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FREE s Friday, September 6, 2013

FOOTBALL PREVIEWS A6

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

Welcome Back to School Edition

PHOTOS BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

READY TO LEARN. Lister Elementary

School students Tate Burns, 5, (above) and Dezare and Diamond Satterwhite, 8 and 9, (top) picked up new backpacks at Communities In Schools Stuff The Bus event at Salishan.

Tacoma’s rite of fall: BACKPACK STUFFING

A FESTIVAL OF MUSIC, SHOES, RESOURCES AND SCHOOL HUGE TURNOUT OF FAMILIES

PARADE UNIFIES EASTSIDE

By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

S

hennetta Smith wore her “Never Surrender” T-shirt to the Eastside Families Back to School Parade & Festival Aug. 30. It was truth in advertising for Smith, for her four children, the staff at First Creek Middle School and the 20-plus social services and performers at the festival. All of them are fighting the odds in the East Side neighborhood, where the population is low-income, diverse and moves more than average. For all its fun, freebies and food, this was a serious, and successful, experiment. The aim was to invite the families, to make them feel welcome and supported at the school, said principal Brad Brown. Family involvement is key to students’ success, and getting so many of them there was a big win. “We planned for 500 people,” Brown said of the barbecue lunch. “I don’t know if we fed half the people before the food ran out.” It was the same with the 200 backpacks. There were still 100 kids needing them after they were gone. Seen one way, it was a disappointment. From the flip side, it was an indication that families are engaging with the school. Fahren Johnson, program director at the school’s Eagle Center, told the kids who missed out that she would try her best to rustle up enough school supplies for them. Even as things were running out Brown was optimistic. People came and got a look at who was ready to support them. Inspire them.

X See PARADE / page A10

By Kathleen Merryman kathleen@tacomaweekly.com

Buying school supplies for kids they don’t know ranks high on the list of Tacomans’ finest habits. No sooner do crayons go on sale for a quarter and markers hit 50 cents than

X See BACKPACKS / page A4

RIGHT ų WHAT’S WITH TACOMA

PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

FLOWER POWER. The students who tend-

ed Roosevelt Elementary School’s garden over the summer celebrated with a feast, and Chinese lantern flowers. From left to right in the back row they are Alyna Lewandowsky, Jocelyn Pichard, Chris Trinh, Ruby Clubbe, Doan Pham, Trang Ha and Quoc Huynh. Front Row, left to right is Sam Clubbe and Alex Fernandez Aponte, Lorena Castaneda-Bitsue. Cecilia Fernandez Aponte and Alannah Connolly.

Growing a feast of lessons By Kathleen Merryman

PHOTOS BY RUSS CARMACK FOR TACOMA PUBLIC SCHOOLS / BOTTOM PHOTO BY KATHLEEN MERRYMAN

FANFARE. First Creek Middle School threw a parade and festival for stu-

dents and families. Lincoln High School’s cheerleaders kicked up the heat, and Tacoma Public School Deputy Superintendent Josh Garcia marched as Grand Marshal. Kids and families enjoyed a barbecue and performances by singers, dancers and poets. (Bottom) Shennetta Smith beamed with her children, Dartanyon, Abrigail, Josiah and Zion Pratcher.

Free to Breathe Tacoma A3 SICK LEAVE: A rally was held last week to raise awareness to have employers provide sick leave for workers. PAGE A2

Volleyball Previews A7

Pothole Pig ...............A2 City News.................A3

Taylor Swift B3

Jocelyn Pichardo cooked her special salsa verde with eggs for the feast. Lorena Castaneda-Bitsue asked her mom to make her famous tamales. Trang Ha, Lorena’s brother Joel, Alahnna Connolly, Cecilia and Alex Fernandez Aponte, Truong Le, Doan Pham, Quoc Huynh, Chris Trinh, Jessica Matushevskaya, Cecilia Fernandez Aponte, Alyna Lewandowsky, and teacher Brett

X See GARDEN / page A9 Facebook: facebook.com/tacomaweekly Twitter: @Tacomaweekly Tumblr: tacomaweekly.tumblr.com Pinterest: pinterest.com/tacomaweekly Flickr:ÁLFNUFRPWDFRPDZHHNO\

Sports ......................A6 Make A Scene ........ B5 A&E ....................... ..B1 Calendar ................. B6 Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

Two Sections | 20 Pages


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Pothole pig’s

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2588 Pacific Highway, Fife, WA 98424  ‹-(?!  7\ISPZOLY!John Weymer / jweymer@tacomaweekly.com 5L^Z+LZR!news@tacomaweekly.com 4HUHNPUN,KP[VY!Matt Nagle / matt@tacomaweekly.com :[HMM>YP[LYZ! Kate Burrows / kburrows@tacomaweekly.com Steve Dunkelberger / stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com Kathleen Merryman / kathleen@tacomaweekly.com Ernest Jasmin / ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com :WVY[Z,KP[VY!Jeremy Helling/ jhelling@tacomaweekly.com 7HNPUH[PVU!Tim Meikle / tim@tacomaweekly.com; Kim Pyle, Dave Davison, Tammy Vince Cruz >LI+L]LSVWLYZ! Cedric Leggin, Ed Curran, Monica Rice 7OV[VNYHWOLY! Rocky Ross *VU[YPI\[PUN>YP[LYZ! Karen Westeen, Steve Mullen, Dave Davison, Sean Contris (K]LY[PZPUN!Rose Theile / rose@tacomaweekly.com

Tacoma Weekly is interested in what is happening in our community. Please send your news and story ideas to the above address or e-mail us at news@tacomaweekly.com. Tacoma Weekly welcomes letters to the editor, your opinions and viewpoints. Anonymous letters will not be published. Tacoma Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potentially libelous material. Please send them to above address or e-mail us at letters@tacomaweekly.com.

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The 1956 Continental Mark II in America’s Car Museum was donated by Steve Boone, owner of Northwest Harley Davidson in Lacey. The Mark II provides viewers with an example of Ford’s forward-thinking designs and attention to quality during the middle of the last century. “To craft the finest automobiles in America� was, after all, the motto of the short-lived Continental Division of Ford Motor Co. Boone said the sleek look and luxurious interior gained his attention when he acquired the car. “The Continental Division of Ford Motor Company traced its roots back to Edsel Ford’s pet project, the 1939 Lincoln Continental,� The April 2005 issue of Hemmings Classic Car noted. The Lincoln line had stopped production in 1948, and dealers were eager to fill their showrooms with a replacement. The Mark II fed into that line.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LEMAY COLLECTION

Work on designing the car started in 1952 with research to determine whether a market for such a premium car even existed. The company determined the model itself would likely lose money, but it would build the brand prestige for other Ford models. A design contest among Ford stylists and outside contractors resulted in a two-door coupe designed by staffer John Reinhart. It

was both traditional and classic, yet incorporated what he termed Modern Formal design - this was the Mark II. When it debuted as a 1956 model in October of 1955, the $9,966 Mark II was one of the heaviest American cars, topping out at 5,190 pounds on a 126inch wheelbase. Under the hood was a standard Lincoln V-8 engine that could reach 60 miles per hour in 16 seconds.

SICK LEAVE BENEFITS MOVE CLOSER TO COUNCIL ACTION By Steve Dunkelberger

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Noshing on hotdogs and brisket, sick-leave supporters gathered in a Sixth Avenue parking lot last week to promote awareness of their effort to require business owners to provide paid sick leave for their workers. Healthy Tacoma is a federation of human rights and minority groups, labor unions, business owners and workers that are working to build support for a proposal the group hopes to bring to Tacoma City Council for consideration. Council members Anders Ibsen and Ryan Mello already back the concept, although the details of “Paid Sick and Safe Time� are being worked out. “We are going to try to push it through when it is ready,� said Healthy Tacoma organizer Sandy Restrepo. The working concept now is to have businesses with more than 10 employees provide an hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked with a cap of 40 hours of sick leave. Larger companies would have higher caps, topping off at 108 hours for firms with more than 250 employees. The sick leave could be used for

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

-(095,:: A rally was held last week to raise awareness of a local move-

ment to have employers provide sick leave for workers.

sick leave would bring since productivity and employee retention makes up for any “lost time.� “It doesn’t cripple you,� she said. “It really doesn’t cost all that much.� Business groups and restaurant associations are opposing the plan because they feel the new requirement would hurt businesses with added cost and regulations in an economic environment that is already tough for businesses to turn profits. Tacoma Chamber CEO Tom Pierson points out that state and federal laws protect workers from being fired for asking for sick leave as proponents contend happens all the time. “You already have protection in place,� he said. “So it comes down to what do we really need to fix?� A look at Seattle’s sick leave law shows that dishwashers and table bussers are much more likely to use their sick leave than servers, so controlling the spread of illnesses from worker to patron hasn’t changed. Small businesses often find themselves shuffling duties around, so an occasional sick day just adds to that mix, Pierson

personal health, preventative care, family sickness or for time to deal with domestic violence legal filings. Similar plans have been approved in Seattle, Portland, New York City, Washington, DC and the entire state of Connecticut. About 40,000 workers around Tacoma, mostly in hospitality jobs in restaurants or hotels, have no sick leave benefits. That‘s two out of every five workers in the city, which is the national average. A report on San Francisco’s ordinance concluded that few businesses saw profits drop from the added cost of providing paid sick leave and that most workers didn’t end up using all the sick leave they had accrued. And about 60 percent of Tacoma businesses, Restrepo said, are already offering some sort of sick leave policy. “An overwhelming amount of businesses are already doing the right thing,� she said. One of those is Makini Howell, who runs Plum Bistro and Quickie Too. She is also a backer of the effort and says the businesses don’t have to fear about the added costs paid

“Ask me about the AARP Auto Insurance Program from The Hartford.�



2nd and ‘I’ Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of road riddled with holiness, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

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said. What the paid leave movement is really about is a national effort against large corporations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These people are targeting one or two businesses,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting that McDonalds and WalMart are often mentioned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is not about Tacoma.â&#x20AC;? McDonalds restaurants are actually mostly franchises that are locally owned and WalMartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leave policy rivals that of most small businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are certainly people struggling out there,â&#x20AC;? Pierson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what else we can do.â&#x20AC;?

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City News TAKE THE COMMUNITY GARDEN HARVEST TOUR Pierce Conservation District and Duchess of Downtown Tours announce the 4th Annual Community Garden Harvest Tour happening Saturday, Sept. 7 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Attendees can see some of the 60 community gardens throughout Pierce County by bus, bike or self-guided to any of the gardens open to the public. The event is completely free to the public and there will be a light lunch provided for gardeners and attendees made by Free Range Kitchen, a new small business incubator and local foods advocate, made with produce from the Sumner Community Garden and Farm. SCHEDULE 10 a.m.: Meet at Wright Park next to the lawn bowling court near the intersection of South G Street and Sixth Avenue (parking is limited!). 10:15 a.m.: Bus Tour departs! Take a free ride with Duchess of Downtown Tours and visit a wide variety of community gardens

in Pierce County. Tacoma Weekly’s Kathleen Merryman will join the tour as a local celebrity tour guide. You must pre-register because spots are limited! www.brownpapertickets. com/event/446026. The Bus Tour will be visiting the following gardens: · Gallucci Garden, S. 14th and S. G, Tacoma · Barangay Community Services Community Garden, S. 46th and S. Hosmer, Tacoma · South 40th Street Community Garden, S. 40th and S. Cedar, Tacoma · Boze Community Garden, E. 68th and E. L, Tacoma · Sumner Community Farm, 12324 Valley Avenue East, Sumner 10:15 am: Bike tour departs! Pierce Conservation District is also doing a guided bike tour which will be an easy to moderate pace and skill level traveling from downtown/Hilltop up towards the north-end and back again. All skill levels welcome! Participants must wear a helmet. The Bike Tour will be visiting the following gardens: · Junett Community Garden; N. 16th & Junett

· Hilltop Urban Gardens and Farm; S. 14th & Ainsworth · Viet Huong Community Garden; S. 18th & G Street · Gallucci Learning Garden; S. 14th & G street · 8th & I Community Garden; S. 8th & I 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Drive yourself to any of the 61 gardens in Pierce County. Many of the community gardens are open to the public on Sept. 7 and you can visit them at your own pace and leisure between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Maps are available at Kings Books and online and at www.piercecountycd.org/communitygardens. 1 p.m.: Return to Wright Park for light lunch made by Free Range Kitchen from fresh and local ingredients including produce from Sumner Community Farm and Garden. There will be vegan and vegetarian options available. The Tacoma/Pierce Community Gardens is a program of the Pierce Conservation District. For more information, visit their website www. piercecd.org/communitygardens. FIND MORE AT TACOMAWEEKLY.COM

-YLL[V)YLH[OL;HJVTH Daughters honor their late mother at 5k run/walk and one mile walk to raise money for the National Lung Cancer Partnership By David Rose

A taxi driver was parked at the Tacoma Dome Transit Center on Aug. 29, when another cab driver parked behind him and started yelling at him for being a “terrorist” because he is Muslim born in Somalia although he is a United States citizen. The victim said the suspect driver had harassed him several times. The suspect driver denied the altercation happened, so police viewed security camera footage. The police later determined that no crime was committed and that the victim should seek a restraining order against the man. A man claimed a convenience store clerk had stolen his wallet at a gas station along the 1400 block of Sprague Avenue. The clerk called police when the man became abusive. The responding officer later arrested the man for threatening the officer with a piece of a mirror and for giving a false name. The man was booked into Fife jail, where officers recognized him from a drug charge earlier that day. The man had apparently swallowed the drugs and was taken to the hospital, where he escaped. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

CORRECTION

Correspondent

Lynn Osborne, a Tacoma mother of two, was 44 years old when she was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2008. She died this past February from the disease, one of 160,000 people who lose their lives every year to DAVID ROSE lung cancer. At 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7 at Tacoma’s Ruston Way-Dickman Park, Lynn’s friends and family will take part in the Free to Breathe Tacoma 5k Run/Walk and 1 mile Walk to raise money for the National Lung Cancer Partnership, a non-profit organization focused on research, education and awareness programs. Cathy Schrock, who works as the public information officer for the Federal Way Police Department, was Lynn’s best friend. She says, “This year is the first memorial walk and I am filled with so much emotion. I want to help fight the BEAST that took our best friend and mother.” All cancers take a devastating toll but lung cancer is the leading killer in the United States, taking more lives than breast, prostate, colon and pancreatic cancers combined.

Police Blotter

In the Aug. 23 story “Old federal building could become new hub for arts,” it was incorrectly stated that the old federal building in Tacoma opened in 1901. The correct date is 1910. We apologize for this error.

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#1 TACOMA WEEKLY 2013 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PREVIEW BELLARMINE PREP RELOADS, LINCOLN LOOKS LIKE 3A CONTENDER

#2 THIS IS WHAT BUMBERSHOOT 2013 LOOKED LIKE PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID ROSE

LOVE IN ACTION. Emily Schorr (left) and Elise Schorr (right) will be helping to raise funds to fight lung cancer in memory of their mom Lynn Osborne (middle).

Only 15 percent of people diagnosed with lung cancer will survive it. This is primarily because today the vast majority of lung cancers are diagnosed at a late stage. Schrock says, “After experiencing the tragedy of losing someone close to me, I made a promise

to Lynn and her family that I would dedicate my time raising the funds needed to fuel advances in early treatment and detection.” For more information on the event and to register to donate, visit www.FreetoBreathe. org/Tacoma.

#3 THE NORTHWEST’S OWN SPUD GOODMAN RETURNS TO THE AIRWAVES #4 PATRIOTISM, GRATITUDE MARK INAUGURAL MILITARY SERVICE PARADE #5 CITY SEEKS TO CURB BLIGHT THROUGH HOUSE FLIPPING

WANTED FOR MURDER

RICHARD C. SANCHEZ

SANTIAGO V. MEDEROS

ANDRES M. MENDEZ

Hispanic male, 22 yrs. old, 5’4”, 155 lbs., black hair, brown eyes

Hispanic male, 20 yrs. old, 5’10”, 140 lbs., black hair, brown eyes

Hispanic male, 26 yrs. old, 5’9”, 150 lbs., black hair, brown eyes

Tacoma Police detectives need your help to locate homicide suspects Richard Sanchez, Andres Mendez and Santiago Mederos. Felony warrants have been issued for Sanchez, Mendez and Mederos’s arrests for Murder in the 2nd degree. On

March 25th, 2010, a 25-year-old man was shot and killed during a fight with multiple suspects in an alley behind the 7000 block of S. Puget Sound Ave. in the City of Tacoma. Detectives identified three of the suspects as Sanchez, Mendez and Mederos.

Sanchez and Mederos are also wanted for Murder in the 1st degree, Attempted Murder in the 1st degree, Conspiracy to Commit Murder in the 1st degree, and Unlawful Possession of a Firearm from an additional homicide investigation.

Fridays at 10:30pm on

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case. Callers will remain anonymous Call 253-591-5959 All

www.TPCrimestoppers.com

1-800-222-TIPS (8477)

 TH 3TREET 7  s 5NIVERSITY 0LACE 7! 


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/,3705.-05+ ;PTL[YH]LS[V H[5PZX\HSS`*HUKSLSPNO[[V\Y =63<5;,,9: ;LLUJVUULJ[ZZ[\KLU[Z ^P[O]VS\U[LLYVWWVY[\UP[PLZ By Kate Burrows kburrows@tacomaweekly.com

For as long as she can remember, Jackie Yeh has always enjoyed helping people and volunteering for organizations that truly make a difference. The JACKIE YEH sophomore at Charles Wright Academy is now focusing her efforts on helping her peers discover the volunteer opportunities available and how rewarding the work can truly be. Through her website www. jackiesvolunteernetwork.com, teens can discover the opportunities that are out there, while finding volunteer work that appeals to them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Volunteering is a great way to meet and connect with new people,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope the website makes it easy for kids to find something they would enjoy.â&#x20AC;? The website features listings from 37 organizations, which include mission statements, locations, special training requirements and more. Last summer, Yeh began writing up the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s content, and officially launched this year. Yeh herself has volunteered for a variety of organizations, including Stand Up For Kids, Associated Ministries, Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hunger Walk and more. Although she enjoyed volunteering for these particular organizations, she wanted to find a way to connect her fellow students with similar opportunities. After realizing there were limited volunteer options for teens, she decided to take action and link students with the opportunities that do exist throughout the region. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My ultimate goal for the website is for all teens everywhere to utilize it and to fit the pieces together, one volunteer and one organization at a time,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have found that helping others find volunteer work is just as rewarding as volunteering myself.â&#x20AC;? For more information about the project, visit www.jackiesvolunteernetwork.com.

Jerry Eckrom has vivid memories of his first Fort Nisqually Candlelight Tour. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I portrayed a sailor from a Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Company supply ship and worked up a Liverpool accent by listening to old Beatle movies,â&#x20AC;? said the Tacoma resident. Eckrom has been the part of every candlelight tour at the Fort in Point Defiance since the first in 1986. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event will take place the evenings of Friday and Saturday, Oct. 4-5. Advance tickets purchase is required online at Brown Paper Tickets candlelighttour.

bpt.me or at Fort Nisqually. Tickets are $12 for adults, $8 for youth ages 4-12. Tours are approximately an hour in length and begin every 15 minutes. A shuttle bus transports visitors to Fort Nisqually from the Zoo parking lot for the walking tour. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the beginning, the tour seemed to work a spell on people,â&#x20AC;? said Eckrom. He recalled one of the first years when â&#x20AC;&#x153;the bus driver was so struck by the excitement of people coming back from the tour he had to come and see it for himself.â&#x20AC;? Campfires and candle-

WBackpacks From page A1

Tacomans load up the shopping cart, swipe the debit card and broadcast the tools for a happy school year. They hold drives at work and church and book clubs. When they shop for backpacks with their kids, they let them pick an extra one and fill it with all the supplies on the teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; list. Sometimes they tuck in a book. Solo, they dart into school offices to leave piles of notebooks. As groups, they support neighborhood schools. Citywide (and county-wide) they team with Communities in Schools to Stuff The Bus. This year, Tacomans donated enough supplies to put 3,000 backpacks on buses bound for neighborhoods where many families live on low incomes and kids know that school is the best path to prosperity. On Aug. 28, the bus was due at Salishanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Family Investment Center at 2 p.m. Word was, there would be 300 backpacks filled with supplies on it. Salishan mom Lisa Miller was in charge of the line. A relentless volunteer, Miller is on a first-name-and-a-hug basis with scores of Salishan kids. This was her third summer working with St. Leoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Food Connection and managing the lunch program at the picnic shelter. Michael Power, manager of educational programs for Tacoma Housing Authority, arrived as Miller was stationing the lunch kids at the front of the line. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is in collaboration with our Brown Bags and Books free summer lunch and learning program, which serves about 40 low-income kids per day,â&#x20AC;? Power said.

light provide illumination for the walking tour of the Fort, where re-enactors bring to life the laborers, servants, gentlemen and ladies of the Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Company. Visitors can eavesdrop on conversations about territorial events, hear discussion of the labors of the day, and be entertained with song, dance, and games. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These people from the past wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be aware of 21st century visitors,â&#x20AC;? said Chris Erlich, event coordinator. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For them, it is 1859, and we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exist. â&#x20AC;&#x153; Through the years, Eckrom has witnessed many

Oh, and by the way, he added, Miller is spectacular. She knows everybody because sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s everywhere. She works at Lister Elementary School and collaborates with the Kimi and Dr. George Tanbara clinic to spread the word on healthy lifestyle choices. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at every festival, every event, building and keeping the peace. Managing the growing line, her signature superpower came into its own. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finally!â&#x20AC;? she laughed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The one time my A.D.D. comes in handy!â&#x20AC;? As she said it, someone tugged on her T-shirt. A 6-year-old girl had lost a tooth, and Miller was off to help the child rinse out her mouth and put the tooth in a safe pocket. The line was squiggling and growing. Kids were excited about backpacks, just as Power had hoped they would be. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is all part of our campaign of expectations,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We expect our children to have success in school and graduate high school ready for college or a job.â&#x20AC;? To that end, THA gave out 500 books to young people over the summer and is working to sign up all eligible students for the College Bound Scholarship program. It was 2 p.m., and the bus STILL wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there. The squiggling intensified, and the line grew around the back side of the Family Investment Center. Representatives of Opus Bank, Old Republic Title and Escrow, Sterling Bank, Columbia Bank, the Tacoma Rainiers, some of the companies that donated supplies were there. Other donors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Puget Sound Orthopedics, the Mount Tahoma High School Football Team, Costco, Titus Will Ford, University of Washington-Tacoma, Nordstrom and Grace Community Church â&#x20AC;&#x201C; greeted students at other Communities in Schools

moments that have stuck with him. He recalled one teenage girl excitedly describing the dresses â&#x20AC;&#x153;practically stitch by stitchâ&#x20AC;? the ladies wore in the parlor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just glad to still be here after all these years,â&#x20AC;? said Eckrom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always great fun to see what new scenarios or new characters this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tour will bring. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to the next surprise.â&#x20AC;? For questions about accessibility requirements or for more information, call (253)591-5339 or go online to fortnisqually.org.

stops. Miller wanted to thank them all. The backpacks, she said, were a physical expression of their good wishes for these children. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It makes kids feel like theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to school maybe a little on top of their game for the year. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hopeful. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This year Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to do really good.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Bella Hernandez, 6, was heading into first grade, and thought about what that new backpack would mean to her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It means my supplies and my school stuff, and it means my teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homework that I have to carry in it,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want a baby blue one.â&#x20AC;? Like Bella, Max Bass is headed to first grade at Lister. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can carry my stuff, and I can bring my homework home and work on it,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A backpack means very, very much to me.â&#x20AC;? At 9, Haylie Jensen, is an old hand, going into Listerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth grade. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It means a lot to me, because I can carry my school work in it. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to lose any of it, because I want to get a good grade,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A backpack keeps everything safe.â&#x20AC;? And then Rhubarb, Tacoma Rainiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; celebrity reindeer, appeared and the bus pulled in. Volunteers ran inside, grabbed backpacks and ran them out to the company representatives, who held them up for kids to choose. There were baby blues among them, and skaters, and starbursts. There were 300 of them â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and some 350 students. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not too late to stuff a backpack â&#x20AC;&#x201C; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be on sale soon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and start a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school year off with a gift of confidence.

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Gather your friends and family and give a hand up to people with HIV/AIDS

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PCAF

WALK FOR LIFE. (Left) The South Sound AIDS Walk kicks off from Cheney Stadium on Sept. 21 at 9 a.m. (Right) Eric Felt (lower left, kneeling) leads The Red

Team that has raised $7,500 since their beginnings in 2011. This year the team has a goal to raise $10,000. By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

N

ow that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a slight shade of fall in the air, the time has come for one of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most anticipated outdoor fundraising events â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the 2013 South Sound AIDS Walk. Taking place at Cheney Stadium on Sept. 21, the push is on now for walkers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; individuals or teams â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to sign up and help raise vital funds to meet the growing needs for comprehensive HIV/ AIDS prevention, care and advocacy services in Pierce, Thurston and Lewis counties. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to do new things and also keep it as familiar for people as possible,â&#x20AC;? said Stacy Ellifritt, events and communications officer at Pierce County AIDS Foundation (PCAF). Among the new things is a free â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fundraise with Friendsâ&#x20AC;? mobile app for smartphones or compatible tablets in which registered participants can stay connected and encourage donations while on the go. This app is intended to help registered walkers fundraise at their convenience on any mobile device and to easily stay in touch with current donors, and recruit new ones. Walkers have an enticing incentive this year to raise all the funds they can. Every $100 raised gets one entry into a drawing for a Seattle Adventure package for two. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So if they raise $300, their name will be in the drawing three times, and so on,â&#x20AC;? Ellifritt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did this a number of years ago, and now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re bringing it back.â&#x20AC;? A few package highlights: a onenight stay in a deluxe king room at the sleek and modern Hyatt at Olive 8; a cruise around the Seattle Harbor with tour passes compliments of Argosy Cruises, a trip to Banya 5 urban spa complete with a Turkish steam room and

tea lounge, and much more. Hannah Febach is PCAFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brand new volunteer coordinator. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very busy these days leading up to the Walk. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right now I am focused on recruiting and coordinating over 150 volunteers,â&#x20AC;? she said, noting that PCAF offers multiple opportunities for volunteers during the day of the Walk â&#x20AC;&#x201C; set up, clean up, photographer and videographer, greeters, route monitors and parking monitors. Greeters welcome people as they walk into Cheney Stadium and point them in the direction of registration. Route monitors stand in groups of two to three at designated spots on the walk route. They cheer the walkers on, guide them in the right direction and provide any assistance needed. Parking monitors help direct traffic and make sure that people park in the designated parking areas and not in the way of the walk route. Interested? E-mail Febach at hfebach@piercecountyaids.org or call her at (253) 383-2565. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, we have a virtual walker option this year,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is for people who would like to participate but canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be there the day of the event or canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t physically walk the route. If they choose this option during online registration, they will gain access to all our fundraising tips and resources. This way they can participate in the success of the event without having to walk the route.â&#x20AC;? This year is Sean Gregoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first time to do the South Sound AIDS Walk, walking with the PCAF Warriors Team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I support the AIDS Walk because many people in my life have been afflicted by HIV and AIDS,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On a more personal note, I know what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to be that scared little gay boy (or gay man, in more recent years) in a doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office alone waiting to see what the results will be. I contend that the biggest issue that HIV positive people face is the

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social stigma, more so than the disease itself. I think it is important to humanize HIV positive people and the most important work/support we can provide is educating the masses and ending the stigma.â&#x20AC;? Eric Felt has â&#x20AC;&#x153;walked the Walkâ&#x20AC;? for the past three years after learning of it through PCAFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Dining Out for Life event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The more I became vocal about my personal support of PCAF, the more people around me shared their personal stories,â&#x20AC;? Felt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had friends I had known for a long time who have come forward and thanked me for my support of this cause â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they had been living with HIV for years and were always afraid to say anything. It really made me realize that there is still so much social stigma around this disease, and this has really inspired me to do what I can to make a difference.â&#x20AC;? Felt is captain of the 17-member Red Team with co-captain Marc Larson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are all friends, and friends of friends, and now new friends. The first year we participated we raised about $2,500 as a team. Last year, we were able to raise over $5,000, so this year we decided as a team to try for $10,000.â&#x20AC;? This is also Laurie Lauermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third year to walk as captain of Team Schmoopie Pie. â&#x20AC;&#x153;PCAF does so much for the community, and I want to be a part of that,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think there is a misconception in the public mind that people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t die of AIDS or complications arising from AIDS anymore and that it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t still being spread. Tacoma has the second highest population of those living with AIDS in the state of Washington, and I think we need to change that.â&#x20AC;? To register for the AIDS Walk and to find out about all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on that day, visit www.piercecountyaids.org.

-<5+9(0:05.;07: /6>;69(0:, 05 +(@: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easier than you think!

Day 1 Start by sponsoring yourself by $25. Day 2 Ask two family members to sponsor you for $25. Day 3 Ask five friends to contribute $10. Day 4 Ask five coworkers to sponsor you for $10. Day 5 Ask five neighbors to contribute $10. Day 6 Ask five people from your religious organization or other group to contribute $10. Day 7 Ask your boss for a company gift of $75. Does your company offer matching funds? Day 8 Ask five local merchants to contribute $10. Day 9 Ask two businesses you frequent to donate $25 (for example, your doctor, dentist, hair salon or dry cleaners).

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Check out these FUNdraising ideas to raise more money and increase your chances of winning a prize! ¡ Do you have an anniversary or birthday coming up? Ask your friends and family to donate to the South Sound AIDS Walk instead of buying you a gift. ¡ Host an elegant cocktail or dinner party and charge admission to attend. ¡ Host a summer barbeque and charge admission to attend. ¡ Include information about the South Sound AIDS Walk and a link to your personal donation page in your email signature. ¡ Post a link to the main South Sound AIDS Walk Web page on your companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homepage.

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Sports

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s new sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 6

Tacoma Weekly 2013 High School Football Preview

RAINIERS FALL TO SACRAMENTO IN SEASON FINALE Second-half slump dooms promising start

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

GOOD FINISH. Rainiers shortstop

PLENTY OF PLAYMAKERS RETURN FOR CONTENDERS

F

inal preparations are underway for the opening games of the football season, which began with a few match-ups on Sept. 5. We finish our football previews with a look at the squads from University Place and Lakewood, along with Life Christian and Tacoma Baptist.

CURTIS VIKINGS

The SPSL 4A should again feature a number of threatening offenses this year, but the Vikings look ready for the challenge as they boast a talented, veteran defense. Leading the way on the defensive line are 300-pound senior Odessa Mendoza and senior Darius Riddley, who each earned first-team all-league honors last year. Joining them are fellow senior Gabe Watkins and junior Jacob Budnick, while all-league linebacker Calvin McClain returns to back them up. Junior Dawson Beard should also make noise at linebacker, while Mitchell Hersey will lead the secondary. The offense, while not as experienced overall, should also be solid as senior quarterback Scott Wismer returns, while Hersey should get a bulk of the carries. Carter McKay and Jayson Williams are playmakers at receiver, while Beau Olson brings experience at tight end. Senior center Tanner Amell also returns to bring leadership and stability to the offensive line. “We don’t have as many returning starters on offense back, but the people we do have back we think are pretty solid, and we have some guys that can go all the way in one play,” said head coach Clay Angle. As in recent years, the Vikings have their eyes set on challenging the likes of Federal Way and GrahamKapowsin, but Angle believes the entire league is improving quickly. “Our league is a solid league,” he said. “If we don’t prepare each week to play hard, bad things can happen… there’s not many creampuffs.” By Jeremy Helling

LAKES LANCERS

Still stinging from last year’s second-place finish to Peninsula in the SPSL 3A, head coach Dave Miller says his team’s resolve to right the ship is strong. “We felt pretty bad about (last year), but we feel we have the players in place to take the title back,” he said. Leading the group for the Lancers is running back and kick returner Caleb Lyons, who is his team’s form of “Mr. Versatility.” “Caleb did it all for us last year and we are looking for a repeat performance from him,” Miller said. Another versatile contributor for Lakes is junior defensive back Kemonee Jenkins, who also may be taking the reins at quarterback. “Kemonee has good straightaway speed, and can be a good lockdown corner too,” Miller said. Junior 6-foot-3, 295-pound interior lineman Kiyrie Simons gives Miller and his coaching staff more versatility when needed. “Kiyrie moves pretty well for a guy his size and covers a lot of ground in the process.” Junior tight end and defensive end Benning Potoa’e should be a monster on both sides of the ball as well. Miller sees better things for the Lancers this year, but knows the challenge will not be easy. “Peninsula is still tough, as is Enumclaw, and Auburn-Mountainview and Bonney Lake are much improved, too.” By Steve Mullen

CLOVER PARK WARRIORS

Still stinging from last year’s two-game forfeiture, which cost the Warriors a playoff spot because of two ineligible players, coach Jon ‘Taz” Randall is looking to right the ship for the 2013 season.

X See FOOTBALL / page A8

PHOTOS BY ROCKY ROSS

OFFENSIVE THREATS. (Top) Lakes receiver Caleb Lyons (15) should

be an all-around threat for the Lancers this year. (Middle) Curtis quarterback Scott Wismer returns to guide a dangerous offense for the Vikings. (Bottom) Clover Park quarterback Keila Pritchard hopes to guide the Warriors to the playoffs after a bitter end to last season.

Carlos Triunfel was 3-for-4 with two RBIs in the Rainiers finale on Sept. 2, and earned a call-up to Seattle shortly thereafter. By Steve Mullen Correspondent

A far cry from the first half of the season, the second half saw the Tacoma Rainiers’ offense slump – with many of the promising young stars being called up to the Mariners – and with it a once-promising start fell apart. The Sacramento River Cats ended the Rainiers’ season on a sour note on Sept. 2, topping Tacoma 9-6 on a pleasant Labor Day afternoon at Cheney Stadium. “We’re sad in one sense not being in the playoffs, but we were pleased with the way the young kids produced,” said Tacoma skipper John Stearns. The Rainiers got started early with three runs in the first inning, but ran themselves out of a bigger inning with Nate Tenbrink and Ji-Man Choi committing base-running mistakes. Sacramento would answer with four runs in the second inning and never looked back. Shortstop Carlos Triunfel was 3-for-4 with two runs batted in for the Rainiers, while recent call-up James Jones was 3-for-3 with two doubles and a run batted in, and right fielder Joseph Dunigan cut the deficit to 8-6 with a two-run homer in the bottom of the eighth. But Rainiers starter Andrew Carraway was roughed up, surrendering eight runs – five earned – on 10 hits in 4.2 innings, with two walks and five strikeouts. But looking ahead to the future, Stearns noted that recent call-ups of Choi, Jones and the addition of Xavier Avery (acquired in a trade from Baltimore for Michael Morse) may provide similar optimism as Nick Franklin and Brad Miller, who both have become mainstays with the Mariners after dominating in Triple-A early in the year. “Choi should be a very good power-hitting first baseman for many years in the majors, and Avery and Jones showed some real ability and their future appears bright.” Other players singled out by Stearns included Truinfel, Chance Ruffin, and Hector Noesi, who got the call to Seattle after the game for the month of September. “They have all earned the promotion and I hope they will take advantage of the opportunity to perform at the highest level and make an impression on the Mariners brass.” The loss to Sacramento put Tacoma’s final record at 76-68, two games shy of a spot in the PCL playoffs. Despite the bitter end, the early success – in which the Rainiers held the best record in the PCL for a majority of the first half – was a great experience for Stearns in his first season as manager. “It’s a pleasure to play in front of such a great group of fans every night here in Tacoma,” noted Stearns. Looking far ahead, Tacoma will open the 2014 season on April 3 against Albuquerque at Cheney Stadium.


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Tacoma Weekly 2013 High School Volleyball Preview

LIONS STILL LOADED, NEW COACHES LOOK TO START STRONG WITH OTHER TEAMS By Jeremy Helling

ing are going to be our strength,â&#x20AC;? noted head coach Steve Johnson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve probably got more good passers this year than Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had inâ&#x20AC;ŚI canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember how long.â&#x20AC;?

jeremy@tacomaweekly.com

A

s fall sports begin to get into full swing, we take a look at the local volleyball squads, some of which are again looking to make deep postseason runs while others are looking to rebuild under new leaders. With matches beginning next week, it should once again be an exciting season.

FOSS

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The bar has been set high after winning the 4A state title last fall, but the Lions should be loaded for another run again. Their recent success and returning roster has Bellarmine Prep nationally recognized, with some rankings placing them within the top 50 schools in the country. The Lions will try to repeat their success behind Narrows 4A MVP and University of Washington commit Courtney Schwan, whose accomplishments and accolades keep rolling in. The dominant 6-foot-2 senior outside hitter is joined by senior Emily Newberry up front, while juniors Reghan Pukis and Claire Martin provide the Lions more overwhelming size. Senior Julia Wright will look to continue to lead the defense, and junior Natalie Jensen will be serving as the setter.

STADIUM

The Tigers will be looking to rebuild under first-year head coach Hannah Merritt and assistants Samantha Mason and Salina Herd. They will

PHOTO BY STEVE JOYCE

9,;<9505.*/(47:. Headlined by Gatorade State Player of the Year and Narrows 4A MVP Courtney Schwan (16), Bellarmine Prep has plenty of talent left to make a run at back-to-back state titles.

have to replace departed outside hitter Tabi Webb and libero Helena Stout, but the potential is there for an improved season. Leading the way should be senior right-side hitter McKenna Cady and senior setter Lauren Schultz, while junior Chloe Coughlan also returns to shore up the middle. Junior Julia Jones will look to step in and be the defensive specialist, while Merritt noted that sophomore Ashton Robertson is a promising right-side hitter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We definitely have strong hitters and blockers and a quick defense,â&#x20AC;? Merritt said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are expecting to be a lot more

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WILSON

The Rams are another squad under new tutelage this year, as former assistant Jackie Mullen takes over. And there will be much to replace, as all-league outside hitter Sojournah Channel transferred back to Spanaway Lake and second-teamers Tia Briggs and Alexis Slater graduated. Mullen will be counting on senior middle hitter Savana Smith and senior right-side hitter Nia Cox to lead the way, while setter Sarah Schroeder will look to set them up with solid passing. Mullen is also impressed with

HOT DEALS

skilled freshman outside hitter Alex Bunch, who should contribute. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our biggest challenge is that since we are such a new team, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just getting our team chemistry going since we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t played together before,â&#x20AC;? Mullen noted.

LINCOLN

The Abes graduated seven seniors last year, but interest in the program remains strong, as 58 girls turned out this season. Headlining the group is senior outside hitter Lyric Jones, a solid all-around player, while senior setter Iyris Fua shows good court awareness and leadership skills.

Sophomore basketball star Tamia Braggs joined the team this season and has impressed early with her work ethic and focus, and incoming freshman libero Leea Jones â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lyricâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sister â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is a skilled defender and excellent passer who should contribute early. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Defense and pass-

./

The Falcons will be a fairly young squad this year, and are another team that welcome a new head coach in Rochelle Rosario â&#x20AC;&#x201C; former assistant at Mount Tahoma. Senior middle blocker Faâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;umanuia â&#x20AC;&#x153;Niaâ&#x20AC;? FĂĄalaviau and senior Naomi King will look to provide the leadership for the Falcons, while junior setters Monica Villanueva and Kiersten Luedtke should set the hitters up nicely. Rosario is also impressed with freshmen Angela Stanback and Patricia Stahlnecker, who each should find a role in the rotation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to build strong, independent women,â&#x20AC;? said Rosario. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our focus is believing this year. Believing in ourselves and our team and that we can achieve.â&#x20AC;?

MOUNT TAHOMA

The Thunderbirds feature a â&#x20AC;&#x153;mixed bagâ&#x20AC;? of talent, according to head X See VOLLEYBALL / page A8

' -.!).         ] Call Charleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at 253-564-9454 or call 253-307-8130 for details.

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WVolleyball

From page A7

coach Terry Lynn Thayer. Thayer will be counting on senior middle hitter Aliyah Carector – who earned second-team all-league honors last year – to lead the way, while senior Rejie Wright will help up front and senior Cydney Tillman should be a solid defensive specialist. The Thunderbirds should also feature some versatility, as senior setter Jessica Evans and junior leftside hitters Asalei Sokimi and Sacha Ausage can also serve as defensive specialists. Sophomore Alanna Bates-Carector flashed a lot of ability last season and should once again be a key player this year.

LIFE CHRISTIAN

After advancing to the 1A state tournament last year, the Eagles should be loaded for another run, returning nearly their entire roster. A solid core of seniors is headlined by dominant right-side hitter Johnnise Moore, while setter Carly Normandeau is an excellent distributer. Fellow senior middle hitters Ashlee Hamilton and Jordan Youngblood should be solid as well, while Acacia Sanchez should help lead the defense along with junior libero Kylie Burton. Junior outside hitter Maddy Long already has extensive experience as well, and sophomore Kaitlyn Konsmo is another important player who can serve as a setter or defensive specialist.

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The Crusaders are a veteran group as well, returning all of their starters, including SeaTac 2B MVP Natalie Snyder. Snyder is dominant with her overhand smash, but also passes extremely well and displays a great serve. Three-year starting setter McKenna Neufeld returns to provide more leadership for the offense, and senior outside hitter Kathryn Carlson also displays a solid all-around game. Senior Michaela Jandebeur should provide some more size up front, while junior Lily Powell should be strong on the right side and sophomores Jane Cooksley and Ashley Brooks should push for more time “We’re going to be a little more complex with our offense,” head coach Rusty Carlson noted of the luxury of returning so many players. “We’re going to continue to emphasize defense and no ball hits the ground.”

ANNIE WRIGHT

The Gators lost Emerald League MVP Lani Kalalau to graduation, but return nearly every other player after claiming seventh place at the 1A state tournament last fall. The offense starts with tall, imposing senior left-handers Margaux Arnston and Tori Smith, who each possess the height and strength to wear down opponents at the net. Junior setter Kaley Turner also returns and should provide Arnston and Smith with ample opportunities to attack, and head coach Rodney Kalalau noted that the teams’ setters should be a strength. Lexi LeClech also returns to the middle, and Maria Vipond is a versatile player that will most likely be asked to help out on the defensive end at libero.

WFootball From page A6

“We have to put it behind us and go forward,” Randall said. “We have a highcharacter team who should respond to the challenge.” Leading the Warrior attack will be senior quarterback Keila Pritchard, who is the younger brother of record-setting former Warriors quarterback Tana Pritchard. Trying to pick up the slack for departed 1,800-yard rusher Brandon Pritchett will be senior Cordel Nelson, who learned from Pritchett for much of the last two years. “Cordel now has to give the game-in and game-out effort that Brandon gave if we are to be successful,” Randall said. Picking up the slack on the defensive side of the ball will be defensive back Damian Davis and 305-pound defensive lineman Niko Ekeroma. If the young players can respond early, Randall thinks Clover Park could contend for a playoff spot. “Fife, Franklin Pierce and Orting should be tough, as we cannot afford to go too deep into our bench late in the season,” Randall said. By Steve Mullen

CHARLES WRIGHT TARRIERS

The Tarriers have their sights set high again after falling in the 1A state playoffs to eventual state champ Montesano. There is a considerable amount to replace, but a strong defense – with nine returning starters – should keep Charles Wright in contention for the Nisqually League title. “We think we should just pick up where we left off defensively,” said head coach Mike Finch. The defense starts with 6-foot-5, 332-pound senior Robert Luke Jr. and 6-foot-4, 260-pound senior Wunmi Oyetuga, who will also anchor the offensive line. Defensive end Jon Bruce, at

PHOTO BY ROCKY ROSS

STOUT ‘D. Senior lineman Wunmi Oyetuga (58) is part of a big, strong defense

for Charles Wright, which hopes to return to the state playoffs this season.

6-foot-7, completes the physically imposing front line, and linebacker Alexander Moore is a speedy playmaker. The Tarriers will look to athletic senior Andrew Williams to be a lockdown corner on the outside. Offensively, sophomore Henry Cheney will take the reins at quarterback, and his quickness should allow for more running opportunities. But the bulk of the carries should go to Moore, whose elite speed should provide for plenty of breakaway plays. Sophomore Desmond Jones takes over at tailback, 6-foot-6 junior Sean Gorman fills in at tight end and Williams will be looked to at wide receiver. Luke and Oyetuga will be joined up front by Bruce, Avery Cederstrand and senior Ken Wakaba, a first-year varsity player set to take over at center. Senior kicker Travis Sowell should ensure a solid special teams corps. “Our goal is to win the Nisqually League championship game and make a deep run in the playoffs,” Finch said. “We’ve got a lot of work (to do) if we’re going to get there.” By Jeremy Helling

LIFE CHRISTIAN EAGLES

First-year head coach

Tim Kuykendall inherits a team that struggled to a 1-9 finish last season. Kuykendall, who had great success coaching baseball at both Auburn and Curtis, should see an improved club with the returning starters on offense alone. Leading the way on offense are wide receiver Kyle Goodman, offensive lineman Kevin Breen, running back Lionel Hampton, and quarterback Taylor Roelofs, which should give the Eagles a balanced offensive attack. Defensively, the Eagles should be improved with defensive back Sam Absten, linebacker Ben Madlena, and defensive back Jeremy Pallwitz. Facing strong returning squads in both Charles Wright and Eatonville and perennial league heavyweight Cascade Christian, Kuykendall believes staying healthy will put the Eagles in a position to contend for a playoff spot. “We have a lot of talent back on both sides of the ball, especially on offense with Taylor, Lionel, and Kyle carrying most of the load.” With a new coaching staff comes new schemes and different looks, but Kuykendall will employ much of the same looks as previous head coach Ross Hjelseth. “We want to keep things simple

65

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the first year and have the players learn it early and all through the season.” By Steve Mullen

;(*64()(7;0:; CRUSADERS

The Crusaders are facing a battle with numbers, as a small turnout forced them to cancel their Sept. 6 season opener against Charles Wright. With the help of three players from Mount Rainier Lutheran, Tacoma Baptist will battle through its schedule, and despite the lack of numbers they look to have some promising talent. “We’re young, but we’ve got a fairly good crew of kids,” said head coach Mark Smith. “We’re just shorthanded.” The offense will be run through junior 6-foot, 170pound quarterback Morgan Wood, a converted wide receiver who Smith noted is “gonna be a good one before he’s done.” Running back Tyler Hertz should get a bulk of the carries, while Elijah Kazarovich should also bolster the ground game and Jonny Van Parys will get looks at wide receiver. The offensive and defensive lines will be anchored by 6-foot-1, 260-pound Tony Porter, while Kyle Kliewer is also a two-way standout and Ezekiel Kazarovich should contribute at offensive line and linebacker. Hertz will also bolster the linebacker corps, while Van Parys will lead the secondary. “I think that the kids that are going to be on the field for the most part know how to play the game, so we’ll have some good experience that way,” Smith said. The Crusaders will get their season underway against Life Christian on Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. at Harry Lang Stadium in Lakewood. By Jeremy Helling

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CONTESTANTS VIE FOR SPOT AT PUYALLUP PRO RODEO With the clock ticking before the first performance of the Justin boots Playoffs at the Puyallup Pro Rodeo hosted by the Washington State Fair, rodeo contestants are becoming very focused on the world standings. Only the top 24 contestants in the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Professional Rodeo Association qualify for the richest rodeo in the Northwest on Sept. 6-8. That means Matt Shiozawa, from Chubbock, Idaho, who won the tie-down roping here last year has some ground to make up. Shiozawa is 28th in the standings. Last year, Shiozawa won $19, 615, moved into the top 10 in the standings and qualified for his sixth Wrangler National

WGarden Clubbeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s children, Alexandra, Ruby and Sam brought enough salads, corn, beans, rice, casseroles and desserts to cover a park picnic table. They had all come to a green spot by the dry Roosevelt Elementary School playfields to celebrate the summer they learned about gardening. The 20 students in grades four through nine from Roosevelt, and Blix elementary schools, Giaudrone and First Creek middle schools and Mount Tahoma High School made up the inaugural Sustainable Roots class. They named themselves the Eastside Green Thumbs. A program of Northwest Leadership Foundation, Sustainable Roots invited students in low-income neighborhoods to spend a summer of learning, growing and sharing at Rooseveltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school garden. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It empowers them in ways we can barely name,â&#x20AC;? said Monty Smith, the retired United Methodist minister who has directed the program this summer as a labor of faith, hope and love, but not pay. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Northwest Leadership Foundation has taken on the commitment to explore how youth, especially underserved kids, can find resources in

Finals Rodeo (NFR). In order to be in Las Vegas this December to compete at rodeoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championships, he has got to earn enough money to qualify for the Playoffs where he could have a repeat victory and move into the top 15 in the standings. For reigning world champion bull rider Cody Teel from Kountze, Texas, the goal is the same, but has a different outcome. Teel is in third place in the standings, just $20,000 behind J.W. Harris, from Mullin, Texas, who won $20,697 and the title here last year. Teel led the world standings for much of the 2012 season en route to his first gold buckle signifying he is the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best. He will be in Puyallup trying to narrow the gap between him and Harris before the regular season is over the end

From page A1

this growing world of environmentalism and sustainable living,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This summer we started the Eastside Youth Garden Project.â&#x20AC;? As is Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way, partners stepped up to collaborate. Pierce Conservation District contributed $10,000, and the City of Tacoma allocated a $4,000 Make a Splash grant. Tacoma School District asked to feed the kids breakfast and lunch, instead of leaving them to rely on the summer meal program by Metro Parks and St. Leoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Food Connection. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a feather in the cap of the food services guy who ran us down and said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do this through food services,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Smith said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The School District has ways to support these things, and this gets them some skin in the game, which is great.â&#x20AC;? Every new partner, from the district to non-profits to neighbors, increases the chances of having the program next year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we get a second year, we will hire second-year students as paid interns,â&#x20AC;? Smith said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a piece we are committed to, provided funding is available. We have high hopes that the conservation district will work with us another year. These garden

programs are new in town, and people are skittish about whether there will be enough infrastructure.â&#x20AC;? Many campuses, from elementary through high school, have gardens teachers use as educational tools when classes are in session. Caring for them through the summer is more random. Castings, for example, has worked with kids in a summer program at McCarver Elementary. But young gardeners at Roosevelt helped out at Stewart Middle Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s raised beds and to inspire students and neighbors at Bryant Elementaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plots. With college students Viet Tran, Libby Shafer and Aliyah Simcoff, they took field trips to the Enviro House, Seymour Conservatory, Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blueberry Park, Owen Beach and the Thursday Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market on Broadway. They delivered vegetables to St. Leoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Food Connection and made pizza at the Free Range Kitchen. Nine of them earned Pierce County food handlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cards. They learned from the example of a dozen different adults working â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mostly volunteering â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to make the camp a success. Lead teacher Brett Clubbe and teacher and consultant Lynn Lomax enlisted Kristen McIvor and Micaela Cooley of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community garden program, Jennifer Chang and Kory Kramer of

of September. Harris is himself a three-time world champion and two-time runner up. In fact, the 2012 race was so tight, Teel won the title by a mere $1,056, less than 1 percent of his total earnings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winning Puyallup was really important for me last year,â&#x20AC;? Harris said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in a better position in the world standings, but as good as Cody and those other guys ride, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have too much of a lead going into the finals (NFR).â&#x20AC;? The 24 contestants in bareback riding, steer wrestling, team roping (heading and heeling), saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s barrel racing will be competing for nearly $500,000. The contestants will be split into two groups Forterra, and Stewartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden coordinator, the aptly-named Kale Inverson, plus donors and grassroots leaders. The investment has paid off in confidence, new skills and a level perspective. Alyna Lewandowsky, 11, got a start on the work skills Brett Clubbe promised, and the personal growth he did not mention. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He told us it would be a great opportunity for education, a great way to get a job at a gardening shop,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The school has so much potential, and gardening is very common. It can help people with anger issues. If you just put a person in a garden, they would be calm, weeding and watering.â&#x20AC;? Trang Ha, 13, looked to the future, too. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you apply for a job or college, it helps that you volunteer,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I learned how to plant, what kind of soil you need, and when to plant. We came four times a week, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m planning to do it next year.â&#x20AC;? Cecilia Fernandez Aponte, 11, was sold on the summer plan at the end of fifth grade. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Brett was our nutrition teacher, and brought us over here to garden. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how I signed up for this program,â&#x20AC;? she said. You learn a lot. I tasted new things. I had never had kale or chives before, but I tasted them, and

of twelve and each will compete twice. Their goal is to do well enough to advance to the semi-finals and the finals, which will both be held on Sept. 8 where the lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share of the prize money will be paid and Puyallup Rodeo champions will be determined. Tickets for the rodeo start at just $5 and may be purchased online at www. thefair.com.

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT WHAT IS GOING ON AT THE FAIR?

they were good.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I grew cucumbers and sunflowers, a really big one, and learned how to plant trees. It was actually pretty fun,â&#x20AC;? said Lorena CastanedaBitsue, 8. She was serving her momâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tamales at the feast, and feeling special. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone was talking about the tamales and telling me they were good.â&#x20AC;? Everyone was right. They were delectable, especially with Jocelyn Pichardoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salsa. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The big thing I learned is about sustainability, and why gardening is important,â&#x20AC;? Jocelyn, 13, said of the summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Planting is how it all started. We have to keep on going. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m planning on an internship.â&#x20AC;? The summer also brought them lessons in disappoint-

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ment, even anger. Vandals killed some of the fruit trees the students planted, though they did not take the first frost peach. They ripped plants out one night, and came back the next day to rip out more. Alahnna Connolly, 13, thought working in the garden would make them feel better than ruining it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can help things grow, and it actually results in pretty things,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peaceful. It helps calm me down.â&#x20AC;? Jocelyn agreed. If she knew who they were, she would invite the vandals to join Green Thumb next summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instead of telling them what not to do, maybe we should invite them to join us,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re envious.â&#x20AC;?

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Local Restaurants EAT YOUR WAY THROUGH THE FAIR By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

One of the best things about the Washington State Fair â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in addition to the thrill rides, music, rodeos, exhibits and entertainment â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is all the delicious food to be had along the midway and beyond. The Fair opens Sept. 6, so bring your appetite and prepare for your tummy to have as much fun as the rest of you. Two new food attractions will be at The Fair this year. The SillyVille Soda Shop is the place for kids WRVWRSDQGKDYHDURRWEHHUĂ RDWRUDQJHFUqPHVRGD and other delights. Located in the SillyVille Train Station. The Bavarian Beer Garden promises to be a veritable trip to Germany as The Fairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nod to Oktoberfest. Enjoy a selection of delicious German beers and other popular favorites. Admission is free with Fair admission â&#x20AC;&#x201C; age 21+ only (all beer gardens). For additional beer, wine and spirits, visit the International Village Rooftop Bar, and the Steel Creek American Whiskey Company in the Expo Hall. More new offerings this year include the famous Ezellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chicken and Juicyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outlaw Grill serving steak on a stick, turkey legs, BBQ chicken, hot dogs and funnel cakes. Sharkeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Seafood will be frying

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PHOTOS BY RUSS CARMACK FOR TACOMA PUBLIC SCHOOLS

LINCOLN BRINGS THE FUN. Lincoln High School students gave First Creek Middle School an sampling of the excitement of high school, with drummers, cheer-

leaders and a picture board of JROTC events.

WParade Tacoma firefighters led the parade with a truck. School and local officials waved from LeMay cars. The Urban Empire dance crew and the Electronettes step team dazzled with their skills. Rodney Raccoon made healthy living look like fun. Lincoln High School Cheerleaders made high school seem glamorous. Teachers from Lister, Blix and Roosevelt elementary schools marched with banners. At the festival, Lincoln students Sienna Weber, Azariea Bonner-Harris and Meme Weber represented the First Creek Sisterhood. They are mentors bent on helping middle schoolers discover their real strengths. Sarah Teague introduced families to United Way of Pierce Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 211 program, which directs people to the resources â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from heat to counseling to food â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they need. Yasmine Farrington of Save Our Soles brought 100 pairs of shoes to give out for free.

From page A1

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I used to collect shoes,â&#x20AC;? the Central Washington University junior said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I woke up one morning and thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I am so selfish.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Now she directs the non-profit she founded to give shoes away. Jesse Pasqcua of AmeriCorps was signing up students for the College Bound Scholarship program. Megan Gaines and Gayla Bacon kept track of the kids who took candies from the Catholic Community Services table. One piece only, they said. Too much is bad for you. But this event, they said was good for everybody in a neighborhood thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s richer in determination than cash. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It brings a huge surge of hope,â&#x20AC;? Gaines said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you have families who are down to no finances, who are struggling to survive, and their kids need supplies, and the teacher is asking you to send in Kleenex and hand sanitizers and you are barely able to clothe your children, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s embarrassing. They feel embarrassed about hand-

me-downs. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing the best you can, and yet again, you feel like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve failed. When you can get school supplies, you think, at least I have that. At least I did this.â&#x20AC;? She paused and looked around and thought of all those notebooks filled, all those pencils down to nubs in a few monthsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wish they could be held more than once a year,â&#x20AC;? she said. And there Shennetta Smith stood with her children, proof that this much collaboration, this much support pays off. The kids, Abrigail, 10, Dartanyon, 9, Zion, 5, and Josiah Pratcher, 3, finished their burgers and asked to go to the bounce houses while their mom told the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story. They moved to Graham from the East, and got scammed by a man who broke into foreclosed homes, changed the locks and rented them to victims, including Smith and her family. When the law caught up with him, the family ended up living in a Salvation Army shelter. Three months later, they

had a chance to move into Salishan, where counselors introduce residents to all the programs that can help them become independent again. They furnished their home, thanks to Northwest Furniture Bank. They stayed healthy, thanks to Community Health Care. Then she and her husband divorced. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew I wanted to go to school,â&#x20AC;? Smith said, and outlined all the support that helped her earn her chemical dependency counselorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certificate and, this year, her associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree. She is bound for Evergreen State College this fall, for a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in psychology. Her children talk about what they want to become after college. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was so down when I came here,â&#x20AC;? she said, looking out at the festi-

valâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social services. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for them, it would be so much harder. So much harder. They are willing to help you if you are will-

ing to do the work to get on your feet and be selfsufficient.â&#x20AC;? They, like Smith, never surrender.

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City Life

Taylor Swift Review

B3

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

SECTION B, PAGE 1

OPENS TODAY

DO THE PUYALLUP WITH NEW ATTRACTIONS AND OLD FAVORITES

PHOTO BY PHILIP PALERMO

WILD RIDE. More than 30 rides await on the midway.

T

he Washington State Fair begins its 113th year today and will continue through Sept. 22. The Fair will officially kick off with the traditional cattle drive and the Washington State Fair Western Rodeo Parade at 10 a.m. on Meridian Street in downtown Puyallup. Corriente cattle will lead the way, followed by draft horse hitches, marching bands, equestrian drill teams and costume characters. Preceding the parade will be the rodeo breakfast, held from 8 to 10 a.m. at Pioneer Park’s Pavilion across from Puyallup City Hall next to the parade route. Breakfast will cost $2. Gate admission will be free from 9 a.m. to noon on opening day with a nonperishable food donation for Puyallup

Food Bank. The fair will feature its usual array of carnival rides, livestock displays, food booths and concerts; and to that mix fair organizers have added several new attractions for 2013. Luminasia lantern festival (daily): This ancient lantern-making craft has been transformed and modernized to dazzle its audience in this larger-thanlife production. Artisans from China have been on the grounds in Puyallup since Aug. 3 assembling this marvelous exhibit. Over 50,000 state-of-the-art bulbs are used to illuminate this spectacle for viewing both day and night. The result is an East-meets-West fusion that’s sure

u See FAIR/ page B4

LITTLE BIG TOWN BRINGS SWEET HARMONIES TO THE FAIR

PHOTO BY WILLIAMS & HIRAKAWA

HARMONY. Little Big Town plays the Western Washington Fair grandstand on Sept. 9.

By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

S

orry to be a bummer, people, but we’re on the wrong side of Labor Day. Nine months of relentless drizzle are just around the corner. The good news, though, is the Washington State Fair kicks off today and runs through Sept. 22, with 17 days of rodeo, carnival rides and chart-topping pop stars to help savor these last, fleeting days of sunshine. And really, what better way to stay in a sunny frame of mind than partying with Little Big Town, the harmony-rich country quartet that will bring its infectious summer jam, “Pontoon,” and other hits to the 11,000-seat Western Wash-

ington Fair grandstand on Sept. 9? The formidable foursome – Karen Fairchild, Kimberly Schlapman, Phillip Sweet and Jimi Westbrook – is enjoying the biggest year of its decade and a half into its run. And recently, Tacoma Weekly caught up with Westbrook to find out how his group plans to build on that momentum. Tacoma Weekly: You guys are having a pretty big year this year. You had “Tornado” go platinum. You had your first No. 1 song, with “Pontoon.” You snagged a Grammy. Do you have a different perspective reaching this pinnacle 14, 15 years into your run as a band? Jimi Westbrook: Back when “Boondocks” came out, in 2005, we u See LITTLE BIG TOWN/ page B4

THE THINGS WE LIKE THREE

ONE

STADIUM FARE Stadium Fare Tacoma’s Original Craft Market - has been a big hit ever since it started this summer on July 6. This new, bi-weekly event in the Stadium District offers great local food, vintage and artistic wares, and entertainment. The Fare takes place in the parking lot of the First Presbyterian Church, across from Wright Park and on the corner of South 2nd & South G Street. There are just two more Fares to go this season - Sept. 14 and 28. Info: http://stadiumfare.com.

CRAFT BEER FEST The 5th annual Tacoma Craft Beer Festival happens Sept. 7, noon to 9 p.m.,at Cheney Stadium. Enjoy 70+ craft breweries, craft ciders and regional wines, games, great food and live entertainment. Admission gets you a 5.5 ounce commemorative taster glass and 10 tasting tokens (additional 5.5 oz pours: $1.50). 21+ only, ID required. Visit www.tacomacraftbeerfest.com.

TWO BRIAN REGAN Brian Regan has distinguished himself as one of the premier comedians in the country. It is the quality of his material, relat-

FOUR able to a wide audience and revered by his peers, which continues to grow Regan’s fan base. The perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Regan consistently fills theaters nationwide with fervent fans that span generations. He performs Sept. 20, 7:30, at Pantages Theater. Get tickets at www.broadwaycenter.org.

STRANGELY ALRIGHT An all ages CD release party celebrating Strangely Alright’s “The Time Machine Is Broken” happens Sept. 6, 8 p.m., at Louie G.’s in Fife. Also featuring special guests and good friends SleepyPilot and a rare set from Stone Age Thriller. A portion of

the proceeds will go to the FISH Food Bank along with any non-perishable food items donated. $7 or $6 with canned food donation.

FIVE ART AT TCC Work by 41 local artists will be on display in The Gallery at Tacoma Community College during the 11th Annual Juried Local Art Exhibit, Sept. 9 through Oct. 18. A reception will be held in The Gallery Sept. 19, 4-7 p.m. For a schedule of gallery talks presented by the artists, visit www.tacomacc. edu/campuslife/thegallery. The Gallery will be closed on Friday during the first week of the exhibit. For the rest of the exhibit, it will be open Monday–Friday, noon to 5 p.m. Use the entrance just off South 12th Street between Pearl and Mildred Streets.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, September 6, 2013

PUYALLUP TRIBAL IMPACT TRIBAL IMPACT

SUPPORTING THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF OUR COMMUNITY

Over the years, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians has transformed itself and its role in the community. The Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s determined protection of its natural resources, its pivotal role in development of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s port area, the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major donations to other governments and to charitable organizations, the new-concept Tahoma Market gas station and convenience store, and the development and expansion of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emerald Queen Casinos are examples of the Puyallup Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic progress. Through its two Emerald Queen Casino locations, Administration, Health Authority, Housing Authority, economic development corporation and school, the Puyallup Tribe is one of the largest employers in Pierce County with a payroll of more than 3,500 people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 74 percent of whom are non-Native â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and total spending in 2011 of nearly $430 million. This spending supports the community by paying good wages and generous benefits to individuals, and by purchasing goods and services from local suppliers, vendors, contractors and construction companies. Assistance provided to the broader Native American community and the Puyallup Tribal membership also has a far-reaching impact in the community as most of these dollars are in turn spent in the local economy. The Puyallup Tribe is continuously living up to its name, which means, â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous and welcoming behavior to all people.â&#x20AC;? As such, the Tribe is a key sponsor of countless local charities, non-profit organizations, social welfare projects and events that may otherwise suffer in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tight economy. Despite economic uncertainties across the country, the South Sound is doing well, and the Puyallup Tribe of Indians plays a key role in keeping that a reality. From funding education, jobs, healthcare, city improvement projects, crime prevention and environmental efforts, the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tradition as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;generous peopleâ&#x20AC;? is as strong today as it ever was.

Millions in Funding for Local Governments Each year the Puyallup Tribe distributes 2 percent of its gaming revenue from its two Emerald Queen Casino locations to local governments. Over the years the Tribe has provided millions of dollars to fund vital projects and services, and in these current times of economic uncertainty and struggle, funding from the Tribe is most welcome as state and municipal governments slash their budgets and lay off workers to help make ends meet. Decisions on how to distribute this money is made by the Community Contribution Committee, which consists of representatives of the Puyallup Tribe, the Cities of Tacoma, Puyallup, and Fife, Pierce County, and the Washington State Gambling Commission. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approved distribution was for $1.9 million and was awarded as follows: The City of Fife was approved to receive $850,000, an amount determined by an interlocal agreement between the City and the Tribe. These funds go toward a host of community improvement projects that have ranged from police and fire protection to road improvements such as implementing high-occupancy vehicle lanes along Fifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stretch of Interstate 5. The City of Puyallup was approved to receive $38,500 for automatic vehicle locators for Puyallup Police Department. Beginning in January, these will be installed in all of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

police cars, which will allow officers to have a moving map on their computers and transmit their locations to the dispatch center. When dispatchers receive 911 calls, they will be able to send the patrol car that is closest to the location of the emergency. The City of Tacoma was approved to receive $798,237. Of this amount, $188,454 will go to law enforcement costs related to the Emerald Queen Casino in Tacoma. Another $541,783 goes to Tacoma Fire Department, which in 2011 provided fire and medical response 525 times to the casinos. And $68,000 goes to the City Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office to pay for prosecuting crimes related to casino operations. Pierce County was approved to receive $85,431 for emergency management services. This covers the cost of assigning county employees to assist the Tribe in preparing to deal with natural disasters. The Tribe agreed to fully fund the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $148,051 request as there were not enough 2% funds available. An additional $62,620 will thus be paid from the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general fund. Washington State Patrol was approved to receive $150,000 for costs associated with mitigating traffic safety issues on state highways impacted by casino patrons.

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Partnering to Improve Local Transportation The Tribe has recognized the need to partner with local jurisdictions to improve local transportation. In the past five years, the Tribe has spent more than $27 million on transportation projects and traffic safety services in neighboring areas. These are largely done in collaboration with state and local governments to benefit the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growing traffic infrastructure, which helps everyone. Projects range from lighting & safety improvements, bridges, to reconstruction projects. These projects provide hundreds of jobs to local engineers, tradesmen, environmental and cultural resource consultants, construction contractors, and the like.

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RECENT PROJECTS INCLUDE: Huckleberry Bridge: Replacement of a 90ft span bridge, including an access road to the bridge. The project was done under agreement with the Forest Service; the Tribe met the requirements of federal environmental law (NEPA) and will be responsible for bridge maintenance after the project is completed. The project went out to bid in 2011 and construction began

in August 2011. The project is now finished and operational. The Tribe recently received a best project management award for this project by the Regional Bureau of Indian Affairs for completing the project under budget and coordinating with non-tribal jurisdictions for fish restoration. Grandview Avenue & R Street: Reconstruction projects that include adding sidewalk, curbs, gutters, lighting, and stormwater drainage. Permitted through the City of Tacoma. Paving was completed in September 2012. Pacific Highway, Fife: Development of civil engineering, right of way identification and planning for the installation of storm water and utilities in a three lane road between Pacific Highway South and 12th Avenue. The development of the roadway and utilities is to enhance traffic circulation and thus traffic safety of the general public and to provide an alternative access point for ingress/egress to the 54th Street interchange with I-5 where the service level is below standard. Project design began in 2009. The first phase of the project was completed and opened to traffic in March 2012.

For more information about the Puyallup Tribe of Indians, visit www.puyallup-tribe.com.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, September 6, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 3

TAYLOR’S STATE OF GRACE My night with Taylor Swift By Sean Contris

On 2012’s “Red” album Taylor dropped the country sound found in earlier recordings in favor of a bigger, more crossover commercial sound. These songs had a larger scale: they were faster, they were more pop, and they transferred over to the arena venue better than one can imagine. Tracks like “Holy Ground,” the U2ian “State of Grace” and, of course, smash hits such as “I Knew You Were Trouble” and “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” were simply made to be performed under bombastic lights on cranes, accom-

Special Correspondent

S

o there I was, it was sometime around 9:30 in the evening on a Saturday night, and I was watching Taylor Swift levitate into the air on a platform that looked like a bizarre hybrid of disco ball and elevator. You know, I’d be lying if I told you that when I woke up last Monday morning I thought I was going to be seeing world’s most powerful 23year-old superstar sail over the heads over 20,000 screaming fans, but there I was, loving every freaking second of it. Swift needs no introduction at this point, so I won’t give her one. You know who this woman is, you know what she does, you know her story, and no matter who you are, you know “Love Story” or “You Belong With Me” by heart. Over the years Swift has enjoyed an incredible and rather graceful rise to stardom. If watching her performance on the “Red” tour confirms anything, it’s that the 16-year-old girl from Nashville singing about teardrops on her guitar is long gone, replaced by an absolute tour de force of pop music glory. Swift made her 56th stop on her marching “Red” tour at the Tacoma Dome on Aug. 31, bringing with her an army of fantastically dressed backup dancers, a full-on stadium spectacle worthy of the Queen of England and an awkward ginger from the UK by the name of Ed Sheeran. Sheeran opened the show, performing in the style of a one-man band, though he was accompanied only by a guitar. He took advantage of a loop pedal, which allowed for him to build a massive pyramid like wall of sound that filled the Stadium. Sheeran ran through his material in rapid fire speed, turning the majority of his music into medleys on the fly, including what was likely a shout out to Seattle’s own Macklemore with a quick break of the “Thrift Shop” chorus. “I have one goal,” he said mid set, “and that’s to make everyone here lose their voice by the time I leave.” Though Sheeran may have missed this goal, it was without a doubt carried on in spirit 30 minutes following his departure. And then there she stood, hidden behind a gigantic red waterfall of a curtain, Swift’s silhouette towered over us all, hand on hip, mic in hand. The curtain came up and America’s sweetheart began the show. Swift’s greatest ability has always been her natural gift for channeling the idea of youth as both a nostalgic hiding place and a fairy tale-like land that holds the infinite possibility that only a child can 100 percent believe in. It’s what has made her music so accessible, and has allowed her to have the crossover appeal that extends well beyond the age of 16. Through her musical evolution and her reach for a slightly more mainstream sound, Swift has never once lost sight of this vision, and instead it appears that her grasp around it seems that much tighter. Much of the visual symbolism employed by Swift and company is unmistakably childlike in design and style. Dancers donned costumes that bore a strong resemblance to characters from famous tales such as “The Nutcracker,” “Alice in Wonderland,” “Cinderella” and for the slightly older, “Moulin Rouge” and even what appeared to be a slight nod to “Les Miserables.”

panied by dancers, confetti, surreal set pieces and a light show that would make Roger Waters blush. And did she disappoint? No. Though some of these performances could have undoubtedly been toned down, it still gave way to some incredible moments. It’s going to be difficult to forget the image of Swift emerging from a toy box in what looked almost like a wedding gown, or how powerful she looked as the stage folded out into a crane and held her over the audience as pieces of red and white confetti showered the crowd. Country music, the house that built her musical career, has not been forgotten on this tour, and the show had no lack of personal moments and poignant true to life stories. A large chunk of the middle section found Swift exploring her quieter songs, and though she may have been on a raised pedestal for most of these songs, their quiet meaning still stood strong. The most important part of country has always been in its honesty, in its directness, and of course, Swift knows this. In between songs she would pause and rattle out long stories that felt at once awkward and unplanned, but all the more raw and genuine for it. During the performance of the show’s most affecting ballad, “All Too Well,” Swift, who was seated on a massive red grand piano, stopped and looked over the crowd wearing an expression of absolute fragility. It was at that moment when the entire audience could see what she had been through, and could sympathize with her. It was at this moment when the artist’s talent shined the brightest; it’s where country’s honesty reared its head; it’s where Miss Swift was at her absolute finest. Highlights from the show include the stripped down, almost Motown take on “You Belong With Me,” the pounding “Holy Ground” (complete with rad new drum breaks), the absurdly grandiloquent “You Belong With Me,” the jaw dropping “Treacherous,” which found Swift lightly stepping toward the end of the stage as if on a tightrope leading to the end of the world, and finally the epic closer “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,” the most explosive moment of the night, which was a total cathartic release in the form of a backhanded tell off. If this performance on the “Red” tour confirms anything at all, it’s that Swift is at the very peak of her power commercially and artistically, and with the exception of maybe a certain Mrs. Carter, Swift reigns unchallenged as the queen of American pop music. Her uncanny ability to channel the sense of youth and excitement is a testament to her ability as not only a songwriter or musician, but as an artist. Even at its snarkiest (and it does get snarky!), her performance still has a sense of purity, a glossy coating that comes with a memory that only looks brighter and brighter in hindsight. One of the most interesting moments of the night occurred when Taylor was off stage. There was a collection of home movies being broadcasted showing Swift’s growing up starting at age 1, and moving all the way to the present day. The video, obviously centered around her love of music, starting with a 3-yearold girl attempting to sing a song she had heard on the radio, and ending with a shot of the very stage we had all gathered around. Swift’s underlining message of course being, “this is something I’ve always wanted to do, something that’s been with me my whole life, and something that I will continue to do until I simply can’t do it anymore.” Sean Contris is currently a student enrolled at TCC. Oftentimes he comes too close to embodying the classical, and often times stereotypical, persona of a young male writer. Sean enjoys listening to a wide range of music and locking himself in his room to read sad Russian novels.

PHOTOS BY BILL BUNGARD/WWW.BILLBUNGARD.COM

See many more of Bill Bungard’s photos of Swift at www.billbungard.com.

DaVinci

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“Come and see!”

Sunday Worship - 10:45am

Add to our local calendar! The Tacoma Weekly calendar is a quick-n-easy way to find out what is going on in Tacoma and the South Sound. It’s featured in our weekly publication and updated online daily. Have an event you’d like to add? Email Dave at dave@tacomaweekly.com to get yours in!


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B • Page 4 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 6, 2013

DRAKE SHOW RESCHEDULED

Drake has rescheduled his stop at the Tacoma Dome for Dec. 4, Live Nation announced Wednesday. The show

was originally scheduled for Sept. 26. Tickets bought for that date will be honored at the December show.

Bumbershoot redux

BEATS ANTIQUE

T

acoma Weekly was undeterred by rumors of ravenous zombies roaming Seattle Center over Labor Day weekend. We weren’t about to miss out on Bumbershoot, Jet City’s annual three-day showcase of music, arts and random weirdness. Here’s some of what we saw with more Bumbershots and video viewable online at www. tacomaweekly.com. 1. The infected were way friendlier than the carnivorous hordes seen on “World War Z,” flashing dead-eyed stares as they posed with festival goers when they weren’t staging zombie attack flash mobs. British ‘60s pop band the Zombies weren’t nearly as frightening as they played the Mural Amphitheatre. 2. Synth-pop legend Gary Numan delivered one of the weekend’s most dramatic and buzz-worthy sets, a performance that included “Cars” and “Metal” from his landmark 1979 album, “The Pleasure Principle,” and “Down in the Park” from his days as leader of Tubeway Army. “When the Sky Bleeds He Will Come” – among newer, gothy cuts – was a testament to his enduring relevance as a performer and songwriter. 3. Ty Taylor – dapper front man for classic rhythm and blues act Vintage Trouble – was

PHOTO BY ERNEST JASMIN

among the festival’s most magnetic performers. He recalled a young James Brown as his band romped through retro rump-shakers from its debut album, “The Bomb Shelter.” 4. Fresh from an appearance at Burning Man Festival, world beat/ electronic fusion band Beats Antique (Zoe Jakes pictured) overcame nagging sound issues and a stolen laptop to deliver a crowd-pleasing set at the Fountain Lawn stage. 5. On a sweltering Sunday, Isaiah John sported a fuzzy, green ensemble as he passed out info on medical marijuana cards. Judging by the plumes of smoke and rich, herbal smell wafting through KeyArena as Kendrick Lamar performed, many concertgoers were favorable to the green agenda. 6. Tacoma’s own Vicci Martinez headlined the Mural Amphitheatre stage on Sunday with songs from her major label debut, “Vicci,” and fan favorites from her days coming up Jazzbones, the Swiss Tavern and other local haunts. We’re guessing you might see her onstage next when pop mentor CeeLo Green headlines the Washington State Fair grandstand on Sept. 12.

More photos at www. TacomaWeekly.com

PRESENTS

Coming December 2013

MOUSE OF THE MONTH : Mouse Prince VII

Find Mouse Prince VII beginning September 15th for your chance to win tickets to Tacoma City Ballet’s World Premiere The Nutcracker or a grand prize package! Visit tacomacityballet.com for contest details.

P Fair

From page B1

to awe its audience. Wander through a lantern-lit ferry boat, gaze at tulip fields and majestic totem poles. This unique look at many Washington state sights is sure to entice the entire family, especially when combined with Eastern lanterns, including lotus flowers, a dragon, pagodas, and much more. This is a separate, ticketed event. Tickets are $10 to $12 for a single-day pass, $16 to $20 for a pass that also includes Fair admission, and are available online at www.thefair. com. Rainier Rush roller coaster: This new, looping inversion coaster guarantees a stomach-twisting experience you won’t forget. It will take you over 60 feet in the air, then hold on tight as you speed downhill around wild loops, along wavy tracks and bendy curves. The 80 degree banked inversion is unique, offering a fear factor exciting for every family member. Rainier Rush offers a smooth ride, in spite of its +5.8 gravity force. Opening Weekend Comcast Dizzy Pass bracelet: This weekend bracelet will be sold on site for $35 on Sept. 7 and 8, and will allow access to all rides, except for the Extreme Scream and Rainier Rush coasters. Piglet Palace: Each year, two sows arrive at the Fair with one ready to deliver her piglets around opening day, and another midway through the Fair. Once the piglets arrive, the Palace will be packed with kids of all ages ogling over the latest newcomers to the Fair. Free with gate admission. Tractor Tracks: Kids will be able to take a spin on a tractor that they pedal around a maze, seeing a red barn, water feature, big farm tractor and more. This attraction is located in Sillyville and is free with gate admission. Laser shows (nightly at 9:00 and 9:30 p.m.) and fireworks (Fridays, Sept. 6, 13, 20): Laser shows will be held every night of the Fair near the Planting Patch. Fireworks will go off starting at 10 p.m. on Fridays. Evergreen Hall: The Floral

PHOTO COURTESY OF ISA LUMINASIA

ILLUMINATION. Don’t miss this year’s feature attraction, the

larger than life lantern festival Luminasia. Department and the Agriculture and $50); Cheap Trick (7:30 p.m. Sept. Horticulture Department have moved 11, $25 to $55); CeeLo Green (7:30 into a new facility so that both prop.m. Sept. 12, $20 to $60); Carrie duce and flowers from the rich earth Underwood (7:30 p.m. Sept. 13, $45 in Washington can be shown.You’ll to $95); Digital Affair with Excision also enjoy the tradition of the beautiand Chuckie (4 p.m. Sept. 14, $45 ful grange displays, too. Sponsor: to $80); Fiestas Patrias Music FesMarquis Spas tival featuring Roberto Tapia (noon Sounder Train (Sept. 14 and Sept. 15, $32.50); Alabama (7:30 21): The Sounder Train will serve 12 p.m. Sept. 16, $35 to $95); Raise stations between Everett and Lakethe Roof featuring Jeremy Camp, wood. Shuttle service will be offered Tenth Avenue North, Kutless and from the Puyallup Station to the Jars of Clay (7 p.m. Sept. 17, $20 to Washington State Fair. $40); Carnival of Madness featuring ‘Crazy Worlds’ 5D Adventures: Shinedown, Skillet, In This Moment Immerse yourself in a walk-thru and We As Human (5 p.m. Sept. 18, interactive, multimedia experience $35 to $45); Larry the Cable Guy that you won’t want to miss! Imagery (7:30 p.m. Sept. 19, $20 to $65); comes to life with 3D glasses (proCarly Rae Jepsen (7:30 p.m. Sept. vided). Free with Fair admission. 20, $20 to $50); Austin Mahone & Green Marketplace: The Funky Bridgit Mendler (7 p.m. Sept. 21, Junk Sisters will be here from Sept. 6 $25 to $60); and Kid Rock (7:30 to 10, followed by a wild west theme p.m. Sept. 22, $45 to $95). from Sept. 11 to 16. The last six days Fair gates open at 10 a.m. on will feature artisan products from the weekdays and 9 a.m. on weekends. region. Admission is $10 to $12.50 for Columbia Bank Concert series: adults, $7.50 to $9 for senior citizens This year’s grandstand headliners and students, ages 6 to 18, and free include Craig Morgan (9 p.m. Sept. for children ages 5 and under. Season 6, after the rodeo, $40); Trace Adkins passes are also available, for $19.50 (9 p.m., Sept. 7, after the rodeo, to $29.50, at participating Walgreens $40); Little Big Town (7:30 p.m. and Safeway stores. Sept. 9,$20 to $60); Al Jarreau with Learn more online at www.theTacoma Symphony (5 p.m. Sept. 10, fair.com.

P Little Big Town

From page B1

actually had a platinum record then, too. So it’s been quite a few years in between; but it definitely makes us so appreciative of what’s goin’ on, because we’ve definitely been on both sides of things. We’re just enjoying the moment; and more than anything we know to do that and to take it all in and just enjoy it, and we’re having the time of our lives out here. TW: Before “Boondocks,” success was pretty gradual for the band. Were there times you doubted you’d reach the level that you’ve reached? Westbrook: You know, I don’t think we ever did. We felt like, until that point, we just weren’t getting the opportunities. But we’re pretty stubborn. Right as “Boondocks” was happening, we had just the prior year gone to our booking agents and those type of people saying, “If you’ll just get us gas money, just get us the opportunity to play in front of people, we’ll take it,” and we did. We were driving ourselves around in a van, just the four of us. We were settin’ up merch, sometimes makin’ our own merch. At that point we were making bootleg copies of “Boondocks” and just passin’ ‘em out ‘cause we felt like that was a song that could give us an opportunity. At that point, all we were thinking about was just trying to get out there and get in front of people. TW: Obviously, you struggled more. But is there anything you miss about the days when you were a band in a van? Westbrook: Those were such great times. They were hard times; we didn’t have a dime to our names, but there is something really cool about that struggle. I think it makes us the band we are today and how close we are, the four of us. … I think of these people as my family, and it definitely has to do with that time period. But I’ll say, I’m enjoying it on this side, too. (He laughs.) It’s a lot easier to crawl on a bus and let someone else drive you all night long. TW: “Pontoon” is kind of a different song for you guys. What attracted you to it in the first place? Westbrook: I think the quirkiness of it. There’s a spirit in that song that’s just a lot of fun. … Then getting in the studio with Jay Joyce and making that track, he just brought it to another level. TW: What about the funny viral video for that thing where you have all the all-stars? How did that come about? Westbrook: A couple of people at our label, I think, had that idea and put that all together. They didn’t really tell us what it was gonna be. … All those folks in there are very busy people, so to think that they took the time to do that. And man, it just kind of spawned a whole series of those

kinds of things. Then we started getting them from fans. Their families would go out on pontoons and make their own versions. It was just really cool how that kind of all took place and spawned all of that activity. TW: Obviously, you’re pretty busy. But in your down time do you find yourself going on YouTube and looking for those. Westbrook: Definitely, when that was going on I couldn’t help myself but go on. Most of the time people would send them to us. But yeah, you know, that’s good late night fodder when you’re on a bus and you’re rollin’ down the road. TW: Or you can Google yourself. Westbrook: (He laughs) I try not to do that. I’ve done it a couple of times, and I’m never happy with the pictures that come up. TW: What’s the focus of your set list this time around? Westbrook: We’re really focusing on this record, on the “Tornado” album. From the moment we were creating in the studio … I couldn’t wait to play this record live. There’s just such great energy in the songs. We throw in maybe a cover tune here and there. We’ve done the Fleetwood Mac moment (“The Chain”) on the CMT Awards. We’re throwing that in there, too, so that’s a lot of fun. Our whole thing is we love playing live, and we’re trying to make a really energetic set. TW: It’s been around a year since “Tornado” came out. Have you had time to start planning the next record? Might you surprise us with some new songs you’re trying out? Westbrook: We’re probably gonna go in the studio at the first of next year and start actually making the record. But we have definitely begun writing, and we’ve had some friends that have come out on the road a few times. We wrote with Lori McKenna again last week; she came out on the road with us, and we had a great time with her. So that’s definitely happening now, and it’s exciting. TW: Do you have any song titles, or can you tell us about the direction you might go in? Westbrook: We’re wide open at this point. You kind of try to find those moments that can be a cornerstone piece of a record. We’ve got some things that we’ve written that we’re really loving; but even on the last record we weren’t sure what songs were going to go on that record until we were in the studio; and even late in that process we didn’t really know what was going to be the final product. That’s one of those things you just kind of have to follow and follow your gut (about) what’s working and what’s not working. So we’ll have to see on that.


Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

SQUEAK & SQUAWK FESTIVAL

Friday, September 6, 2013 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Live Music

TW PICK OF THE WEEK: A WHO’S WHO OF TACOMA MUSIC WILL PLAY A SHOW TO HELP PAY LOCAL MUSICIAN JHO BLENIS’ MEDICAL EXPENSES, SEPT. 8 AT THE SWISS TAVERN. THE SCHEDULE WILL INCLUDE THE RANDY OXFORD BAND, BUMP KITCHEN, LITTLE BILL & THE BLUENOTES AND MORE WITH MUSIC GOING FROM 1-9 P.M. LEARN MORE AT WWW.THESWISSPUB.COM.

LITTLE BILL

FRIDAY, SEPT. 6 PHOTO COURTESY OF ARTISTS

HOOTERS. The Hoot Hoots play Broadway Center Sept. 15 as part of this

MONDAY, SEPT. 9 LOUIE G’S: Strangely Alright (rock) 8 p.m., AA

year’s Squeak and Squawk festival. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

he most hipster-approved of Tacoma’s upstart music festivals is back. Squeak and Squawk returns on Sept. 12 with two indie-rock showcases daily at the Dome District’s New Frontier Lounge and Broadway Center’s Studio 1 through Sept. 16. Squeak and Squawk was founded by local scenesters Sean Alexander and Peter Lynn in 2008 and was taken over by current organizers Jena Stedtler and Adam McKinney last year. This will be the festival’s fourth run. “We don’t have any heavy metal or hip-hop or anything like that,” McKinney said, when asked to differentiate Squeak and Squawk from events like Art on the Ave and Music and Art in Wright Park. “Basically, Squeak and Squawk is a curated festival,” he said. “So I’m only booking bands that AIN’T THEM BODIES SAINTS (96 MIN, R) Fri 9/6: 2:00, 6:45 Sat 9/7-Sun 9/8: 11:50am, 2:00, 6:45 Mon 9/9-Thu 9/12: 2:00, 6:45 CLOSED CIRCUIT (96 MIN, R) Fri 9/6-Thu 9/12: 4:25, 9:05 BLUE JASMINE (98 MIN, PG-13) Fri 9/6: 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 Sat 9/7-Sun 9/8: 11:40am, 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 Mon 9/9-Thu 9/12: 1:50, 4:10, 6:25, 8:50 THE SPECTACULAR NOW (95 MIN, R) Fri 9/6: 2:20, 7:05, 9:15 Sat 9/7-Sun 9/8: 12:10, 2:20, 7:05, 9:15 Mon 9/9: 2:20, 7:05, 9:15 Tue 9/10: 9:15 Wed 9/11-Thu 9/12: 2:20, 7:05, 9:15 LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (132 MIN, PG-13) Fri 9/6: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Sat 9/7-Sun 9/8: 12:00, 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 Mon 9/9-Thu 9/12: 2:55, 5:45, 8:35 THE WAY, WAY BACK (113 MIN, PG-13) Fri 9/6-Thu 9/12: 4:40 A HIJACKING (103 MIN, PG-13) Tue 9/10: 2:15, 7:00

I can really stand behind and say this is something worth seeing. We try to bring in more outside talent than a lot of other festivals in Tacoma do. We do have our local acts, but we’re sort of trying to broaden the musical horizons for Tacoma.” McKinney and Stedtler raised $7,500 through Kickstarter this year - more than three times last year’s budget. That allowed the duo to bring in some of their favorite acts from out of town, among them the Bay Area’s Carletta Sue Kay and Twin Steps and Tender Forever, the stage name of Portland electro-pop artist, Melanie Valera. “Carletta Sue Kay is someone that I saw at South by Southwest in 2011, and I was immediately struck by her,” McKinney said. “It’s a guy named Randy Walker from San Francisco. He’s just a really big dude, and he cross dresses sloppily and sings torch songs, almost like Antony and the Johnsons.” McKinney also expected Twin Steps’ vintage brand of art-rock to be a big hit. “They incorporate elements of ‘50s slow dance music with soul samples and guitar freakouts, and it’s all a really interesting mixture,” he said. Squeak and Squawk will also include its share of Tacoma and Seattle buzz bands, the likes of the Fame Riot, Not From Brooklyn, Wheelies, the Hoot Hoots and La Luz. The Broadway Center shows are open to all ages, while you must be 21 or older to attend the New Frontier showcases.

FESTIVAL SCHEDULE The most up-todate ticketing info is available online at w w w. s q u e a k a n d squawk.com. Sept. 12 The Fame Riot, Xylophones and J. Martin, 6 p.m. at Broadway Center I Like Science, Week of Wonders and People Under the Stairs, 9:30 p.m. at New Frontier Lounge Sept. 13 Carletta Sue Kay, Hands In and the Optimistics, 6 p.m. at Broadway Center Twin Steps, Summer Cannibals and Tangerine, 9:30 p.m. at New Frontier Lounge Sept. 14. Tender Forever, Margy Pepper and La Luz, 6 p.m. at Broadway Center I Will Keep Your Ghost, Man Plus and Future Bass, 9:30 p.m. New Frontier Lounge Sept. 15 Lake, Friends & Family and the Hoot Hoots, 6 p.m. at Broadway Center Wheelies, Fen Wik Ren and Not From Brooklyn, 9:30 p.m. at New Frontier Lounge Sept. 16 Goat and Upchuck and the Chunks, 6 p.m. at Broadway Center (free) Rowhouse and friends, 9:30 p.m. at New Frontier Lounge (free)

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (blues) 9 p.m., NC ENCORE: Ladies night (hip-hop, top 40 DJs) 10 p.m., $1 women, $7 men GRIT CITY @ 502: Angry Moms tour (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $15 MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (Jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Ghost 211 (top 40) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Matt Fulchiron (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE THURM’S: Delvon Lamarr Trio (funk) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Craig Morgan (country) 9 p.m., $40, AA

SATURDAY, SEPT. 7 EMERALD QUEEN: Andrew Dice Clay (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $25-$65

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WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Al Jarreau with Tacoma Symphony (jazz, pop) 7:30 p.m., $20$75, AA

ANTIQUE SANDWICH SHOP: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3 DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (rock, blues) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Crazy Texas Gypsies (blues, open jam) 8 p.m., NC GRIT CITY @ 502: Comedy open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Rodger Lizola, Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open jam, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m. UNCLE SAM’S: Subvinyl Jukebox (open jam) 8 p.m.

DAWSON’S: Clubhouse Jazz Series, 8 p.m., NC HARMON TAP ROOM: James Coates (acoustic open mic) JAZZBONES: Easy Star All Stars (reggae Pink Floyd covers) 8 p.m., $15 STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, $8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 7 p.m., NC, 18+ WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Cheap Trick (rock) 7:30 p.m., $25-$55, AA

THURSDAY, SEPT. 12 NEW FRONTIER: I Like Science, Week of Wonders, People Under the Sun (indie-rock) 9:30 p.m., $7

SUNDAY, SEPT. 8 TACOMA COMEDY: Naughty vs. Nice with Jubal Flagg (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open mic karaoke, 9 p.m., NC JOHNNY’S DOCK: The Singles Band (dance) 5 p.m., NC MARINE VIEW CHURCH: Buckshot Jazz, Josephine Howell (jazz, gospel) 5 p.m., NC, AA NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass open jam, 3 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rich Wetzel’s Groovin’ Higher Orchestra (jazz) 5 p.m., NC

502: Rock Bot (karaoke band) 8 p.m. BROADWAY CENTER: Fame Riot, Xylophones, J. Martin (indie-pop) 6 p.m., $7, AA DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC DAVE’S OF MILTON: Open jam, 8 p.m. ENCORE: Latin Fusion Thursday (DJs) 10 p.m., $5 women, $7 men JAZZBONES: Kry, DJ Switch (top 40) 11 p.m., $7 men, NC women ROCK THE DOCK: Open mic, 8:30 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open jam) 8 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Ben Roy (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m. WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: CeeLo (soul, pop) 7 p.m., $20$60, AA

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

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BOB’S JAVA JIVE: Brad Yaeger & the Night Terrors, The Crush, HOTT MT (rock) 9 p.m. CULTURA EVENT CENTER: Terrance Parson, Playboy Brey, Ashy Knucks (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $10, $15 DOYLE’S: Velocity (jazz, funk fusion) 9:30 p.m., NC ENCORE: Celebrate Your Saturday (DJs) 10 p.m., $10 GRIT CITY @ 502: Angry Moms (comedy) 8:30, 10 p.m., $15 LOUIE G’S: AKA CD release (rock) 8 p.m., AA NEW FRONTIER: CFA, Big Wheel Stunt Show (rock) 9 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock covers) 9 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Matt Fulchiron (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: True Holland, Suction, Tyranny Theory (rock) 7 p.m. WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Trace Adkins (country) 9 p.m., $40, AA

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JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (karaoke with band) 11 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rafael Tranquilino (rock, blues) 8 p.m., NC WASHINGTON STATE FAIR: Little Big Town (country) 7:30 p.m., $20-$60, AA UNCLE SAM’S: Billy Pease, Paul Buck, Chris Gartland (blues) 8 p.m.

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 6, 2013

SAT., SEPT. 7 CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL Tacoma’s most popular brew fest may be moving to a minor league ball park this year, but everything about it is strictly major league. From noon until 9 p.m., 6,000 to 7,000 beero-philes will celebrate the hoppy wares of more than 70 regional breweries, the likes of Tacoma’s Harmon Brewing Company, Gig Harbor’s 7 Seas Brewing and Graham’s M.T. Head Brewing Company at least year’s fest and its winter counterpart, the Big Beer Festival. That is not to mention all the music and grub. Info: www.tacomacraftbeerfest.com

COMING EVENTS

POOCH POOL PARTY Dog owners can treat their furry friends to a swim in Stewart Heights Pool from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7. Four-legged friends will have the opportunity to paddle around with other dogs, lunge through the Lazy River and splash in the sprayground. In addition to swimming there will be contests for dogs and an agility course. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/calendar.

FRI., SEPT. 20 BRIAN REGAN AT PANTAGES Brian Regan has distinguished himself as one of the premier comedians in the country. Brian’s non-stop theater tour has visited more than 80 cities each year since 2005 and continues through 2013. It is the quality of his material, relatable to a wide audience and revered by his peers, which continues to grow Brian’s fan base. The perfect balance of sophisticated writing and physicality, Brian Regan consistently fills theaters nationwide with fervent

class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

TW PICK: JAZZAGANZA

JAZZ LIVE AT MARINE VIEW KICKS OFF ITS FALL SEASON ON SUN., SEPT. 8 WITH A CELEBRATION OF JAZZ ENTITLED JAZZAGANZA. IT’S AN ANTHOLOGY OF JAZZ, WITH A LOOK AT HOW JAZZ HAS CHANGED AND GROWN FROM ITS HUMBLE BEGINNINGS. WIKIPEDIA PERHAPS BEST DESCRIBES JAZZ: JAZZ IS A MUSIC GENRE THAT ORIGINATED AT THE BEGINNING OF THE 20TH CENTURY, ARGUABLY EARLIER, WITHIN THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITIES OF THE SOUTHERN UNITED STATES. ITS ROOTS LIE IN THE ADOPTION BY AFRICAN-AMERICANS OF EUROPEAN HARMONY AND FORM, TAKING ON THOSE EUROPEAN ELEMENTS AND COMBINING THEM INTO THEIR EXISTING AFRICANBASED MUSIC. ITS AFRICAN MUSICAL BASIS IS EVIDENT IN ITS USE OF BLUE NOTES, IMPROVISATION, POLYRHYTHMS, SYNCOPATION AND THE SWUNG NOTE. FROM ITS EARLY DEVELOPMENT UNTIL THE PRESENT DAY, JAZZ HAS ALSO INCORPORATED ELEMENTS FROM POPULAR MUSIC ESPECIALLY, IN ITS EARLY DAYS, FROM AMERICAN POPULAR MUSIC. THE FABULOUS GOSPEL, R & B AND JAZZ VOCALIST JOSEPHINE HOWELL JOINS THE BUCKSHOT JAZZ BAND CONSISTING OF BUCK CHANDLER ON PERCUSSION, EUGENE BIEN ON KEYBOARDS AND CLIFF COLON ON SAXOPHONE. IN ADDITION, MODERN DANCE INSTRUCTOR MONICA MCETHY-BALLET ADDS A THEATRICAL ELEMENT TO THE EVENING. DON’T MISS ANOTHER FINE EVENING OF JAZZ IN THE BEAUTIFUL SETTING OF MARINE VIEW. THE PERFORMANCE STARTS AT 5 P.M.ADMISSION IS FREE TO ALL AGES. MARINE VIEW CHURCH IS LOCATED AT 8469 EASTSIDE DR. NE. IN TACOMA. INFO: WWW.MARINEVIEWPC.ORG

FREE TO BREATHE TACOMA Champion the lung cancer cause by registering today for the sixth annual Free to Breathe Tacoma 5K Run/ Walk and 1-Mile Walk on September 7 at Dickman Mill Park in Tacoma. The inspirational event will bring the community together to raise funds that will fuel groundbreaking research necessary for making the dramatic breakthroughs in early detection and treatment that can save lives. All proceeds support the National Lung Cancer Partnership, a non-profit organization dedicated to doubling lung cancer survival by 2022. Info: www.FreetoBreathe.org/tacoma. COMMUNITY GARDEN HARVEST TOUR The time has come for the fourth Annual Community Garden Harvest Tour to see what’s growing! Meet at Wright Park at 10 a.m., next to the lawn bowling court near the intersection of S. G and 6th Ave (parking is limited!). The bus tour will depart at 10:15 a.m. sharp! The bus will visit a wide variety of community gardens in Pierce County--some new, some old, some urban, some rural--but all unique and beautiful in their own right! You MUST pre-register because space is limited. A bike tour will depart at 10:15 a.m. This is a guided bike tour which will be an easy-to-moderate pace and skill level traveling from downtown/hilltop up towards the north-end and back again. All skill levels are welcome. Many of the community gardens are open to the public all day and you can visit them at your own pace and leisure between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Info: www.piercecountycd. org/communitygardens

Promote your community event,

room dancing on the first Sunday of every month and every Monday afternoon from 1-3 p.m. There is live music. Admission is $5. It is a good idea to come with a dance partner. This dance was formerly held at South Park Community Center. Info: www.metroparkstacoma.org/ star or (253) 404-3939. ZIP LINE NOW OPEN Two courses at Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium test physical agility and mental toughness – and anyone can conquer them. Zoom is more than a zip line; it is an aerial activity course that includes a number of challenges such as a swinging log bridge strung between trees, a high wire to walk and a fishermen’s net strung between trees to climb through. And, yes, there are sections of zip line to put some zing into the adventure experience. There are two distinct circuits to Zoom, one for kids as young as 5, sized just right for smaller children, and one with appeal for a range of ages, including adventureseeking adults. Info: www. pdza.org/zoom. TEDDIE BEAR MUSIC Teddie Bear Music is a child and parent musical adventure. Join instructor Janice Berntsen as she shows students how to share the gift of music and movement with their children, ages 1-4. Sessions are held Thursdays at 8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. at Ted Brown Music, located at 6228 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Info: www.tbmoutreach.org.

fans that span generations. The performance takes place at 7:30 p.m. at the Pantages. Tickets: $49.50. Info: www. broadwaycenter.org.

SUN., SEPT. 22 RICK STEVES AT THE PANTAGES Join travel guru Rick Steves as he leads a discussion on Travel as a Spiritual Act. Steves is the author of more than 50 European travel guidebooks and host of the public television series, Rick Steves’ Europe. He believes that thoughtful travel expands our worldview and shapes how we address the challenges confronting our nation. Having spent four months each year overseas for the last 30 years, Rick believes that travel helps us “challenge truths we were raised to think were self-evident and God-given.” Travel also helps us appreciate the spiritual diversity of the planet while nourishing the soul of the traveler as he/she encounters the beautiful and the unique in new and unfamiliar places. His classes have helped millions of Americans not only enjoy maximum travel thrills per kilometer, minute and euro, but become better citizens of our planet. Rick shares how the other 96 percent of humanity sees our nation and explores how his social activism has grown naturally out of his travel experiences. The $75 ticket prices include a post-show meet and greet, as well as a 2014 version of his popular guidebook “Europe Through the Back Door.” The performance takes place at 5 p.m. at the Pantages. Info: www.broadwaycenter.org.

SUN., SEPT. 29 BACK TO BEALE ST. FUNDRAISER The South Sound Blues Association presents Back to Beale Street Blues 2014, a fundraiser, concert and dance to help send The Randy Oxford Band and Arthur Migliazza

to the international blues challenge in Memphis, Tenn. In January. The event will be held at The Swiss, and donations of $10 for Blues Society members or $12 for nonmembers, will be accepted. Children under 12 are free. Six top regional acts will be featured, including the Rafael Tranquilino Band, Blues County Sheriff, Blenis/Ehly Band with special guest Thai Barket, and the Mark Riley Trio. The event takes place from 4-10 p.m. The Swiss is located at 1904 S. Jefferson Ave. Info: www.blues.org.

BULLETIN BOARD STADIUM FARE Stadium Fare – Tacoma’s Original Craft Market – has been a big hit ever since it started this summer on July 6. This new, bi-weekly event in the Stadium District offers great local food, vintage and artistic wares, and entertainment. The Fare takes place in the parking lot of the First Presbyterian Church, across from Wright Park and on the corner of South 2nd & South G Street. There are just two more fares to go this season - Sept. 14 and 28. Info: stadiumfare.com. PARENTS NIGHT OUT Each month, on the first and third Friday from 6-9 p.m., is parents’ night out! Bring the kids to the Children’s Museum of Tacoma, where organizers will entertain the kids in a safe and fun environment. Cost is $25 per child, $10 each additional sibling. Members receive a 10 percent discount. Parents’ Night Out is most appropriate for children 3-10 years old. All children must be able to use the toilet independently. Registration is required. Register early, spots fill up quickly! Info: www. playtacoma.org/programs. T-TOWN SWING Get your Tacoma swing dance fix every Thursday at Urban Grace Church, located in downtown. Intro to swing dance: 8:30-9 p.m., free

with dance admission. Social dancing, 9-11:30 p.m., is $5. The atmosphere is super laidback and fun, and features great guest instructors and DJs playing awesome swing music from the 1930s and 1940s, and it is sure to keep all the dancers hopping all night long. In addition, blues will be played every second and fourth Friday of the month and kizomba every fourth Sunday. BROWNS POINT LIGHTKEEPERS COTTAGE The Browns Point Lightkeepers Cottage, Gardens and Museums are now open every Saturday from 1-4 p.m. through November. Tour the 1903 cottage and view the new exhibit in the basement museum called “Dash Point Since 1906” – a collection of old and new photos and fun artifacts celebrating the Dash Point community. Visit the historical vignettes in the basement including kitchen, sewing room and old-fashioned school. Also on the grounds is the Boathouse museum that houses a replica Coast Guard surfboat, information on its construction and a collection of antique tools. View the original lighthouse bell, and visit the recently restored Jerry Meeker Real Estate office on the grounds. This is the original 1906 office from which Meeker sold Hyada Park building lots. The park is a great place to picnic, fly a kite, beachcomb and more. Admission is free. Great for all ages. Limited entrance to people with disabilities (stairs). Group or school tours may be arranged by calling the message phone (253) 927-2536. Location is in the Browns Point Lighthouse Park at 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Limited parking or access the park through the adjacent Browns Point Improvement Club parking lot. Info: http://www.pointsnortheast.org or (253) 9272536. BALLROOM DANCING The STAR Center hosts ball-

HOT HULA FITNESS Every Monday through Wednesday, Asia Pacific Cultural Center hosts hot hula fitness classes from 7-8 p.m. Inspired by the dances of the Pacific islands, hot hula fitness incorporates easy to perform dance moves set to the sounds of traditional Polynesian drum beats fused with funky reggae music, resulting in a modern, hip fitness workout. Hot hula fitness is a fun, new and exciting dance workout that isolates your larger muscle groups, quads and arms, providing a total body workout in 60 minutes. All ages and fitness levels will enjoy hot hula fitness. Admission: $6 (discount with APCC membership). APCC is located at 4851 South Tacoma Way. DRUM CIRCLE Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages drum circle every Thursday from 6:30-8 p.m. You do not need to have a drum to participate. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 2723211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com. THE VALLEY CHORALE The Valley Chorale, a soprano-alto-tenor-bass singing group, meets every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Lutheran Church of Christ the King, located at 1710 E. 85th St. in Tacoma. If you like singing, contact Joy Heidal at (253) 8481134 or Dixie Byrne at (253) 677-5291 for more information and a personal invitation to join the group. UKULELE CIRCLE Ted Brown Music Tacoma hosts a free, all-ages ukulele circle every Wednesday from 6:30-8 p.m. For more info contact Ted Brown Music at (253) 272-3211 or visit www.tedbrownmusic.com.

Many more calendar listings available at www.tacomaweekly.com


Friday, September 6, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 7

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV EMPLOYMENT City of ma o Tac Jobs www.cityoftacoma.org/jobs

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Section B • Page 8 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 6, 2013

NOTICES Auction Notice

Abandoned Vehicle 2nd Thursday Monthly Lakewood Towing Inc. #5002 9393 Lakeview Ave SW Lakewood, Wa 98499 Ph. 253-582-5080 Auction 09122013 Date 9/12/2013 View @ 11 am Auction Starts @ 2 pm In accordance with RCW 46.55.130 Lakewood Towing Inc. will sell to the highest bidder. See complete listing @ lakewoodtowing.com or posting at our office

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Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy

253-770-8552

Pet of the Week

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“Bess” This week’s Featured Pet is a loyal and loving Pit Bull named Bess. This 9 year old sweetheart is looking for an owner who wants a companion for life, as much as she does. Bess is a low maintenance lady, looking to devote herself to her new forever family. Just sitting at your feet or patting her head is joy enough for this amazing pup. Bess is a dog that will be devoted to you for the rest of her days and will love you every step of the way. Don’t miss out on your chance to meet this one of a kind Pit Bull. Take Bess home with you today! Reference #A477403

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www. thehumanesociety.org

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week

1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

Max

Max is an over exuberant boy with a lot of energy. He’s in need of an active Forever Family with no kids. Stop on by today.

Jingle Jingle’s got all you need and more! She comes with free goodies too! Take this beautiful calico home. www.MetroAnimalServices.org


Friday, September 6, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Stephanie Lynch

CALL 253.922.5317

HOMES FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

936 S Sheridan $229,000

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

Let me help! Call today.

253.203.8985 www.stephanielynch.com Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2012

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards

Beautiful Victorian 4plex in good location back on the market after remodel. Walking distance to hospitals, downtown, parks. 0DLQ Ă RRU XQLW KDV one bedroom plus attached bonus room, dining room, lg kitchen with nook, new carpet throughout, bay windows. Upstairs unit has 2 bedrooms, bath, lg living room, kitchen & balcony. Lower level has 2 studio apts & bath. Sep. utilities for main and upper units. 3,064 sq ft MLS# 523770

Better Properties Heather Redal 253.363.5920 WATERFRONT

Selling Your Commercial Building or Business? Call

Jean Bonter 253-312-2747 FOR LEASE

Point Defiance CafĂŠ and Casino. Fully operational with unique card room and gambling facility. Only licensed casino between Lakewood and Bremerton. Or as an alternative, this facility could be used as full service restaurant with banquet rooms. Many other possibilities including day care, private pre- school, dance studio, and the list goes on. All handicap accessible.

DEER RIDGE HOME, PUYALLUP

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT

North Salmon Beach Community on Tacoma Narrows, 35-feet overwater frontage leasehold property. Deck, w & parking lot rights. $25,000 Contact Salmon Beach North: Roger Edwards 253-752-7010

Beautiful home crafted by Steve Jensen and meticulously cared for. All the Jensen signature touches - soaring spaces, coffered ceilings, crown molding, wainscoting, 6â&#x20AC;? base trim, tile, granite, and expansive windows. Sited on an elevated lot that adjoins natural area to the rear. Listen to the birds and your private waterfall from your patio. Wonderful landscaping designed for beauty and easy care. Sensational island kitchen opens to stunning family room. Huge master suite with fireplace. MLS #479207

UNIQUE BOUTIQUE BISTRO

With Beer and Wine License. $20,000 Full Price.

GIG HARBOR ž ACRE BUILDING LOT

Beautifully wooded, water and power available. $79,000. Perfect setting for your custom home. Owner/agent

Evergreen Commercial Brokerage

www.jeanbonter.com

Businesses Opportunities HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

5007 S Alaska St

2914 N 30th St $399,950

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EHGEDWKVI0DMHVWLFYLHZV 0RYHLQUHDG\PLGFHQWXU\PRGHUQ1HDU Proctor District & Ruston Way waterfront. 0LQXWHV IURP , IRU HDV\ FRPPXWLQJ 6WXQQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHJOHDPLQJKDUGZRRGV ORYHO\  HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW NLWFKHQ D VHFOXGHG  EDFN\DUGGHFNZYLHZ0/6

Cozy, warm & inviting are usually words one uses to describe a small cottage- not todaythis house has room for everyone. W/ 4 bedrooms, EDWKVRIĂ&#x20AC;FH MLS#518929 workshop, enclosed $174,950 covered patio, a media/den area, greatroom/kitchen, plus formal livingroom & diningroom- this house OLYHVHDVLO\ HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\$ODUJHIHQFHG\DUG tons of offstreet parking & an inviting master VXLWHDUHDZRZQĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHPDNHWKLVKRPH even more welcoming; add proximity to HYHU\WKLQJ DJUHDWĂ RRUSODQDKKK+RPH

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

Better Properties Shannon 253.691.1800

15 Salmon Beach MLS # 493836

TWO HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St. $449,000 MLS#502568

Fantastic No-Bank Waterfront Home W/Gorgeous Sw Exposure - Perfect For Summer Fun! Absolutely Awesome Quality in this Rebuilt 3-Story Home. Lavish Use of Granite, Limestone, Travertine. 3 Expansive Decks Cover Over 1500 Sq Ft of Amazing Outdoor Space for Entertaining & Relaxing! Convectair Heating & Commercial Grade Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen, Too. Soak in your jetted tub in the UGĂ RRU0DVWHU6XLWHDV\RXZDWFKVHDOLRQV eagles, sailboats & tugs drift by. Spectacular setting!

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

North End Charmer!

4 Sale with Owner Contract

HOMES FOR SALE FOR RENT

FOR RENT

Duplex. 3 bd, 2 bath. Double car garage. Fenced yard. No Pets. $1,150 per month. (425) 417-7477

33 N Salmon Beach MLS # 477936

CONDOS & HOMES SPANAWAY

NORTH TACOMA

22907 46TH AVE E.

1109 N OAKES ST

$1100

$1275

3 BED, 1 BATH 1372 SF. BEAUTIFUL HOME HAS UPDATED BATHROOM/KITCHEN, FORMAL DINING, FAMILY ROOM AND MORE.

4 BED 2 BATH 1800 SF. RENOVATED 4 BED HOME HAS ALL APPLIANCES, GARAGE SPACE, EXTRA STORAGE AND MORE.

PUYALLUP

NORTH TACOMA

7251 176TH ST CT E

2912 N 26TH ST

$1395

$1200

2 BED, 1 BATH 824 SF. FANTASTIC HOME HAS FORMAL DINING, FAMILY ROOM, HUGE MASTERS, LAUNDRY ROOM & MORE.

2 BED, 1 BATH 1144 SF. 2 BED NORTH END HOME HAS UPGRADED KITCHEN, FORMAL DINING AND FENCED YARD W/DECK.

TACOMA

TACOMA

744 MARKET ST #301

4702 N FERDINAND ST

$1150

1 BED 1 BATH 603 SF. DOWNTOWN LOFT STYLE CONDO HAS ALL CONCRETE FLOORS, ROOFTOP DECK AND MORE.

2 BED 1 BATH 908 SF. RUSTON DISTRICT HOME HAS EAT IN KITCHEN, FRESH PAINT, EXTRA STORAGE, FENCED YARD & MORE.

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200 View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

Professional Management Services

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

$375,000

Sound Views! Fabulous location close to Proctor, UPS, the waterfront and freeways. 4beds/1.5 baths... KDUGZRRGĂ RRUVDQGFRYHGFHLOLQJV2QHFDUJDUDJH + oversized two car garage with heated shop (a mechanic, wood worker, or artists dream!) Exceptional 9000 sq. ft. lot possible sub-divide (buyer to verify). 1HZHUURRIZLQGRZVDQGIXUQDFH7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FKRPH 7HUULĂ&#x20AC;FORFDWLRQIDEXORXVRSSRUWXQLW\ Call Pam (253) 691-0461 for more details or a private showing! MLS# 482872 Better Properties North Proctor

Dave Peterson â&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 222-8480

reduce

VERY SUCCESSFUL/PROFITABLE SPORTS BAR Business is For Sale for $320,000 Terms are avail. price reduced

GREEN PUP SPORTSprice BAR & GRILL reduced (famous for its pizza) $189,000, Terms av. UNDISCLOSED RESTR./LOUNGE/ price SPORTS BAR, reduced Doing over $700,000 annual food & drink sales, great food. Asking price is now $125,000 with $75,000 down, motivated seller. HIGH GROSSING, VERY PROFITABLE COFFEE SHOP CAFE FOR SALE price $99,000 High trafic Count location. reduced VINOTIQUE WINE SHOP/BAR/DELI IN LAKEWOOD Business is for sale for price $109,000. Cash/terms. reduced

LAUNDROMAT W/ DROP SHOP. price Same location 15 years in Lakewood. reduced Excellent lease with contract terms. $36,000 PORT OF TACOMA DINER Breakfast & Lunch, M-F, Price $70,000. Long-time established & great location.

Business For Sale

â&#x20AC;&#x153;UNDISCLOSEDâ&#x20AC;? BEAUTY SALON In Puyallup, Great Location, $20,000 Cash. ice

Lakewood Nicest Spot At Salmon Beach! 62ft Of SW Exposure Salt Waterfront. This compound features 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x23â&#x20AC;&#x2122; separate shop, hot tub w/covered gazebo, covered boat storage, 6-ton hydraulic boat Lift, brick wood burning Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHZLWKLQVHUWH[SDQVLYHGHFNLQJRQDOO sides of home, drop-dead gorgeous 180 degree panorama! Extensive remodel and rebuild throughout the last 9 years, including roof, VLGLQJVRIĂ&#x20AC;WVZLQGRZVGRRUVGHFNLQJERDW hoist, water system, heaters, kitchen, master suite, stairway, and more.

price

LANDMARK â&#x20AC;&#x153;BBQ INNâ&#x20AC;? reduced Restaurant/Lounge Huge Price Reduction - For Sale For $510,000 (R.E. $485K) Bus. $25K. Bldg. has been completely remodeled for a sports bar and grill.

Beauty & Barber 11634 pacific Hwy

3310 N. 30th

NORTH END GAS STATION/MINI MART High gross sales, excellent profit, positive cash flow, Price is $1,100,000 (Bus. & Prop.), possible terms

RURAL LIVING: ASHFORD, WA- Restr./ Lounge, $125,000 with $50K Down, Real E. Avail: 3.4 Commercial Acres for Future Devel., 3 BR Remodeled Home, laundromat.price d

$875 A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with no HOA. High Ceilings, gas ÂżUHSODFHVVHSDUDWHO\PHWHUHG&DOOIRUSULYDWH VKRZLQJWRGD\Linda Brandfors 253-229-8331 or Lynn Rhone 253-223-4421 Better Properties 6223 Mt. Tacoma Dr. SW Lakewood, Wa 98499

GIG HARBOR CHINESE RESTR., same owner 25 years. $175,000 w/terms.

253-355-2992

pr reduced

CALL RICHARD PICTON or ED PUNCHAK 253-581-6463 253-224-7109

253-584-0171

Doug Arbogast Foreclosure & Investment Specialist

(253) 307-4055

Low interest rates + affordable prices = great investment opportunities.

Dougarbogast.com douga@johnlscott.com

Pierce County Community Newspaper Group is seeking an

Over 20 Years Real Estate Experience

Call me todayâ&#x20AC;Ś I am happy to help you with your Real Estate needs.

Experienced

ADVERTISING SALES Representative

Now is the time to invest in Real Estate for your future!

4424 6th Ave Suite 1, Tacoma, WA 98406

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If you think you would be a good fit for our company, we would like to hear from you. Please submit your resume to: employment@tacomaweekly.com

Tired of renting? Jennifer Pacheco Monthly payments Mortgage Officer on a new home Loan NMLS #486264 could be less than 253-926-4131 your rent. Call me www.umpquabank.com/jpacheco jenniferpacheco@umpquabank.com for details!

MILTON â&#x20AC;˘ EDGEWOOD

Loan products subject to credit approval

For qualifications contact Jen


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, September 6, 2013

Andrew Dice Clay

Makaha Sons

Anthony Hamilton

September 7, 8:30pm

September 21, 8:30pm

September 28, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom $20, $30, $45, $50

I-5 Showroom $45, $65, $95, $100

CageSport MMA XXVII

Loretta Lynn

Tim Allen

October 5, 7pm

October 17, 8:30pm

October 19, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $30, $45, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom $40, $70, $95, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.


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