng Chinese Opera Club. There will be hands-on activities for all ages. As the festival closes at 6 p.m., the Moon Princess will lead a parade of lanterns. Presented by the Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation. Price: Free. Info: Info@TacomaChinesePark.org or www.tacomachinesepark.org/community/events/moon-festival. ‘UNDER CONSTRUCTION’ Fri., Sept. 16, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. University of Puget Sound – Kittredge Gallery, 1500 N. Warner St. This 2016 Studio Art Graduate Residency exhibit will include work by Gabriela Yoque, Grace Best-Devereux, Carly Brock and Rachel Kalman. Price: Free. Info: (253) 879-3348; www.pugetsound. edu ‘THE HOUSE OF THE BASKERVILLES’ Fri., Sept. 16, 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 17, 8 p.m. Sun., Sept. 28, 2 p.m. Lakewood Playhouse, 5729 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd., Lakewood This three-person comedic version of the Sherlock Holmes classic will drop you right into the middle of this fast paced comedy of impossibly quick changes, comedic chaos and mysterious mys-

tery. Special pay-what-youcan actors’ benefit showing at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 22. Price: $25 general admission, $22 military, $21 seniors and $19 students/educators. Info: (253) 588-0042 or www. lakewoodplayhouse.org ‘THE UNDERPANTS’ Fri., Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 17, 7:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 18, 2 p.m. Tacoma Little Theatre, 210 North ‘I’ St. The renowned comic actor and author of “Picasso at the Lapine Agile� Steve Martin provides a wild satire adapted from the classic German play about Louise and Theo Maske, a couple whose conservative existence is shattered when Louise’s bloomers fall down in public. Ages: All ages. Price: $24; $22 students, seniors & military; $20 12 and under. Info: (253) 272-2281; www.tacomalittletheatre.com

‘MOBY DICK – THE TALE RETOLD’ Fri., Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 17, 7:30 p.m. Sun., Sept. 18, 2 p.m. Tacoma Youth Theater, 924 Broadway, Tacoma SPOILER ALERT: The whale wins! Are you one of the thousands of people who claim to have read this great American novel, but what you really meant was that you: 1.) Read the Cliff’s Notes; 2.) Breezed through the comic book version; 3.) Picked it up at the bookstore (or library), read the back cover, looked at the illustrations and considered it read. Join the crowd. You missed a lot: Crazy prophets. Mutiny. Thrilling whale hunts. Obsession. Death and destruction. It’s all in the book, and in Assemblage Theater’s “Moby Dick: The Tale Retold.� Price: $15 adults (under 65), $10 students, active military, adults 65+ Tickets at the door or through www.brownpapertickets.com. Info: www. assemblagetheater.com

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

tia. Price: Free - Registration required at (253) 798-8787. Info: (253) 798-4600; www. PierceADRC.org

er than the hot glass techniques more widely known in the Pacific Northwest. Parking: $2.50 hr. Additional free parking is available on Dock St. Price: $15; $12 seniors, students and military with ID; $5 children 6-12; free for children 5 and under. Info: (866) 468-7386; www. museumofglass.org

CRAFT SATURDAYS Sat., Sept. 17, 1-4 p.m. Job Carr Cabin Museum, 2350 N. 30th St. Drop by the Job Carr Cabin Museum for a different children’s craft project every month. Ages: 4-8. Price: Pay as you can. Info: (253) 6275405; www.jobcarrmuseum. org

BILL COLBY: RETRO COLBY Mon., Sept. 19, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. University of Puget Sound – Kittredge Gallery, 1500 N. Warner St. “Retro Colby� is a retrospective exhibition of work by former University of Puget Sound art professor Bill Colby. Price: Free. Info: (253) 879-3348; www. pugetsound.edu

JUNK IN YOUR TRUNK COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE Sat., Sept. 17, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sprinker Recreation Center, 14824 C St. S. This is a twist on the old garage sale. Load up your trunk and sell your “stuff� from the back of your vehicle. You bring the “junk,� we bring the people. Just drive up and sell. Ages: All ages. Price: $20-$30. Info: (253) 798-4141

CREATIVE COLLOQUY’S MONTHLY READING & OPEN MIC Mon., Sept. 19, 7 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Court C Join local scribes of all levels at Creative Colloquy’s monthly literary event, featuring selected readers and an open-mic session. Price: Free. Info: (915) 471-5028; creativecolloquy.com

TANGOHEART Sun., Sept. 18, 5-8 p.m. Cultura Event Center, 5602 S. Washington St. Enjoy Argentine tango milonga dancing in a special presentation featuring music by the renowned Tangoheart Quintet. A bar and fresh baked empanadas will be available as well. Ages: 21 and over. Price: $15. Info: (253) 222-0105

OPEN MIC NIGHT AT FORREY’S FORZA Fri., Sept. 16, 7-9:30 p.m. Forza Coffee Company, 2209 N. Pearl St. Open Mic Night is perfect for those looking to share their talent and passion for music. Ages: All ages. Price: Free. Info: (253) 301-3925; forzacoffeecompany.com ALZHEIMER’S CAREGIVER CONFERENCE Sat., Sept. 17 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Emmanuel Lutheran Church, 1315 N. Stevens St. This is a free informational conference for caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s and other forms of demen-

COMMENCEMENT BAY HAIKU MEETING Tues., Sept. 20, 6 p.m. King’s Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Join Commencement Bay Haiku at this monthly meeting open to the public. They ask participants to bring a page of 3-5 haiku or one page of haibun (prose with haiku) to read as they give constructive suggestions to each other. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801; www.kingsbookstore.com

DAVID HUCHTHAUSEN: A RETROSPECTIVE SELECTION Sun., Sept. 18, 12-5 p.m. Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock St. Much of the Seattle artist’s work uses the slower, cold working glass processes such as cutting and polishing rath-

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar� link.

Alysa Taylor has been in the world of Metaphysics for 20-plus years. She does spiritual counseling, palm and Tarot readings out of two local shops: Crescent Moon Gifts and Magical Garden. Contact Alysa at these two shops or e-mail revalysataylor@gmail.com.

“I believe that metaphysics are tools that can help enrich our everyday lives.� ARIES (MAR. 21 – APR. 20) Someone else could believe you are being overly optimistic, or any sort of reliance you have on somebody else may not have the stability you expect. There can be more going on behind the scenes and this cautions you to refrain from impulsive actions. Taking care of details is necessary but likely difficult until late Oct.

LIBRA (SEP. 23 – OCT. 22) There can be sudden, unexpected changes with somebody else. They will have no problem putting themselves first and this may surprise you. There can be a lot more to this than meets the eye. Being annoyed and having your say can have little effect. You will become clearer in your mind during October. Wait for opportunities.

TAURUS (APR. 21 - MAY 20) There won’t be much that is clear, especially in situations where someone else could be putting you under pressure when it comes to their expectations. This is testing you to consider what underpins your own security. Don’t take any risks or you will find yourself in a situation of being a slave to circumstance until late Oct.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23 – NOV. 21) It might be necessary to let something go that you didn’t expect, mainly because you do not have enough time to deal with the detail it involves. It could also be a question of money. You will need to get priorities in order up to late Oct. Distractions to these will need to be dealt with – there is no point delaying the inevitable.

GEMINI (MAY 21 – JUN. 20) There could be some confusion between friendship or something more on a personal level, or whether you can rely on being supported on a work or business level. Taking a sudden risk, particularly if this involves abandoning a secure situation, is not wise. Thought and patience need to be applied to late Oct.

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22 – DEC. 21) Opportunity can present itself suddenly. Your natural generosity of nature must be put to one side long enough to consider either the personal obligations attached or how it can affect responsibilities you already have, especially until late Oct. Your energies need to be focused on the long-term growth of structure in your life.

CANCER (JUN. 21 – JUL. 22) First and foremost, you need to weigh up any sudden appearance of new obligations expected of you on a daily basis. Initially, there can be a lacking of information, and this is where you need to be alert. Do not make any decisions until you have had sufficient time to look at the finer details or you could become a slave to this.

V J Y C S P B L G W S E V X R L N O W Y

P N W I B D F W N G E H WQ A Y S I T C E K D E E G AW D K S B Y T I B F O S A

I R M J G I K N V C P L G W A O B Z X G

K P X S T D Y P I N B L Q R T J G E R L

T E A R S O R D E M I R S G B S I I R A

F S I E N C Y E H N R W R U I M I Y X R

L O E O F B V G S R D M D S L K G T U U

Z I B O O H F A B J N G H R B J I F Y T

S F B M V J M R K O E M H E S H N S S A

Z Y N R T X O F J T A F W N F O J E R N

U O Z U A I G O S E R S E H F A I Q P D

K O B Y J R Z S L O S G K F O W R V J O

S Z P R M I Y T V E Z O K J Y Q E V Z F

Y K T E Z I C E A Y U G J A A F V E L V

W L K D L T F H R U T C D J L X O D O V

N J W L X L X P V I F E K K P L E X F J

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20 – FEB. 18) If you are practical when it comes to priorities, it can result in much financial improvement over the next six months. This can be tied to money owed to you, and if this is the case, you need to remain focused on it until late October. A short break to somewhere out of the ordinary could open up a whole new perspective in life.

VIRGO (AUG. 23 – SEP. 22) You will be tested to remain focused on your own situation and the actions you intend to take to get things structured or in order. Distractions from other people will be the greatest challenge and could easily unsettle actions you have already taken to put a good foundation in place. This will go on until late Oct.

PISCES (FEB. 19 – MAR. 20) The lunar eclipse this week occurs in your sign, which can result in many personal things coming to fruition over the next six months. What you have to avoid is impulsively getting into situations that involve greater commitment, particularly if somebody else thinks it is a good idea. Keep your own best interests in mind.

C N I N S I X R C G U P D S Z L A Y J X

J H F E T R W P P X T B X M R A M O E L

We’ve hidden 12 Tacoma Weekly-themed words in this word search. How many can you find? Not sure what you’re looking for? Head over to B5 for the complete word list.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22 – JAN. 19) Future plans have many unknown facets connected to them that cannot be seen or known right now. The most reliable aspect to this is that dramatic underlying change can include the structure of home and family matters. Making sudden changes to obligations can actually have the effect of generating more obligations in some way.

LEO (JUL. 23 – AUG. 22) Don’t be tempted to do anything impulsive or risk-taking that involves money, and particularly if it means some sort of long-term financial commitment. Expenses you don’t expect could come up in late Oct.or something that appeals to you now could lose its appeal. By all means, enjoy yourself, but not in an expensive way.

I P U I D X M O A T I U S W A L K Q O D

NATURAL GAS How many words can you make out of this phrase?


Friday, September 16, 2016 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

CALL 253.922.5317

Classifieds 253.922.5317 www.tacomaweekly.com

SERVICES

SERVICES

ELECTRICAL

CASH FOR CARS

CASH FOR CARS

Allied Electric Service

CASH FOR CARS PAY TOP $! $100 & UP. WE WILL BUY YOUR UNWANTED VEHICLES & RVS. FREE TOWING. CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATE. 253-341-9548 STEVE

WE BUY CARS

offers electric service of commercial, industrial, residential, & marine construction. Also offers CCTV, security & fire systems.

Toll Free 1-877-272-6092 www.alliedmarinecorp.com ALLIEE1963CQ

HAULING

AND TRUCKS

RUNNING OR NOT TITLE PROBLEMS? ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE

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HAULING

CLEANING Life is too short to spend it cleaning... So let us do it for you.

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LAWN CARE

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Big John’s Lawn Care

TriState Roofing Your Local Roof Experts “Repairs or Replacement� TriState Roofing, Inc.

HAULING

SERVICES Âş Storm Clean-up Âş Handyman

1901 Center St., Tacoma, WA 98409 253-363-8280 www.tristate.pro

FREE Hauling (253) 397-7013 for Metal

HAULING

PAINTING

ALEX’S LANDSCAPING SERVICES GUTTER CLEANING AND HAULING

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LIMO

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EMPLOYMENT

Experiencing Workplace Discrimination? Retired City of Tacoma Civil Rights Investigator will provide assistance. Call 253-565-6179. Never a fee for my services.

www.stewartandson.com • (253) 565-0138 2601 70th Ave W, Suite G, University Place

ASSISTANT

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BOOKS

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EMPLOYMENT Fife Towing is looking for experienced tow operators who are hardworking and self motivated. Employment is full time. Pay is DOE. To apply email service@ fifetowing.com or visit 1313 34th Ave. E., Fife WA 98424 (253) 922-8784

BOOKS

Admin Assistance, Design, & Writing Services At Its

EMPLOYMENT

Friends of Longshoremen Needed! Great Earning Potential! Help Us Promote Exclusive Health & Wellness Products that are FDA Approved/Covered by Insurance. Call Toby Today (323) 696-5093

DISCRIMINATION

Business & Home u es o & o e i es in o s & u o e

$149.99 per month* *valid under 100 transactions per month

Piso bookkeeping offers services for small business and individuals in the Kitsap County area. We strive for excellence in customer services and consistently reduce our fees provide affordable services.

(360) 990-2358 www.pisobookkeeping.com

EMPLOYMENT

PIERCE COUNTY COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER GROUP IS SEEKING A

SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHER PCCNG, Pierce County’s community news leader, is seeking a Sports Photographer with a great eye for capturing live game action at games, practices and events in Pierce County. Experienced photographers preferred. REQUIREMENTS: 1-2 years experience taking sports photos. Must have professional equipment, reliable transportation and ability to travel to sports event locations. The ideal candidate is a self motivated, outgoing individual with a positive attitude. They should be able to work evenings and weekends, be willing to work outdoors in various weather conditions, and be able to stand, bend, kneel for prolonged periods of time.

Please send your resume and photography examples to jgimse@tacomaweekly.com MILTON • EDGEWOOD

CONTACT US Phone: Mail:

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Advertising Representatives: • Rose Theile, rose@tacomaweekly.com • Marlene Carrillo, marlene@tacomaweekly.com • Andrea Jay, andrea@tacomaweekly.com


3ECTION"s0AGEsTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs&RIDAY 3EPTEMBER 

NOTICES

PETS MALTESE & YORKIE MIX PUPPIES FOR SALE. 2 MALES & 1 FEMALE, 11 WEEKS OLD, SMALL 4.5 TO 5 LBS. 253-380-8303. READY FOR NEW HOME.

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Fife Towing, Fife Recovery Service & NW Towing, at 1313 34th Ave E, Fife on 9/19/2016. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130 at 11:00 a.m. Viewing of cars from 10:00-11:00 a.m. Registered Tow Numbers 5009, 5421, 5588. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com

Pet of the Week

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE Northwest Towing, at 2025 S 341st Pl, Federal Way on 9/19/2016. In compliance with the RCW46.55.130. at 2:00 p.m. Viewing of cars from 1:00-2:00 p.m. Registered Tow Number 5695. Cash Auction Only www.fifetowing.com King County housing Authority (KCHA) Retaining Wall renovations at Vantage Glen REQUEST FOR BIDS KCHA is seeking qualified contractors who Are interested in submitting bids for the Retaining Wall Renovation at Vantage Glen. The Work consists of, but is not limited to, the renovation of retaining walls using steel and shotcrete, as indicated in the plans and specifications. The property is located at 18100 107th Place SE, Renton, WA 98055. Bids packets are available for download on KCHA’s website at HYPERLINK “http://www.kcha.org/ business/contruction/open/� http://www.kcha. org/business/contruction/open/. If you have questions, please contact Cristy Thompson at HYPERLINK “mailto:cristy@kcha.org� cristy@kcha.org. an optional pre-bid meeting is scheduled at the property on September 20, 2016 at 10:00 AM. This is a Sealed Bid; all bids must be received in a Sealed Envelope Marked “Bid Documents: Vantage Glen Retaining Wall�. The Bid must be time and date stamped at KCHA no later than the above due date and time. No Bids will be accepted after that date and time. No Fax or Email Bids will be accepted. The estimate is $196,432.14 STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT DANE COUNTY

ESSENCE We’re just crazy about Featured Pet Essence. The two-year-old Pitty Mix is a fantastic specimen of a dog, with an active, playful, and friendly spirit. She also behaved swimmingly during a puppy playdate earlier this week, and most likely will not need to be the sole pooch of your place. Meet her today at your local Tacoma shelter — #A510608

www.thehumanesociety.org

FOR SALE CUSTOM MADE QUEEN BEDROOM SUITE. TEAK FINISH OILED FINISH. NEARLY NEW CONDITION. NO QUEEN MATTRESS. NEW OVER $1200. QUICK SALE $250. IN STORAGE.

253-397-5929

WANTED

TO: TREVOR L. DAVIDSON Case NO. 2016SC005151 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Replevin Action has been filed to recover the possession of the following described goods and chattels, to a 2009 Chevrolet Aveo, V.I.N. KL1TD66EX9B659672. A copy of the Replevin Action has been sent to your last known address. NOW, unless you shall appear at the Circuit Court of Dane County, located in the Dane County Courthouse, State of Wisconsin at 215 S. Hamilton, Room 2000 before the Commissioner/Judge on 09/30/2016 at 8:30 a.m. a Judgment may be granted to the creditor suing you for the delivery of said property and for damages for the detention thereof and for costs. Dated this 08th day of September, 2016 HEARTLAND CREDIT UNION Plaintiff Lori Haidinger5325 High Crossing Blvd Madison, WI 53718 (608) 282-7000

WANTED: Old Post Cards, Photo Albums, Menus, Shipping, Railroad, Airplane Automobile Items, Old Pens, Watches, Costume Jewelry, Quilts, Toys, Musical Instruments, Native American and Any Small Antiques.

  

VOLUNTEERS Make Time , Make Connections: Hospice Volunteers Needed CHI Franciscan Hospice and Palliative care is looking for compassionate people interested in honoring those near the end of their life. We are committed in our program to celebrate and support people’s lives all the way until they die. Volunteers can help by taking time to listen to life stories, make phone calls, support a tired caregiver, play someone’s favorite music, run errands, welcome people to our hospice facility, or just hold someone’s hand. Our next training starts Saturday, September 10th at Hospice House. Training includes flexible web-based material along with class room instruction. To learn more and to get started call us toll free at 1-855534-7050 or email us at jamesbentley@ chifranciscan.org Volunteer meals on Wheels Driver Seeking a volunteer Meals on Wheels Driver. Delivers frozen meals once a week in the Pierce County area, mileage reimbursement. Must have a clean background check, WA driver’s license, car insurance and food handlers card. Call front desk for more info: 253-272-8433

AmeriCorps Opportunity: Employment Case Manager/Job Developer Tacoma Community House is seek an outgoing, enthusiastic, and motivated professional that is passionate about assisting low-income community members on their journey to self-sufficiency. This professional position is responsible for assisting people in need of employment. The case manager/job developer will provide career counseling, employment & training information, job search skills, workshop facilitation, job placement/follow-up, and referral to other community resources. The case manager/job develop will assist in facilitation of our Employer Advisory Board and will also develop and implement 3 financial fitness events. Contact Arrie Dunlap at (253) 383-3951 or adunlap@tacomacommunityhouse. org for more information.

AmeriCorps Opportunity: Read2Me Program Specialist Tacoma Community House seeks an AmeriCorps member to assist in the Read2Me Program in local elementary schools. Read2Me is a one-on-one adult/ student reading program for struggling first, second, and third grade readers. Duties include recruiting volunteers, producing a monthly tutor newsletter, facilitating bimonthly tutor workshops, tracking attendance for both students and volunteer tutors, researching best practicing best practices for tutoring strategies and tutor training and tutoring a student in each of the four schools. You must be 18-25 years of age at the start date of service (Sep 1, 2016-Jul 15, 2017). Contact Karen Thomas at (253)-383-3951 or kthomas@tacomacommunityhouse.org for more information. Great Volunteer Opportunity Make friends, have fun and help seniors with simple tasks. You’ll make a big difference by helping people maintain their independence. This is volunteering, not caregiving. Volunteers must be 55 or older, low income, serve 15 hrs/wk and live in Pierce or Kitsap Counties. Drivers are especially needed. Benefits include hourly tax-free stipend and mileage reimbursement. For information call Julie at Lutheran Community Services, Senior Companion Volunteer Program, (253)722-5686. Food Bank Eloise’s Cooking Pot Food Bank on the Eastside of Tacoma, WA is powered strictly by volunteers. We provide much needed food and other basic household items to people in need on a weekly basis. Being a volunteer driven organization we are always looking for good people who are interested in donating a few hours of their lives helping make the lives of someone else a little better. Donate as much or as little of your time you want for a wide variety of tasks, there is always plenty to do. If you are looking for a way to be part of something bigger and give a little much needed help to the local community then contact us and

VOLUNTEERS we’ll get you started. Please join us in helping to spread a little holiday cheer. Contact 253-2122778. Help furnish hope to those in need! NW Furniture Bank Volunteers needed. “NWFB helps restore hope, dignity and stability in our community by recycling donated furniture to people in need.� Tuesday-Saturday Truck Volunteers Needed- 9:00 am-2:00 pm. Truck volunteers ride along in the truck, deliver furniture to clients and make residential and corporate pickups; they are an essential part of the NWFB Team. To volunteer contact us at info@ nwfurniturebank.org or call 253-302-3868. South Sound Outreach is offering free tax preparation for those who make $50,000 or less. To schedule an appointment call 253.593.2111 or visit our website at www. southsoundoutreach. org. Make a difference in the life of a child! The Northwest Youth Sports Alliance is looking for coaches for our developmental youth sports program. Sports vary by season. Coaches are provided general training and go through a national background check clearance process. For more information, visit www.metroparkstacoma.org/nysa or contact Roy Fletcher, Youth Sports Coordinator, royf@tacomaparks.com or 253.305.1025. Join us in changing lives! Changing Rein Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies, a nonprofit, offers equine assisted services to differently-abled individuals. Currently the program offers several volunteer opportunities. Our primary need at present is for program volunteers who work with our horses and support our riders in therapeutic and adaptive lessons. Other volunteer opportunities include: grounds maintenance and administrative/clerical work. Must be at least 14 years old to participate. Horse experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. For more information contact: Volunteer Coordinator at 253-370-1429 or volunteer@changingrein.org.

The Tacoma Maritime Institute meets every 4th Monday at the Midland Community Center 1614 99th Street East Tacoma WA Potluck at 6:00, all are welcome. Meeting Starts at 7:00. Call 253-536-4494 Be a Big Brother! Becoming a Big is a fun and easy way to volunteer in your community and make a BIG difference in the life of a child. There are several program options to fit your schedule and interests, such as meeting your Little at school, going on an outing or attending an agency-planned activity. For more information, visit www. bbbsps.org or call 206.763.9060. INTERVIEWEES FOR A NON-PROFIT PROJECT “MEMORY COMMUNITYâ€? What It Is: We are Memory Community (a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation). The Memory Community Project is a creative service to seniors. Our Goals & Objectives: To create an accessible resource that: • helps our senior citizens tell their stories • connects the young and the old • increases our understanding of those before us who help us be who we are • honors the generations before us and show our appreciation by preserving their memories • All seniors are welcome to volunteer for filming their story! • At most two days of work during daytime – Day 1: pre-production meeting, and Release Form signing Day 2: filming, ideally wrapped within half a day What we’d like you to talk about in the film: Use 10 minutes or so to tell the most memorable story from your life, the lessons that were learned, and the wise words you want to pass along to your children/grandchildren. Compensation: a DVD in which you are the leading character, and a free upload to our website http://memorycommunity.org/ Contact: send your emails to deyung@ memorycommunity. org Or call Deyung at 253-858-2445 for scheduling a meeting. The filming is free, but donations are appreciated to help the project continue.


Friday, September 16, 2016 sTACOMAWEEKLYCOMs 3ECTION"s0AGE

Classifieds REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

REALTORS

HOME BUYER EDUCATION CLASSES WA State Housing Finance Commission Loan Programs Home Buyer Course Topics t %PXO1BZNFOU"TTJTUBODF1SPHSBNT‰ BOEIPXUPHFUZPVSTIBSF t (FUUJOHRVBMJmFEBOEBQQSPWFEGPSBMPBO t $IPPTJOHUIFSJHIUMPBOUZQFGPSZPV t 6OEFSTUBOEJOHDSFEJUTDPSFTBOEIPXUPVTF DSFEJUJOXBZTUPJNQSPWFZPVSTDPSF t -FBSOUIF)PXBOE8IZPGXPSLJOHXJUIB SFBMUPS UIFIPNFQVSDIBTJOHQSPDFTTBOEIPX UPNBLFBOPGGFS

CLASSES ARE FREE! CALL FOR DATES AND MORE INFORMATION

LEARN ABOUT THE... Home Advantage Loan

REALTORS

REALTORS

7713 197th St. Ct. E., Spanaway, WA 98387 This completely remodeled, bright, like-new home has 2 Master Bedroom Suites with full baths plus 2 additional large bedrooms AND Loft area which could be 5th bdrm, 2 family rooms on main and 3.5 baths! Open Concept Kitchen with tile island, SS appliances, pantryand maple cabinets opens to family room w/gas fireplace and walks out sliding doors to backyard. Huge master w/walk in closet, coved ceilings, remodeled bath. 2nd master w/full bath, new carpet throughout, located in culdesac with park. (MLS# 1018117)

HEATHER REDAL

(Loan Specific Criteria applies)

0% INTEREST/%.035("(& NO MONTHLY PAYMENT!

Stephanie@LynchHomeGroup.com

(Deferred for 30 yrs. or if you sell or refinance house)

REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED

61500'5)&45.035("(&".06/5 64&'03%08/1":.&/503$-04*/($0454

Top Producing Broker 2008-2015 Voted “Five Star Professional� by Clients

REALTORS

FREDERICKSON AREA RESIDENTIAL $269,000

Down Payment Assistance

253-203-8985

REALTORS

JUST LISTED

%0/05/&&%50#&'*3455*.&)0.&#6:&3 )064&)0-%45)"5&"3/6150 1&3:3 64&8*5)')" 7" $0/7-0"/4

CLASSES HELD REGULARLY

CALL 253.922.5317

Your Local Agent - Serving buyers, sellers, investors and military relocation. Realtor, Windermere Professional Partners www.HomesintheSouthSound.com HeatherRedal@Windermere.com (253) 363-5920

www.stephanielynch.com

SERGIO HERNANDEZ

FEATURED PROPERTIES

Serving the Community Since 1991

17 SALMON BEACH, TACOMA

Better Properties University Place/Fircrest (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

PENDING $399,950

NOW LEASING 4008 S. Pine, Tacoma

MLS#: 1005622 Area: Point Defiance Beds: 3 Baths: 1.75 Incredible, no bank water front gem nestled amongst the intriguing & eclectic community of Salmon Beach. Whale watch from your deck, breathe in sea air year round, & leave your cares behind as you become one w/ nature in this amazing home.

3616 49TH AVE NE, TACOMA

$595,000

MLS#: 1010544 Area: Brown’s Point Beds: 3 Baths: 1.75

Completely remodeled w/over 200k in high end upgrades. 5 offices, private exits, shared executive conference room, kitchen w/dining area, lots of storage, and 15 parking stalls. One office could be used as apartment for out of state clients. ADA Accessible. Mall & 38th Street Exit.

So cool, so functional, so efficient. Entire home heated w/ 1500 watts & a gas fireplace. Heated floors; hickory cabinets; soaring 18 foot ceilings & a stunning custom, old growth staircase & banister are some of the fab details. Huge partially finished upstairs awaits your vision.

$375,000

4608 60TH AVE W, UNIVERSITY PLACE FOR SALE 8424 15th Ave SE, Olympia

$279,000

Charming 2 story with covered porch on corner lot. Living room with soaring ceilings, gas fireplace and open spindled staircase. Kitchen with SS appl. , walk in pantry and breakfast bar, open to Family room and Dining area. Slider to patio and fenced back yard. Master with walk in closet and 5 pc bath with jetted tub. additional 2 bedrooms that share a jack and jill bath. Close to schools, shopping and JBLM. 1 year old appliances stay! New roof.

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

HOMES

HOMES

3008 S. 12th St., Tacoma

MLS#: 963152 Area: University Place

sold

Appliances: Dishwasher, Range/Oven, Refrigerator Interior Features: Bath Off Master, Double Pane/Storm Window, Dining Room, Vaulted Ceilings

$339,950

Shannon Agent Extraordinaire

HOMES

HOMES

House for Sale in University Place

TACOMA 2112 N FIFE ST #8

$1395

$1100

2 BED 1 BATH 910 SF. STUNNING CONDO INCLUDES HARDWOODS, GRANITE COUNTERS, WASHER/ DRYER AND W/S/G IN RENT.

2 BED 1.75 BATH 1123 SF. NORTH END APT HAS LARGE LIVING ROOM, DECK, RESERVED PARKING, WASHER/DRYER AND CATS OK.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 Professional Management Services

253-632-2920

LAKEWOOD 8017 CUSTER RD #A3

$1450

$1250

3 BED 2.5 BATH 1534 SF. 3 BEDROOM TOWNHOME INCLUDES ALL APPLIANCES, NEW CARPET, ATTACHED GARAGE AND MORE.

2 BED 2 BATH 1023 SF. AMAZING CONDO HAS ALL APPLIANCES, 5 PIECE MASTERS, FRONT PATIO AND GARAGE SPACE.

TACOMA

BONNEY LAKE

760 COMMERCE ST #503

8403 LOCUST AVE E #K3

$1025

$1050

2 BED 2 BATH 1249 SF. LAVISH DOWNTOWN CONDO HAS HARDWOOD FLOORS, ALL APPLIANCES AND $65 FOR W/S/G.

2 BED 2 BATH 1100 SF. BEAUTIFUL CONDO HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, WASHER/DRYER, RESERVED PARKING & COVERED PATIO W/STORAGE.

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Carmen Neal, Blue Emerald Real Estate

FEATURED PROPERTIES

sold $249,950

sold

This charming 3 bedroom home sits on a large private lot located in the highly desirable University Place district. This updated home has beautiful vaulted ceilings, all new windows, new roof, updated bathroom, fresh paint inside & out and a new fully fenced and landscaped back yard! There is also a covered carport with plenty of storage and U shaped driveway for easy access. Home is move in ready!

By APPT only. 1530 sq. ft. 3 bd, rambler, 1.5 bath, Âź acre lot, RV parking, 2 car garage, 2 storage buildings, sprinkler, alarm system. New roof, windows and gas furnace. 2 fireplaces, hardwood & carpet, pocket/ louvered doors, french doors, cement patio. Estate Sale.

3626 65th Ave. W, U.P., 98466 $275,000 253-531-9549

RV SPACE

RV SPACE 30 Foot Max. Not Older than 2008. $345 month, $150 Deposit. Screening. No pets. 253-381-8344 COMMERCIAL

NORTH LAKEWOOD COMM. BUILDING FOR LEASE. $650 MONTH, $600 DEPOSIT AND SCREENING. 253-381-8344 Kress 932 Broadway Office suites available 600-2,500 SF Conveniently located across from Commerce St Transit hub Contact Tom Brown or Eric Cederstrand 253-779-8400

BUSINESSES OPPORTUNITIES COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS FOR SALE/LEASE POPULAR, WELL ESTABLISHED, VERY PROFITABLE EATERY, with Beer, Growlers, Wine & Liquor. Asking price $375,000.

$369,900

Just Listed!

RV SPACE

COMMERCIAL 3 Beds, 1 Bath, 1250 SF. Wonderful Victorian home that has easy commute to UPS & is close to Franklin elementary!!! Large covered front porch. Main floor bedroom. Both a living room & family room Large bedrooms. Breakfast bar & loads of storage in kitchen. Newer roof, storm windows, newer hot water tank & furnace. Great Value Fully fenced backyard and paved driveway. Fresh paint inside and out, new flooring, updated plumbing & electrical, and fully insulated! Plenty of room for your own touches! Super close to 6th Ave! MLS# 832899 $150,000

DUPONT 2115 BOBS HOLLOW LN. #A

If I wouldn’t buy it, I won’t sell it to you and if I wouldn’t live in it, I won’t list it.

Ph: 253.691.1800 F: 253.761.1150 shannonsells@hotmail.com

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA 5321 N PEARL ST #307

Beds: 3 Baths: 2.5

Heat/Cool: Forced Air Water Heater: Electric

11299 Borgen Loop NW Gig Harbor, WA 98332

MEXICAN FAST FOOD Successful Franchise in Pierce County, 15 yrs. same location. $350k annual gross sales, excellent net. Asking $129,000, terms avail., Owner retiring. OFFICE BUILDING WITH 6 SUITES, Close to Wright’s Park, ideal for Attorneys or Professional use. Asking Price $599,000, Terms. Suites are also available for Lease. LONGTIME ESTABLISHED POPULAR RESTR./LOUNGE ON 6TH AVE. Business for sale. $110,000 OR LEASE the space, 3,300 SQ. FT. $149,000 for $4,000 Month. another price reduction

Lisa Taylor 253-232-5626

Michelle Anguiano 253-232-5626

www.Homes4SaleByMichelle.com

SAME OWNER: BARTENDING ACADEMY OF TACOMA, Since 1959, Very profitable, Training provided.

RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


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