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FREE s Friday, August 15, 2014 2014 GARFIELD STREET FAIR

Kings overcome Outlaws

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MUSIC AND ART AT WRIGHT PARK

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SOUTH TACOMA CAR SHOW

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SPOTLIGHT ON: JOHN HICKS

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Y TACOMAWEEKL.com YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER - 26 YEARS OF SERVICE

DR. GORDON KLATT’S LIFE OF SERVICE TO BE CELEBRATED

PHOTOS COURTESY OF WALT KAPLIN

REUNITED. (Bottom Left) Gathering for a photo op during NSRA Appreciation Day. (Back row, left to right): Leroy Judkins; Gary Dinwiddie; Gene Garland, Western Washington Street Rod Division representative; Dean Darnell; Scott McMahill; Don Amundson. (Front row, left to right): Lynda Amundson; Mary Louise Darnell; Elaine Garland; Leighton Rider, Washington chief inspector; and Griot’s Garage manager Guy Divivo.

PHOTO COURTESY AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

By Kathleen Merryman

Vintage Vehicle Appreciation

month continues in Tacoma

HILLTOP STREET FAIR AND CAR SHOW AUG. 23

NATIONAL STREET ROD ASSOCIATION MAKES TACOMA HISTORY By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

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ugust is Vintage Vehicle Appreciation Month in Tacoma, as officially proclaimed by Mayor Marilyn Strickland, and coming up are two events where car enthusiasts and families will find plenty of entertainment and summer fun. The Hilltop Street Fair and Car Show is Aug. 23, at Martin Luther King Jr. Way and South 11th Street, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. This family-friendly event offers 10 hours of fun, food, performances and spectacle: Broken Spoke Bike ramp demo, 2nd Cycle social bike ride, Tacoma celebrity dunk tank, giant puppet theater, storybook play castle, free books from Reading is Magical, raffles and kids activities with Radio Disney, Community Health Care free health and dental screenings and insurance enrollment assistance, a sidewalk mural chalk-off and more. The car show is open to all special interest vehicles and will be held at Peo-

The car show is open to all special interest vehicles and will be held at People’s Park starting at 9 a.m. with awards presented at 2 p.m. ple’s Park starting at 9 a.m. with awards presented at 2 p.m. The historic Hilltop neighborhood was a hot rod haven during the 1950s, and the community is invited to take part in the fun and fellowship of the car show the way it was way back when. There will be awards, door prizes, three stages of live entertainment, more than 75 vendors and much more. Registration is $15 and opens at 7:30 a.m. The first 100 pre-registrants will receive a dash plaque and a choice from among some of the most popular movies of the ’50s: “Don’t Knock the Rock,” “The James Dean Story” and “Hot Rod Girl.” These movies sell for up to $20 apiece and make for wonderful family

entertainment. The 18th annual South Tacoma Classic Car Show is happening Aug. 16, on South Tacoma Way between 50th and 56th streets (entry is at 50th Street and South Tacoma Way). Expect to see more than 300 vintage vehicles on display and there will be plenty of food, music, vendors, entertainment, hula hoop contest and more. Read all about it in Tacoma Weekly’s “City Life” section in this issue.

HISTORY MADE

Earlier this summer, an event took place that was one of the most important X See CARS / page A9

The community will have one more chance to celebrate the life and work of Dr. Gordon Klatt this year. On Sunday, Aug. 24, at 1:30 p.m., friends and admirers will gather at – and probably fill – the stadium at Mount Tahoma High School to honor the man who founded the international Relay for Life movement. That movement, active across the United States and in 23 other nations, has raised more than $5 billion to fight cancer. It does that work at every level, from research to transportation for patients, and against every kind of cancer. Much of the money stays to work in the community where it was raised. Klatt died of heart failure Aug. 3. He was 71, and had been diagnosed with stomach cancer in May 2012. It’s a testament to the joy he brought to the fight against a grim disease that Relay had already filled Mount Tahoma’s stadium once this year. On June 13 and 14, thousands of walkers, survivors, teams and

X See KLATT / page A8

CROSSWALK WORK SET FOR THE FALL By Steve Dunkelberger stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

Community meetings in the fall prompted Tacoma City Council to set aside $2.5 million for crosswalk improvements around the city. That work is set to start soon at 57 crosswalks, mostly around schools and tricky intersections that neighbors and street data targeted. Each of the city’s five council districts gets about $300,000 in crosswalk and intersection upgrades while downtown would get about $1 million. While the work will make

X See CROSSWALKS page A9

WANTED IN TACOMA Police hunt for knife-wielding robber. PAGE A3

Pothole Pig ...............A2 Crime Stoppers.........A3

Sports ........................A10 Hot Tickets ................A12

Look for daily updates online! tacomaweekly.com

A&E ....................... ....B1 Make A Scene ............B5

Calendar ................. B6 Horoscopes............. B6

Two Sections | 24 Pages


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Pothole pig’s

POTHOLE OF THE WEEK VISIT US ON FACEBOOK MHJLIVVRJVT[HJVTH^LLRS`

80th and ‘G’ Street Tacoma has a tremendous pothole problem, and the city knows it. During the past couple of years, the city has acknowledged this issue by spending millions of dollars in major arterial repairs with the council’s “pothole initiative.� And in 2010, routine maintenance by Tacoma’s Grounds and Maintenance Division completed street repairs on 229,638 square feet of road. In 2011, the city repaired about 150,000 more square feet of roads riddled with holes, and continued those efforts in 2012. And while that may sound like a lot of ground, new holes pop up – or return – each and every day, which means a pothole-free road might never exist in Tacoma. With the help of our readers and our dedicated Pothole Pig, we will continue to showcase some of the city’s biggest and best potholes through our weekly homage to one of T-Town’s most unnerving attributes. Help the Pothole Pig by e-mailing your worst pothole suggestions to SaveOurStreets@tacomaweekly.com. Potholes in need of repair can be reported to the City of Tacoma by calling (253) 591-5495.

#1 SEATTLE RADIO LEGEND BOB RIVERS SIGNS OFF FOR THE FINAL TIME #2 SWEDEN COMES CALLING FOR TACOMA’S DEREK JOHNSON #3 SPOTLIGHT ON: LOGAN KENSING

RAINIERS RELIEVER JUST HAPPY TO BE HERE

#4 POLICE SEARCH HILLTOP FOR ACCUSED MURDERER #5 ONE DIES AFTER MOTORHOME PLUNGES DOWN UWT STEPS

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Bulletin Board LOTS TO DO AT MCKINLEY HILL STREET FAIR Come enjoy a day of family fun and entertainment at the McKinley Hill Street Fair on Saturday, Aug. 16, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Held on McKinley Avenue between Division and 34th, the day will include all sorts of activities in conjunction with the Tacoma Christian Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s back to school backpack giveaway to 1,500 students, along with the Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health fair for kids and adults offering physicals, dental screenings and haircuts. There will be five blocks of vendors with arts and crafts, three beer and wine gardens and food trucks and food vendors including Lakewoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House of Donutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 30-foot donut truck, ice cream, barbecue, water stations and more. Four live bands will play on the main stage â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ben Potter at 10 a.m., Nolan Garrett at noon, Two Story Zori at 2 p.m. and Rocky Sandoval at 4:20 p.m. A DJ will spin music in between the live shows. There will be a kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chalk art zone sponsored by Achten Quality Roofing, with Daffodil Princesses drawing right alongside the children. Kids can also help paint a wall mural on McKinley Street. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss live demonstrations from the Dockyard Derby Dames, an all female flat track roller derby team that will skate it out right on McKinley Avenue and show what tough really means. Ben Warner and Alchemy Indoor Skate Park & Education Center will bring an amazing skate demonstration down the center of McKinley. Team members of the Seattle Mist womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s football team will be there too, along with Tacoma Rainiers mascot Rhubarb. In conjunction with Lincoln High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 100th birthday, a Road Rally run/walk will start at Lincoln High and end at the McKinley Street Fair at the VFW Hall. The Road Rally will include a raffle and Seahawks merchandise to win. Registration at Lincoln is from 9-11 a.m. and the route ends by 3 p.m. with awards at 3:30. In a wonderful show of support for several families whose homes recently burned, there will be a donation table to collect financial contributions for these displaced families. After the street fair closes at 6 p.m., head over to Pacific Avenue for the second annual Military Appreciation Parade, which runs from 6-7 p.m. More information at www.facebook.com/groups/ mckinleystreetfair. *644<50;@7(9;5,9:/,37>0;/)(*2;6:*/663 Even though stores in the Tacoma area have big school supply sales before school begins, outfitting children for school can be costly. Community partners have stepped up to host outreach events throughout August to provide backpacks and school supplies and other services such as haircuts and school physicals. If you know of a family that needs help to prepare their child for the first day of school, please share the following information about community back-to-school events. Life Center will hand out backpacks and school supplies for K-12 students at Baker Middle School, 8001 S. J St., Tacoma, from 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 17. The outreach event for K-12 students Saturday, Aug. 30, will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Life Center, 1717 S. Union Ave. Life Center will also provide lunch, haircuts, face paintings and inflatables at both events. Families can come to the Tacoma Backpack Outreach event hosted by Puget Sound Christian Center, 4020 S. 56th St., Tacoma, Saturday, Aug. 23, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This back-to-school event will have 2,500 backpacks to give to children accompanied by a parent or guardian. Children can get free haircuts, clothes and school physicals. Families will have entertainment, food, health services and community services offered on site during the event. Resources are limited and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Communities In Schools of Tacoma (CIS) will send a Stuff the Bus school bus Aug. 21 to collect school supplies from many local businesses and organizations that have been conducting school supply drives at their workplaces. CISâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal is to gather enough supplies for 3,000 backpacks for students at all grade levels in Tacoma Public Schools. Tacoma Public Schools (TPS) and CIS of Tacoma joined together for the 10th annual Stuff the Bus campaign to help students get the tools they need to succeed in school. The bus will bring the school supplies to Baker Middle School where volunteers will fill the backpacks Aug. 22 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. CIS needs volunteers to sort the school supplies and stuff backpacks. If you would like to get involved, call Jenna Aynes at (253) 571-5053. Principals can pick up as many as 25 filled backpacks and additional school supplies at Baker Middle School Aug. 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We see far too many low-income children coming to school without the proper tools to learn and thrive,â&#x20AC;? said Teresa Maxwell, executive director of Communities In Schools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The simple act of giving a child what he or she needs to fully participate in school demonstrates to kids

that our community cares about their future.â&#x20AC;? School supplies cost more than ever, according to the latest â&#x20AC;&#x153;backpack index,â&#x20AC;? recently released by Huntington Bank. The cost of equipping K-12 public school students for the 2014-2015 school year has jumped as much as 20 percent, the Huntington study said. And according to the National Retail Federation, total spending on back-toschool items is expected to reach $74.9 billion this year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; up about 3 percent from $72.5 billion in 2013. For more information, contact Teresa Maxwell at (253) 571-1114.

90+,;/,9(03:(;;(*64(9(0367,5/6<:, Tacoma Rail will open its doors to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 23, to offer free train rides, locomotive tours and a 100th birthday celebration. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope people take this chance to see the railroad and the port from a view they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get any other day,â&#x20AC;? said Dale King, Tacoma Rail superintendent. Tacoma Rail Open House visitors will stay busy with: ¡ Free train rides around the Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tideflats ¡ Walk through a locomotive ¡ Exclusive peek at rarely seen rail maintenance equipment, rail yards and other rail operations ¡ Model train displays ¡ Games ¡ Clowns ¡ Food ¡ Giveaways For more information, go to TacomaRail.com. Free parking and shuttle service will be available at the Fabulich Center, 3600 Port of Tacoma Rd. (9,(;(3,5;<50;,:;6/,3736<0,. Musicians from Tacoma to Everett will perform at Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza and music venue in Fife on Aug. 23 beginning at 5 p.m. The purpose of this all-ages show is fundraising to help owner, Louie Galarza, in his time of need. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Louie has given so much to so many people in need. He has given freely and never asked any of us for anything in return. It is now our turn to show Louie our thanks for his generous heart by giving back to him,â&#x20AC;? said Michelle Haley of Sacred Soul Tattoo, one of the event organizers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had to talk him into it and he reluctantly agreed to let us do this for him.â&#x20AC;? Bands slated to perform are: Jason Kertson, Glenn Cannon Trio, Midstokke, Hard Money Saints and A Lien Nation with other talent yet to be announced. In addition, Sacred Soul Tattoo will be celebrating their eighth anniversary at the event. Kids under 13 get in free and there is a suggested donation of $10 at the door. A Go Fund Me account has also been created. Those not able to attend but want to help can make a donation at gofundme.com/b1mcng. Louie Gâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza is located at 5219 Pacific Hwy. E., Fife, WA 98424. Âş*/03+9,5Âť:),33Âť7<)30* (9;>692;6),9,+,+0*(;,+ The public is invited to celebrate the reinstallation of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bellâ&#x20AC;? by Larry Anderson on Aug. 28, from 2-3 p.m., in the park at 3825 Ruston Way. Anderson will be present at this event, along with Council Member David Boe, representatives from Washington Partnerships for Action Voices for Empowerment (PAVE), and members of the Tacoma Arts Commission. The sculpture was commissioned as a gift to the citizens of Tacoma from PAVE and other private donors to celebrate the life, spirit and accomplishments of PAVE founder and director Marty Gentili (May 26, 1942 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Feb. 28, 1993). â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are delighted the bell is home again for all to play,â&#x20AC;? said PAVE Executive Director Tracy Kahlo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It reminds us of the importance to celebrate the gifts of all children while honoring the life of Marty. We greatly appreciate the combined efforts of the City of Tacoma and the Tacoma Arts Commission for restoring the bell for all to enjoy.â&#x20AC;? The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bellâ&#x20AC;? was originally installed along Ruston Way and gifted to the City in 2000. The cast bronze sculpture measures over five feet tall and is decorated with a parade of children around the border. It was designed to be rung and accessible by people with disabilities. The sculpture was removed from Ruston Way in 2011 to allow for structural and cosmetic repairs and work on the surrounding site. The City reinstalled the sculpture and completed restoration work in 2014. PAVE provides support, advocacy, training and informational resources to empower families and individuals with disabilities. Since 1979, PAVE has provided information, training and support for over 1,000,000 individuals with disabilities, parents and professionals. Anderson resides in Bonney Lake and is a prolific bronze sculptor whose sculptural work can be seen throughout Tacoma and across the United States. :,,469,)<33,;05)6(9+0;,4: (;;(*64(>,,23@*64

DaVinci Salon and Spa      

     

     

    



Seeking Loving Foster Homes! Hispanic and/or Bilingual parents urgently needed for Shortterm Foster Care for Unaccompanied Hispanic Youth We are a part of the International Foster Care Program at Catholic Community Services. Training and reimbursement provided.

Individuals should meet the following: Â&#x2021; Live within the Tacoma area Â&#x2021; Have a valid driversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; license and current care insurance. Â&#x2021; 6XIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWproofofLQFRPHWRVXSSRUWKRXVHKROGDQG dependents Â&#x2021; Able and willing to take initial and ongoing foster care parenting courses Â&#x2021; Have social security and proper documentation for residency Â&#x2021; Pass a background check Â&#x2021; Ability to drive foster children to appointments/school

Call Rosalinda Ramos 253-502-2639 rosalindar@ccsww.org




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WANTED IN TACOMA

POLICE HUNT FOR KNIFE-WIELDING ROBBER By David Rose :DVKLQWRQ¡V0RVW:DQWHG

Tacoma police say thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a knife-wielding robber they need your help identifying, who hit the same store twice within days. He robbed the 72nd Street Deli and Market on July 17. Two days later, DAVID ROSE he returned and threatened the clerk with a large knife. In the first robbery, he easily just grabbed the cash and took off, but detectives say that when he came back the second time, the clerk decided to fight back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This time a clerk actually picked up a stool and hit him with it,â&#x20AC;? said Officer Lorretta Cool of the Tacoma Police Department. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He caused him to drop the knife. The clerk went to get another tool to hit him with and the suspect grabbed the cash register and fled out the door.â&#x20AC;? Cool continued: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a market that people go in and out of quite frequently. Even at that time at night itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pretty busy area. In this instance it was just the clerk that had the confrontation with

him. But, had there been a customer in the store, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, he might have hurt them also.â&#x20AC;? Detectives think heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s white, in his mid20s, and had a beard for the first hit that he shaved off for the second. If you know his name, Crime Stoppers will pay you a cash reward. Call 1 (800) 222-tips. Be sure to watch â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wantedâ&#x20AC;? Fridays at 10:30 p.m. on Q13 FOX and 9:30 p.m. on Joe TV.

ON-STREET PARKING RATES GO UP, GARAGE PARKING RATE GOES DOWN By Steve Dunkelberger VWHYHGXQNHO#WDFRPDZHHNO\FRP

On-street parking meter rates are increasing by a quarter to $1 an hour, but parking in city-owned garages at Park Plaza North, the Tacoma Parking Garage and Pacific Plaza Garage are dropping by $5.50 to just $2 for three hours. The changes are meant to increase the availability of parking for downtown shoppers as well as generate money for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking system. For comparison, Seattle street parking cost between $1 and $4 an hour. Olympia parking costs $1 an hour and Portland charges up to $1.60 an hour. The rate changes come after a recommendation by the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parking Technical Advisory Group of local merchants and community members to

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

7(9205. Parking rates in downtown Tacoma are undergo-

ing a change to increase the availability of parking for shoppers and generate money for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking system.

align rates so that on-street parking spaces are available to shortterm customers, while longerterm parkers would use garage spaces. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the first step in the integration of the on- and off-street parking system,â&#x20AC;? the

advisory group stated in its April report. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One product the city lacked was affordable parking for the customer, client and visitor who wish to stay more than two hours.â&#x20AC;? The lowering of the garage rates solves this issue since most

of the garage spaces are either vacant or taken by monthly leases to downtown workers. The group reviews parking data every year to establish rates and programs that encourage the availability of parking spaces for downtown shoppers and workers as well as generate money to fund repairs and operations. People who park for longer than three hours will face higher all-day prices, and are being advised to park for free at the Tacoma Dome Station garage and ride the Link light rail to their downtown location. All day parking will jump from $12.50 to $16, although fivehour parking will be $12, a drop of 50 cents, compared to the former rates. After-hour rates will drop to $4. The rate changes will take effect by the end of the month.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a story as old as time, but well worth repeating everyone Tacoma Weeklybecause is interested in knows type. A in highly intoxicated what isthe happening our community. 20-something dude in cargo shorts Please send your news and story ideas thought it would be a good idea to to news@tacomaweekly.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;egg onâ&#x20AC;? a group of women across the street from a nightclub around the corner of Sixth Avenue and North Anderson on Aug. 12, after last call. His amorous antics landed him in jail when a fight broke out and he thought it would be a great idea to throw a rock through the windshield of a parked truck. The trouble was that the bar security had watched the whole thing go down and tried to calm the melee. The boozed buddy chimed â&#x20AC;&#x153;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not the security for the streetâ&#x20AC;? before punching the security guard in the face. Bad call son, bad call. The drunken vandal quickly found himself on the ground in a restrained but less-than-fluffy manner as other security guards strongly suggested the man refrain from further punches. Coppers arrived at the scene quickly. The rock-throwing d-bag found himself in handcuffs before he got himself hurt by the crowd. He told police he remembered taunting the women but conveniently couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recall throwing the rock through the windshield. He found himself with a free ride to the gray-bar hotel in Fife on a host of charges including assault and vandalism. It is best to not advise officers about their legal options when you are panhandling to support a drug habit. A one-armed man learned that lesson when he was spotted several times holding a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Need Helpâ&#x20AC;? sign and collecting money at the corner of 27th Street and Portland Avenue on Aug. 12. An officer told the man that he was violating the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s panhandling ordinance. The man got into the back of the patrol car but said he would prefer a ticket rather than a trip to jail because he would not be able to feed his drug habit in jail and didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to get sick. The officer declined the suggestion, prompting the man to get upset for the crap storm to come as he went through drug withdrawals. The officer found the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drug needles pre-loaded with heroin when booking the man into jail, making sure to add a few charges to the manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crime sheet before heading back to patrol duty. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger

       The Pierce County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department needs your help to identify the suspect responsible for a residential burglary and theft. On the early morning of Wednesday, July 30th 2014, an elderly woman woke to find the front door open and her purse missing from her Gig Harbor home. At 5:15 a.m. that morning, the pictured suspect used the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stolen credit card to rent movies from a Redbox machine

and to purchase cigarettes at an Albertsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s store on 51st Ave. NW in Gig Harbor. The suspect appears to be a white male in his 40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, slender build, with receding gray hair. He was seen wearing a green t-shirt and dark shorts. The suspect may also be responsible for the theft of several thousand dollars worth of golf clubs and electronics that were stolen during a car prowl that morning in the same neighborhood. Fridays at 10:30pm on

1,000

$

Receive up to for information leading to the arrest and charges filed for the person(s) in this case.

Call 253-591-5959 www.TPCrimestoppers.com

All Callers will remain anonymous

1-800-222-TIPS (8477)

 TH 3TREET 7  s 5NIVERSITY 0LACE 7! 


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New mobile app connects residents with services The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Customer Support Center â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a â&#x20AC;&#x153;one-stop shopâ&#x20AC;? for City services offering a concierge feel in the way of reception, face-to-face interaction, 311 telephone support and online resources â&#x20AC;&#x201C; has served nearly 34,000 residents since its opening last fall. Today, it offers mobile app connectivity and features refreshed branding. Development of the app was spearheaded by the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Information Technology Department. The app gives community members the ability to make and track non-emergent service requests, and find answers to frequently asked questions. The updated brand â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TacomaFIRST 311 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; reflects the commitment made by the City through its Public Access, Service and Security initiative to providing residents and visitors with a level of access to services designed with an enhanced customer experience in mind. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The FIRST in TacomaFIRST 311 stands for Fast Information Resource Team, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who we are,â&#x20AC;? said Customer Support Center Manager Laâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Toya Mason. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re fast, we can connect you with the information you need, and the City believes in putting your needs first.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Civic engagement is very important to the City,â&#x20AC;? said Information Technology Director Jack Kelanic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited to provide this new platform that the community can use with mobile devices to obtain information and let us know about issues that need to be addressed.â&#x20AC;? As part of the Public Access, Service and Security initiative, office footprints have also been reassessed through space planning efforts in the Tacoma Municipal Building complex, with the goal of moving all public interface functions to publically accessible floors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Public Access, Service and Security initiative ultimately makes things easier for the community members we serve,â&#x20AC;? said Assistant to the City Manager Nadia Chandler Hardy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It prioritizes simple, efficient and effective access to City services.â&#x20AC;? More information is available at cityoftacoma.org/ tacomafirst311.

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EYES TURN TO GENERAL ELECTION, CHARTER CHANGES State Rep. 27th Legislative Pos. 1

General Election Nov.4

Laurie Jinkins

12,085

Robert Hill

By Steve Dunkelberger

Rodger Deskins

stevedunkel@tacomaweekly.com

The primary election will be certified on Aug. 19, but the candidates slated for the general election in November are all but official. The top two vote getters in each primary race will face off in the general election on Nov. 4. The big draw on the Tacoma ballot wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t likely be the political races but the city charter changes that are also riding the ballot. Tacoma City Council has slated 12 charter changes that will now go up for a public vote. Two charter amendments would give the council more oversight of department heads; one would require council confirmation for appointments while another would require council confirmation of the Director of Utilities when appointed by the Public Utilities Board and require reconfirmation every two years following annual performance reviews by the board. Another change would allow the city council to issue emergency ordinances that take effect immediately rather than after the legal language is published. This change follows the controversy surrounding the Union Avenue Walmart construction since the council issued an emergency moratorium against big box stores within the city three years ago only to have Walmart permits submitted the following morning, ahead of when the moratorium was set to take effect. The permit was â&#x20AC;&#x153;grandfathered inâ&#x20AC;? by just a few hours. Term limits will also change if approved by voters. A charter change would allow a person to serve two consecutive terms of four years on the council and then two full consecutive terms of four years as mayor rather than tallying a total time in office against the current 10-year term limit. A Citizen Commission on Elected Salaries will be formed to determine the compensation and salary of the mayor and council if a charter amendment is approved. About half of the charter changes would be considered â&#x20AC;&#x153;pass throughâ&#x20AC;? updates to bring the city charter into compliance with state law and policies such as using gender-neutral language and deleting obsolete terms, expanding the definition of discriminated classes by adding color, ancestry, gender-identity, sexual orientation, familial status, honorably discharged veteran and military status to the list. One change would remove citizenship and city residency as requirements of eligibility for city employment, while another would end the prohibition against new cemeteries, mausoleums or crematories within Tacoma. Another would formally create a Landmarks Preservation Commission. For the record, only 121,055 of the 442,910 registered voters in Pierce County voted in the primary election, making for a 27.33 percent turn out. The deadline to register for the general election is Oct. 27. That election will likely have a higher turn out of 159,000 ballots, or 36 percent of the registered voters.

67.64%

646

3.62%

5,048

28.25%

State Rep. 27th Legislative Pos. 2 Jake Fey

12,155

Micah J. Anderson Steven T. Cook

68.03%

705

3.95%

4,941

27.66%

State Rep. 28th Legislative District Steve Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ban

13,248

56.14%

Tami Green

10,297

43.64%

State Rep. 28th Legislative Pos. 1 Richard (Dick) Muri

13,629

58.64%

Mary Moss

9,534

41.02%

State Rep. 287th Legislative Pos. 2 Paul Wagemann

6,353

27.45%

Christine Kilduff

7,301

31.54%

Monique Valenzuela Trudnowski

5,915

25.56%

State Rep. 29th Legislative District Steve Conway

7,036

62.28%

Terry Harder

4,215

37.31%

State Rep. 29th Legislative Pos. 1 David Sawyer

6,589

58.84%

Jason Bergstrom

4,557

40.69%

State Rep. 29th Legislative Pos. 2 Steve Kirby

8,699

94.70%

City Council - District No. 7 Derek M. Young

14,461

49.94%

Stan Fleming

14,417

49.79%

House of Representatives - District No. 6 Derek Kilmer

82,119

58.72%

Marty McClendon

48,010

34.33%

House of Representatives - District No. 10 Denny Heck

51,398

51.57%

Joyce McDonald

41,172

41.31%

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Youth Paddle

LINDQUIST HOLDS 5TH ANNUAL AUCTION AT KINGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BOOKS

greeted at Owen Beach

PHOTO BY JEFF CAVEN

CELEBRITY GUESTS. Last year, Lindquist hosted film star Molly Ringwald and Peter Buck of R.E.M. Both celebrities have donated singed CDs for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s auction.

By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

While the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s canoe journeys traditionally include children, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paddle to Bella Bella, British Columbia was too long a journey for the youngest children to undertake. However, Cultural Coordinator and head of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Canoe Family Connie McCloud made sure the youngsters got their canoe journey and she was there at Owen Beach on Aug. 5 to greet the 20 young travelers at their Pt. Defiance stop on the way to Manchester State Park. An eagle soared overhead, making the arrival even more blessed. Tribal Councilmember Tim Reynon was there as well and together with McCloud and Canoe Family member Joanna Gutierrez the three greeted the incoming five canoes one by one â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Muckleshoot, Nisqually, Native Bridge, Squaxin Island and Puyallup. Then it was off to the Youth Center for a meal and relaxation. On Aug. 3 the young tribal paddlers, their adult companions and the support boats began their journey at Squaxin Island and the journey came to an end on Aug. 7 at Suquamish. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We made the commitment to put on any of the kids who wanted to go,â&#x20AC;? McCloud said, noting that most of them were 5-11 years old. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So they really are young and they really want to paddle or be in the canoe.â&#x20AC;? She said most of them were new

PHOTOS BY MATT NAGLE

ALL ASHORE. (Top) Puyallup Tribal Culture Coordinator and head

of the Tribeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Canoe Family Connie McCloud greets the Squaxin Island canoe. (Above) The Muckleshoot canoe comes forward to greet those waiting onshore.

paddlers as well, so on this particular journey there were more adults than usual on the support boats so that more eyes could be on the children. McCloud said the paddlers were doing an amazing job. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is their second day out on the water and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing real well. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re handling that responsibility and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re learning.â&#x20AC;? What they learn is everything from canoe etiquette while on the water to the traditional cultural teachings of the canoe so that the young people understand the depth and meaning of what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing. Then there are the daily chores, like setting up and taking down camp, cooking breakfast and getting lunches readyâ&#x20AC;Ś Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot to do when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re living out in nature and away from everyday conveniences. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re building skills, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re learning to work together and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re problem solving,â&#x20AC;? McCloud said, and they get a reward â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a Puyallup Youth

Canoe T-shirt to wear with pride because they earned it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They will have accomplished a goal.â&#x20AC;? Youth canoe journeys also serve as drug and alcohol prevention, as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a drug and alcohol free paddle for everyone involved. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing is using our traditional culture and values to work as a family and as a community,â&#x20AC;? McCloud said, which can have a positive impact on tribal members in recovery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The people here have made a commitment to being drug and alcohol free and to be a model in our community.â&#x20AC;? For tribal members who may be struggling with substance abuse or tobacco, the Canoe Family is there with canoe medicine for anyone who wants to give up the drinking and drugging life for something better. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This offers people hope that there can be, and is, something different,â&#x20AC;? as McCould said.

Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fifth annual Signed Book and Wine Auction will be held at Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books in Tacoma on Friday, Aug. 15 at 5 p.m. New York Times bestselling author Garth Stein will attend. His new novel, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Sudden Light,â&#x20AC;? will be available for auction six weeks before it appears in bookstores. Steinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous novel, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Racing in the Rain,â&#x20AC;? is also an auction item. Other signed books on the auction list include bestsellers by Ann Rule, Maria Semple and Bret Easton Ellis. For music fans, Peter Buck of R.E.M. and actress/singer Molly Ringwald have donated signed CDs. There will also be wine bottles up for auction and open for drinking. The Harmon Pub will provide beer. Light appetizers can be nibbled between stacks of used books, as Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remains open for business during the festivities. This signature fundraising event for Lindquist typically includes local political figures, including Congressman Derek Kilmer, Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland, Deputy Mayor Victoria Woodards, city and county council members, legislators and others. Detective Ed Troyer will be the emcee. Lindquist, after being elected by a landslide in 2010, is up for election again this year, although he lacks an opponent. For more information, contact campaign manager John Cummings at (406) 498-5081, or visit the Facebook event page. See also www. marklindquist.org.

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DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T LET A DUI RUIN YOUR SUMMER FUN Summer is a time for parties and picnics in the sun, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let a DUI ruin your fun. Even though Washington legalized marijuana for adults 21 and older, it is still illegal and dangerous to drive under the influence of marijuana or alcohol. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Specifically, we want people to know that marijuana doubles the risk of a fatal crash,â&#x20AC;? said Darrin Grondel, Traffic Safety Commission director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With new retail marijuana stores in the mix, we want to remind the public that prescription and over-the-counter drugs, as well as illegal and recreational drugs, can impair driving ability,â&#x20AC;? Grondel said. That is why, between Aug. 15 and Sept. 1, extra officers will be on our roads looking for drivers under the influence of alcohol, marijuana or other drugs during the annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign. Many of these officers have special training to identify when a driver is under the influence of drugs and alcohol. Drivers are encouraged to find alternative transportation or ride with a sober designated driver. â&#x20AC;&#x153;More people may be using marijuana recreationally, but that should never be mixed with driving,â&#x20AC;? said Lt. Rob Sharpe, commander of the Washington State Patrol Impaired Driving Section. Lt. Sharpe noted that law enforcement has been arresting drugged drivers for a long time and will continue to identify and arrest drivers who make the poor choice to drive under the influence of marijuana, alcohol or other drugs. Additionally, law enforcement reminds young drivers that impairment laws are much stricter for anyone under the age of 21. A young driver who has any marijuana in their system or a blood alcohol concentration of .02 or higher, is considered to be driving under the influence and is at risk for arrest. During 2013 in Pierce County, 4,347 people were charged with DUI. The Bonney Lake, Dupont, Fife, Fircrest, Gig Harbor, Lakewood, Milton, Puyallup, Sumner, Tacoma and University Place Police Departments, the Pierce County Sheriff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department, the Washington State Liquor Control Board and the Washington State Patrol will participate in this Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign with the support of the Tacoma-Pierce County DUI and Traffic Safety Task Force. All of these extra patrols are part of Target Zero â&#x20AC;&#x201C; striving to end traffic deaths and serious injuries in Washington by 2030. For more information, visit targetzero.com. Additional information on the Washington Traffic Safety Commission can be found on the website, wtsc.wa.gov.

FAMILY HONORS SON WITH SUICIDE EDUCATION NON-PROFIT By Derek Shuck Derek@tacomaweekly.com

On Dec. 19, 2013, Amy Carter received heart-wrenching news. Her son, Logan, had taken his own life, to the complete shock of everyone in the family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of helplessness that goes with a suicide. We realized there werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a ton of resources out there for him if he went to get help,â&#x20AC;? Carter said. Carter soon found a way to honor her son, and with help from her sister and husband formed The Logan Foundation, a new non-profit organization focused on raising awareness of suicide prevention tactics and education. Despite being a relatively new organization, the Logan Foundation has hit the ground running, putting on one to two events every month since its inception. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to continue doing outreach events and family events. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re connected to your kid or the youth that are in your life, those warning signs might be more present. There may be more opportunities to reach out to the child,â&#x20AC;? Carter said. With the upcoming school year, the Logan Foundation is responsible for informing Pierce County schools about the suicide prevention curriculum that it helps to fund in partnership with other non-profits throughout the state. The curriculum focuses on teaching kids how to look for signs of depression in both their friends and themselves. Through the use of the ACT system (acknowledge, care, tell), peers can identify troubles with their friends and let professionals know. However, the key comes in educating students in knowing the signs to look for. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From talking to [Loganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s] friends, they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know what to watch out for. As adults we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know he was so depressed,â&#x20AC;? Carter said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The teenage mindset is very different from an adult. Problems that adults have and work through are oftentimes insurmountable for a teen.â&#x20AC;?

PHOTOS COURTESY OF AMY CARTER

REMEMBER. Sid is the official mascot for the Logan Foundation,

reminding parents not to be a mannequin in a kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. Amy Carter and her family started the Logan Foundation when her son, Logan, took his own life in December 2013.

This is why Carter believes it is important to educate youth not just in school, but out of school as well. The Logan Foundation was recently contacted by the Pierce County Referee Association to spread their curriculum to the sports and club team level. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sports, once kids get to the middle school level, are a good pool to educate about suicide prevention,â&#x20AC;? Carter said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Often times they take on a leadership position.â&#x20AC;? The Logan Foundation is looking to encourage these leadership opportunities, hoping to make enough to fund teen football gear for club sports. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids that are invested in sports feel more connected to peers and have more adults in their lives and less incidents of depression because they are being active,â&#x20AC;? Carter said. The Logan Foundation understands that suicide prevention is more than just education, actively encouraging adults to become engaged with the youth in their life. The Logan Foundation even has its own subdivision, the Mannequin Eradication

Front, based on Loganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own irrational fear of mannequins. It started as an inside joke but quickly developed into a message from the Foundation: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a mannequin in a kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life â&#x20AC;&#x201C; become involved.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It goes outside of just general suicide prevention. Just being active and involved with kids can help,â&#x20AC;? Carter said The Mannequin Eradication Front has also produced the unofficial mascot of the Logan Foundation, Sid the Mannequin, a spray painted plastic upper torso that represents the Logan Foundation at events they put on and participate in. The Foundation is currently organizing a poker run in September and a benefit concert is in the works for October. Carter and her organization focus on making a lot of events in all-ages venues, so activities can be enjoyed by the whole family. If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1 (800) 273-8255. For more information on the Logan Foundation visit theloganfoundation.com.


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Our View

Help students get on the right path as school starts

T

EDITORIAL CARTOON BY CHRIS BRITT s CBRITTOON@GMAIL.COM s 7774!#/-!7%%+,9#/-%$)4/2)!,#!24//.3 FIND CARTOONS, THE ART OF FREE SPEECH: CHRIS BRITT AT TEDXTACOMA ON YOUTUBE.COM

Guest Editorials

Bathtubs, smokestacks and a five-star resort: Lessons from Kohler, Wisconsin By Don C. Brunell Today, there is a tendency to look with distain at manufacturing facilities, especially those located on working waterfronts. Historically, those factories were sited there because the raw materials and finished products could be transported only by water. But as our state and nation progressed, railroads, highways and even airports were added and industrial areas formed. In fact, our legislature, cities, counties and ports funded the necessary improvements to those areas to specifically attract industries and the accompanying family-wage jobs. Past governors made economic development the cornerstone of their administrations. For example, Booth Gardner formed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Team Washingtonâ&#x20AC;? and successfully recruited high-tech industries to southwest Washington. Otherwise, those facilities would have landed in Oregon. However, today many urban dwellers, particularly those that buy condos along the waterfront, tend to look at industrial facilities as obstructions to â&#x20AC;&#x153;theirâ&#x20AC;? views and annoyances to their lifestyles. For example, one California transplant told me the Georgia Pacific pulp and paper mill was an â&#x20AC;&#x153;eyesoreâ&#x20AC;? and should be demolished. That mill was built in 1883 and Camas grew up around it. It is on the banks of the Columbia and Washougal rivers and, unknown to him, it is one of the most efficient producers of

bathroom and facial tissue, paper towel and napkins â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all products that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have online or digital substitutes. When plants close and are demolished, as was the case of the old Boise Cascade paper mill located in the heart of the Port of Vancouver working waterfront, developers swoop in with their billion dollar plans to build high-end condos and office-retail complexes. There is nothing wrong with that as long as the condo buyers fully understand their neighbors are industries. The railroad, for example, is integral to the Portâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operation and to the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation network and it runs around the clock transporting all kinds of products that we need and use daily. There are hundreds of examples where industries and neighborhoods coexist successfully every day. For proof, just visit Kohler, Wisc., where the Sheboygan River runs into Lake Michigan. It is a village founded as a model company town in 1900 when the Kohler Company built its new plant. Kohler is no Microsoft. By todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standards it is classified as part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Old Economy.â&#x20AC;? The company manufactures kitchen and bathroom sinks, bathtubs, toilets, shower stalls and faucets much the same way as it has for decades. Hot furnaces turn steel into molten metal for molds, bake enamel onto it, and also harden porcelain. Yet the air and water are clean,

children attend school a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw away, and workers play in the parks and on ball fields. The neighborhood around Kohlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters and the massive industrial complex includes a five-star resort, complete with championship golf courses, an upscale shopping mall, theater, a wildlife refuge, and some of Wisconsinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest homes. The resort is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The American Clubâ&#x20AC;? which was originally built to house immigrant workers. It was a place where they learned the English language and studied to become citizens. In fact, because the neighborhood is a bit pricey, many Kohler employees live in nearby Sheboygan, which is on the shores of Lake Michigan. The point is industries and cites coexist very well along the waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s edge. So, you folks who turn up your noses at the ideas of sharing the waterfront with manufacturing facilitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the jobs and necessary products they provideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;take note: Kohler, Wisc., is an example of how an industrial site can exist in harmony with any neighborhood, regardless of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s income level or station in life. Don C. Brunell is a business analyst, writer and columnist. He recently retired as president of the Association of Washington Business, the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest and largest business organization, and now lives in Vancouver. He can be contacted at theBrunells@msn.com.

he end of summer vacation is often filled with a flurry of emotions for parents and children, as months of being home ends and a new school year dawns. Children in homes where making ends meet is a constant struggle can shoulder a particular type of stress. Family budgets are often challenged with summer expense of day care, camps and the added meals to pay for outside of the school year. Tacoma schools are a main food provider to 60 percent of its students, who receive free and reduced meals, after all. Then come the expenses of school supplies and the expectation of new clothes, a new backpack and a cool new lunch box. Researchers estimate that parents spend an average of $300 per elementary school student and upward of $350 for junior high and high school students just to cover basic supplies and clothes. Money for new calculators and jump drives and spiral notebooks just isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t available for far too many Tacomans. Not having those crucial supplies puts these students at a disadvantage and can carry on for months since homework goes unfinished without them. The cost of equipping public school students for the upcoming school year has jumped as much as 20 percent from last year, a Huntington study reported. Technology is key to modern education, but it is also expensive. Scientific calculators, for example, can cost $200, but are required for many high school courses. You can help. Community partners around Tacoma are hosting events in August to provide backpacks and school supplies and services such as haircuts and school physicals for those students who would otherwise go without. Life Center volunteers, for example, will be handing out backpacks and school supplies for Tacoma students at an event at Baker Middle School, 8001 S. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; St., from 1-5 p.m. on Aug. 17 and on Aug. 30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Life Center at 1717 S. Union Ave. Another backpack give away will be hosted by Puget Sound Christian Center, 4020 S. 56th St., Tacoma on Aug. 23, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Volunteers will hand out some 2,500 backpacks to any child in need who is accompanied by a parent or guardian. Families will have entertainment, food, health services and community services offered on site during the event as well. Resources are limited and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Communities In Schools of Tacoma will send a Stuff the Bus school bus around Tacoma on Aug. 21 to collect school supplies from local businesses and organizations in an effort to gather enough supplies for 3,000 backpacks for students at all grade levels in Tacoma Public Schools. This 10th annual event grows every year, but needs donations of all sorts. The bus will then bring the school supplies to Baker Middle School, where volunteers will fill the backpacks Aug. 22 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Please consider buying a few extra things when you are doing your own backto-school shopping to stuff the backpacks bound for those who struggle to have the basics for their education. Go to http:tacoma.ciswa.org to find out how you can help or to connect to an effort to get the school supplies your children need to succeed.

CORRECTION The Aug. 1 story â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tea-ing off with the Olive Branch CafĂŠâ&#x20AC;? included incorrect hours of operation for the cafĂŠ. It is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Tacoma Weekly apologizes for the error.

In the war to protect masculinity, Hamas and Israel make strange bedfellows TACOMAWEEKLY

By Rob Okun

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to do what a manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to do. And a countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to do what a countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to do.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu July 21, 2014 interview on NBC News Amid weeks of horror and unconscionable suffering in the Gaza Strip there is a truth hiding in plain sight: Wild West manhood is being played out in the Middle East. Shoot first; ask questions never. Tough talkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, manup bluster, both from Hamas leader Khaled Meshaal and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu â&#x20AC;&#x201C; poster boys for a strain of masculinity so toxic itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infected thousands of young men on both sides. The pair, and other male Israeli and Hamas leaders, have full-blown cases of mascupathy, a condition not yet found in any psychiatric manual. Psychotherapists Charlie Donaldson and Randy Flood describe such men as having few feelings (feelings are unmanly, feminine), loners (donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get close to many people), exaggerate autonomy (asking for help invites mockery), and always have to be in control (being vulnerable exposes you to fear and shame.) Sound familiar? Toxic masculinity has many faces. Internationally, examples abound â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from Russia and Ukraine to Egypt and Iraq, and, of course, the spiraling violence in Gaza, careening out of

control as stubborn men with limited imaginations refuse to acknowledge the failure of their morally bankrupt policies. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not hard to connect the dots: for a month Meshaal and Netanyahu have been choreographing a new version of an old dance of destruction and death. In the other war theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re waging â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the one to protect conventional masculinity â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the pair make strange bedfellows. Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you see National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre introducing them at an NRA convention as they stand, hands clasped overhead like running mates in a political campaign? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only thing that stops bad guys with rockets and drones,â&#x20AC;? LaPierre might say by way of introduction, â&#x20AC;&#x153;are good guys with rockets and drones.â&#x20AC;? Meanwhile, a growing chorus in the world community is rising up in anguish, crying out, â&#x20AC;&#x153;STOP! NOW!â&#x20AC;? trying to drown out the pairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fiddling as Gaza burns. What about men, at this painful moment? We have an opportunity â&#x20AC;&#x201C; weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re being challenged, actually â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to step forward â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as men â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to demand the male leaders on both sides end the violence. Despite males in every culture continuing to be socialized to follow conventional notions of manhood, attitudes are shifting; men on every continent are working to redefine masculinityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;from university campuses in the U.S. to major cities across Asia. (A November symposium in Delhi on transforming manhood is expected to be attended by some 600 delegates from 90 countries.)

At one point during NBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s July 21 interview with Netanyahu, anchor Brian Williams recounted how the night before the network had â&#x20AC;&#x153;aired scenes of the largest hospital in Gaza having to turn away dead bodies at the hospital morgueâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? He asked Netanyahu, â&#x20AC;&#x153;How does it strike you as a father, as a human being? (Emphasis added.) Netanyahu replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very saddening. To see any of these civilian deaths is terribly saddeningâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? Not, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m saddened. Not, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m terribly saddened.â&#x20AC;? No doubt Hamas leader Meshaal would have answered similarly if asked about the Israeli dead. Men can no longer afford to stand passively by as other men, like Meshaal and Netanyahu, assume positions of leadership, men so detached from their hearts they somehow speak about the disfigured corpses of children dispassionately, without a quiver in their voices, without choking back tears. Men willing to end our silence about the damage caused by toxic masculinity have a real role to play in interrupting the Gaza warâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;all war for that matter. If the male leaders of Hamas and Israel donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t speak for us, we have to tell them so. Now. Rob Okun (rob@ voicemalemagazine.org) writes for PeaceVoice, is editor of Voice Male magazine and the new anthology, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Voice Male: The Untold Story of the Profeminist Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Movement.â&#x20AC;?

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WKlatt From page A1

medical professionals turned out to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Klattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big idea. In 1985, Klatt was a colorectal surgeon who spent much of his time cutting rotten cancer out of good people. He was also a runner, an accordion player and a good guy. He was particularly angry at cancer that spring, and wanted to find a new way to raise money to kick it off the planet. The answer did not lie with the accordion. Instead,

he came up with a blatant stunt he hoped might raise $10,000. He would walk and run around the University of Puget Soundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s track at Baker Stadium for a solid 24 hours, and his friends would back him with pledges. For a modest fee, they could also join him on that track. At the end of that day and night, he covered 83 miles, brought in $27,000 and got people wondering what might happen if more people walked for 24 hours, and asked their friends to donate. The next year, with the help of organizers including Tacoma Public Schools public information officer Pat Flynn, they tested the idea with 19 teams and

raised $33,000. They have refined the event as it has grown. It starts with a survivor lap each year, filling the track with the patients, caregivers and survivors who walk as proof that this disease can be beaten. Come the darkness, they light luminarias to honor people who have died of cancer, as well as survivors and caregivers. They close with the Fight Back Ceremony, and Klattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cheer, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keep up the fight!â&#x20AC;? The event has grown into the American Cancer Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s single largest fund-raiser. It has also given cancer foes a way to wage their war in solidarity. When the American Cancer Society posted its tribute to Klatt on its website, www.cancer. org, 237 people around the globe posted messages on it. Most of them never met Klatt but, like his dearest friends, call him Gordy. Willie Stewart of Tacoma was among the first to post. The former principal of Lincoln High School, Stewart is a prostate cancer

survivor and leads a support and information group for men fighting the disease. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d known Klatt, his wife, Lou, and his children, Julie Sullivan, Lisa Steudel and David Klatt, for decades. He honored Klatt for his career in the military, from which he retired as a colonel before going into practice at K-Y Surgical Associates in Tacoma. And he mourned the loss. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have lost a great friend who has great compassion for others,â&#x20AC;? Stewart wrote online. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His main mission was to find a cure for all cancers. He also served our nation as an outstanding officer. My heart-felt sympathy for Lou and family.â&#x20AC;? On Tuesday, Stewart, who also retired as a colonel, added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was honored to have served as the Executive Officer under Col. Klatt from 1987 to 1990. He was the commander of the 50th General Hospital, 1,000 beds, at Fort Lawton in Seattle. He was a great commander who was comfortable delegating

duties to his subordinates. Under his command, the mission of the 50th General Hospital was accomplished with flying colors. He was the recipient of many military honors, and he was committed to promoting cancer awareness during his command.â&#x20AC;? From East Sydney Technical College in Australia, Danny Brombal wrote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank you, Gordy. For the gift of Relay for Life, for the Hope that brings families, friends and communities together. Mostly thanks for giving us the chance to Fight Back through Relay.â&#x20AC;? Terry Schmeckpeper of LaCrosse, Wis., wrote: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The positive steps in fighting cancer that came about because of Relay For Life are almost beyond measure. The credit for that progress sits on Dr. Klattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoulders. And we owe him a huge debt.â&#x20AC;? Monica Van Hoomissen chaired the Relay in San Jose, Calif., this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were celebrating the second day of our Relay on Aug. 3, the day we lost you,â&#x20AC;? she wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a patient of yours in Tacoma before moving to San Jose. I became involved in Relay last year to remember my Dad, only learning through my training materials that you founded the Relay for Life movement. So humble and modest were you that in my several visits to your office I never saw any sort of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bragging rightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; about Relay for Life. â&#x20AC;Ś Thank you not only for being one of my healthcare providers, but also for giving so many the opportunity to do so

     

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much for so many more.â&#x20AC;? There were tributes from London, from the island of Molokai, from Nagano, Japan, Zambia, and this, from Mumbai, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We at Indian Cancer Society would like to share our deepest condolences and grief at this moment with the Klatt family. Thank you for the gift of Relay for Life, it has brought hope to many fighting cancer. We at Indian Cancer Society are very proud to be part of this worldwide event to fight against cancer. He will be missed and remembered by all. May his soul rest in peace.â&#x20AC;?

DR. GORDON KLATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LAST MESSAGE TO RELAY FOR LIFE Friday evening, June 13, Dr. Gordon Klatt sent greetings to participants celebrating the 30th annual Relay For Life. His friend Harvey Rosen read Kattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s message: Thirty years ago, I stepped onto the track at the University of Puget Sound with the vision to raise money for the battle against cancer. With the support of the Tacoma community and my colleagues, we have now grown into a global event. Each year, millions of people in over 23 countries raise muchneeded funds and awareness to save lives through the Relay for Life movement. Relay has raised more than $5 billion to help with groundbreaking research and to provide free information and services for patients and their families. My wife, Lou, and I are very grateful for all of your help with this vision. Without the dedication from all of you here in the Tacoma Community, we would not have grown to where we are today! Let us keep fighting for every birthday that is threatened by cancer in your communities and everyone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Let us celebrate the survivors for what they have overcome and remember those who have lost to their disease. Let us honor the people who have fought and are fighting cancer. Let us thank our caregivers and families who have never given up. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s celebrate the 30 years of hope, and letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finish this fight!


-YPKH`(\N\Z[Â&#x2039;tacomaweekly.comÂ&#x2039;:LJ[PVU(Â&#x2039;7HNL

WCrosswalks some intersections safer, there is much more work to do since the city hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t budgeted general crosswalk improvements outside of its Hazardous Sidewalk Replacement Program and Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan or when improvements could be tied into utility or street projects in the area that could share the cost. Budget crunching, however, is underway to fund another round of crosswalk improvements under the next budget set for approval in late fall. Most of the work at the 57 locations will be restriping crosswalks and adding signage, while some will include installing new upgraded signal lights and more extensive work. The idea is to stretch the money as far as possible and work on finding money for the ones that need more extensive work. Work on the initial list will start soon followed by a break during the winter and resume next spring. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe we will do more pedestrian, bike safety and crossing projects than we ever have before because people care about it,â&#x20AC;? City

From page A1

Councilmember Robert Thoms said, noting that more than 600 people commented about street crossing safety issues around the city during the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Talk the Walkâ&#x20AC;? open houses earlier this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have deferred maintenance for decades in a way that is unhealthy.â&#x20AC;? The city spends just 4 percent of its budget on roads, two percentage points lower than it spends on library services, he said. That said, city officials found money to repair key intersections because people spoke up about them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These efforts to work together really pay off.â&#x20AC;? The city now has a roster of more than 300 intersections that neighbors suggested need improvement once the first crosswalks are upgraded, so crosswalk improvements will be part of Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future for years to come. Future upgrades will be done based on traffic and pedestrian volumes,

collision rates and the intersectionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proximity to parks, bus stops, hospitals and schools. Detailed maps of the intersections identified by traffic data and neighborhood input are available on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web site. The city also has a roster of street repairs, upgrades and pothole fillings that tally almost $1 billion. And of course, there are decaying sidewalks that also need repairing. But those are easier to fix since state law puts the responsibility to maintain them onto the property owners that front the sidewalk. If someone reports the address of a damaged sidewalk, a city inspector will confirm the needed repair and notify the property owner about the need for repairs as well as options available to have the work done. The property owner is responsible for the sidewalk repairs despite the fact that the sidewalk is on the city right of way or if a city-planted tree causes the sidewalk to buckle.

WCars

From page A1

automotive event dates in Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich vintage vehicle history â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the first ever National Street Rod Association appreciation day held on June 22. Hosted by Griotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garage, organizers say it was the largest spectator and participant turnout by the NSRA in the state of Washington. In the winter of 2013, the leadership of the newly formed Pierce County Rod & Custom Car Association contacted Gene Garland, Western Washington representative for the NSRA, regarding a first ever NSRA appreciation day for Tacoma. Garland distributed 170 special NSRA Appreciation Day pins and Don Amundson, longtime member and state inspection representative, inspected 43 vehicles for free. Griotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garage donated food for the event â&#x20AC;&#x201C; chips, soft drinks and Nathanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famous hot dogs. The Pierce County Rod & Custom Car Association board and committee members who contributed to the success of the event included Ken Bradford, Dennis Castle, Gary Dinwiddie, Bob Jasper, Chuck Johnson, Walt Kaplin, Vern LaCousiere, Junior Nelson, Jimmy Olson, Dick Page, Harry Schaffert and Jim Walden. Host clubs included the Toppers (founded in 1951), Demonoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (founded in 1957) and the Kings Men

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(founded in 1959). The NSRA is the oldest association of its kind in the United States, dating back to 1971. Its membership of more than 55,000 encompasses all 50 states. Each year, the organization hosts 11 major, three-day shows throughout the country, including the NSRA Northwest Street Rod Nationals Plus held in Ridgefield, Wash. at the Clark County Events Center. NSRA President Vernon Walker personally attends most of these events and others across the U.S. The monthly Street Scene magazine is one of the perks members receive when they join the NSRA, along with the valuable Fellow Pages booklet â&#x20AC;&#x201C; if an NSRA memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vehicle breaks down, all that he or she has to do is look for a person in the Fellow Pages who lives reasonably close, make a cell phone call and help is on the way. This is in addition to the other worthwhile reason to join the NSRA. The Pierce County Rod & Custom Car Association announced that next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NSRA Appreciation Day will be held on June 21, 2015 at Griotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garage. This is in keeping with the associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intent to establish a long-term partnership with the NSRA and its leaders and members in our state. For additional information, contact any of the association/board members or call Walt Kaplin at (253) 858-8739.

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TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 2014

Kings overcome Outlaws

The Sideline is Tacoma Weekly’s sports-only blog, providing you with quick game recaps as well as some content that won’t appear in print! Check in for regular updates, and we hope you enjoy! http://www.tacomaweekly.com/sideline

SECTION A, PAGE 10

TACOMA RAINIERS

NOW FACE BENGALS FOR CHAMPIONSHIP

By Justin Gimse jgimse@tacomaweekly.com

I

n a brutal and emotional clash between crosstown rivals, the Puyallup Nation Kings upended the upstart Puget Sound Outlaws 28-7 Saturday night, Aug. 9 at Chief Leschi Stadium and secured a spot in the Western Washington Football Alliance championship game in just their second year as a franchise. The WWFA championship game will pit the Kings against the Pierce Country Bengals, another cross-town rival and equally Tacoma-heavy team, which pushed them to the limit 24-21 in the final regular season game on July 26. Pierce County (9-2) scored a touchdown in the waning moments of their semifinal match-up against the Renton Ravens (8-2) and a Ronald Baines interception with 1:12 sealed the rugged 12-8 victory and assured a rematch of the WWFA “Game of the Year.” Both teams will square-off at 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16 at Renton Memorial Stadium. The undefeated Kings ran their record to 10-0 and moved up to number four in the American Football News Today semi-pro/amateur national rankings. Including two preseason games, the Kings have won 12 straight and a championship trophy would make it a baker’s dozen. But that opportunity didn’t come easy against the Outlaws. The teams offered up a combined 11 turnovers. At times, it seemed as if they were almost daring each other to make something happen. In the end, it was the Kings who made the fewer mistakes and their defense gave the Outlaws little or no room to breathe for more than 56 minutes of the ballgame. Donald McKee got things started for Puyallup with a three-yard bull rush up the middle for a touchdown with 8:36 remaining in the first quarter. The Kings started the drive all the way down at the Outlaws’ 33-yard line following botched snap on punt attempt. The Outlaws responded with what would be their longest drive of the game. Starting out at their own 39-yard line, the Outlaws weathered a sack by Tutu Tamaalevea and dodged a bullet with a roughing the punter call that kept their drive alive. Nine plays later, they were at the six-yard line and lining up for a field

PHOTOS BY RICHARD STARK

MOVIN’ UP! Catcher John Hicks has

made the most of his Triple-A promotion batting .328 since being called-up by the Tacoma Rainiers from Double-A Jackson, Tennessee. The burly Virginian has played on several winners throughout his career, which bodes well for the Rainiers and Mariners, down the line.

SPOTLIGHT ON: JOHN HICKS Rainiers catcher has valuable lessons to share By Karen Westeen Missbaseball9@juno.com PHOTOS BY JUSTIN GIMSE

MONARCHY. (top) Sam Solomon fights to keep his head upon his

shoulders as Ravonte Brown tries to put a stop to the Kings potent offense. (bottom) Nick Noga celebrates his 25-yard interception return for a touchdown. The monster 6-3, 285 pound middle linebacker has returned four interceptions for touchdowns at Chief Leschi Stadium this season.

goal. Kicker Cameron Bailey’s kick went wide right and it would be the last true scoring opportunity for the Outlaws until the final moments late in the game. Puget Sound’s defense rose to the occasion on the following Kings drive and forced a Puyallup punt after a threeand-out. Punter Ryan Burks backed the Outlaws up down to the five-yard line and it was going to be trouble. On the second play from scrimmage, Outlaws’ quarterback Bryce Williams put a little too much air under a pass over the middle and the Kings’ monster linebacker Nick Noga was in position to intercept the ball at the 25-yard line. The 6-3, 285 middle linebacker broke to the sideline toward the end zone, was momentarily stopped at the three-yard line, but bulldozed his way across the line for his fourth interception return for a touchdown this season at Chief Leschi Stadium. The Kings now led 14-0 with mere seconds ticked off the clock in the

second quarter. Puyallup blocked the Outlaws punt on the next possession and looked poised to score again starting at the Puget Sound 27-yard line. Four plays later, running back Chris McCutchin fumbled the ball and Quinn Smith and Devon Greene recovered for the Outlaws. The Outlaws were able to muster a first down on their next drive, but stalled, and were forced to punt. Marques Wise lofted a short, but high kick that bounced at the Outlaws’ 35-yard line and bounced back in the wrong direction. Unable to get out of the way of the ball, Kings’ linebacker Stanley Matau instead scooped it up, turned around and sprinted 25 yards untouched for a touchdown and the Kings would enter the half with a 21-0 lead. Penalties and fumbles plagued both teams in the third quarter until the Kings put another seven on the board X See FOOTBALL / page A13

After being drafted by the Mariners in 2011, catcher John Hicks spent the first year of his career at Clinton, Iowa, followed by a year in High Desert, California, in 2012. Last year he was with Double-A Jackson, Tennessee, where he threw out a league-leading 49.3 percent of attempted base stealers. Before joining the Rainiers on July 10, he was back in Jackson for the first part of this season. In 14 games, he is currently batting .328 Hicks sat down recently to talk to Tacoma Weekly‘s baseball correspondent Karen Westeen about his baseball career, as seen from crouching behind home plate.

KW: Where’s your off season home? JH: I live in Goochland, VA, about 30

minutes from Richmond. It’s where I grew up.

KW: Do you still live with your parents or do you have a family of your own? JH: I don’t have a family yet, and I do live with my parents. I have two brothers, one who’s married with two kids and one who’s getting married this summer. KW: And you finished three years of college at the University of Virginia? JH: I did.

X See RAINIERS / page A13


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THE ENDING OF AN ERA UWT Huskies founder Joshua Seals looks back on a winning legacy

By Matt Nagle matt@tacomaweekly.com

W

hen Joshua Seals first began his quest to establish the University of Washington-Tacoma Huskies basketball team in 2012, he did so armed with a dream and a confident outlook of his own abilities. With invaluable support from campus officials, his mom Sandra and some key fellow students, Seals succeeded in making his dream come true, and the UWT community â&#x20AC;&#x201C; if not all of Tacoma â&#x20AC;&#x201C; have much to be proud of in this young manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dedication to his vision and to his alma mater. Last year, Seals completed his mission as the UWT Huskies basketball leader, having graduated in 2013 on the Deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List and as a member of the Phi Sigma Theta national honor society with a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in self and society. After graduating, he remained with the team to lead them as captain, coach and also a team player. They leave this year with a record of 5-1. Seals played the position of a dynamic point guard and guard. He was noted for his sharp shooting ability, his speed (thanks to his experience as a track athlete), his ability to steal the ball and his tough defensive skills. Having played basketball since he was a young child, Sealsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time growing up on the court playing on various school teams and city and church leagues shaped him into the fine athlete who later took his skills to college to start something great for UWT. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Basketball was always my favorite sport,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I loved to hoop. I always wanted to go to a college that had a great basketball team but when I enrolled at UWT, I realized they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have an all-menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team so I decided to use my leadership ability and organize one.â&#x20AC;? With the proper help from college officials, the UWT Huskies team was born. Student involvement was impressive and the league quickly took off. The UWT Huskies signed up under a Comeback Sports league and have been a very competitive team in the South Sound Sports League. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was challenging, competitive, sometimes even tough but we kept going,â&#x20AC;? said Seals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes the seasons went great; other times they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go so well. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like life â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you learn to take the highs and the lows. You just have to stick it out. You grow from it. It toughens you. You have to have grit!â&#x20AC;?

BEYOND THE COURT

Collegiate sports play a vital role in the success of any prestigious college, particularly the popular sports such as football, basketball, baseball, softball and soccer. These are real drawing cards for athletic students but the purpose of the basketball association â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tacoma Huskiesâ&#x20AC;? is to not only produce athletes but also create a fraternity-type group of guys â&#x20AC;&#x201C; men who can achieve in class as well as on the court. As Seals explained, being talented in a sport is one thing but if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t balance that with a good work ethic, good conduct and an education, you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get very far. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have seen many young men with potential not reach their goals because of a poor attitude or lack of effort,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to work hard and not miss great opportunities given to you. Some guys couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t last on the college team because they were incapable of being a UWT Husky â&#x20AC;&#x201C; being in college, earning a degree, putting college student work before athletics, maintaining strong work ethics and being respectful on and off the court. These are the standards for winning on the court and in the real world.â&#x20AC;? Being a college athlete can be demanding, but through determination and structure Seals held down a job, led on-campus organizations, maintained honors grades and graduated on time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was very important for me to set the example for my ballers by exemplifying these standards for them to follow. It is important to lead by example,â&#x20AC;? he said.

CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE

With gratitude, Seals named those who helped make the UWT Huskies possible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I sincerely appreciate the efforts

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SANDRA SEALS

GO HUSKIES! The UWT Huskies teams â&#x20AC;&#x201C; (top) fall

2013, (top left) winter 2014, (top right) spring 2014 and the one that started it all in 2012 (above). (Right) UWT Huskies founder Joshua Seals with the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second place division trophy, winter 2013.

each player gave to this franchise. Great job, guys! I want to especially thank Mr. Ed Mirecki, director of student involvement, for his support. Also, Zachary Druce for his efforts to help support this group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have great appreciation for all of the UWT Huskies who came and rooted for us at the games, especially to my mom, Sandra, for all of her help and encouragement. You are great! Of course, I thank God who gave me the ability and the opportunity to lead this team.â&#x20AC;? His classmates Chris Altidor and Zak Mohamed also deserve an honorable mention, Seals said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanks, Cris, for your great defense in games. You were there with me from the beginning. To Zak Mohamed, vice-president of the basketball association, not only did you help offensively on the court; you were a vocal leader on campus. Job well done. Another shout-out is to James Henderson, who was a fierce competitor that could drive to the basket at will and defeat his competitors. Unfortunately, he suffered an injury last season that limited his playing time in the playoffs. James was a dynamic guard. Also thanks to Louis Jones, who was a consistent player. He was a good rebounder and defender for two seasons. Good job, men.â&#x20AC;? Altidor commented, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since the beginning of the basketball association we have seen successes, failures, wins and losses but through it all I am proud to be a part of an organization that continues to be a model for its community.â&#x20AC;?

PASSING THE TORCH

Now that Sealsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time with the Huskies has come to an end, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hoping that another college student will step up and lead the Huskies further. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping to pass the torch on to another great individual who is a leader and visionary,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When the new University Y (YMCA) Center is completed, I hope the UWT Huskies will be in there making their mark on the court. Hopefully this will motivate ballers to keep playing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope to see more collegiate club sports teams produced at UWT,â&#x20AC;? Seals states. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is important for students who come to UWT to know that not only do they have a great opportunity to further their intellect but also they have the opportunity to display their athletic skills.â&#x20AC;? This team is history in the making, thanks to the efforts

of Joshua Seals. He was a brilliant leader, a risk-taker and a motivator â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a leader on and off campus. A purpose-driven individual, he will leave an honorable legacy at UWT for his accomplishments in building this team. His leadership, talent, academic intelligence and athletic ability will not be forgotten at UWT.

Great job, Joshua Seals! Go UWT Huskies!


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SPORTSWATCH

TACOMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOT TICKETS

BANDIT SPRINT BOAT TAKES THIRD AT PORT ANGELES RUN

AUGUST 15 - 27

The Bandit Sprint Boat team had a fine showing over the Aug. 9-10 weekend with the number 47 boat taking third-place in the A-400 class. With speeds topping out over 90 miles per hour, the team of Darrin and Autumn Swindahl clocked the fastest run of the day at 52.8 seconds. The Graham-based family of racers also boasts the competitive 76 Boat run by Brian and Aubrey Swindahl. The Bandit Sprint Boat team competes in the American Sprint Boat Racing Series and has three races left on the schedule. For more information go to asbracing.com.

SATURDAY AUGUST 16 COLLEGE SOCCER Pierce College .vs. Pierce Alumni Heritage Park, Puyallup - Noon

SATURDAY AUGUST 16 SEMI-PRO FOOTBALL WWFA Championship Game Puyallup Nation Kings .vs. Pierce County Bengals Renton Memorial Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6 p.m.

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20 TRIPLE-A BASEBALL Omaha Storm Chasers .vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:05 p.m.

JESUS MONTERO NAMED MILB PLAYER OF THE MONTH FOR JULY

THURSDAY AUGUST 2 TRIPLE-A BASEBALL

Minor League Baseball announced Aug. 12 that Tacoma Rainiers first baseman Jesus Montero has been named the Pacific Coast League Player of the Month for July. Montero, 24, led the PCL with 33 RBI and 72 total bases in 27 games with the Rainiers last month. He ranked second in the league in slugging percentage (.692) and extra-base hits (17), and third in total hits with 39. Montero turned in 12 multi-hit games over that stretch, including a season-high 5-for-5, six-RBI performance at Salt Lake on July 4. In 94 games with the Rainiers this season, Montero is batting .290 with 24 doubles, one triple, 16 home runs and 74 RBI. He ranks first on the team in extra-base hits (41), total bases (176) and home runs, and sits eighth in the league in RBI. This season is Monteroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third in the Mariners organization and second with the Rainiers. He was acquired by Seattle along with pitcher Hector Noesi as part of a trade that sent pitchers Michael Pineda and Jose Campos to the New York Yankees on Jan. 20, 2012. Montero was originally signed by the Yankees as a non-drafted free agent in 2006. The Rainiers open an eight-game road trip at New Orleans at 5 p.m. tonight. The team returns to Cheney Stadium to play the final homestand of the season on Wednes-

Omaha Storm Chasers .vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:05 p.m.

FRIDAY AUGUST 22 TRIPLE-A BASEBALL Omaha Storm Chasers .vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:05 p.m.

SATURDAY AUGUST 23 - PRO BOXING Battle at the Boat 97 Emerald Queen Casino â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7 p.m.

SATURDAY AUGUST 23 TRIPLE-A BASEBALL Omaha Storm Chasers .vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:05 p.m.

SUNDAY AUGUST 24 TRIPLE-A BASEBALL

TUESDAY AUGUST 26 TRIPLE-A BASEBALL Iowa Cubs .vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:05 p.m.

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 27 TRIPLE-A BASEBALL

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The gloves will be laced-up once again Aug. 23 at the Emerald Queen Casino showroom. The ten round main event will feature former IBF Light Middleweight World Champion Kassim Ouma (28-8-1, 17 KOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) versus rising star Osumanu Adama (22-4, 16 KOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) in what is expected to be one of the most thrilling main events in years at the EQC. The six-round semi-main event will feature local undefeated star and knockout artist Marcelino Pineda (4-0, 4 KOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) versus a tough Virgil Gree (8-2, 2 KOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s). Also appearing on the card will be local rising stars Jeremy McCleary (4-0), Cameron Sevilla-Rivera (4-0, 4 KOs), and Harrison Bevens (2-0, 2 KOs). Tickets are available online through Ticketmaster and can be purchased in-person at the Emerald Queen Casino box office.

Local track and field sensation Saudia James-Heard took home the gold medal in the Triple Jump at the recent United States National Junior Olympics held in Houston, Texas. The 14-year old leaped 38-8.75 breaking the previous record of 38-4 set in 2006. James-Heard added a bronze medal performance in the Long Jump with a best leap of 18-1.75. James-Heard is a member of Hersheyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pacific Northwest Track and Field team.

MONDAY AUGUST 25 TRIPLE-A BASEBALL

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LOCAL LEAPER SETS NATIONAL RECORD AT JUNIOR OLYMPICS

Iowa Cubs .vs. Tacoma Rainiers Cheney Stadium â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:05 p.m.

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day, Aug. 20. To purchase tickets for the Rainiers eight remaining home games this season, please visit the team online at tacomarainiers.com, call (800) 745-3000 or visit the Cheney Stadium Box Office located at the front entrance to the ballpark. For the most up-to-date news and notes about the team, please visit the Rainiers online at tacomarainiers.com, follow the club on Twitter (@RainiersLand).


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WFootball

he was traded last month. When the draft started he and I went in to watch with our families. When I heard my name called it was a really awesome experience.

WRainiers

From page A10

From page A10

with 3:36 left in the third. Looking at second and goal from the one-yard line, the Kings rolled out their shortyardage secret weapon in defensive tackle Tutu Tamaalevea. The big 330 pounder took the Justin Southern handoff and plowed his way over the goal line for his first touchdown of the season and the Kings led 28-0. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was planned during practice,â&#x20AC;? said Tamaalevea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;the Rhino.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; They gave it to me and I just took it right in. For a defensive lineman it feels great. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of hard to score a touchdown on defense, so when I scored that touchdown it was like heaven.â&#x20AC;? The Kings defense held the shutout until there was 20.4 seconds left in the game when the Outlawsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cory Croom took a pitch and just made it to the right pylon on a fourth and goal from the one-yard line. For the Kings, the win continues what has become a dream season for the second-year franchise that will come down to a Tacoma match-up in Renton, of all places. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been playing semi-pro for 11 years now,â&#x20AC;? said Tamaalevea, who finished with two sacks and three tackles for losses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m 36, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still pushing it. This is the best organization Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever been a part of in my whole semi-professional career. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m proud to call myself a King. If we do our job and sacrifice for the next teammate, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re good. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re two teams from Tacoma, so I figure it should be in Tacoma. But it is what it is. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still going to go out there and do our job.â&#x20AC;? For the Outlaws (6-5), it was the end to their most successful season, which included the first playoff victory in franchise history. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We tried our best, but made too many mistakes,â&#x20AC;? said Outlaws head coach Richard Warren. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And you cannot beat a team like this when you do that. But I had a great season with these 2014 Outlaws and we will regroup for next year and be even better. I had a four to five-year plan to make to the championship game. Well, I guess it will be in the fifth year.â&#x20AC;?

KW: What was your major? JH: Foreign affairs. KW: Do you think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll finish your

degree?

JH: Yes. When I left college the head baseball coach made me promise Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d finish college within ten years. So before too long Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping to finish it up. KW: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your earliest baseball memory? JH: Probably when I was ten years old my older brother and I played on the same All Star team together in the Dixie Youth league. My dad was a coach, and my mom came to all our games. KW: What other sports did you play? JH: I played football in high school.

That was my first love but as I got older I realized Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d probably have a brighter future in baseball. I played baseball from sixth grade on.

KW: Were you expecting the Mariners to take you? JH: We had meetings with scouts from probably 25 teams so I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure what team would take me. I thought it would be somewhere around the fourth round. KW: And you went first to Clinton, Iowa, which isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too far from Virginia. Did your folks come to see you there? JH: They did not. I only played close to 40 games there. What was really cool about being there was that Virginia was in the ACC, and the Mariners drafted a lot of players from the conference so I got to play with a lot of the guys I had played against in college and root for them.

KW: Did you go to any College World

Series?

JH: Yes, I went to two. In 2009 and

2011. We finished third nationally in 2011.

KW: And you played with some of your current teammates in college. JH: Yes. Andrew Carraway, Chris Taylor, and Danny Hultzen. And coming up through the lower minors I played with about half the guys who are on the team now. KW: Did you have any of your current coaches previously? JH: Yes, Roy Howell, our manager, was my hitting coach in High-A and Cory Snyder, our hitting coach, was my hitting coach in Double-A last year. KW: You were drafted in the third round

in 2011. Where were you on draft day? JH: We were here working out for the College World Series and I knew that the draft would be on at that time so we asked the coach if my folks and I could be together to watch it. Stephen Kohlscheen was my roommate and was with the Mariners until

KW: Catchers are involved with nearly every play that happens when their team is in the field. You must have to really stay alert, watch for base stealers, wild pitches, help the pitcher with pitch selection, etc. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you get worn out mentally as well as physically by the end of the game? JH: Definitely. But when the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s over if you get a win the feeling you have makes it all worthwhile. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why you see a lot of catchers end up being coaches and managers. They have to know where every player has to be for every play.

KW: How about your knees? Have you KW: And then you played in the Fall been on the disabled list at all with knee

Instructional League? JH: Yeah, we went to Arizona for about three or four weeks and I got to play with some of the guys from Virginia.

KW: The next year, you played in High Desert and were named to both the midKW: Were you always a catcher? JH: I played lots of positions until I was season and post-season All Star teams. Did

11 or 12 but focused just on catching after that.

KW: But donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hitters make adjustments to pitchers during the game? JH: Absolutely, especially as you get to the higher levels. If you get a batter out one way the next time heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll look for that pitch and make adjustments to it.

you play in the mid-season game? JH: I did. I was in the Cal League and the way they work is that the league has one All Star team and they play against the Carolina League, so we flew to Winston-Salem so that was really close to home. I had probably 30 family members there. It was pretty cool, except our team lost.

KW: In the Cal League you led nearly every defensive category as a catcher, so I wondered if you think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more valuable to your team with your offense or your defense? JH: I would say defense. You have to work to get your pitchers through the game and if the other team isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t scoring any runs because you and the pitcher are working together that well itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty valuable to the team. KW: When a new pitcher comes to the team, how long does it take you to get in synch working with him? JH: One good thing is that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve played with some of the guys before in Big League camp and we talk a little before the game so I know how they like to attack hitters and what they feel good with.

problems? JH: Not since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in pro ball. The only DL time Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had was last year when I sprained my groin slightly running to first base.

KW: How do you stay in shape during the off season? JH: The last few years Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone up to UVA and I have a guy I know in Richmond where I go to hit a couple times a week. KW: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been the highlight of your career so far? JH: One thing that was really cool in the lower minors was going to the play-offs both in Clinton and High Desert. Individually going to the All Star Game was a blast and getting to go to Big League camp a couple of times to be around the Major Leaguers and learn from them. At my first Big League camp two years ago I got to spend some time around Raul Ibanez. Talking to a player like that who has so much hitting experience is really valuable. KW: Have you thought any about your future, even though youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just 24 now? JH: Not too much. Hopefully baseball works out and I can play a long time. One thing I think I would enjoy doing is coaching college baseball. Going back now spending time around some of my college coaches you can be more yourselves now youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not playing. You can learn so much about how they change guysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives and make them feel really comfortable with who they are.

Local Restaurants RESTAURANT SPOTLIGHT: ISLAND PIZZERIA

I

sland Pizzeria, located at 6332 Pacific Ave., is the brainchild of LaMonica and her husband, Andrew, an authentic chef hailing from Trelawny, Jamaica. Originally envisioned as a haven for Caribbean food, the couple altered their plan when they determined that the west side of Tacoma loves pizza. Island Pizzeria meets the needs of these pizza lovers by offering traditional pizza with an island flair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We offer traditional things, but we add our own niche to it,â&#x20AC;? LaMonica said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We give the community what they are used to and more.â&#x20AC;? Nothing exemplifies this marrying of styles more than the Jamaican Jerk Pizza: Mozzarella cheese, jerk sauce, jerk chicken, green peppers, red onions and banana peppers for $11.99. For Tacomans looking for a more traditional experience, Island Pizzeria offers $5 cheese and pepperoni 12-inch pizzas all day every day. To go completely off the wall, try the Island Delight Pizza: Mozzarella cheese, chicken, pineapple, tomatoes, onion, pesto, banana peppers and plantain for $11.99. Island Pizzeria specializes in Jamaican Patties, everything from spicy to jerk chicken to vegetarian

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for $4.50. Other items at Island Pizzeria include hoagies, lasagna and wings, all with an island spice. Island Pizzeria is just one passion for LaMonica, as the other lies in poetry and writing. She released a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book last year and is an avid fan of young poets in the community. She hopes she can channel this passion by having Island Pizzeria host events for artists in Tacoma, including spoken word sessions. The other unique aspect of Island Pizzeria is all the vegetarian friendly options. The owners themselves are vegan, so it is important to the couple that Island Pizzeria has a swath of dietary options. Pizzas can be ordered as vegan or vegetarian including vegetarian pepperoni. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted to offer that same kind of service to vegan and vegetarian customers that we would want at restaurants,â&#x20AC;? LaMonica said. While Island Pizzeria may be a little outside of the box, the couple know that Tacoma is the place to lay roots for such an experimental food combination. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a very diverse community with people who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afraid to try something new,â&#x20AC;? LaMonica said. Island Pizzeria is open seven days a week Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. and Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. To put in an order, call (253) 212-9891. Currently Island Pizzeria is pick-up only, with deliveries coming soon.

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By Derek Shuck derek@tacomaweekly.com

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THE 2014 GARFIELD STREET FAIR

This Saturday, Aug. 16th, is the 11th annual Garfield Street Fair and Car Show in the center of Parkland.

The 2013 Jackson Hewitt booth at last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garfield Street Fair was a huge hit. PHOTOS COURTESY OF GARFIELD STREET BUSINESS ASSOCIATION

Last years Garfield Street Fair and Car Show featured music by Strangely Alright (in photo) and other bands.

SHOP THE COMPETITION, THEN

With many vendors, The Garfield Street Fair and Car Show is going to be a great community event. By Erica Cooley Special to Tacoma Weekly

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The historic Garfield Street, located near Pacific Lutheran University is a great hidden gem with many businesses surrounding and a great community atmosphere.

n its 11th year, the Garfield Street Fair will take place Saturday, Aug. 16, in the heart of Parkland. Comday of local fun with Northern Pacific Coffee Comprised of businesses on Garfield Street and businesses that neighbor Garfield Street, pany, Dr. Daniel Oliveira, Salon6, Hobby Town and the Garfield Street Business Association represents Animal Hospital of Parkland. The street fair begins the heart of the Parkland community that offers an at 10 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m. The community is getarray of products and services in a friendly, comfort- ting more involved this year with Trinity Church in Parkland showing a movie in the park after the street able neighborhood setting. Presented by the Garfield Street Business Asso- fair is over. Explore ciation, Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s street fair is meant to showcase Parkland and its many these businesses and all that the community has to exciting attractions offer. With 100 plus vendors, you can look forward this Saturday all day.  to seeing Parklandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best local business, the likes The Garfield Street   of Elizabethâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holistic Health Spa, Collison Realty, Business Association Hobby Town, Pita Pit and 208 Garfield CafĂŠ, to name has more fun events a few. Previous years have always been great family coming up such as and community fun with many vendors and busi- Trick or Treat on Garfield Street in Octonesses participating. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year, we have focused on adding more for ber and Holiday Walk kids to do at the street fair. There will be a bouncy & Shop in December. For more inforhouse, as well as Safe Streets will be making I.D. cards for kids,â&#x20AC;? said Melissa Sevy, one of the organizers of mation on the event the street fair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With this event being put on by the and others visit www. local business association, there is more of a commu- shopgarf ieldstreet. nity feel. There are many businesses from the Parkland com. community participating as well as other regional venPARKLAND AUTO LICENSING, INC. DBA dors which makes it different than any other market or â&#x20AC;&#x153;SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1946â&#x20AC;? street fair going on this summer.â&#x20AC;? Grab a bite to eat at local restaurant favorites like VEHICLE/VESSEL LICENSING Farrelliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza, (253) 537-3112 215 GARFIELD ST. S STE. 1 Reynaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mexican Restaurant, Pita Fax: (253) 538-1118 Tacoma, WA 98444 5CNBP?H>ILM  Pit and more. This GOMC=;FMN;A? <??L year is projected to be bigger and betA;L>?H G;LA;LCN; ter in many ways, A;L>?H =BCF>L?H_M with more food ;=NCPCNC?M;H>NB? vendors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have <?MN=;LMBIQCH been involved with NIQH the Garfield Street Fair for two years now, and this year we have a few more food vendors including the Warthog thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Parkland,â&#x20AC;? Sevy said. As in previous years there will be a car show during the day for fans of classic cars, hot rods and muscle cars. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Motorcycles are welcome, too. Trophies and awards for the car show will be presented to winners,â&#x20AC;? says Sevy. This weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 11th Annual Garfield Street Fair is scheduled to be a

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City Life

Amy Ray Goes Solo

B2

TACOMAWEEKLY.com

FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 2014

SECTION B, PAGE 1

PHOTO BY JUSTIN TAMMINGA

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

MAWP IT UP. (Clockwise) The front row view from last year’s festival; this year’s youngest performers, Lucien and Dahlia Tamminga from Pig Snout; Girl Trouble’s Kurt Kendall; Tacoma power-pop trio Trees and Timber. By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

S

wing a dead cat most years at Music and Art in Wright Park, and you’re bound to hit a crusty, old punk-rocker – some seasoned Gen-Xer whose rock pedigree dates back to the Reagan Era, the Community World Theater and the golden age of Tacoma punk. But fans will notice a distinct youth movement at this year’s festival, which is slated for noon to 7 p.m. on Aug. 16 at Wright Park, 501 S. I St. “We have a lot of young kids onstage this year,” organizer Cody Foster said of the lineup, which features teen bands Fist of Fire and Nitrogen Lion Society. “They’re impressive, man,” he said of the latter. “The singer is a young gal and really has an amazing adult-sounding voice – kind of like a Gwen Stefani, almost – and they have one of the best drummers I’ve seen out of Tacoma yet.” But no one will do more to lower the median age at MAWP this weekend than Dahlia and Lucien Tamminga – ages 6 and 9 – two-thirds of new Tacoma buzz band, Pig Snout. “I didn’t want to force music on them, because all of my friends whose parents made them practice hated it and went in a different direction,” said Pig Snout guitarist and proud dad, Justin Tamminga, a music teacher and veteran of local rock outfits Hands of Toil and Braski. “When they started showing an interest, I jumped all over it,” he said “I started posting videos of them playing. I’m their dad, so I think it’s amazing, but people were freaking out and just eating it up online.” The videos – which can be found at

www.youtube.com/pigsnoutband – led to invitations to play a show at the New Frontier Lounge and a June benefit concert at Jazzbones for a scholarship named after Tamminga’s fallen Braski band mate, Brian Redman, who died in a scooter accident in 2009. It was the birth of Tacoma’s most adorable D.I.Y. band. Dad helped write six songs, but the kids got to pick their own name and even designed their own merch. “They get it,” Tamminga said of the upcoming MAWP gig. “I’ve taken them to that since they were babies, so they’re gonna be really into it. “But they don’t really grasp the concept of it all,” he added, chuckling. “It’s exciting, and then when it’s over it’s not a big deal. There’s no normal band thing where there’s any pretentiousness. It’s kids so it’s like, ‘We did that. Who cares?’” The 22-year-old MAWP festival grew out of Mother Records, the defunct label and record store – owned by festival founder Ken Johnson – that used to be located across the street from the park. Mother specialized in punk and sludgemetal, and over the years MAWP became known for showcasing the heavier side of the local music scene. “What we’d like to do is broaden the rock n’ roll horizon a little bit,” said Jayme Fisher, who joined Foster on the festival’s band selection committee this year. “To open it up a little bit more to indie bands and stuff that really hasn’t been a priority to MAWP before. It’s been largely super rock n’ roll heavy. Together I think we put together a great, mixed bill where there’s something for everybody.” The heavy bands will still be out in force on Saturday, with popular

hard-rock acts Mos Generator, Mico de Noche, Sleeper Cell, Infinite Flux and Mechanism scheduled to perform. But MAWP will showcase one of its most diverse lineups yet with Red Hex (experimental garage), Trees and Timber (power pop), Shotgun Kitchen (humorous outlaw country), Jesus on the Moon (indie-rock) and Bandolier (twee-pop, vintage R&B) also on the bill. Returning to MAWP is beloved Tacoma garage-punk quartet Girl Trouble, a band that celebrated its 30th anniversary this year with a new documentary “Strictly Sacred: A Film About Girl Trouble,” directed by Red Hex’s Isaac Olsen. Girl Trouble is the only band invited to play the festival every year. This year, fans will also have some music to take home with them. As part of their fund-raising efforts this year, the non-profit committee that organizes MAWP has been selling “Tacoma Music Conservation Compilation, vol. 1: Organic Arsenic,” a collection of 29 rare Tacoma punk recordings with contributions from the likes of Seaweed, Swelter, My Name, Poppa Wheelie and Portrait of Poverty. “Some stuff’s never been digitized at all, and it’s all going away,” Foster said. “It does decay, and it does get messed up if you don’t have it stored in the appropriate place. Even some of the DATs we had had started to show some fatigue, but not so bad we couldn’t restore them. “It’s important because we’re just trying to make sure there’s stuff that’s heard that was never heard before.” The “Tacoma Music Conservation Compilation” will sell for $10 this weekend with proceeds benefiting next year’s festival. Foster said several copies will also be set aside to be loaned out by local libraries.

PHOTO BY STEVE DUNKELBERGER

PHOTO BY DON FARWELL

THE THINGS WE LIKE ONE MATIKA WILBUR

traits accompanied by stirring audio narratives from select sitters. (Pictured here: Matika Wilbur, “Mary Evelyn Belgarde” (Pueblo of Isleta and Ohkay Owingeh), 2014. Digital silver image, 16 x 20 inches. Courtesy of the artist.) Info: www. tacomaartmuseum.org.

TWO

Washington photographer Matika Wilbur (Tulalip and Swinomish Tribes) is on a journey with “Project 562” to build cultural bridges, abandon stereotypes and renew and inspire our national legacy by documenting people from every federally recognized indigenous nation in the United States.Tacoma Art Museum is now showing an inaugural exhibition of work from “Project 562” in “Photographic Presence and Contemporary Indians: Matika Wilbur’s Project 562.” The exhibition features 40 Native American por-

BUFFALO WILD WINGS Bring your friends, family, colleagues, and neighbors as UW Tacoma takes over Buffalo Wild Wings on Aug. 20. The fundraiser will run all day, leading up to main events at 4 p.m. when “Overtime” starts until 7 p.m. filled with music, games, trivia, prizes and much more. Prizes will be drawn and 10 percent of all food and non-alcoholic beverage sales directly benefit the UWT Diversity Resource Center. To make your orders

count towards the DRC, be sure you tell your server you are with UWT Diversity or tell them HTA-B. Come and help pack the house.

THREE POP-UP GALLERY A one night only pop-up gallery happens Thursday, Aug. 21, 6-9 p.m. at 919 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tacoma. See 99 pieces of art and buy at $99 each (painting, drawing, sculpture, photography), something for everyone. Meet new local artists, find that piece that your wall has been missing, and mingle with wine.

FOUR BEAT GOES ON Dance Theatre Northwest’s Regional Performing Company and School will present an upbeat “Arts Are Education” ballet to Broadway-style performance and a collection of ballet, jazz and tap dance pieces on Saturday, Aug. 16, 5:30 p.m. at the University Place Civic & Library Atrium (3609 Market St., University

Place). Melanie K i r k - S t a u f f e r, artistic director, will narrate. Admission and parking are free and the facility is handicapped accessible. Info: (253) 778-6534 or www.DTNW.org.

PHOTO BY MAKS ZAKHAROV

FIVE FREE OUTDOOR MOVIE Metro Parks and BECU bring free family fun to STAR Center (3873 S. 66th St.) on Aug. 15 with the movie “Despicable Me 2” (PG), live music by the Matt Brown Band, laser tag in the outdoor playground and more. Entertainment begins at 5 p.m., movie begins at dusk.


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 2 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, August 15, 2014

Indigo Girls head back to studio after Amy Ray solo tour By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

Amy Ray helped get Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concert year started right when her iconic folk-rock duo, Indigo Girls, headlined the Pantages Theater in January. Then, soon after, she was back on the road solo in support of her new, country album â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goodnight Tender,â&#x20AC;? a disc sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll showcase with regional stops at Olympiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Capitol Theatre on Aug. 21 and Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Triple Door on Aug. 22. As luck would have it, though, Ray and the other half of Indigo Girls, Emily Saliers, had just wrapped practice when she called Tacoma Weekly last week and, while in that mode, she shed some light on what fans can expect from the long-awaited follow-up to their last album, 2010â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beauty Queen Sister.â&#x20AC;? Tacoma Weekly: I know this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t your first solo disc. But youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not breaking up the band, right? Ray: Oh, no, no way. In fact, Emily just left. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on a new record. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on arrangements right now, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna record in probably October and November. TW: What can you say about what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on? Ray: We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t done a new record in a long time (because) there was just so much going and we just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel like we were ready yet to do it. Now we feel like we are, and we have this woman who produced Lucy Wainwright-Rocheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last record. Her nameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jordan Hamlin, and we asked her to produce this record â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cause we like the way she pulled out really different stuff fromâ&#x20AC;Ś what Lucy had done before. We felt like it would be cool to just kind of step out of the box a little bit. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just workinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on harmonies and guitar parts right now, so I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna sound like. TW: So youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still pretty early in the process? Ray: We write separately, and both of us have written most of the songs. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got about five right now and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m workinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on three more. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably just decide which ones work the best. She has a lot. She probably has eight or 10. TW: You mention there was some hesitation to record before. Ray: Sometimes you just need to have more distance between your last project and your new one. I think we felt like we had a lot of touring going on. Emilyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner had a baby, my partner had a baby. I think a couple months ago we got to a place where we were like, OK, we understand how to sort of be in our families and do music at the same time. TW: And you want to push the new

PHOTO CREDIT PAUL DUNLAP / DENISE PLUMB

INDIGO GIRL. Amy Ray will showcase her new country sound in Olympia and Seattle next week. Learn more at www.amy-ray.com.

music in a different direction. Ray: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not even like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, we wanna do something radically different.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I just think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be good to work with someone brand new and really explore our arrangements a little more completely. Last record, we spent a lot of time on our own songwriting, and we had a certain amount of time in the studio; and (with) the arrangement process, I feel like we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as thorough as we could have been. So some stuff sounds great on the record, but it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t translate to the stage as well. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done a lot of symphony shows, and we have about 21 of our songs that have been scored for orchestras, and (that) broadens your horizons musically. We just have more ideas, I think, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cause it gives you more vocabulary when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing that. TW: Are there song titles? Ray: Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a song on there called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Texas Was Clean,â&#x20AC;? and I actually wrote it

inspired by the series â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friday Night Lights.â&#x20AC;? (She laughs.) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also about some friends of mine in Texas that I used to hang out with. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of those things where a TV show or a book will make you think of something. I wrote a song thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rise of the Black Messiahâ&#x20AC;? that I wrote about the Angola Three (three prisoners that spent decades in solitary confinement at Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Angola Prison.) Herman Wallace died this past year. He had been in solitary confinement for over 35 years. (He was freed after 41 years in solitary last year.) So I wrote a song for him, actually before he died, after I received a letter from him from prison about six years ago. TW: The song about Herman Wallace makes me think of my favorite song from when I saw you in January â&#x20AC;&#x201C; your Faye Tucker song â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with criminal justice being a unifying theme. Why is that topic so important to you?

Ray: Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a litany of problems in the prison system. There was just that expose in the New York Times about Rikers Island and the abuse those kids have suffered from some of the prison guards there. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s terrible. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really, really terrible. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really look at prison as this chance, any more, to reform and rehabilitate people and give them a chance to look at the context of why theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in there. I mean, there are some people that do and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure there are some prisons that do. I definitely have had relatives in prison that have come out on the other side and been much better off because they got lucky, you know, and were in a good program and recovered. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also seen the other side of it, just through reading books and Herman Wallace and first-hand accounts and people that I know that do legal work. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mess, you know. I think one of the main problems is (prisons have) been privatized, and I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big problem. TW: I guess we should finally talk about the songs youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing here in Washington. Ray: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m bringing my country band, and that means pedal steel and Dobro and fiddle, drums and bass. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very traditional country music, for the most part. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a few southern rock songs in there, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly old-school gospel, bluegrass and country â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just a departure from other stuff Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done solo. I kind of did this just for fun. TW: Certainly, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some stuff in your arsenal with the Indigo Girls that has some twang to it. But what made you want to do a full country record? Ray: Well, I really like old-school country, what we think of as more traditional country and things that grew out of the Carter Family and Loretta Lynn and Hank Williams and Dolly Parton. â&#x20AC;Ś And Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been writing songs in that vein for probably about 12 years. I kept thinking at some point when I feel like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got enough songs and I understand exactly what I wanna do ... Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna do a record thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just old-school country. So I just got to a place where I had enough songs and had some time and had some players I really liked a lot and built on that. We went in and (recorded) pretty much live. We did everything in a week, to tape, and then I mixed it later with a mixer that I really like. TW: You started the early version of some of these songs 10, 12 years ago. Is it an important part of your process to let things germinate like that? Ray: I just knew that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the right context yet for putting them on a record, you know. I really wanted to get together a collection of songs that worked well together and could be treated in the same vein. It was a distant goal of mine.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Friday, August 15, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 3

Seattle radio legend Bob Rivers signs off air for the final time By Glen Casebeer

CULTURE CORNER

A GUIDE TO THE MUSEUMS OF TACOMA

Muesum of the Week: Fort Nisqually Living History Museum

Special to Tacoma Weekly

For the last quarter century, Bob Rivers has been setting his alarm and waking up when a lot of people in the music industry are just going to bed. Friday, Aug, 8, was his last day of having to do that, exactly 25 years to the day of his very first show in Seattle. The timing for starting a rock radio show in Seattle really couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have been any better as the world began to turn its eyes and ears on what seemed to be anything music-related coming out of Seattle. The show took off in a big way, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bob Rivers Showâ&#x20AC;? quickly became a major player in town and beyond with his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twisted Tunes.â&#x20AC;? A decade later, the show would move a couple ticks up the dial to classic rock station KZOK-FM (102.5) for a number of years before finally landing at the iconic KJR-FM (95.7). Along the way, they added people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; like Pedro Bartes, Luciana Bartes and Arik Korman â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to work behind the scenes to keep things running smoothly. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also had a number of people on the mic with them, including Q13â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kaci Aitchison and Jodi Brothers Blau, who has filled that role for the last few years. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let the color of his hair fool you. Even though his dark locks have turned gray, Rivers is still young at heart and quick-witted with a playful energy, part of the reason he was so well liked as a Seattle radio host. But Rivers says he wanted more time to spend on other things like his own music, hiking, his colony of bees and his beloved

Point Defiance Park, 5400 N. Pearl St. Wed.-Sun., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info: FortNisqually.org Fort Nisqually was the first European settlement on Puget Sound. Established in 1833 by the Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Company, the original site was on the beach and plains above the Nisqually River delta in the present town of DuPont, Washington. In 1933, major efforts were undertaken to preserve the fortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s few remaining structures. Only the Factorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House and the Granary had avoided disrepair and decay. The buildings were relocated to Tacomaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point Defiance Park and several other buildings were recreated to present Fort Nisqually as it was in 1855. PHOTO BY GLEN CASEBEER

FAREWELL. A smiling Bob Rivers takes calls on the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final day.

family. In fact, one of the reasons Rivers cited for leaving his spot behind the microphone was that he was expecting to be a grandfather soon; and from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make this stuff up fileâ&#x20AC;? he announced on the air, during his final show, that his new granddaughter, Hazel, decided to come out a week early so she could hear her grandpa on the radio for the last time. The show was being played in her room at Swedish Hospital and new father Keith Rivers called in to the show to have a chat with his father on the last day, as Riversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; other son, comedian Andrew Rivers, listened in from across the radio console from his dad. As the various cast members took to the microphone and unsuccessfully fought back tears trying to explain just how important this man and this show had been to them, the audience did the same. For the final show Rivers and crew took calls

throughout the duration to give his fans plenty of time to express themselves. Although the event had some sad moments, and there were just as many laughs as there were tears, make no mistake about it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this was a celebration. Down the hall from the studio there was a party going on. Bands played throughout the morning for the special guests that were lucky enough to get an invitation. The crew members would assemble on that stage after the show with an impromptu blues jam, feature Pedro Bartes on drums with Bob, Spike, Joe and Jodi laughing and laying down a hilarious call and response segment. In an ironic twist, with the flashbulbs lit up and the TV cameras rolling, Riversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; final mission at KJR, who is himself a pilot, was to press the button to launch a new Clear Channel station, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Jet,â&#x20AC;? thereby killing the historic KJR name. Truly the end of an incredible era for two iconic northwest franchises.

AUG

2014

This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events:

Crafts of the Past â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Basket weaving with Deborah Raynes Sat., Aug. 16 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sun., Aug. 17 (11 a.m. to 5 p.m.)

Baskets were an ordinary but essential part of 19th century life, as containers for gathering, storing and carrying things. Raynes has been making willow and reed baskets at Fort Nisqually for many years, including during the annual Candlelight Tour. Willing visitors will have the opportunity to make a small rustic basket of willow or reed to take with them. Each weekend through Sept. 28 a different artist will be â&#x20AC;&#x153;in-residenceâ&#x20AC;? at the Fort with displays and demonstrations of their work. Most will also offer visitors the opportunity to try their hand at the specific art form.

Current Exhibits: Archaeology at Fort Nisqually Through Nov. 23

Pieces of ceramic, metal and glass tell a story about the everyday life and labors of the men and women of historic Fort Nisqually. This exhibit features fragments of plates and tea cups, bottles, toys and game pieces, buttons, earrings and brooches, and other material found from both the 1833 and 1843 Fort Nisqually sites. These fragments provide a glimpse into the habits and lifestyles of the people that made up the first European settlement on Puget Sound. Some of the fragments have been reconstructed into nearly whole artifacts. Reproductions and period pieces help illustrate what other fragments looked like when whole.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 4 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Friday, August 15, 2014

    

 

Vintage cars, music and the Captain USA Monster Truck highlight full day of family fun By Ernest A. Jasmin ejasmin@tacomaweekly.com

T

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something good for families. You can bring your kids. Sometimes we have folks pulling their young kids around in wagons. TW: What era of cars will be on display? EGAN: Usually, there are two or three from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;20s all the way up into a few from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re primarily â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;30s to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an opportunity to come and spend the day with other people who like the classic cars, celebrating their heritage and their youth. TW: How many people do you expect to show up? PHOTO COURTESY OF STBDA EGAN: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to say. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had estiMONSTER. The Captain USA truck will be on display on mates from 4,000 to 7,000 or 8,000. South Tacoma Way this weekend. TW: Do you have bands or do you have the DJ? always put on a great show. At 2:30 we have a hula EGAN: We have a DJ who plays music from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;50s and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s throughout the day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a little hoop contest for all ages. This is always a fun event. vintage rock nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll. The Stonegate is going to have live music all day and into the evening, and Dawsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s may have some live music in the evening. The T & T Tire Factory has their Captain USA Monster Truck. He has to just stay parked, but he does start it up once or twice during the day, though, to get the kids all excited. The Jo Emery Ballet School each year puts on a dance show for the event. Each year they visit a different era of dance. This year they will be doing dances from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;20s and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;30s. The show is at 2 p.m. and is always a crowd favorite. The dancers

he South Tacoma Business District Association will take over six blocks of South Tacoma Way between 50th and 56th streets with its 18th annual South Tacoma Car Show on Aug. 16. Dozens of hot rods, muscle cars and vintage rides are expected to show up with contestants competing for a drawing for a stay at Quinault Beach Resort and other prizes. Pre-entered cars will start parking around 7:30 a.m. with the official show kickoff at 8:30. The $2 admission charge goes to the STBDA Food Banks. STBDA Manager Gloria Egan checked in to provide a few more details. TACOMA WEEKLY: So what is the South Tacoma Car Show all about? EGAN: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about celebrating the community and auto row here. Transportation thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been the heart and soul of the South Tacoma area has been different forms of transportation, from the railroad on. You have the dealers north and south of us, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re kind of a business district. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the hub for the community here. TW: How does this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show compare to early shows? EGAN: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re much larger than when we started. The first year I think we had 70 some cars, and now we have over 200. It started out and has continued because we were looking for something to bring community together and to bring people to our district to show them what we have to offer and let them know this is a great place to visit and shop â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and to get people acquainted with the neighborhood. TW: What stands PROUDLY SERVING TACOMA SINCE 1926! out about the first 18 years for you? Full Service EGAN: The camaLocal & Worldwide Deliveries raderie of the people who come, park their cars and visit. We have people that have 4734 South Tacoma Way been to every show. Tacoma, WA 98409 And thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a group of new people EURZQVĂ RZHUVDQGJLIWVFRP who come for the HPDLOEUZQVĂ ZUV#DROFRP first time each year.

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Make a Scene Your Local Guide To South Sound Music

Young and Talented: The Grand Cinema Presents the 25 New Faces for 2014

Friday, August 15, 2014 • tacomaweekly.com • Section B • Page 5

Nightlife

TW PICK OF THE WEEK:

FOLLOWING LAST MONTH’S APPEARANCE AT FREEDOM FAIR, BACK TO BEALE STREET FINALISTS AND SIR MIX-A-LOT PROTÉGÉS AYRON JONES & THE WAY WILL BE BACK IN TACOMA HEADLINING JAZZBONES ON SUNDAY, AUG. 17. ALSO ON THE BILL ARE VIVIDAL AND NBC-TV “THE VOICE” CONTESTANT SPEAKER BOX, WITH MUSIC STARTING AT 3 P.M. AND TICKETS SET AT $10; WWW.JAZZBONES.COM.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GRAND CINEMA

FUN! The 2014 New Faces of Independent Filmmaking will take place this

coming week, August 15th–20th, at the Grand Cinema in downtown Tacoma. By Erica Cooley Special to Tacoma Weekly

With summer film festivals in high supply, this weekend, Aug. 15-20, The Grand Cinema will be presenting 25 New Faces of Independent Filmmaking. This festival is different and unique with an opportunity to view and discuss trendsetting independent films with some of the industry’s most distinguished young directors, actors and actresses, producers, screenwriters and cinematographers at Tacoma’s only art-house theater. The 25 New Faces of Independent Filmmaking

The Blue Mouse Theatre

opx!qmbzjoh X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST Nightly @ 7:00 pm Sat. & Sun. Matinee @ 3:45 pm

2611 N. Proctor 253.752.9500

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

253.593.4474 • grandcinema.com MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT (97 MIN, PG-13) Fri 8/15: 2:05, 4:25, 6:45 Sat 8/16-Sun 8/17: 11:45am, 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:00 Mon 8/18-Tue 8/19: 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:00 Wed 8/20: 2:05, 4:25, 9:00 Thu 8/21: 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:00 BOYHOOD (165 MIN, R) Fri 8/15-Tue 8/19: 1:45, 5:10, 8:30 Wed 8/20: 5:10, 8:30 Thu 8/21: 1:45, 5:10, 8:30 THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY (122 MIN, PG) Fri 8/15: 2:55, 5:35, 8:15 Sat 8/16-Sun 8/17: 12:10, 2:55, 5:35, 8:15 Mon 8/18-Thu 8/21: 2:55, 5:35, 8:15

is a prestigious competition organized by the country’s leading cinema periodical, Filmmakers Magazine. Inclusion on the list of 25 has become one of the most prestigious honors a young filmmaker can receive. Past New Faces award winners include Rooney Mara, Ryan Gosling, Hilary Swank, Lena Dunham and Ellen Page. The 2014 New Faces could be a great way to familiarize yourself with some of the brightest rising stars in the film industry. During the week-long film festival at The Grand Cinema, each of the New Faces honorees will have one of their films screened and then a film discussion will be held afterward if the filmmaker is present. This year’s 25 New Faces will present two free events in addition to the screenings for local film buffs to mix and mingle with the rich Pacific Northwest film community. There will be an Opening Night Mixer from 9:30 – 11 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 15 in The Grand Cinema’s lobby for film fanatics to come and chat with a glass of wine or a beer while listening to the music of Mr. Melanin. Celebrate the start of an exciting week of film on your Friday night at the Grand. Also do not miss the viewing of “Skunk” and “Night at The Dance” as well as others and a discussion following with Annie Silverstein. Enjoy visiting with the New Faces honorees in a roundtable discussion on Aug. 18 at 6 p.m. This is a great, and free, opportunity for local film enthusiasts to

discuss with the filmmakers about the production and business of independent filmmaking. “Janicza Bravo will be discussing her short films ‘Pauline Alone’ and ‘Gregory Go Boom,’ which stars Michael Cera, following the ‘New Faces Shorts Group 3’ screening at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 19,” comments Zach Powers, director of marketing and communications for The Grand Cinema. Come out any day this weekend and coming week to The Grand Cinema to enjoy independent, award-winning films from the 2014 25 New Faces award winners. Bernardo Britto, maker of animated short “Yearbook,” which recently received the Sundance Short Film Jury Prize, will be present as well as composer Rich Vreeland. Out of the 25 New Faces, 11 will be visiting The Grand Cinema for this interesting collaboration of filmmakers, composers, actors, screenwriters and many of the other roles that go into making an independent film. Annie Silverstein, Darius Clark Monroe, Zeek Earl and Chris Caldwell, Janicza Bravo, Joe Callander, Dustin Guy Defa, Josef Wladyka, Rich Vreeland, Scott Cummings, Lev Kalman and Bernardo Britto will be present at this week-long celebration and display of rising new stars in filmmaking. For the entire film showing schedule and more information on 25 New Faces visit www.25NewFaces.com. Proctor Art Gallery

A MOST WANTED MAN (121 MIN, R) Fri 8/15: 1:10, 3:50, 9:15 Sat 8/16: 9:15 Sun 8/17: 6:30, 9:15 Mon 8/18: 1:10, 3:50, 9:15 Tue 8/19: 9:15 Wed 8/20: 3:50, 9:15 Thu 8/21: 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:15

Featured Artist:

Gary LaTurner Award Winning Paintings You are invited to an Artist Reception

COLLECTED SHORTS GROUP 2 (79 MIN, NR) Sat 8/16: 4:30, Mon 8/18: 7:00 COLLECTED SHORTS GROUP 3 (85 MIN, NR) Sun 8/17: 4:30, Tue 8/19: 2:00 EVOLUTION OF A CRIMINAL (83 MIN, NR) Sat 8/16: 7:00, Wed 8/20: 2:00 L FOR LEISURE (84 MIN, NR) Sat 8/16: 2:00, Wed 8/20: 7:00 MANOS SUCIAS (80 MIN, NR) Sun 8/17: 2:00, Tue 8/19: 7:00

606 Fawcett, Tacoma, WA

253.593.4474 • grandcinema.com

GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Pop Rocks (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Gene Vallejo birthday party featuring Voxxy Vallejo (rock, blues) 7:30 p.m., $5 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC MAXWELL’S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Mighty High, Ethan Tucker Band (reggae, rock) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Joe Zimmerman (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: Church of Hate (metal) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM’S: CJK with Gary Crooks, Mike Jaap and Kurt Kolstad (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA

SATURDAY, AUG. 16 EMERALD QUEEN: Sinbad (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $25-$65

B SHARP COFFEE: Richard Allen and the Louisiana Experience (zydeco) 4 p.m., NC, AA DOYLE’S: The Approach unplugged (reggae, ska, rock, hip-hop) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Ho Le Thu, Duong Quang, Cam Tho and more (Vietnamese pop) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Donald Glaude (DJ) 9 p.m., $10 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G’S: Equal Ruins, UnHailoed, American Wrecking Company, Syztem7 (metal) 2:30 p.m., $10, AA NEW FRONTIER: Loser Dog, Coma Figura (indie-rock, pop) 9 p.m., $5 OPERA ALLEY: Downtown Block Party (eclectic) 4 p.m., NC, AA THE SPAR: Fields Under Clover (Gaelic) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Joe Zimmerman (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM’S: Alive She Cried, Heartbreaker (classic rock covers) 8 p.m. WRIGHT PARK: Music and Art at Wright Park featuring Girl Trouble, Red Hex, Bandolier, Trees and Timber and more (indie-rock, punk, metal) noon to 7 p.m., NC, AA

MONDAY, AUG. 18

GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy, 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Velocity (blues) 9 p.m., NC

TUESDAY, AUG. 19 STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC

ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE’S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: CPOC benefit with Moote from Click 98.9 (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 20 JAZZBONES: Maurice the Fish Sessions with Dear Darkness, The Thrill, Breakaway Derringer (rock) 8 p.m., $5

DAWSON’S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC OLD TOWN PARK: Kim Archer (singer-songwriter) 6:30 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Dave Nichols’ Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m.

THURSDAY, AUG. 21 THE SWISS: Mister Master (rock, blues, funk) 9 p.m., NC

SUNDAY, AUG. 17 B SHARP COFFEE: Tacoma Belly Dance Review (belly dance) 7 p.m., NC, AA

B SHARP COFFEE: The Keith Henson Octet (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA CHARLEY’S: Blues jam with Richard Molina, 8 p.m., NC DAWSON’S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Wet Rats (Brazilian punk) 9 p.m., $5 TACOMA COMEDY: Kermet Apio (comedy) 8 p.m., $10 UNCLE SAM’S: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC

GUIDE: NC = No cover, AA = All ages, 18+ = 18 and older

3811 N 26th Street Tacoma, WA 98407 The award winning painting “Community” and additional award winning paintings will be on view.

PAG Presents

The following movies and times are part of our 25 New Faces of Independent Film series this week at the Grand. COLLECTED SHORTS GROUP 1 (92 MIN, NR) Fri 8/15: 7:00, Tue 8/19: 4:30

LOUIE G’S: Trigger Happy, Prophets of Addiction, Ravages of Time, Rain Light Fade (rock) 5 p.m., $8, AA

DAWSON’S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Gin Creek (blues) 7 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Puget Sound Music For Youth (rock) 2 p.m., NC, AA TACOMA COMEDY: Battle of the Sexes (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ UNCLE SAM’S: Strange Pleasure (rock cancer benefit) 8 p.m.

August 21, 2014 5 - 8 p.m.

THE AFRICAN QUEEN (105 MIN, PG) Wed 8/20: 1:45, 6:45 ANTZ (83 MIN, PG) Sat 8/16: 10:00am

FRIDAY, AUG. 15

Guest Artist Carol Woolford Women Painters of Washington Northwest Pastel Society

Special Reception - Meet Carol Woolford Saturday, August 23rd 1 - 4 p.m. 3811 N. 26th, Tacoma WA, 98407, 253-759-4238, www.proctorartgallery.com

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Section B • Page 6 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 15, 2014

COMING EVENTS

TW PICK: BENEFIT FOR LOUIE G. Sat., Aug. 23, 5 p.m. Louie G’s Pizzeria, 5219 Pacific Hwy. E., Fife

Musicians from Tacoma to Everett will perform an allages fundraising show to help Louie G’s owner Louie Galarza in his time of need. Bands slated to perform are: Clear The Chaos, Hard Money Saints, Jason Kertson & The Immortals, A Lien Nation (pictured here), Glenn Cannon Trio (Glenn from Windowpane), Vividal and As The Moon. In addition, raffles will be held PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN HAMILTON/SEATTLE SOUND LIVE between bands and Sacred Soul Tattoo will be celebrating their eighth anniversary at the event. A Go Fund Me account has also been created. Those not able to attend but want to help can make a donation at www.gofundme.com/b1mcng. Price: $10 suggested donation at the door, kids under 13 get in free. VOXXY VALLEJO & THE MOSS BROTHERS BAND Fri., Aug. 15, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Jazzbones, 2803 Sixth Ave. You know him....you love him..... you’ve missed him. Come celebrate Gene Vallejo’s birthday at Jazzbones and bring a birthday pie! Gene Vallejo will open the show with a solo acoustic set then he, Voxxy and Markal will perform a Voxxy Vallejo set with the Moss Brothers Band closing it out. Price: $5. Info: (253) 396-9169 SUMMER BASH FEATURING CLICK! MOBILE MOVIES Fri., Aug. 15, 5 p.m. Kandle Park, 2323 N. Shirley St. Pack your snacks, blankets and lawn chairs and head to the park for a free outdoor movie, music, and fun for the whole family. During the month of August, enjoy family-friendly fun and a movie, presented by BECU and movie sponsor Click! Network in

partnership with Metro Parks Tacoma. Each week the festivities are at a different Metro Parks Tacoma location (Kandle Park, STAR Center, Center at Norpoint, Stewart Heights Park). Price: Free. Info: (253) 305-1000 MONTHLY COMMUNITY MEAL Fri., Aug. 15, 5:30-7 p.m. Trinity Lutheran Church, 12115 Park Ave. S. On the Third Friday of the month, Trinity Lutheran Church in Parkland offers a free, healthy, vegetarian meal (entree, side and salad, often gluten free) for members of the community. You need not be a church member to attend, and there is no worship or preaching at this community event. There is no charge for the meal which is served in Thompson Hall, near the church’s offices. Enter off of 121st Street South. Parkland Transit Center is two blocks away. Price: Free. Info: (253) 537-0201

PARENT’S NIGHT OUT Sat., Aug. 16, 6-9 p.m. Children’s Museum of Tacoma, 1501 Pacific Ave. Need a night out? Let us entertain your children in a safe and fun environment. Sign up for Parent’s Night Out and treat yourself and the kids to some fun. While at the Museum your child will play games, explore the playscapes, create works of art and enjoy pizza and treats. PNO is most appropriate for children 3-10 years old. All children must be able to use the toilet independently. Price: $25 per child, $10 each additional sibling. Info: (253) 627-6031

BROWNS POINT LIGHTHOUSE MUSEUM OPEN Sat., Aug. 16, 1-4 p.m. Browns Point Lighthouse Park, 201 Tulalip St. N.E. Browns Point Lighthouse Museum is open for tours on Saturdays from 1-4 p.m. Includes the 1903 Lightkeepers Cottage, basement vignette displays of schoolroom, sewing room, kitchen, laundry and the current exhibit about the “father of Browns Point” Jerry Meeker. Boathouse museum has Coast Guard surfboat replica and display of tools. Ring the original fog bell, play on the beach, picnic in the park and enjoy the Heritage Gardens surrounding the cottage. Price: Free. Info: (253) 927-2536 SCHOOL SUPPLY DRIVE FOR FOSTER KIDS Sat., Aug. 16, 10 a.m. Sleep Country USA, 5225 Tacoma Mall Blvd. To ensure that the Northwest’s nearly 20,000 foster children are prepared with the essential tools for a successful school year, Sleep Country is hosting its annual school supply drive for foster kids through Sept. 7. To lend a helping hand, drop off donations of new school supplies including backpacks, flash drives, binders, notebooks, pens and

Promote your community event, class, meeting, concert, art exhibit or theater production by e-mailing calendar@tacomaweekly.com or calling (253) 922-5317.

pencils at any Sleep Country location. Info: (888) 887-5337; www. sleepcountry.com

of responsibility, mainly by stressing the importance of collaboration, efficiency, and best practices. Price: Free. Info: (727) 215-8929

TACOMA BELLYDANCE REVUE Sun., Aug. 17, 6:30 p.m. B Sharp Coffee House, 706 Opera Alley The Tacoma Bellydance Revue is a monthly show featuring bellydancers from all around the South Sound area. Come and experience all types of different bellydance styles. B Sharp also serves coffee, beer, wine, sandwiches and appetizers. This is B Sharp’s first birthday show so that means The Revue is turning one too. Come and celebrate. Price: Free. Info: (253) 922-8284

HEALING YOGA STRETCH WITH NANCY K Mon., Aug. 18, 7 p.m. MultiCare Gig Harbor Medical Park, 4545 Point Fosdick Dr. NW Healing Yoga Stretch with Nancy K is a transformational journey for body, mind and spirit. Each class will be different, depending on who is present and will include yoga postures, active stretches and relaxation techniques. You will learn how to “listen to your body.” Wear comfortable, layered clothing. We provide yoga mats but if you would like to bring your own that would be helpful. Price: Free. Info: (866) 200-2383

SUNDAY MORNING MEDITATION CLASS Sun., Aug 17, 10-11:15 a.m. Meditate in Tacoma, 501 Pacific Ave. A peaceful, contemplative time in your weekend. Join us for guided meditations and uplifting advice on how we can transform our day-today life into opportunities for personal and spiritual growth. Through developing inner peace in this way, outer peace will naturally come about. Price: $5 suggested donation. Info: (360) 754-7787

INTRO TO AUDIO PRODUCTION Tues., Aug. 19, 1-5 p.m. Main Library, 1102 Tacoma Ave. S. Learn the basics of great audio production from an expert mentor at this two-day class. Essential for the up and coming music artist or voice over artist. Also quite helpful for film and movie production. Attendance at both days is required due to the cumulative nature of the class. Price: Free. Info: (253) 591-5666

MARITIME SECURITY 2014 WEST Mon., Aug. 18, 7 a.m. Hotel Murano Bicentennial Pavilion, 1320 Broadway Maritime Security 2014 West provides discussion and collaboration on strategies and technologies to counter maritime security threats encountered by governments, law enforcement and port/terminal owners and operators. Interactive workshop sessions are designed to give all conference participants the actionable knowledge on how to better secure their maritime areas

BANNED BOOK CLUB Tues., Aug. 19, 7 p.m. Doyle’s Public House, 208 St Helens Ave. Join this book club reading books that have been banned or challenged. August’s selection is :Maus I: A Survivor’s Tale: My Father Bleeds History” by Art Spiegelman. Books available for purchase at King’s Books. Meets the third Tuesday of every month at Doyle’s Public House. Price: Free. Info: (253) 272-8801

For more details on these events and many more, visit www.TacomaWeekly.com and click on the “Calendar” link.

HERB GODDESS HOROSCOPE Kerri Bailey is a horticulturist and a certified herbalist. She makes custom blends and consults at Ubiquitous Journey (www.UBJourney.com) on 6th Avenue. Kerri owns two businesses – the online herb store www.HerbalElements.net and a water garden store inside Alpine Nursery in South Hill (www.AlpineGrows.com) called The Pond Pad (www.ThePondPad.com). She writes blogs on gardening, ponds, natural health and herbal remedies and teaches classes through Free University (www.FreeUNW.com).

ARIES (Mar. 21 – Apr. 19) This is a great time to make changes either in your career or love life. You may find the perfect mate or strengthen a committed relationship. Find ways to maximize your potential in an investment. Use your inner courage and strength to finalize past dealings.

LIBRA (Sep. 23 – Oct. 22) Fantastic social and financial opportunities may be coming your way. You will be even more popular than you already are. The spotlight will be on you this week. Make yourself available to accept invitations and attend events. Clear up that financial burden.

TAURUS (Apr. 20 - May 20) The influence of Venus encourages you to focus on enhancing your home and domestic life. You are in the mood to create a more positive, upbeat environment. Unexpected good fortune may come your way this weekend. Time to get busy and get it done.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21) You will find the resolve you need to clear up problems or concerns that you’ve been having lately. Use this energy to determine which direction you really want to go. Happiness comes from within. We have to live it, believe it and own it every day. Treat others how you want to be treated.

GEMINI (May 21 – Jun. 20) Your impulsive ideas may pay off for you leading to greater success. This week’s spotlight is on home and family matters. Fix broken items and relationships that you have been putting off. Someone misses you and wants to seek a reunion. Be fair and kind.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21) Your mantra has been lead, follow or get out of the way. How’s that been working for you? This week’s influence will help you to release old problems and heal your wounds that have been holding you back. Prioritize your goals to maximize your success and spiritual growth.

CANCER (Jun. 21 – Jul. 22) Finally, you receive praise or reward for all your hard work. You have the gift to see solutions that are beyond most people. Use this gift to find creative resolve to financial or domestic problems. Intense fiery feelings of passion may occupy your thoughts.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19) Connect with others that share the same interests and desires as you. Surround yourself with confidence in order to maintain your focus. Things may seem like they go wrong all the time and that you are always fixing problems. What can you do to avoid these in the future?

LEO (Jul. 23 – Aug. 22) Impulsive urges to voice your opinion may happen several times this week. If others disagree, then agree to disagree to avoid conflict. You are at a creative peak that may help you expand and express your options. Use your gut when making decisions.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18) Sometimes we don’t realize that we already have all the tools we need. Figuring out how to utilize them is the real trick. Your success is ruled by your intense passion. This week’s focus is on social and love interests, which should be enjoyable, surprising and long overdue.

VIRGO (Aug. 23 – Sep. 22) Remember to take time to reflect, relax and stay focused. You do so much for others and have so much going on that you often neglect and forget about yourself. Examine your diet and wellness habits. Make a new, realistic plan that will work for you.

PISCES (Feb. 19 – Mar. 20) A friend or loved one may be trying to tell you something important. Listen to what they are trying to tell you so you don’t undo your hard work. Inner strength comes with the ability to see past our own ego and let others contribute to your success. Have your focus be on the long term.

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NOTICES

&$6(180%(538<&9',66 7KH3HWLWLRQHUKDVĂ&#x20AC;OHGD&LYLO3HWLWLRQDJDLQVWWKH 5HVSRQGHQWLQWKLV&RXUW %RWKWKH3HWLWLRQHUDQG5HVSRQGHQWKDYHWKHULJKWWR OHJDOUHSUHVHQWDWLRQLQWKLVFDVH7KLV&RXUWKDVDOLVW of attorneys and spokespersons who are admitted to SUDFWLFHLQWKLV&RXUW 7KH5HVSRQGHQWPXVWUHVSRQGWRWKLV&LYLO3HWLWLRQ within twenty (20) days after being served. The Respondent must respond by serving a copy of a ZULWWHQDQVZHURQWKH3HWLWLRQHUDQGE\Ă&#x20AC;OLQJWKLVZULWWHQ DQVZHUZLWKWKLV&RXUWDORQJZLWKDQDIĂ&#x20AC;GDYLWRIVHUYLFH <28$5(680021('WRDSSHDULQWKH3X\DOOXS7ULEDO &RXUWRQWKH3X\DOOXS,QGLDQ5HVHUYDWLRQLQWKHPDWWHU RIZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW(DVWWK6WUHHW7DFRPD :DVKLQJWRQDQG\RXDUHWRVWD\XQWLOWKLV&RXUWPD\ hear this matter. <28$5(680021'('WRDSSHDURQ7KXUVGD\WKH GD\RI2FWREHUDWSPIRUDQ,QLWLDO+HDULQJ

ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE -PML;V^PUN-PML9LJV]LY`:LY]PJL  5>;V^PUNH[(]L,-PML VU0UJVTWSPHUJL^P[O[OL 9*>H[!WT=PL^PUNVM JHYZMYVT!!WT9LNPZ[LYLK;V^ 5\TILYZ  *HZO(\J[PVU6US` ^^^Ă&#x201E;ML[V^PUNJVT

PETS

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Tiny Bird Rescue Sandy 253-770-8552

Need safe farms or barns for indoor/outdoor semi-feral cats. 7KH\DUHĂ&#x20AC;[HG vaccinated and de-wormed. Ages 9 mo. & up. Leave message at (253) 203-4608

v. )UUDK/%UDGOH\DQG+DUROG&KDG7RP 5HVSRQGHQW V  7R)UUDK/%UDGOH\DQG+DUROG&KDG7RP 7KHSHWLWLRQHUĂ&#x20AC;OHGDFKLOGVXSSRUW FLYLO DFWLRQ against you in the above named court. ,QRUGHUWRGHIHQG\RXUVHOI\RXPXVWĂ&#x20AC;OHDQDQVZHU E\VWDWLQJ\RXUGHIHQVHLQZULWLQJDQGĂ&#x20AC;OLQJLWZLWK the court and serving a copy on the petitioner within twenty (20) days after the day you received notice of this hearing.

Metro Animal Services Pets of the Week 1200 39th Ave SE, Puyallup, WA 98374 253-299-PETS www.metroanimalservices.org

,I\RXIDLOWRUHVSRQGD'()$8/7-8'*0(17PD\ be entered against you without further notice to you. A default judgment is a judgment granted the 3HWLWLRQHUIRUZKDWKDVEHHQDVNHGLQWKH3HWLWLRQ 7KLV6XPPRQVLQLVVXHGSXUVXDQWWR6HFWLRQ   RIWKH3X\DOOXS3DUHQWDO Responsibility Act. 127,&(2)+($5,1* $KHDULQJRQWKHSHWLWLRQLVVHWIRU2FWREHUDW DPDWWKH3X\DOOXS7ULEDO&RXUW 'DWHG$XJXVW /s/ Lou Hammond &OHUNRIWKH&RXUW 3X\DOOXS7ULEDO&RXUW (DVWWK6WUHHW 7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ (253) 680-5585 720$'211$*21=$/(=526$6 ,QWKH:HOIDUHRI:('2% &DVH1XPEHU38<* <28DUHKHUHE\VXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRUDQ $'-8',&$7,21+HDULQJLQWKH&KLOGUHQ·V&RXUWRI WKH3X\DOOXS7ULEHRI,QGLDQVRQWKH3X\DOOXS,QGLDQ 5HVHUYDWLRQZKLFKLVORFDWHGDW(DVWWK 6WUHHW7DFRPD:DVKLQJWRQ

Metro has kittens! Only a few left, so act fast and give one of these furry friends a Forever Family theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sure to love!

Pet of the Week

<RXDUHVXPPRQHGWRDSSHDUIRUD$'-8',&$7,21 +HDULQJRQWKH7+GD\RI129(0%(5DW 30 ,I\RXKDYHDQ\TXHVWLRQVSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKHFRXUW clerks at (253) 680-5585. 127,&(38568$177275,%$/&2'(6(&7,21 7+(&28570$<),1'7+(3$5(17 *8$5',$125&8672',$1,1'()$8/7)25 )$,/85(725(6321'25$33($5$7$ &2857+($5,1*7+,60$<5(68/7,1<285 &+,/' 5(1 %(,1*3/$&(',1$127+(5+20( $1'7+(3$5(1725'(5('72&255(&7 &(57$,1352%/(06 1RWLFHSXUVXDQWWRÂ&#x2020;,IWKHSDUHQW V  guardian or custodian fails to respond or appear for WKHIRUPDODGMXGLFDWRU\KHDULQJWKH&RXUWPD\Ă&#x20AC;QG WKHSDUHQW V JXDUGLDQRUFXVWRGLDQLQGHIDXOWDQG enter a default order of child/family protection and order necessary intervention and appropriate steps WKHSDUHQW V JXDUGLDQRUFXVWRGLDQPXVWIROORZWR correct the underlying problem(s). 1RWLFHSXUVXDQWWRÂ&#x2020;ZKHQDSDUW\DJDLQVW ZKRPDMXGJPHQWLVVRXJKWIDLOVWRDSSHDUSOHDGRU RWKHUZLVHGHIHQGZLWKLQWKHWLPHDOORZHGDQGWKDW LVVKRZQWRWKH&RXUWE\DPRWLRQDQGDIĂ&#x20AC;GDYLWRU WHVWLPRQ\WKH&RXUWPD\HQWHUDQRUGHURIGHIDXOW DQGZLWKRXWIXUWKHUQRWLFHWRWKHSDUW\LQGHIDXOW enter a judgment granting the relief sought in the complaint.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aboo & Piperâ&#x20AC;? ,I\RX¡UHORRNLQJIRUDG\QDPLFGXRWRĂ&#x20AC;OO\RXU home with excitement and affectionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Aboo & Piper are just the pair for you. This wonderful brother & sister combo came to the shelter in June, and are waiting for the right family with enough love for two! Aboo & Piper are a 1 year old bonded pair, so they must go to their forever home together. These Oreo kitties have so much more love to give. They canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to curl up next to you on the couch for a nap or have an exciting game of tag. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on your chance to make Aboo & Piper apart of your family today! Reference #A487516 & #A487517

Visit us at 2608 Center Street in Tacoma www.thehumanesociety.org


Friday, August 15, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ tacomaweekly.com â&#x20AC;˘ Section B â&#x20AC;˘ Page 9

Pierce County

Community Newspaper Group

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV HOMES FOR SALE

Stephanie Lynch

HOMES FOR SALE

1232 S Adams St.

We are now experiencing a sellers market which brings more money when selling your home. Call me today if you are thinking about selling for your free market analysis and learn how I will sell your home for the most dollar to you!

Let me help! Call today.

253.203.8985 www.stephanielynch.com

Super charming home w/ the ease RIQHZHU amenities... Box beam ceilings, hardwood Ă RRUVPDUEOHHQWU\SLFWXUHSODWHUDLOV SHULRG VW\OHOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;[WXUHVDGGWRWKHDPELHQFHZKLOH QHZHUURRIIXUQDFHKHDWSXPSLQGRRURXWGRRU speakers, newer wiring/plumbing, & gas Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHDGGWRWKHDKKKKIDFWRU6SDFLRXV living room, large kitchen, HUGE dining room, a bedroom and cute remodeled bathroom JUDFHWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWĂ RRU*LJDQWLFGHFNZVHDWLQJ welcome home. Move in and make it yours.

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$199,850

Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award Recipient 2008-2013

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

REPRESENTING BOTH BUYERS AND SELLERS

2212 N Ferdinand St Tacoma

Proven Results Experienced Integrity High Service Standards FOR RENT

FOR RENT

Room for Rent in Tacoma. Next to Cheney Stadium. $450 includes all utilities. Washer & dryer in unit. No pets. No smoking inside home. (Have a deck to smoke on.) 253-382-9403 HOME FOR RENT IN TACOMA. $1250 per month. %5%$VTIW7RZQKRXVH :'KRRNXSV&DWVDUH2. SXUUU'RJVDUH2.²ZRRRI *UHDWVTIW7RZQKRXVH 3 bdrm/2 bath with a bonus URRPIRURIĂ&#x20AC;FHGHQDYDLODEOHIRU LPPHGLDWHUHQWDO/JFRXQWU\ style kitchen with dishwasher DQGJDVVWRYH:DVKHU'U\HU KRRNXS1HDUEXVURXWHVIRU FRQYHQLHQWDFFHVVWRPDMRU shopping and nearby colleges. Built in 1900 with many charming WXUQRIWKHFHQWXU\GHWDLOVVXFK as real wood paneling. Large ZLQGRZV3OHDVDQWVLQJOHIDPLO\ neighborhood. 253-571-9563.

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

3728 N Gove St, Tacoma

1127 N Fife St, Tacoma

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Cute little bungalow in Proctor! Nice upgrades LQFOXGHDQHZIDPLO\ URRPZLQGRZVURRI energy package & carpet 6 years ago. Detached garage was converted to extra living space. It has a separate electric panel, KHDW OLJKWVORWVRI possibilities... music studio, art studio, exercise / yoga room, HWF3DUNLQJIRUFDUV RIIWKHDOOH\QH[WWR garage. Charming back yard, too! Hardwood Ă RRUVXQGHUFDUSHW H[FHSWLQIDPLO\URRP 0/6

Call Dave Peterson, Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@ betterproperties. com.

2711 Henry Road N

Super cute home with DIDQWDVWLFORFDWLRQ 1HDUVFKRROVIDE 6th Ave Biz District and close enough WRIUHHZD\DFFHVV 'HFNRIIRIH[WUDODUJH bedroom. Bonus room IRUOLEUDU\GHQPHGLD located between bedrooms. Full bath upstairs with the EHGURRPVKDOIEDWKRQ PDLQIRUFRQYHQLHQFH 3OXPELQJIRUDUG bath is in master FORVHWLIRQHZDQWHGWR Ă&#x20AC;QLVKLWRQHFRXOGKDYH a true master suite... 1HZURRISDLQW LQ DQGRXW UHIXUELVKHG kitchen and baths. /LJKWEULJKWDQGDLU\ ZHOFRPH

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

6711 36th St Ct NW, Gig Harbor

:RQGHUIXOWXUQRIWKHFHQWXU\KRPHZ lovely upgrades AND original charm: New underground power, sewer & waterlines w/ new plumbing, new panel & wiring in home. Soaring FHLOLQJV EXLOWLQVDGGFKDUDFWHU0/6 

CONDOS & HOMES TACOMA

PUYALLUP

4702 S WARNER ST #D

9109 166TH ST

$750

$1375

2 BED, 1.5 BATH 700 SF. PERFECT UNIT HAS NEW PAINT, NEW KITCHEN, WASHER/DRYER, STORAGE CLOSET AND W/S/G INCLUDED.

3 BED 2 BATH 1536 SF. AMAZING RAMBLER INCLUDES ALL APPLIANCES, FAMILY ROOM, FENCED YARD, A/C AND PETS OK.

NORTH TACOMA

TACOMA

3418 N PROCTOR ST #3

1615 154TH ST E

$675

$1195

1 BED, 1 BATH 625 SF. REMODELED UNIT HAS FRESH PAINT, NEW CARPET, ALL APPLIANCES AND W/S/G INCLUDED IN RENT

3 BED, 2 BATH 1533 SF. PERFECT HOME HAS LARGE ROOMS, FAMILY ROOM, WASHER/DRYER, FENCED YARD, PATIO AND MORE

TACOMA

LAKEWOOD

6450 S MASON AVE #8

8017 CUSTER RD #A3

$725

$1100 2 BED 2 BATH 1023 SF. STUNNING CONDO HAS VAULTED CEILINGS, HARDWOODS, 5 PIECE MASTERS, PETS WELCOME & MORE.

Absolutely Charming, Mediterranean Style, custom built North Tacoma view home. (QMR\&RPPHQFHPHQW %D\YLHZIURP0VWU%U EDOF,QVLGHIHDWLQFO 0DUEOHĂ RRUHQWU\6W 6WHHO$SSO*UDQFRXQW tops, Cust. built Hickory cab. + Beaut. Brazilian &KHUU\KDUGZRRGĂ RRU Bay windows. Mstr suite w/ FP & Lrg bath+steam shower, Cali closet. 1HZ(QHUJ\(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW heating. Cent. vacuum, new paint in & out, new carpet, Finished Bsmt w/ kitchen. Close to Schools, Parks, Freeway, Hospitals & :DWHUIURQW

Park52.com ¡ 253-473-5200

Gil Rigell Better Properties N. Proctor (253) 376-7787

Professional Management Services

2213 S 72nd St

1617 N. Division

$194,950

$160,000

2 BED 1 BATH 800 SF. 2 BED APT INCLUDES MOVE IN SPECIAL, NEW COUNTERS, NEWER WINDOWS AND W/S/G INCLUDED

Debbie Houtz Better Properties 253-376-2280

View pictures, discounts & more properties online.

HOMES FOR SALE

HOMES FOR SALE

COMMERCIAL BUILDING 4008 S. Pine Completely remodeled w/over 200k in high end upgrades. 10 offices, private exits, shared executive conference room, kitchen w/dining area, lots of storage, and 15 parking stalls. One office could be used as apartment for out of state clients. ADA Accessible. Mall & 38th Street Exit.

MLS# 663155

$669,000

Askthehometeam.com Sergio Hernandez (253) 431-2308 Sergio@betterproperties.com

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%HG%DWK 6)3ULYDWH and secluded, yet PLQXWHVIURP,WKLV LVDORWRIKRPHIRU the $$. Huge yard, master on the main, Ă&#x20AC;UHSODFHVYLQ\O windows, natural JDVKHDWWRQVRI storage, large living VSDFHVEHGURRPV total, 2.75 baths plus GHQIDPLO\UHFURRP 2 decks, gorgeous sunsets, what more do you need?

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

&ODVVLF¡VFUDIWVPHQ charmer in the heart RI1RUWK7DFRPD +DUGZRRGĂ RRUV:RRG EXUQLQJĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHIRUPDO dining room w/ French doors open to patio. Lots RIZLQGRZV QDWXUDO light, large kitchen, huge master bedroom suite ZLWKZDONLQFORVHW1HZ double pain windows, updated electrical, new icynene insulation, built LQVWRUDJHXQĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHG VTXDUHIRRW basement with utility ODXQGU\:DONWR restaurants, schools, parks. You will love being an owner in the historic GreyGables!MLS 

Heather Redal (253) 363-5920 Heatherredal@ gmail.com

HOMES FOR SALE

Askthehometeam.com

3578 E F St, Tacoma â&#x20AC;˘ $105,000 This home is completely remodeled and move-in ready with a massive, fenced backyard. Updated plumbing & electrical. New carpet, paint, moldings, doors. New kitchen with hickory cabinets, range, dishwasher. 12 by 14 covered deck. Huge Heather Redal Outbuilding for storage, (253) 363-5920 alley access. ( MLS # Heatherredal@gmail.com 582500)

2 parcels : Build your dream home with a gorgeous view of Narrows Bridge and Puget Sound. The property is being sold as one to maximize the building envelope and open space but see what works best for you. Build on one lot, sell the other or Sergio Hernandez build on the whole lot, there (253) 431-2308 is so much opportunity Sergio@betterproperties.com here! (MLS # 612161)

11425 Madera Cir SW Lakewood

2001 N Cedar St.

1HVWHGEHKLQGWKHFRYHWHGJDWHVRI0DGHUD your elegant dream home awaits. Boasting DQRSHQVSDFLRXVà RRUSODQWKLVKRPHLV DQHQWHUWDLQHU¡VGUHDPDQGFKHI¡VGHOLJKW Elaborately upgraded in 2013. MLS#

Awesome only begins to describe this home! :DUPDQG,PPDFXODWHZLWKOLJKWĂ&#x20AC;OOHGURRPV WKLV([FHSWLRQDO&UDIWVPDQOLYHVEHDXWLIXOO\ :HOFRPLQJIURQWSRUFKEHDXWLIXOKDUGZRRGV DQGFODVVLFEXLOWLQV6WXQQLQJNLWFKHQ w/Granite, Viking stove and a Apron sink that steals the show! Lovely yard with mature SODQWVDQG$UERUYLWDHWUHHVWKDWSURYLGHMXVW WKHULJKWDPRXQWRISULYDF\WRUHOD[DQGUHZLQG New sewer line, panel and YES a 2car garage! 3HUIHFWORFDWLRQVKRUWZDONWR836RU3URFWRU Great Schools: Lowell, Mason and Stadium.

 Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

2 HOMES IN ONE! 1207 N K St. A 3 Bdr, 3 Bath AND a 2 Bdr, 2 Bath. Historic 1910 North Slope home is all new inside and out . Condo living with QR+2$+LJK&HLOLQJVJDVÂżUHSODFHV separately metered.

Call for private showing today. 253.606.0689 BROKER PARTICIPATION WELCOME

$399,000 %HG%DWK VTIW2SHQĂ RRU plan & vaulted ceilings highlight this handsome UDPEOHURQDSDUNOLNH corner lot in Artondale. .LWFKHQIHDWXUHVDQ LVODQGQHZVPRRWKWRS stove & convection oven, tile countertops & bay windows. Family room ZLWKĂ&#x20AC;UHSODFHLVSHUIHFW IRUHQWHUWDLQLQJDVLV WKHODUJHGHFN IHQFHG backyard. The master VXLWHRQHRIWKUHHQHZO\ carpeted bedrooms, has French doors to the deck and a remodeled ĂśEDWKURRP\U URRILQVWDOOHGLQ 10 mins to schools, shopping, recreation & 65 MLS# 573155 $257,500

HOMES FOR SALE

NEW LISTING: VIEW LOT â&#x20AC;˘ $214,000 1116 N. Jackson, Tacoma

Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

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CALL 253.922.5317

UPS AREA: This 3 bdrm FKDUPHUIHDWXUHVDPDLQ level with master bdrm ZLWKEDWKQGEGUP DQGIXOOEDWK2QHFDU JDU IXOO\IHQFHG\DUG 0/6 NORTH END: Cozy, FKDUPLQJ FRPIRUWDEOH EGUPKRPHZLWKFDU garage on a quiet street. FHA/VA terms. $235,000 0/6

Angelo Scalici BETTER PROPERTIES R.E. 253-376-5384

3614 E G St, Tacoma

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Need space? This house is much larger than it appears... :DQWFKDUP":H KDYHLWKHUHIURP the coved ceilings to WKHKDUGZRRGĂ RRUV through the arches DQGWKHJRUJHRXVZRRGZRUNWKLVKRXVHKDV DSSHDO0/6

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Shannonâ&#x20AC;˘ Better Properties (253) 691-1800

11717 10th Ave E 3 bed, 2 bath. Healthy living at itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ă&#x20AC;QHVW0HWLFXORXV %HDXWLIXOKRPH ZLWKWRQVRIQDWXUDO light. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll love to entertain in this desirable open Ă RRUSODQWKDW¡V HQHUJ\HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW has great air quality and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Greenâ&#x20AC;? building materials. (OHJDQFHDW\RXUIHHWZLWKJRUJHRXVKDUGZRRG Ă RRUVWKURXJKRXW6SHFLDOWRXFKHVLQFOXGHFORVHW organizers in every closet, Manabloc Plumbing, =HUR92&SDLQW(FRIULHQGO\\DUGZLWKQDWLYHSODQWV DQGFDUJDUDJH,GHDOO\ORFDWHGFORVHWRIUHHZD\V shopping... Lovely Home!

MLS# 658008

$229,000

Better Properties N. Proctor, Please call Pam (253) 691-0461 for details or private showing.

$480,000

MLS# 655057

Better Properties N. Proctor, Please call Pam (253) 691-0461 for details or private showing.

PROPERTY

PROPERTY

OLD TOWN $499,950 Amazing development potential with this unique Old Town property! City KDVJLYHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOSODWDSSURYDOIRU lots on this prime 3 acre piece. Big YLHZVSRVVLEOHIURPDOOORWVLQWKLV great neighborhood, tucked back & RXWRIWKHZD\:DONWRWKHKLVWRULF 2OG7RZQGLVWULFWZLWKLWVFRIIHHVKRSV wine bar & restaurants.; then stroll GRZQWRWKHZDWHUIURQW HQMR\WKH gorgeous Puget Sound setting with walking paths, public docks, shoreline restaurants & more! MLS# 332653 Call Dave Peterson, Managing Broker at Better Properties N Proctor for more information. 253-222-8480 or davepeterson@betterproperties.com.

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL

Businesses Opportunities 4 Sale with Owner Contract GIG HARBOR CHINESE RESTR., same owner 26 yrs., $100,000 w/terms, $50,000 down payment PORT ORCHARD, DOWNTOWN

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Food & Beverage, annual gross sales, approx. $1,300,000, excellent net. Owner selling real estate & the business for $850,000, terms avail., same location over 100 years.

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LAKEWOOD CAFE/LOUNGE Seller is very motivated, price is now $57,000 Another price reduction

CALL RICHARD PICTON 253-581-6463 or ED PUNCHAK 253-224-7109


Section B • Page 10 • tacomaweekly.com • Friday, August 15, 2014

Sinbad

Battle at the Boat 97

Anthony Hamilton

August 16, 8:30pm

August 23, 7pm

September 13, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $60, $65

I-5 Showroom $25, $40, $100

I-5 Showroom $45, $65, $95, $100

Willie K

CageSport MMA XXXII

Tim Allen

September 27, 8:30pm

October 4, 7pm

October 18, 8:30pm

I-5 Showroom $20, $30, $55, $60

I-5 Showroom $35, $55, $100

I-5 Showroom $40, $70, $95, $100

MORE Winners, MORE Often! 1-888-831-7655 • www.emeraldqueen.com EQC I-5 (I-5 Exit 135): 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, WA 98404 EQC Hotel & Casino (I-5 Exit 137): 5700 Pac. Hwy E., Fife, WA 98424

You must be 21 to enter the casino. Management reserves the right to change any event or promotion. Tickets available at the EQC Box Offices. EQC is not responsible for any third party ticket sales.

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Twa 8 15 14 p01  

Twa 8 15 14 p01  

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